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Updated on Saturday, October 25 at 07:58 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Lesser Swallow-tailed Swift,©Dan Lane

25 Oct Re: huge movement - smiths point suffolk Co [Gabriel Willow ]
25 Oct Loads of birds at Fort Tilden [Isaac Grant ]
25 Oct Re:huge movement - smiths point suffolk Co [Mike ]
24 Oct unusual junco Robt. Moses SP Suffolk County [David Klauber ]
25 Oct Croton point park today [Larry Trachtenberg ]
24 Oct NYC Area RBA: 24 October 2014 [Ben Cacace ]
24 Oct Jones Beach [syschiff ]
24 Oct PELAGIC TRIP POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER [Doug Gochfeld ]
23 Oct Pine Siskins/Weevil! [Joan Collins ]
23 Oct NNYBirds: Pine Siskins/Weevil! ["'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" ]
22 Oct Pine Siskins/Rusty Blackbird/Gray Jays, etc. [Joan Collins ]
22 Oct NNYBirds: Pine Siskins/Rusty Blackbird/Gray Jays, etc. ["'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" ]
21 Oct Re: NYC Visible (and audible) Nocturnal Migration now [Richard Guthrie ]
21 Oct NYC Visible (and audible) Nocturnal Migration now [Andrew Farnsworth ]
20 Oct 10/20- Brooklyn Viz Mig (great flight of Kinglets, Phoebes, and Siskins) etc. [Doug Gochfeld ]
20 Oct Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
20 Oct Connetquot River SPP - Main Pond ["McIntyre, Annie (PARKS)" ]
19 Oct 10/19: Queens & Brooklyn Migration [Doug Gochfeld ]
19 Oct Re: Brooklyn songbird & raptor flight [Peter Reisfeld ]
19 Oct Brooklyn songbird & raptor flight [Rob Jett ]
19 Oct Sands Point Preserve (Nassau) []
19 Oct Jones beach coast guard 2 marbled godwit [Robert Taylor ]
19 Oct SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER, Sands Point (Nassau) []
18 Oct Greater Yellowlegs and ducks at Massapequa Preserve [Robert Taylor ]
18 Oct Chandler Estate - Park [Rich Perkins / TAM ]
17 Oct NYC Area RBA: 17 October 2014 [Ben Cacace ]
17 Oct Western Kingbird at Sunken Meadow SP, Suffolk [Pat Palladino ]
17 Oct Jones Beach [syschiff ]
16 Oct Scotters at Quogue Beach Club []
16 Oct birds coast guard sation jones beach [gary straus ]
16 Oct RE: Broad-winged Hawk [Will Raup ]
16 Oct Broad-winged Hawk [Fred Baumgarten ]
15 Oct Blue Grosbeak @ Sunken Meadow SP, Suffolk [David La Magna ]
14 Oct Jones Beach addendum [syschiff ]
14 Oct Jones Beach [syschiff ]
14 Oct OK Slip Falls Trail/September sighting/migrants [Joan Collins ]
14 Oct NNYBirds: OK Slip Falls Trail/September sighting/migrants ["'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" ]
14 Oct Eurasian Wigeon-Blydenburgh County Park, Suffolk Co. []
14 Oct Seaside Sparrow, Randall's Island, New York County [David Barrett ]
14 Oct Golden Eagle/other October migrants/Boreal Birds/etc. [Joan Collins ]
14 Oct NNYBirds: Golden Eagle/other October migrants/Boreal Birds/etc. ["'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" ]
14 Oct Fwd: [JERSEYBI] VERMILLION Flycatcher [Ardith Bondi ]
13 Oct Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
13 Oct Queens County Bird Club Inc. - Upcoming Meeting Info - Janet Zinn presents "The Birds and Beasts of Tanzania" [Nancy Tognan ]
13 Oct Jones Beach [syschiff ]
13 Oct Re: Common Gallinule Continues at Patchogue Lake (Suffolk Co.) [Joe Jannsen ]
13 Oct Common Gallinule Continues at Patchogue Lake (Suffolk Co.) [Ken Feustel ]
12 Oct Linnaean Society of NY: Glimpses into unfamiliar worlds (Tues Oct 14, 6-9 pm) [Angus Wilson ]
12 Oct Pathogue Common Gallinule--YES [John Gluth ]
12 Oct Pelham Bay Park- Bronx [Jack Rothman ]
12 Oct Jones Beach West End [syschiff ]
12 Oct Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots [Ben Cacace ]
12 Oct Sparrows at Jamaica Bay NWR ["Joseph O'Sullivan" ]
12 Oct Fly over Bald Eagle []
12 Oct Clay colred sparrow [Arie Gilbert ]
12 Oct Re: Common Gallinule Patchogue Lake Suffolk Co [Mike ]
12 Oct Lesser-blacked Gulls [Peter Post ]
12 Oct Turtle Cove, Pelham Bay Park ["Editconsul AT aol.com" ]
12 Oct The New York Botanical Garden ["Editconsul AT aol.com" ]
12 Oct Croton point park [Larry Trachtenberg ]
11 Oct Central Park Incl. Black-billed Cuckoo etc. [gabriel willow ]
11 Oct Common Gallinule - Patchogue Lake (Suffolk) [Derek Rogers ]
10 Oct Junco x White-throated Sparrow hybird, Central Park, New York City [Joe DiCostanzo ]
10 Oct Jones Beach [Tim Dunn ]
10 Oct Re:CONNECTICUT WARBLER @ Hoyt Farm Park [John Gluth ]
10 Oct NYC Area RBA: 10 October 2014 [Gail Benson ]
10 Oct Central Park NYC Bird Walk - North End on Friday October 10th [Deborah Allen ]
10 Oct South Shore Beaches [syschiff ]
10 Oct Re: Goose me, please [Ben Cacace ]
10 Oct Goose me, please [Allan Mueller ]
10 Oct CONNECTICUT WARBLER @ Hoyt Farm Park (Commack, Suffolk Co.) [John Gluth ]
10 Oct Holtsville Ecology Site []
10 Oct Manitou Marsh Report, Putnam County, NY ["Ryan J. Bass" ]
10 Oct Kissena Park morning report, Queens NY [Cesar Castillo ]
10 Oct Fwd: Coastal Fallout [Peter Reisfeld ]
10 Oct Coastal Fallout [Steve Walter ]

Subject: Re: huge movement - smiths point suffolk Co
From: Gabriel Willow <gabrielwillow AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 08:27:54 -0400
I'm in Cape May (not NY I know), and it's a huge morning down here too: 
thousands of robins & blackbirds flying high (Red-winged and Rusty), 
Yellow-rumps & Swamp Sparrows everywhere, siskins & Purple Finches flying over 
regularly as well. Guess it's hopping all along the coast this AM? 


- Gabriel Willow



> On Oct 25, 2014, at 8:17 AM, Mike  wrote:
> 
> Thousands if birds overhead and on the ground at Smiths Point park now. So 
far mainly sparrows- white throat predominating and lots of overhead Siskins. 

> 
> Mike Cooper
> Ridge NY
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Oct 24, 2014, at 9:35 PM, David Klauber  wrote:
>> 
>> Early this afternoon Bobby Rosetti and I saw an unusual looking junco. The 
gray head contrasted strongly with its brown back, and there was a small black 
"mask" through the eyes and lores. The underparts were typical Slate-colored 
gray and white - no browns or reddish tinges. The closest match we could find 
was Red-backed Junco, which should be nowhere near here. Sorry no photos. If 
any one is around tomorrow it may be worth a look. It was along the northern 
side of the parking lot of field 2, a short distance west of the entrance 
booths 

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--
Subject: Loads of birds at Fort Tilden
From: Isaac Grant <hosesbroadbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 08:24:14 -0400
Ground is littered with sparrows and kinglets and yellow rumps. Flock after 
flock of Siskin and Putple finch touching down. 

Isaac Grant
Senior Loan Officer

> On Oct 25, 2014, at 8:17 AM, Mike  wrote:
> 
> Thousands if birds overhead and on the ground at Smiths Point park now. So 
far mainly sparrows- white throat predominating and lots of overhead Siskins. 

> 
> Mike Cooper
> Ridge NY
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Oct 24, 2014, at 9:35 PM, David Klauber  wrote:
>> 
>> Early this afternoon Bobby Rosetti and I saw an unusual looking junco. The 
gray head contrasted strongly with its brown back, and there was a small black 
"mask" through the eyes and lores. The underparts were typical Slate-colored 
gray and white - no browns or reddish tinges. The closest match we could find 
was Red-backed Junco, which should be nowhere near here. Sorry no photos. If 
any one is around tomorrow it may be worth a look. It was along the northern 
side of the parking lot of field 2, a short distance west of the entrance 
booths 

>> --
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
> --
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> Please submit your observations to eBird!
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--
Subject: Re:huge movement - smiths point suffolk Co
From: Mike <mikec02 AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 08:17:12 -0400
Thousands if birds overhead and on the ground at Smiths Point park now. So far 
mainly sparrows- white throat predominating and lots of overhead Siskins. 


Mike Cooper
Ridge NY

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 24, 2014, at 9:35 PM, David Klauber  wrote:

> Early this afternoon Bobby Rosetti and I saw an unusual looking junco. The 
gray head contrasted strongly with its brown back, and there was a small black 
"mask" through the eyes and lores. The underparts were typical Slate-colored 
gray and white - no browns or reddish tinges. The closest match we could find 
was Red-backed Junco, which should be nowhere near here. Sorry no photos. If 
any one is around tomorrow it may be worth a look. It was along the northern 
side of the parking lot of field 2, a short distance west of the entrance 
booths 

> --
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> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
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> Please submit your observations to eBird!
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--
Subject: unusual junco Robt. Moses SP Suffolk County
From: David Klauber <davehawkowl AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:35:08 -0400
Early this afternoon Bobby Rosetti and I saw an unusual looking junco. The gray 
head contrasted strongly with its brown back, and there was a small black 
"mask" through the eyes and lores. The underparts were typical Slate-colored 
gray and white - no browns or reddish tinges. The closest match we could find 
was Red-backed Junco, which should be nowhere near here. Sorry no photos. If 
any one is around tomorrow it may be worth a look. It was along the northern 
side of the parking lot of field 2, a short distance west of the entrance 
booths 

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--
Subject: Croton point park today
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 01:35:17 +0000
The rain over the last few days left some puddles in the park including up by 
the airplane field. Charlie Roberto passes on he had an excellent Westchester 
find of pectoral sandpiper in one of them about 9:00 this am. Also seen in 
grass in the area of air field were single vesper and Lincoln's sparrows. Lots 
of juncos too. Peregrine, kestrel and harrier seen hunting by or on main 
landfill. 


L. Trachtenberg
Ossining

Sent from my iPhone

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--
Subject: NYC Area RBA: 24 October 2014
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 20:10:41 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 24, 2014
* NYNY1410.24

- Birds mentioned

SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

GOLDEN EAGLE
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden-Plover
American Oystercatcher
MARBLED GODWIT
Red Knot
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Eastern Phoebe
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
American Pipit
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
CONNECTICUT WARBLER
Wilson's Warbler
Canada Warbler
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Vesper Sparrow
LARK SPARROW
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
Nelson's Sparrow
Snow Bunting
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 24th
2014 at 6pm. The highlights of today's tape are SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER,
MARBLED GODWIT, GOLDEN EAGLE, CONNECTICUT WARBLER, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER,
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, LARK SPARROW, BLUE GROSBEAK,
DICKCISSEL and RED-HEADED WOODPECKER.

Certainly this week's top rarity was an adult SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER
seen only briefly last Sunday morning at a private section of Sands Point
near East Creek on Long Island's north shore. Otherwise the highlight was
really an active migratory push through our area last weekend into Monday
with storm systems pretty much shutting things down after that.

Sunday morning found many thousands of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS along the
Atlantic shore. The birds reorienting themselves inland after having been
blown out over the ocean by the very strong overnight winds. Almost 8,000
Yellow-rumps were estimated at Fort Tilden and a stationary count at Robert
Moses State Park exceeded 10,000. Other species were actually not terribly
well represented in this flight including such expected diurnal migrants as
AMERICAN ROBIN and RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. At Fort Tilden some migrants
tallied Sunday included an AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER going by with some
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, 21 ROYAL TERNS moving south and 123 PINE SISKINS, 31
PURPLE FINCHES, 22 AMERICAN PIPITS and a DICKCISSEL. The Siskin totals
improved on Monday with 610 counted out at Coney Island Creek Park along
with good numbers of EASTERN PHOEBES, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS and the like.

Another surprise on Sunday was an immature GOLDEN EAGLE spotted over the
Edgemere Landfill in Far Rockaway. Also there Sunday were 3 WILSON'S SNIPE,
these certainly on the move as two more were noted at Jones Beach West End
Sunday along with singles at Randall's Island and Robert Moses State Park
and elsewhere. GOLDEN EAGLES have also now begun to appear at inland
hawkwatches but be aware that good numbers of Bald Eagles also continue to
move through.

A decent variety at Floyd Bennett Field Sunday featured single CLAY-COLORED
and VESPER SPARROWS and other good landbirds within city limits included a
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER at Randall's Island last Friday and Sunday the latter
day also producing VESPER SPARROW and NELSON'S SPARROWS and a BLUE GROSBEAK
there. Another BLUE GROSBEAK in Central Park Saturday, WORM-EATING WARBLER
and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW in Prospect Park Monday and a LARK SPARROW at
Marine Park in Brooklyn today.

At Jones Beach West End the number of LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS gathering
at high tide in the West End 2 parking lot reached 46 late Saturday
afternoon with at least 30 there on Sunday. Also at high tide a MARBLED
GODWIT has been visiting the bar off the Coast Guard Station with 2 there
Sunday along with over 400 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS and other shorebirds
including 10 RED KNOTS and a couple of SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. Large
numbers of FORSTER'S TERNS continue around Jones Inlet with some ROYAL
TERNS also lingering there.

Out a Robert Moses State Park notable landbirds included DICKCISSELS
Saturday through Monday a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW Saturday and Sunday, an
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER Sunday and a SNOW BUNTING moving by today.

A late CONNECTICUT WARBLER was found at the Chandler Estate in Mount Sinai
last Saturday. Other warblers spotted during the week included MAGNOLIA,
BLACK-THROATED BLUES and GREEN, PRAIRIE, CANADA and WILSON'S. Also noted
recently have been a few RUSTY BLACKBIRDS and EASTERN MEADOWLARKS.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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--
Subject: Jones Beach
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:48:08 -0400
 Joe Giunta, Debbie Martin, Joe Viglietta and I (Sy Schiff) primarily birded 
the perimeter around the West End #2 (WE) lot venturing down to the beach. 
First, we perused the bar, by scope, from the Coast Guard Station lot, finding 
a mass of AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS and 7 ROYAL TERNS. The base of the hedgerow 
had about 20 sparrows including a half dozen WHITE-CROWNED. 

We drove over to the SW corner of WE and then walked counter clockwise around 
the lot. On the east side of the swale, we paused to walk down to the ocean. On 
the beach there were a dozen LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS to our right (west) and 
3 to our left (east), while back at the lot there were 3 more. A few SANDERLING 
mixed in with 100 DUNLIN moved by along the water's edge. 


Five HORNED LARKS, SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWS were noted as we birded along 
with a PEREGRINE FALCON, several MERLIN and a hunting NORTHERN HARRIER. 


Also seen this morning were both KINGLETS, THRASHER, CATBIRD, TOWHEE, 7 species 
of SPARROWS, GOLDFINCH and loads of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. 


Sy

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--
Subject: PELAGIC TRIP POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER
From: Doug Gochfeld <fresha2411 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:03:47 -0400
I am posting this here in case there is someone who is who is registered
for the trip but who's E-Mail we did not have in the pelagic trip E-Mail
list.


TRIP POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER

Unfortunately, while the offshore forecast has come down, the conditions to
and from the canyon have become less favorable and will likely hamper our
ability to get to the canyon with ample time to bird, and make
birding/photography conditions difficult in general.
We sincerely apologize for the back and forth. Getting offshore is always
touch and go and we felt it was worth it to exhaust every possibility. The
forecast didn't work with us today.

Information about a reschedule date will be made available early in the
week. Thank you for your patience.

-Sean and Doug

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--
Subject: Pine Siskins/Weevil!
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:58:42 -0400
10/23/14 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

Pine Siskins are back again this morning - 3 days in a row now.  With such a
widespread movement underway for this species, I wasn't sure they would
stay.  It will be interesting to see if they stay through the winter.  I
posted a Pine Siskin photo to my Facebook page yesterday (taken through a
window).

 

I received feedback regarding the mystery creature on the water smartweed
photo (on the list, personal email, and via Facebook).  It is a weevil,
likely Lixus rubellus, which is commonly associated with water smartweed.  I
didn't notice the weevil on the trip, but later when I was looking at the
photos on a large screen monitor.  This often happens, and it is why I enjoy
taking photos and videos - I often notice things later on that I didn't see
in the field.  Thanks to Alan Wells, Leah Valerio, Bob Duncan, Larry Master,
Ezra Schwartzberg, and Ferne Merrill for feedback on the insect.  List
serves and Facebook are wonderful!

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian


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Subject: NNYBirds: Pine Siskins/Weevil!
From: "'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" <Northern_NY_Birds@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:58:42 -0400
10/23/14 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

Pine Siskins are back again this morning - 3 days in a row now.  With such a
widespread movement underway for this species, I wasn't sure they would
stay.  It will be interesting to see if they stay through the winter.  I
posted a Pine Siskin photo to my Facebook page yesterday (taken through a
window).

 

I received feedback regarding the mystery creature on the water smartweed
photo (on the list, personal email, and via Facebook).  It is a weevil,
likely Lixus rubellus, which is commonly associated with water smartweed.  I
didn't notice the weevil on the trip, but later when I was looking at the
photos on a large screen monitor.  This often happens, and it is why I enjoy
taking photos and videos - I often notice things later on that I didn't see
in the field.  Thanks to Alan Wells, Leah Valerio, Bob Duncan, Larry Master,
Ezra Schwartzberg, and Ferne Merrill for feedback on the insect.  List
serves and Facebook are wonderful!

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian
Subject: Pine Siskins/Rusty Blackbird/Gray Jays, etc.
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:11:55 -0400
10/22/14 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

Pine Siskins showed up at our feeders yesterday (10/21/14) (same day they
arrived at Mickey Scilingo's feeders).  I was putting the feeders up at dawn
on 10/17/14, when a Black-capped Chickadee landed a few inches from me and I
heard a Pine Siskin flock nearby.  There are now 10 species visiting the
feeders.  The siskins continued to visit today (we also have Purple Finches
visiting).  I have 9 feeders out, and 6 more to add.

 

A solo Rusty Blackbird flew into a tree near me at the Little Tupper
Lake/Round Lake outlet area late this morning.  This continues to be a very
reliable location to find this species in both spring and fall migration.  I
was observing White-crowned, White-throated, and Chipping Sparrows at the
time.  Gray Jays were active and vocal at Sabattis Bog.  I "talked" with
them for a long time and they flew out to observe me!

 

My canoe-camping trip on the newly opened Essex Chain Lakes Primitive Area
was published on Adirondack Experience at:
http://www.adirondackexperience.com/blog/2014/10/canoe-camping-the-essex-cha
in-lakes .  There are many photos of the flora, fauna, and scenery at this
beautiful location.  If you look closely at the second Water Smartweed photo
(near the end of the blog), there is a creature on the flower - it has a
long, tubular looking nose.  If anyone can identify it, I would love to know
what it is - thank you!

 

My canoe-camping trip on gorgeous Lake Lila and climb of Mount Frederica was
also just published on Adirondack Experience at:
http://www.adirondackexperience.com/blog/2014/10/the-lure-of-lovely-lake-lil
a .  Again, there are a lot of scenic photos (sunset and sunrise) of the
lake and mountain.  I noticed two metal bands on the leg of one of the two
adult Bald Eagles perched over my camp site.

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 

 

 


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Subject: NNYBirds: Pine Siskins/Rusty Blackbird/Gray Jays, etc.
From: "'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" <Northern_NY_Birds@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:11:55 -0400
10/22/14 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

Pine Siskins showed up at our feeders yesterday (10/21/14) (same day they
arrived at Mickey Scilingo's feeders).  I was putting the feeders up at dawn
on 10/17/14, when a Black-capped Chickadee landed a few inches from me and I
heard a Pine Siskin flock nearby.  There are now 10 species visiting the
feeders.  The siskins continued to visit today (we also have Purple Finches
visiting).  I have 9 feeders out, and 6 more to add.

 

A solo Rusty Blackbird flew into a tree near me at the Little Tupper
Lake/Round Lake outlet area late this morning.  This continues to be a very
reliable location to find this species in both spring and fall migration.  I
was observing White-crowned, White-throated, and Chipping Sparrows at the
time.  Gray Jays were active and vocal at Sabattis Bog.  I "talked" with
them for a long time and they flew out to observe me!

 

My canoe-camping trip on the newly opened Essex Chain Lakes Primitive Area
was published on Adirondack Experience at:
http://www.adirondackexperience.com/blog/2014/10/canoe-camping-the-essex-cha
in-lakes .  There are many photos of the flora, fauna, and scenery at this
beautiful location.  If you look closely at the second Water Smartweed photo
(near the end of the blog), there is a creature on the flower - it has a
long, tubular looking nose.  If anyone can identify it, I would love to know
what it is - thank you!

 

My canoe-camping trip on gorgeous Lake Lila and climb of Mount Frederica was
also just published on Adirondack Experience at:
http://www.adirondackexperience.com/blog/2014/10/the-lure-of-lovely-lake-lil
a .  Again, there are a lot of scenic photos (sunset and sunrise) of the
lake and mountain.  I noticed two metal bands on the leg of one of the two
adult Bald Eagles perched over my camp site.

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 

 

 
Subject: Re: NYC Visible (and audible) Nocturnal Migration now
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 21:27:58 -0400
Sounds like a deadly combination. I worry about a high building collision
mortality rate. It might be good for some to check the grounds around some
of the taller lit up buildings in the morning.

Rich Guthrie


On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Andrew Farnsworth <
andrew.farnsworth AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Good evening all,
> For those of you in Manhattan, NYC, may I suggest stopping what you are
> doing and stepping out side right now. There is a large amount of nocturnal
> movement happening, quite easily visible at times even with the naked eye
> from street level (and more so with binoculars looking up to the cloud
> ceiling from building rooftops) in the lights of a number of up-lit
> buildings on the Upper East Side, and presumably elsewhere in the city and
> surrounding areas. There's also quite a lot of calling happening (lots of
> White-throated Sparrows, some Dark-eyed Juncos, Hermit Thrush). A quick
> check of radar will show why - there is a heavy flight underway in
> favorable winds and birds are interacting with isolated thunderstorms and
> low cloud ceilings (and the artificial light dome of NYC).
>
> Good nocturnal birding!
> Andrew
>
> --
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Subject: NYC Visible (and audible) Nocturnal Migration now
From: Andrew Farnsworth <andrew.farnsworth AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 21:15:08 -0400
Good evening all,
For those of you in Manhattan, NYC, may I suggest stopping what you are
doing and stepping out side right now. There is a large amount of nocturnal
movement happening, quite easily visible at times even with the naked eye
from street level (and more so with binoculars looking up to the cloud
ceiling from building rooftops) in the lights of a number of up-lit
buildings on the Upper East Side, and presumably elsewhere in the city and
surrounding areas. There's also quite a lot of calling happening (lots of
White-throated Sparrows, some Dark-eyed Juncos, Hermit Thrush). A quick
check of radar will show why - there is a heavy flight underway in
favorable winds and birds are interacting with isolated thunderstorms and
low cloud ceilings (and the artificial light dome of NYC).

Good nocturnal birding!
Andrew

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Subject: 10/20- Brooklyn Viz Mig (great flight of Kinglets, Phoebes, and Siskins) etc.
From: Doug Gochfeld <fresha2411 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:54:52 -0400
Viz Mig (visible migration) was once again in full effect in south-coastal
NYC this morning. For the first few hours of today, I was at Coney Island
Creek Park, which was awash in Kinglets of both species, Sparrows, and
other typical Mid-October migrants. Not typical was just how high the
numbers were, of Ruby-crowned Kinglets (RCKI) and Eastern Phoebes
(EAPH) flying west along the beach towards the tip of Sea Gate. I tallied
~110 RCKI and almost 60 EAPH actively continuing their migrations along the
beach, and there were still another ~30 of each using the small green belt
of the park after most of the vizmig died down. This was in fairly stark
contrast to yesterday, when there seemed to be relatively few Eastern
Phoebes around, and when the number of Kinglets on the coast was certainly
not of the magnitude evident today.

While RCKIs were the dominant Kinglet, Golden-crowned Kinglets were present
in good numbers, with near 50 detected through the morning. Other
highlights from here:
*610* Pine Siskins (all westbound, mostly in flocks ranging from 10 to over
100 individuals)
1 Rusty Blackbird (calling flyover)
1 each of Tufted Titmouse and Red-bellied Woodpecker, neither of which are
normally present here. The Titmouse was actually the first individual I've
heard of of this species for this location, despite a good amount of
coverage over the last few falls & winters.
24 Sharp-shinned Hawk
64 Tree Swallow

A bit later, at Canarsie Park in Brooklyn, Shane Blodgett and I found
similarly high concentrations on the ground of Hermit Thrush, Eastern
Phoebe, and Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and also had a flyover female Boat-tailed
Grackle.

Complete eBird checklists for each location here:

Coney Island Creek Park (with photos):
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20285966

Canarsie Park: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20287936


Good Birding!
-Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:14:57 -0700
RBA
 
*  New York
*  Syracuse
* October 20, 2014
*  NYSY  10. 20. 14
 
Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird Alert
Dates(s):
October 13, 2014 - October 20, 2014
to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
covering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge
and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),
Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortland
compiled: October 20AT 6:00 p.m. (EDT)
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org
 
 
#413 Monday October 20, 2014
 
Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week of 
October 13, 2014
 
Highlights:
-----------

EARED GREBE
RED-NECKED GREBE
CACKLING GOOSE
BRANT
EURASIAN WIGEON
AMERICAN AVOCET
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
LITTLE GULL
SHORT-EARED OWL
SNOWY OWL
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
LAPLAND LONGSPUR
PINE SISKIN


Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------

 10/15: 2 AMERICAN AVOCETS were seen at Towpath Road. They have been found 
through the 19th. 

 10/19: An EARED GREBE and 2 EURASIAN WIGEONS were seen in the Main Pool. A 
HUDSONIAN GODWIT was found in Puddler’s Marsh. A CACKLING GOOSE was seen at 
Knox-Marsellus Marsh. 



Cayuga County
------------

 10/15: An early LAPLAND LONGSPUR was found on the inside of the break wall at 
Fair Haven State Park. 



Onondaga County
------------

     10/15: The Rt. 31 SNOWY OWL was again seen, this time near Wegman’s.
 10/16: A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen near the Eagles nest at Three Rivers WMA 
north of Baldwinsville. 

 10/19: A BRANT was seen at close range on Vann Road near Beaver Lake Nature 
Center west of Baldwinsville. Upwards of 70 DARK-EYED JUNCOS were seen at 
Beaver Lake Nature Center. 

 10/20: A LINCOLN’S SPARROW and the county’s first FOX SPARROW were spotted 
under the power lines at Three Rivers WMA. A late VESPER SPARROW and large 
numbers of WHITE-CROWNED and WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS were found in the scrubby 
area east of Van Rensselear Street at the Inner Harbor. 



Oswego County
------------

     10/18: A LITTLE GULL was found at the overlook at Derby Hall.
 10/19: An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and the region’s first fall FOX SPARROW 
were seen at Great Bear Recreation Area north of Phoenix. 

     10/20: A PINE SISKIN was heard at Great Bear Recreation Area.


Oneida County
------------

     10/20: A PINE SISKIN was reported near Camden.

     


--  end report



Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y.  13027  U.S.A.
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Subject: Connetquot River SPP - Main Pond
From: "McIntyre, Annie (PARKS)" <Annie.McIntyre AT parks.ny.gov>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:47:37 +0000
Nothing rare - the expected winter visitors are trickling in. Pie-billed Grebe, 
Ring-necked duck, Mallard, American widgeon, Gadwall. The highlight was 30+ 
wood ducks on the SE side of the Main Pond. 



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Subject: 10/19: Queens & Brooklyn Migration
From: Doug Gochfeld <fresha2411 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:39:31 -0400
A 4 hour stationary count, with Sean Sime and Luke Musher, on the hawkwatch
platform atop Battery Harris at Fort Tilden this morning was
predictably productive.
Echoing other reports from throughout the region, our most abundant mover
was "Myrtle" Yellow-rumped Warbler. We tallied just under 8,000
Yellow-rumpeds flying west, and also had some decent numbers of other
species of passerines (flying west unless otherwise specified), the
highlights being:
123 Pine Siskin
31 Purple Finch
22 American Pipit
1 Horned Lark (heading east)


The non-passerine flight was also highly entertaining, with lots of Canada
Geese, Brant, and Double-crested Cormorant (the latter being early in the
morning almost exclusively). Highlights of birds over the water were *21*
westbound Royal Terns, a very high count for this location, and single
westbound Common Tern, which is getting a bit late. Raptor-wise, the
Sharp-shinned Hawk (82) flight was very heavy, the American Kestrel (77)
flight seemed phenomenal for the late date, and we also tallied 15 Northern
Harriers ranging across all compass points and from right over the water to
way up in the clouds. It would have been lots of fun to stay for much
longer and see what type of raptor totals we could have accrued on the
beach, but alas we had to vacate around 11 AM, right as the hawk flight was
starting to get even denser. As seen from reports and observations from
elsewhere later in the day, not least of which is Corey Finger's Golden
Eagle from Edgemere in the afternoon, the raptor flight clearly stayed
strong late into the day.

The two most notable single individual birds in my mind were an *AMERICAN
GOLDEN-PLOVER* that flew over in a flock of 8 Black-bellied Plovers, and a
stunning leucistic male Red-winged Blackbird, that was completely pale
except for the epaulets. A photo of the awesome looking Whitebird is here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/29840397 AT N08/15393166088/

Complete eBird checklist from Fort Tilden here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20280619


An afternoon jaunt around Prospect Park in Brooklyn produced *15 species *of
Warblers among 73 total species, and good sparrow diversity.

A complete list from Prospect Park can be found here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20279918

Good Birding!
-Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.

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Subject: Re: Brooklyn songbird & raptor flight
From: Peter Reisfeld <drpinky AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:30:18 -0400
It was interesting to hear about the large movement at Floyd Bennet Field this 
morning, and that the birds were heading west northwest, not south. The radar 
last night showed a very high bird density moving southeast, ending centered on 
mid Long Island. The density dissipated by 6 AM (1000 UTC) as the birds 
descended. I wonder if this mass of birds having been blown too far eastward, 
might have hit the coastline and turned back west, veering up at sites of 
favorable habitat along their way. 


I saved the radar loop at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/50403904 AT N03/14958138434/

Happy fall birding,

Peter
On Oct 19, 2014, at 8:22 PM, Rob Jett  wrote:

> Just a quick note about today's bird flight from the perspective of Floyd 
Bennett Field. It was one of the birdiest days at this location that I can 
remember in a very, very long time. 

> 
> I led a trip for the Linnaean Society and it was clear from very early that 
the overnight winds brought in a huge number of passerines. In addition, there 
seemed to be a near constant stream of raptors with accipiters topping the list 
for abundance. It was interesting to note that, for whatever reasons, most 
appeared to be moving WNW not south. 

> 
> During the early morning there were hundreds of birds (mainly yellow-rumps 
and robins) passing overhead or dropping into the community gardens or North 
40. Yellow-rumped Warblers were ubiquitous, with my best "guesstimate" being 
easily a couple of thousand seen or heard. Sparrow numbers were noticeably way 
up from last weekend, the highlights being a Vesper Sparrow and Clay-colored 
Sparrow. Both were seen along the berm at the east side of the field opposite 
Aviator Sports and the soccer fields. 

> 
> Hurrah for cold fronts!
> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Rob
> 
> **********
> 
> Floyd Bennett Field, Kings, US-NY
> Oct 19, 2014 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 6.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Linnaean Society trip led by me. Strong NW winds overnight followed 
by strong WNW to N winds gusting to 20 mph. Mostly just birded gardens, Ecology 
Village and North 40. 

> 62 species
> 
> Brant  X     Huge number of migrating flocks.
> Canada Goose  X
> Double-crested Cormorant  X
> Osprey  1
> Northern Harrier  8     Huge raptor flight most of the day.
> Sharp-shinned Hawk  X     Approx. 20 - 25
> Cooper's Hawk  X     Approx. 15 - 20
> Red-shouldered Hawk  1
> Broad-winged Hawk  1     Immature, flying over North 40 and grassland.
> Red-tailed Hawk  3
> Killdeer  4     Flying off field on north side of community gardens.
> American Woodcock  1     North 40 trail.
> Laughing Gull  X
> Ring-billed Gull  X
> Herring Gull  X
> Great Black-backed Gull  X
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  X
> Mourning Dove  X
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
> Downy Woodpecker  X
> Northern Flicker  X
> American Kestrel  6     Huge raptor flight most of the day.
> Merlin  2
> Peregrine Falcon  2
> Eastern Phoebe  X     Approx. 15.
> Blue Jay  5
> American Crow  X
> Tree Swallow  2
> Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
> Brown Creeper  2
> Winter Wren  1     Heard in community garden.
> Carolina Wren  3
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  X
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  X     Abundant.
> Hermit Thrush  4
> American Robin  X
> Gray Catbird  X
> Northern Mockingbird  X
> European Starling  X
> Cedar Waxwing  X
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
> Palm Warbler  30
> Yellow-rumped Warbler X Abundant, best estimate is approximately 2,000 
individuals. 

> Chipping Sparrow  X
> Clay-colored Sparrow 1 Field opposite Aviator Sports and soccer fields. Photo 
to follow. 

> Field Sparrow  2
> Vesper Sparrow  1
> Savannah Sparrow  X
> Song Sparrow  X
> Swamp Sparrow  X
> White-throated Sparrow  X
> White-crowned Sparrow  5
> Dark-eyed Junco  X
> Northern Cardinal  X
> Indigo Bunting  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  X
> Brown-headed Cowbird  X
> House Finch  X
> Pine Siskin  6     2 flyovers, 4 perched in tree near Return-a-Gift Pond.
> American Goldfinch  X
> House Sparrow  X
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20280990 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
> http://citybirder.blogspot.com
>  AT thecitybirder
> 
> --
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Subject: Brooklyn songbird & raptor flight
From: Rob Jett <citybirder AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 20:22:18 -0400
Just a quick note about today's bird flight from the perspective of Floyd 
Bennett Field. It was one of the birdiest days at this location that I can 
remember in a very, very long time. 


I led a trip for the Linnaean Society and it was clear from very early that the 
overnight winds brought in a huge number of passerines. In addition, there 
seemed to be a near constant stream of raptors with accipiters topping the list 
for abundance. It was interesting to note that, for whatever reasons, most 
appeared to be moving WNW not south. 


During the early morning there were hundreds of birds (mainly yellow-rumps and 
robins) passing overhead or dropping into the community gardens or North 40. 
Yellow-rumped Warblers were ubiquitous, with my best "guesstimate" being easily 
a couple of thousand seen or heard. Sparrow numbers were noticeably way up from 
last weekend, the highlights being a Vesper Sparrow and Clay-colored Sparrow. 
Both were seen along the berm at the east side of the field opposite Aviator 
Sports and the soccer fields. 


Hurrah for cold fronts!

Good birding,

Rob

**********

Floyd Bennett Field, Kings, US-NY
Oct 19, 2014 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
6.0 mile(s)
Comments: Linnaean Society trip led by me. Strong NW winds overnight followed 
by strong WNW to N winds gusting to 20 mph. Mostly just birded gardens, Ecology 
Village and North 40. 

62 species

Brant  X     Huge number of migrating flocks.
Canada Goose  X
Double-crested Cormorant  X
Osprey  1
Northern Harrier  8     Huge raptor flight most of the day.
Sharp-shinned Hawk  X     Approx. 20 - 25
Cooper's Hawk  X     Approx. 15 - 20
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Broad-winged Hawk  1     Immature, flying over North 40 and grassland.
Red-tailed Hawk  3
Killdeer  4     Flying off field on north side of community gardens.
American Woodcock  1     North 40 trail.
Laughing Gull  X
Ring-billed Gull  X
Herring Gull  X
Great Black-backed Gull  X
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  X
Mourning Dove  X
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Downy Woodpecker  X
Northern Flicker  X
American Kestrel  6     Huge raptor flight most of the day.
Merlin  2
Peregrine Falcon  2
Eastern Phoebe  X     Approx. 15.
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  X
Tree Swallow  2
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  2
Winter Wren  1     Heard in community garden.
Carolina Wren  3
Golden-crowned Kinglet  X
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  X     Abundant.
Hermit Thrush  4
American Robin  X
Gray Catbird  X
Northern Mockingbird  X
European Starling  X
Cedar Waxwing  X
Common Yellowthroat  3
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Palm Warbler  30
Yellow-rumped Warbler X Abundant, best estimate is approximately 2,000 
individuals. 

Chipping Sparrow  X
Clay-colored Sparrow 1 Field opposite Aviator Sports and soccer fields. Photo 
to follow. 

Field Sparrow  2
Vesper Sparrow  1
Savannah Sparrow  X
Song Sparrow  X
Swamp Sparrow  X
White-throated Sparrow  X
White-crowned Sparrow  5
Dark-eyed Junco  X
Northern Cardinal  X
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Brown-headed Cowbird  X
House Finch  X
Pine Siskin  6     2 flyovers, 4 perched in tree near Return-a-Gift Pond.
American Goldfinch  X
House Sparrow  X

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20280990 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

http://citybirder.blogspot.com
 AT thecitybirder


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Subject: Sands Point Preserve (Nassau)
From: <glennq AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 19:59:04 -0400
I birded the Sands Point Preserve this morning from 8-10. There was quite a bit 
of migratory movement. Both kinglets were numerous as were Cedar Waxwing and 
Hermit Thrush. Warblers were limited to Palm, Yellow-rumped, and a single 
Black-throated Blue. 

Sparrows were well represented by Song, White-throated, and Chipping, plus 
single White-crowned and Field, and a bonus of 2 Lincoln’s. Winter Wren was 
also present. 


After the preserve, I walked along the beach to East Creek where I found the 
previously posted Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. Still trying to upload video to an 
old Flickr account (what an awful web service this is). 

Brant were very numerous with over 1000 sitting on the out going tide mudflats, 
with several hundred more flying east to west in small flocks all morning. I 
photographed one individual with a curious white spot on the head behind the 
eye. It seemed to be acting different from the others, too. 

Nothing else on the sound save gulls and cormorants. A bonus to the flycatcher 
was 3 American Pipits feeding on the beach, along with several Savannah 
Sparrows. 


Hawks were curiously absent today. 2 local Red-tails were all I could find.



Glenn Quinn
Hauppauge, NY

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Subject: Jones beach coast guard 2 marbled godwit
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 13:29:50 -0700
Right now on sandbar, also brants are back

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Subject: SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER, Sands Point (Nassau)
From: <glennq AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 15:47:32 -0400
This morning, at 10:40 AM, I found a stunning adult Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 
on private land in Sands Point. Right about here: 40.86798,-73.710962 

I observed it at close range for about 10 minutes and took some truly, truly 
awful video of it which I will try and crop and post somewhere later. 

For those of you familiar with this area, I found the bird at an area called 
East Creek which is adjacent/part of Prospect Point in Sands Point (Nassau 
County). East Creek is a salt marsh bordering Long Island Sound and there is a 
wide border of dune scrub growth between the salt marsh and the sound. The bird 
was perching nicely on the bushes here but eventually disappeared behind the 
large creek that feeds this marsh. I searched for it again for about an hour 
before moving on. 

This area is unfortunately on private land. There is no access to this area by 
car. You can walk to it (about half to three quarters mile) by heading west 
from the Sands Point Preserve beach. The beachfront is of course public all the 
way but the salt marsh area is private village land. 

There was plenty of other movement in the area today, too, I’ll post results 
later when I get home again. 




Glenn Quinn
Hauppauge, NY





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Subject: Greater Yellowlegs and ducks at Massapequa Preserve
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 10:20:55 -0700
Hi Everyone,

I know it's not rare at all, but I saw a Greater Yellowlegs at Massapequa
Preserve this morning - noteworthy because long time residents of the area
have said that the preserve used to be a hotspot for them years ago - I
don't know what drove them away, but hopefully today's sighting is some
hope that they might return.  American Wigeons, Northern Shovelers, and a
Wood Duck were at the ponds north of Sunrise Highway.  I'm hoping the
Eurasian Wigeons that have frequented the preserve for the last several
winters will return - I'll check at least every few weeks.  Songbirds
(nothing uncommon) included Downy and Red Bellied Woodpeckers, Carolina
Wrens, Yellow Rumped Warbler, and White Breasted Nuthatches.

Good Fall birding,
Rob in Massapequa
http://longislandbirding.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Chandler Estate - Park
From: Rich Perkins / TAM <rich AT tamweb.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 09:18:54 -0400
I was birding this morning at Suffolk County Park - Chandler Estate in Mt
Sinai, NY.  I saw a Connecticut Warbler, Nelson's Sparrow, 3 - Swamp
Sparrows, Hermit Thrush, Ruby Crowned Kinglet, lots of Yellow Rumps and a
bunch more common birds. 

 

 

Thanks,

 

Aidan Perkins


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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 17 October 2014
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 20:18:50 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 17, 2014
* NYNY1410.17

- Birds mentioned

Wood Duck
EURASIAN WIGEON
American Wigeon
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Red-necked Grebe
American Bittern
Common Gallinule
American Golden-Plover
MARBLED GODWIT
Pectoral Sandpiper
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
Black-billed Cuckoo
Common Nighthawk
Red-bellied Woodpecker
WESTERN KINGBIRD
PHILADELPHIA VIREO
Tennessee Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Vesper Sparrow
LARK SPARROW
Nelson's Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 17th
2014 at 7pm. The highlights of today's tape are EURASIAN WIGEON, WESTERN
KINGBIRD, MARBLED GODWIT, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, LARK SPARROW, CLAY-COLORED
SPARROW, BLUE GROSBEAK and DICKCISSEL.

Following the drake on the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge two
more EURASIAN WIGEONS were uncovered this week. One a male molting into
good plumage was spotted on Patchogue Lake on Monday. This lake currently
is hosting a COMMON GALLINULE that is often seen from vantage points at the
end of East 2nd or East 3rd Streets on the western side of the lake. The
other drake EURASIAN WIGEON was on Stump Pond in Blydenburgh County Park in
Smithtown on Tuesday joining a congregation of waterfowl that included 12
WOOD DUCKS, 70 AMERICAN WIGEON, 6 GREEN-WINGED TEAL and 12 RING-NECKED
DUCKS.

Some decent migratory movement took place during the week. Last Sunday
produced well over one thousand PINE SISKINS moving west past Robert Moses
State Park accompanied by a lot of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, some PURPLE
FINCHES, a dozen RUSTY BLACKBIRDS, some RED-BELLIED WOODPECKERS and other
seasonal migrants.

Unusual migrants uncovered on Sunday included BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, a
PHILADELPHIA VIREO at Fort Tilden, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER at Fort Tilden
and Lido Beach and elsewhere, a LARK SPARROW east of field 7 at Heckscher
State Park and a DICKCISSEL in East Hampton. In addition several
CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS have been reported recently from various locations
including Jones Beach West End, Prospect Park, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge,
New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, Pelham Bay Park and the Shirley
Marina. Certainly a good time of year to find this species but be aware of
the very similar fall immature Chipping Sparrows and make sure the lores
are a clear pale buffy to confirm a CLAY-COLORED. The VESPER SPARROW has
been hanging out in Prospect Park since Sunday still there today around the
ballfields and a BLUE GROSBEAK was reported in the park Tuesday. Another
BLUE GROSBEAK was found Wednesday in the field 2 dump at Sunken Meadow
State Park and just in a WESTERN KINGBIRD was spotted at that location
today.

Other interesting birds in the city parks recently have featured one or two
late COMMON NIGHTHAWKS to at least Wednesday, up to 6 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS
at Marine Park in Brooklyn Sunday and an AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER at Floyd
Bennett Field last Saturday while Plumb Beach in Brooklyn added an AMERICAN
BITTERN Monday.

Later warblers reported this week include TENNESSEE, BAY-BREASTED and
WILSON'S WARBLER and sparrows have included some LINCOLN'S with NELSON'S
now occurring with lingering SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROWS in various
coastal marshes.

At Jones Beach West End a MARBLED GODWIT has been appearing on the Coast
Guard Station bar among the several hundred American Oystercatchers and
other shorebirds. Up to 7 ROYAL TERNS have also visited there and a large
number of FORSTER'S TERNS continues around Jones Inlet with over 200 seen
sitting on the pilings with shorebirds at the Point Lookout Marina by the
waterworks last Sunday. Also at the parking field at West End 2 continues
to attract LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS at high tide especially with 10 there
last Sunday and 13 on Monday. Last Saturday an arriving AMERICAN TREE
SPARROW was in East Hampton and the lingering RED-NECKED GREBE was still at
Mecox.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Subject: Western Kingbird at Sunken Meadow SP, Suffolk
From: Pat Palladino <dino1277 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:53:15 -0400
There is currently a Western Kingbird at the dump area of Sunken Meadow SP 
behind Field 2. 


Patrick F. Palladino


> On Oct 15, 2014, at 6:13 PM, "David La Magna"  wrote:
> 
> Late this afternoon, 4:30ish, a quick stop after work to the dump area in the 
back of Field 2 at Sunken Meadow produced at least one Blue Grosbeak, 
presumably one of the individuals that was previously reported earlier in the 
year at this location. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Jones Beach
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:56:09 -0400
 Jones Beach 17 October.

Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) birded the west end at low tide this morning. 
Yesterday's rain and today's brisk W to WSW wind seems to have driven the birds 
away. Yellow-rumped warblers continue to dominate, but the Phoebes and Sparrows 
have moved on. We did see one each PALM and PINE WARBLER; also a BLUE-HEADED 
VIREO and a few Kinglets. 


We walked out to the inlet via the fisherman's Road and scanned the bar on the 
other side of the inlet. There were Black-bellied Plover, Oystercatchers, 
Sanderling and terns, lots of terns. Besides those feeding in the inlet, we 
estimated at least 300 FORSTER'S TERNS, in two separate groups, as they 
repeatedly picked up and settled back down on the bar . 


As I looked at a 2nd year LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL on the West End #2 lot, 
several Herring Gulls and 2 more 2nd year plus a 1st year Lesser flew in to 
join on the lot. 


Sy

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Subject: Scotters at Quogue Beach Club
From: <AndyatWH AT aol.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 22:57:01 -0400
On my way home I stopped at Quogue Beach Club, and saw several flocks  of 
Scoters in the Ocean just the other side of the breakers.
Mostly Black Scoters,but also several of Surf, and just a few  White-winged.
Andy Murphy
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Subject: birds coast guard sation jones beach
From: gary straus <baga2809 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 19:49:11 -0400
Birded from3:30 to5:30 there were 7 royal terns & a marbled godwit on the
bar  GARY STRAUS


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Subject: RE: Broad-winged Hawk
From: Will Raup <hoaryredpoll AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:31:13 -0400
Heard but not seen?
What about a sneaky Blue Jay?
Will RaupGlenmont, NYDate: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:15:59 -0400
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Broad-winged Hawk
From: fredbee.eater AT gmail.com
To: NYSBirds-L AT cornell.edu

A fairly late individual just heard on the Sarah Lawrence College campus, 
Yonkers. Catching up with its pals, I guess. 

--Fred--
Fred BaumgartenSharon, CT/Westchester, NYAnd points in 
betweenfredbee.eater AT gmail.com 



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Subject: Broad-winged Hawk
From: Fred Baumgarten <fredbee.eater AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:15:59 -0400
A fairly late individual just heard on the Sarah Lawrence College campus,
Yonkers.  Catching up with its pals, I guess.

--Fred--

Fred Baumgarten
Sharon, CT/Westchester, NY
And points in between
fredbee.eater AT gmail.com

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Subject: Blue Grosbeak @ Sunken Meadow SP, Suffolk
From: David La Magna <dlamagna AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 18:12:53 -0400
Late this afternoon, 4:30ish, a quick stop after work to the dump area in the 
back of Field 2 at Sunken Meadow produced at least one Blue Grosbeak, 
presumably one of the individuals that was previously reported earlier in the 
year at this location. 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Jones Beach addendum
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:42:14 -0400
Add Black-throated Blue Warbler. The Blue-throated Blue Warbler was last seen 
hiding between the keys on my key board. 


Sy

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Subject: Jones Beach
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:33:02 -0400
Jones Beach West End 14 Oct

Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) birded the west end this morning to find fewer 
birds but still 50+ species The bar still harbors a few hundred AMERICAN 
OYSTERCATCHERS plus an undetermined number of mostly hatching year BLACK 
SKIMMERS. As the tide increased, the dozen DUNLIN were joined by BLACK-BELLIED 
PLOVER, RED KNOT, a few SANDERLING, more DUNLIN and a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, 
Best additions were 2 ROYAL TERNS. 


A COMMON LOON was in the basin and moved out into the channel where FOSTER'S 
TERNS were feeding. RUDDY TURNSTONES continue on the Coast Guard breakwater. 
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS continue on West End #2 parking lot. 


Raptors included NORTHERN HARRIER, SHARP-SHINNED, COOPER'S HAWKS, MERLIN and 
PEREGRINE FALCON (are falcons still raptors now that they've been classified as 
Parrots?---just a thought). 


A WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH (rare on the beach) joined RED-BREASTED in the 
median. We saw a PINE, a number of PALM, loads of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, a 
male BLUE-THROATED BLUE WARBLER and a BLUE-HEADED VIREO. Sparrow species were 
limited but WHITE-CROWNED were present. 


Briefly seen by others was the continuing CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. Also, a BLACK 
TERN was reported at the jetty. 


Sy

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Subject: OK Slip Falls Trail/September sighting/migrants
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:54:43 -0400
9/29/14 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

A Blackpoll Warbler migrant was observed at the summit of The Pinnacle, the
mountain we live on in Long Lake.  A Pine Warbler was singing for a long
time in the pines along the lake behind the Long Lake Central School.

 

9/28/14 Long Lake

 

My husband and I boated to Turtle Beach at the north end of 14-mile Long
Lake.  I posted photos to my Facebook page below of the beach, lake, Common
Loons in changing plumage, Bald Eagle nest, and seaplane.  There were two
Bald Eagles observed staying close to the nest area - which they do well
into the fall each year.

 

9/27/14 Low's Ridge - Upper Dam Trail (along Hitchins Bog to Hitchins Pond
on the Bog River in St. Lawrence Co.)

 

I led a walk to Hitchins Pond and up Low's Ridge that was co-sponsored by
Northern NY Audubon and the Town of Long Lake.  It was a gorgeous, peak leaf
color weekend.  Nineteen people took part and we began around 9 a.m.  The
day was quite hot, so birds were fairly quiet.  In addition to Yellow-rumped
Warblers, we observed a tail-pumping (yellow) Palm Warbler at Hitchins Bog.
We heard several flocks of Pine Siskins - the first day I noted a movement
for this species which has continued.  Views from the summit of Low's Ridge
were spectacular!  I posted photos to my Facebook page.

 

9/19/14 Pre-dawn migration in Long Lake

 

I was out pre-dawn and there was a huge movement of Swainson's Thrushes.
Locally, 3 Barred Owls and Common Loons were vocalizing.  A porcupine,
startled by my husband and I talking, climbed a tree along our lawn (Sept. -
Oct. is breeding season for porcupines and they have been very active!).  I
also saw 2 meteors.

 

9/17/14 Trail to OK Slip Falls and the Hudson River Gorge (Hamilton Co.)

 

I hiked the newly opened trail to spectacular OK Slip Falls and the Hudson
River Gorge.  Photos (trail, waterfall, flora, fauna) and video of the
waterfall can be seen in my latest blog for "Adirondack Experience" at:
http://www.adirondackexperience.com/blog/2014/10/hike-spectacular-ok-slip-fa
lls .  An Eastern Wood-Pewee sang at the trailhead.  A Barred Owl vocalized
midday near the falls.  Winter Wrens were abundant.  Blue-headed Vireos and
Common Yellowthroats sang, and Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green,
and Yellow-rumped Warblers were observed.  I believe the 4-inch slug I
photographed is a Carolina Mantleslug - if there are any shell-less
terrestrial gastropod mollusc experts out there, I'd love to hear from you!
This is going to be a very popular trail in the Central Adirondacks.

 

9/14/14 - 9/15/14 Essex Chain Lakes Canoe - Camping Trip (Essex and Hamilton
Counties)

 

I camped at the most remote site in the chain - Sixth Lake (#2) and nearly
had the Essex Chain Lakes to myself (only one other party on Third Lake).
It was a Sunday night with a forecast for 30 degrees, so I thought I might
have complete solitude!  This newly opened area is lovely - I have a blog
with many, many photos that will be published soon by Adirondack Experience.
Jeff Nadler camped in the chain earlier in the season and heard Olive-sided
Flycatchers.  There is certainly habitat for this species between Fifth and
Sixth Lakes.  Common Loons are abundant in the chain.  Once again, there was
a nocturnal movement of Swainson's Thrushes and I could hear their call
notes through the tent walls all night.  At dawn, my camp was surrounded by
their "whit" call notes.  Barred Owls were abundant hooting and
"monkey-calling" all around the lake during the night!

 

9/12/14 Massawepie Mire (St. Lawrence Co.)

 

David Buckley and I hiked 6 miles round trip (to Silver Brook) at Massawepie
Mire.  Some of the species found:

 

Ruffed Grouse - drumming

American Kestrel - 2

Gray Jay - 7 (groups of 3 and 4) (photo on Facebook)

American Redstart - at David's house in Piercefield

Cape May Warbler - 2 different birds

Magnolia Warbler

Palm Warbler - many

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Lincoln's Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

Purple Finch

 

David spotted a huge Black Bear on the trail just as I sat down at Silver
Brook for a food break.  I had a nice view, but not long enough to get a
photo!

 

9/10/14 Mountaineer Trail near Massawepie Lake (St. Lawrence Co.)

 

The Boy Scouts have done a great deal of wonderful work on the trail since
the last time I hiked it - lots of new wooden walkways over wet areas, and
they completely rebuilt the bridge over the outlet of the lake (photos on
Facebook).  This continues to be one of my favorite Adirondack trails.  An
adult Common Loon was still feeding a juvenile on Massawepie Lake.  I
photographed a female Black-backed Woodpecker (photo on Facebook).
Warblers: Nashville, Magnolia, Blackburnian, Palm, Pine, Yellow-rumped, and
Black-throated Green.

 

9/8/14 Long Lake

 

I was out pre-dawn and this was the most active migration night that I've
noted all season.  The sky was filled with Swainson's Thrushes - just
remarkable!  An Ovenbird landed and gave its evening song!

 

9/7/14 Sabattis Bog (Hamilton Co.)

 

Warblers: Black-and-white, Nashville, Magnolia, Bay-breasted, Palm,
Yellow-rumped, and Black-throated Green.  Lincoln's Sparrows were still in
the bog.  I posted photos of some of the warblers and a Lincoln's Sparrow on
my Facebook page.

 

9/6/14 Long Lake

 

A Chestnut-sided Warbler was observed outside our home.

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 


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Subject: NNYBirds: OK Slip Falls Trail/September sighting/migrants
From: "'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" <Northern_NY_Birds@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:54:43 -0400
9/29/14 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

A Blackpoll Warbler migrant was observed at the summit of The Pinnacle, the
mountain we live on in Long Lake.  A Pine Warbler was singing for a long
time in the pines along the lake behind the Long Lake Central School.

 

9/28/14 Long Lake

 

My husband and I boated to Turtle Beach at the north end of 14-mile Long
Lake.  I posted photos to my Facebook page below of the beach, lake, Common
Loons in changing plumage, Bald Eagle nest, and seaplane.  There were two
Bald Eagles observed staying close to the nest area - which they do well
into the fall each year.

 

9/27/14 Low's Ridge - Upper Dam Trail (along Hitchins Bog to Hitchins Pond
on the Bog River in St. Lawrence Co.)

 

I led a walk to Hitchins Pond and up Low's Ridge that was co-sponsored by
Northern NY Audubon and the Town of Long Lake.  It was a gorgeous, peak leaf
color weekend.  Nineteen people took part and we began around 9 a.m.  The
day was quite hot, so birds were fairly quiet.  In addition to Yellow-rumped
Warblers, we observed a tail-pumping (yellow) Palm Warbler at Hitchins Bog.
We heard several flocks of Pine Siskins - the first day I noted a movement
for this species which has continued.  Views from the summit of Low's Ridge
were spectacular!  I posted photos to my Facebook page.

 

9/19/14 Pre-dawn migration in Long Lake

 

I was out pre-dawn and there was a huge movement of Swainson's Thrushes.
Locally, 3 Barred Owls and Common Loons were vocalizing.  A porcupine,
startled by my husband and I talking, climbed a tree along our lawn (Sept. -
Oct. is breeding season for porcupines and they have been very active!).  I
also saw 2 meteors.

 

9/17/14 Trail to OK Slip Falls and the Hudson River Gorge (Hamilton Co.)

 

I hiked the newly opened trail to spectacular OK Slip Falls and the Hudson
River Gorge.  Photos (trail, waterfall, flora, fauna) and video of the
waterfall can be seen in my latest blog for "Adirondack Experience" at:
http://www.adirondackexperience.com/blog/2014/10/hike-spectacular-ok-slip-fa
lls .  An Eastern Wood-Pewee sang at the trailhead.  A Barred Owl vocalized
midday near the falls.  Winter Wrens were abundant.  Blue-headed Vireos and
Common Yellowthroats sang, and Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green,
and Yellow-rumped Warblers were observed.  I believe the 4-inch slug I
photographed is a Carolina Mantleslug - if there are any shell-less
terrestrial gastropod mollusc experts out there, I'd love to hear from you!
This is going to be a very popular trail in the Central Adirondacks.

 

9/14/14 - 9/15/14 Essex Chain Lakes Canoe - Camping Trip (Essex and Hamilton
Counties)

 

I camped at the most remote site in the chain - Sixth Lake (#2) and nearly
had the Essex Chain Lakes to myself (only one other party on Third Lake).
It was a Sunday night with a forecast for 30 degrees, so I thought I might
have complete solitude!  This newly opened area is lovely - I have a blog
with many, many photos that will be published soon by Adirondack Experience.
Jeff Nadler camped in the chain earlier in the season and heard Olive-sided
Flycatchers.  There is certainly habitat for this species between Fifth and
Sixth Lakes.  Common Loons are abundant in the chain.  Once again, there was
a nocturnal movement of Swainson's Thrushes and I could hear their call
notes through the tent walls all night.  At dawn, my camp was surrounded by
their "whit" call notes.  Barred Owls were abundant hooting and
"monkey-calling" all around the lake during the night!

 

9/12/14 Massawepie Mire (St. Lawrence Co.)

 

David Buckley and I hiked 6 miles round trip (to Silver Brook) at Massawepie
Mire.  Some of the species found:

 

Ruffed Grouse - drumming

American Kestrel - 2

Gray Jay - 7 (groups of 3 and 4) (photo on Facebook)

American Redstart - at David's house in Piercefield

Cape May Warbler - 2 different birds

Magnolia Warbler

Palm Warbler - many

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Lincoln's Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

Purple Finch

 

David spotted a huge Black Bear on the trail just as I sat down at Silver
Brook for a food break.  I had a nice view, but not long enough to get a
photo!

 

9/10/14 Mountaineer Trail near Massawepie Lake (St. Lawrence Co.)

 

The Boy Scouts have done a great deal of wonderful work on the trail since
the last time I hiked it - lots of new wooden walkways over wet areas, and
they completely rebuilt the bridge over the outlet of the lake (photos on
Facebook).  This continues to be one of my favorite Adirondack trails.  An
adult Common Loon was still feeding a juvenile on Massawepie Lake.  I
photographed a female Black-backed Woodpecker (photo on Facebook).
Warblers: Nashville, Magnolia, Blackburnian, Palm, Pine, Yellow-rumped, and
Black-throated Green.

 

9/8/14 Long Lake

 

I was out pre-dawn and this was the most active migration night that I've
noted all season.  The sky was filled with Swainson's Thrushes - just
remarkable!  An Ovenbird landed and gave its evening song!

 

9/7/14 Sabattis Bog (Hamilton Co.)

 

Warblers: Black-and-white, Nashville, Magnolia, Bay-breasted, Palm,
Yellow-rumped, and Black-throated Green.  Lincoln's Sparrows were still in
the bog.  I posted photos of some of the warblers and a Lincoln's Sparrow on
my Facebook page.

 

9/6/14 Long Lake

 

A Chestnut-sided Warbler was observed outside our home.

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 
Subject: Eurasian Wigeon-Blydenburgh County Park, Suffolk Co.
From: <pjlindsay AT optonline.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:40:21 -0400
  There is a male Eurasian Wigeon among the waterfowl on Stump Pond at 
Blydenburgh Park, in Hauppauge (or Smithtown, depending on which website 
you look at). Other waterfowl species of interest were 12 Wood Duck, 70+ 
Am. Wigeon, 6 Green-winged Teal and 12 Ring-necked Duck.

Katydids were singing in three locations on this summer-like afternoon.

Pat Lindsay
Bay Shore

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Subject: Seaside Sparrow, Randall's Island, New York County
From: David Barrett <miler6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 14:48:11 -0400
The saltmarsh on the northeast shore of Randall's Island, just north of
baseball field #42, is known to attract *Ammodramus* sparrows such as
Nelson's Sparrow at this time of year. I did not have any of those today,
but I had a brief glimpse of my first SEASIDE SPARROW there, which
responded to pishing by climbing atop a reed and then promptly disappeared
and was not seen again in nearly an hour of further searching. To reach
this bird I had to climb down onto the rocks that line the shore and
proceed west to near the middle of the marsh, which is possible only when
the tide is relatively low.

David Barrett
www.bigmanhattanyear.com

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Subject: Golden Eagle/other October migrants/Boreal Birds/etc.
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:18:42 -0400
Just a few general observations from up north.

 

Pine Siskins continue to be heard everywhere I hike/camp in the Adirondacks.
Purple Finches are also moving around.  Golden-crowned Kinglets are abundant
- as Shai Mitra mentioned regarding Downy Woodpecker movements, it can be
tricky to distinguish movements in local, year-round residents.
Golden-crowned Kinglets are typically found year-round in the Adirondacks,
but they appear to currently be much more abundant than normal - seemingly
in every bush and tree!  Wild Turkeys had another good year and they are
abundant.  Barred Owls are heard every night outside our home and everywhere
I camp.  Small mammal populations were way up this past summer, and numbers
are dropping off a bit now.  Last winter, we had Blue Jays at our feeders
(in the Central Adirondacks) throughout the winter for the first time.  Blue
Jays have been perching on our porch railing for the past few days and
appear to be searching for the feeders!  I normally wait until late October
to start feeding birds to avoid Black Bears and Raccoons, but I decided to
start feeding this week.

 

We have been observing an Eastern Coyote outside our house for the past week
or so.  I took a dawn photo of the coyote on 10/12/14 and posted it to my
Facebook page listed below.

 

10/12/14 Long Lake (Hamilton County)

 

I observed the season's first (juvenile) Golden Eagle migrant over Big Brook
along Route 30 in Long Lake at 2 p.m.  It appeared to be taking off (it was
right over the road) with a Common Raven encouraging it to leave.  It soared
higher and higher - in the background of my scope view, I could just make
out several much smaller raptors in the same thermal with the eagle!  (This
was the same day that the first Golden Eagle was tallied at Franklin
Mountain Hawk watch.)

 

There was a female Eastern Towhee migrant at the outlet of Little Tupper
Lake with a bill covered in berry juice!  (Photo on my Facebook page.)  This
location is a magnet for many migrating species and one of my favorite
birding locations, because you never know what you'll find. (Other sparrows:
White-crowned, White-throated, Chipping, Song, and Dark-eyed Junco)

 

Among many Yellow-rumped Warblers at Sabattis Bog, a tail pumping (yellow)
Palm Warbler appeared.  Gray Jays have been actively feeding along the road
by Sabattis Bog for several days.  Dragonflies were active and I
photographed a lovely butterfly at Sabattis Bog (photo on Facebook).

 

10/11/14 Bloomingdale Areas (Franklin Co.)

 

On a half-day tour with a couple from New Jersey, we visited boreal habitat
areas.  Here are some of the species found:

 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Black-backed Woodpecker - two different birds calling (one upset by the
appearance of the 2 friendly Gray Jays!)

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Blue-headed Vireo

Gray Jay - 5 (two different groups of 2 and a 5th heard vocalizing) - we
encountered two very friendly Gray Jays in an area where I didn't think they
would be tame!  (Photo on my Facebook page.)

Common Raven

Boreal Chickadee - at least 6 (flock of at least 4 and another group of at
least 2)

Brown Creeper

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Hermit Thrush - several

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Purple Finch

Pine Siskin

 

On my way back to Long Lake, I found a calling/rattling Black-backed
Woodpecker across Sabattis Bog (Sabattis Circle Road) and 3 foraging Gray
Jays by the bog.  I nearly hit a Ruffed Grouse that suddenly ran into Route
30.  There was a solo Ring-necked Duck and Wood Ducks on Shaw Pond in Long
Lake.

 

10/9/14 Long Lake - I observed an Eastern Towhee migrant with the hordes of
Dark-eyed Juncos on our lawn.

 

10/5/14 Whiteface Mountain & Bloomingdale (Essex and Franklin Counties)

 

Larry Master and I went up Whiteface Mountain pre-dawn on 10/5 and
encountered freezing temps and blowing fog (& some snow on the trees - see
my Facebook page!).  It was tough to get out of the car.  We found many
birds, including a couple of Bicknell's Thrushes.  We also found a couple of
Boreal Chickadees on the drive down.  I spent time birding in lowland areas
(River Road and Bloomingdale) after we came down to a warmer climate!  Here
are some of the species:

 

Ruffed Grouse - 2

All 6 possible woodpecker species, including a male Black-backed Woodpecker
(photos on my Facebook page)

Blue-headed Vireo

Gray Jay - 2

Boreal Chickadee - 7 (2 on Whiteface, and groups of 2 and 5 in the
Bloomingdale area)

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird - large flock

Bicknell's Thrush - at least 2 on Whiteface

Swainson's Thrush - 2 (one on Whiteface and another along River Road
foraging with robins and bluebirds)

Hermit Thrush

Nashville Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Sparrows: Savannah, Song, White-throated, White-crowned, and Dark-eyed Junco

Finches: Purple, Pine Siskin, and Amer. Goldfinch

 

10/2/14 to 10/3/14 Canoe-camp trip on Lake Lila in the William C. Whitney
Wilderness Area w/ a climb of Frederica Mountain (Long Lake, Hamilton Co.)

 

I have a blog on this trip with many photos that will soon be published -
I'll send the link when it appears.  It was a terrific night for migration
and I was thrilled to be out camping!  I was next to Shingle Shanty Brook at
camp site 17.  Here are some of the species found on the trip:

 

Canada Goose - non-stop flocks came over in wave after wave beginning at
dusk

Ruffed Grouse - 2

Common Loon

Osprey

Bald Eagle - 2

Greater Yellowlegs - 2

Wilson's Snipe - 2

Barred Owl - several

Belted Kingfisher

Pileated Woodpecker

Blue-headed Vireo - singing

Gray Jay - 2

Brown Creeper - singing

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - singing

"Gray-cheeked Thrush" - first of the season night flight call heard

Swainson's Thrush - a few migrants

Hermit Thrush - many pre-dawn

Common Yellowthroat - Shingle Shanty Brook

Yellow-rumped Warbler - many flocks

Sparrows: Song, Swamp (a few singing), White-throated (singing), and
Dark-eyed Junco

Finches - Purple, Pine Siskin - many heard including a flock at the first
hint of dawn light, and Amer. Goldfinch

 

There was a bull Moose observed at the mouth of Shingle Shanty Brook an hour
before I arrived!  I saw the huge paths in the vegetation when I canoed
Shingle Shanty Brook.

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 


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ARCHIVES:
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3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: NNYBirds: Golden Eagle/other October migrants/Boreal Birds/etc.
From: "'Joan Collins' Joan.Collins AT Frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" <Northern_NY_Birds@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:18:42 -0400
Just a few general observations from up north.

 

Pine Siskins continue to be heard everywhere I hike/camp in the Adirondacks.
Purple Finches are also moving around.  Golden-crowned Kinglets are abundant
- as Shai Mitra mentioned regarding Downy Woodpecker movements, it can be
tricky to distinguish movements in local, year-round residents.
Golden-crowned Kinglets are typically found year-round in the Adirondacks,
but they appear to currently be much more abundant than normal - seemingly
in every bush and tree!  Wild Turkeys had another good year and they are
abundant.  Barred Owls are heard every night outside our home and everywhere
I camp.  Small mammal populations were way up this past summer, and numbers
are dropping off a bit now.  Last winter, we had Blue Jays at our feeders
(in the Central Adirondacks) throughout the winter for the first time.  Blue
Jays have been perching on our porch railing for the past few days and
appear to be searching for the feeders!  I normally wait until late October
to start feeding birds to avoid Black Bears and Raccoons, but I decided to
start feeding this week.

 

We have been observing an Eastern Coyote outside our house for the past week
or so.  I took a dawn photo of the coyote on 10/12/14 and posted it to my
Facebook page listed below.

 

10/12/14 Long Lake (Hamilton County)

 

I observed the season's first (juvenile) Golden Eagle migrant over Big Brook
along Route 30 in Long Lake at 2 p.m.  It appeared to be taking off (it was
right over the road) with a Common Raven encouraging it to leave.  It soared
higher and higher - in the background of my scope view, I could just make
out several much smaller raptors in the same thermal with the eagle!  (This
was the same day that the first Golden Eagle was tallied at Franklin
Mountain Hawk watch.)

 

There was a female Eastern Towhee migrant at the outlet of Little Tupper
Lake with a bill covered in berry juice!  (Photo on my Facebook page.)  This
location is a magnet for many migrating species and one of my favorite
birding locations, because you never know what you'll find. (Other sparrows:
White-crowned, White-throated, Chipping, Song, and Dark-eyed Junco)

 

Among many Yellow-rumped Warblers at Sabattis Bog, a tail pumping (yellow)
Palm Warbler appeared.  Gray Jays have been actively feeding along the road
by Sabattis Bog for several days.  Dragonflies were active and I
photographed a lovely butterfly at Sabattis Bog (photo on Facebook).

 

10/11/14 Bloomingdale Areas (Franklin Co.)

 

On a half-day tour with a couple from New Jersey, we visited boreal habitat
areas.  Here are some of the species found:

 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Black-backed Woodpecker - two different birds calling (one upset by the
appearance of the 2 friendly Gray Jays!)

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Blue-headed Vireo

Gray Jay - 5 (two different groups of 2 and a 5th heard vocalizing) - we
encountered two very friendly Gray Jays in an area where I didn't think they
would be tame!  (Photo on my Facebook page.)

Common Raven

Boreal Chickadee - at least 6 (flock of at least 4 and another group of at
least 2)

Brown Creeper

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Hermit Thrush - several

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Purple Finch

Pine Siskin

 

On my way back to Long Lake, I found a calling/rattling Black-backed
Woodpecker across Sabattis Bog (Sabattis Circle Road) and 3 foraging Gray
Jays by the bog.  I nearly hit a Ruffed Grouse that suddenly ran into Route
30.  There was a solo Ring-necked Duck and Wood Ducks on Shaw Pond in Long
Lake.

 

10/9/14 Long Lake - I observed an Eastern Towhee migrant with the hordes of
Dark-eyed Juncos on our lawn.

 

10/5/14 Whiteface Mountain & Bloomingdale (Essex and Franklin Counties)

 

Larry Master and I went up Whiteface Mountain pre-dawn on 10/5 and
encountered freezing temps and blowing fog (& some snow on the trees - see
my Facebook page!).  It was tough to get out of the car.  We found many
birds, including a couple of Bicknell's Thrushes.  We also found a couple of
Boreal Chickadees on the drive down.  I spent time birding in lowland areas
(River Road and Bloomingdale) after we came down to a warmer climate!  Here
are some of the species:

 

Ruffed Grouse - 2

All 6 possible woodpecker species, including a male Black-backed Woodpecker
(photos on my Facebook page)

Blue-headed Vireo

Gray Jay - 2

Boreal Chickadee - 7 (2 on Whiteface, and groups of 2 and 5 in the
Bloomingdale area)

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird - large flock

Bicknell's Thrush - at least 2 on Whiteface

Swainson's Thrush - 2 (one on Whiteface and another along River Road
foraging with robins and bluebirds)

Hermit Thrush

Nashville Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Sparrows: Savannah, Song, White-throated, White-crowned, and Dark-eyed Junco

Finches: Purple, Pine Siskin, and Amer. Goldfinch

 

10/2/14 to 10/3/14 Canoe-camp trip on Lake Lila in the William C. Whitney
Wilderness Area w/ a climb of Frederica Mountain (Long Lake, Hamilton Co.)

 

I have a blog on this trip with many photos that will soon be published -
I'll send the link when it appears.  It was a terrific night for migration
and I was thrilled to be out camping!  I was next to Shingle Shanty Brook at
camp site 17.  Here are some of the species found on the trip:

 

Canada Goose - non-stop flocks came over in wave after wave beginning at
dusk

Ruffed Grouse - 2

Common Loon

Osprey

Bald Eagle - 2

Greater Yellowlegs - 2

Wilson's Snipe - 2

Barred Owl - several

Belted Kingfisher

Pileated Woodpecker

Blue-headed Vireo - singing

Gray Jay - 2

Brown Creeper - singing

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - singing

"Gray-cheeked Thrush" - first of the season night flight call heard

Swainson's Thrush - a few migrants

Hermit Thrush - many pre-dawn

Common Yellowthroat - Shingle Shanty Brook

Yellow-rumped Warbler - many flocks

Sparrows: Song, Swamp (a few singing), White-throated (singing), and
Dark-eyed Junco

Finches - Purple, Pine Siskin - many heard including a flock at the first
hint of dawn light, and Amer. Goldfinch

 

There was a bull Moose observed at the mouth of Shingle Shanty Brook an hour
before I arrived!  I saw the huge paths in the vegetation when I canoed
Shingle Shanty Brook.

 

Joan Collins

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/   

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 
Subject: Fwd: [JERSEYBI] VERMILLION Flycatcher
From: Ardith Bondi <ardbon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 09:33:14 -0400
Thought this might interest a few New Yorkers.

Ardith Bondi


Hi All,

A 1st year male Vermillion Flycatcher is currently putting on a great show
at Rea's Farm " the beanery" in Cape May.

Good Birding!

Mike
Cape May Point

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 15:22:22 -0700
RBA
 
*  New York
*  Syracuse
* October 6, 2014
*  NYSY  10. 06. 14
 
Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird Alert
Dates(s):
September 29, 2014 - October 06, 2014
to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
covering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge
and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),
Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortland
compiled: October 06 AT 5:00 p.m. (EDT)
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.org
 
 
#412 Monday October 06, 2014
 
Greetings. This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week of 
September 22, 2014
 
Highlights:
-----------

CACKLING GOOSE
AMERICAN AVOCET
PARASITIC JAEGER
LITTLE GULL
FORSTER’S TERN
SNOWY OWL
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
DICKCISSAL
NELSON’S SPARROW
PINE SISKIN


Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------

 Only seven species of shorebirds were seen at the complex this week 
highlighted by the two AMERICAN AVOCETS seen as recently as yesterday (10/12) 
at Knox-Marsellus Marsh but not yet reported today. 



Onondaga County
------------

 13 species of Warbler and LINCOLN SPARROW were found in the county this week. 
Get them before they’re gone. 

 10/7: An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was found again in Three Rivers WMA under the 
power lines on 60 Road. They were found again yesterday and today in the same 
location. 

 10/8: A juvenile female type DICKCISSAL was found on the east side of Van 
Rensselear Street near the inner harbor in Syracuse. Unfortunately it was not 
relocated the next day. 

 10/11: A SNOWY OWL was still being seen actively hunting in the Rt. 31 mall 
location in Clay. 

 10/12: An adult and juvenile BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON were seen again in 
Onondaga Creek south of Spencer Street on the Creekwalk in Syracuse. 

     10/13: 2 CACKLING GEESE were found in the Inner Harbor area in Syracuse.


Jefferson County
------------

 10/10: A NELSON’S SPARROW was found on Zimmer Road in Fort Drum. Driving is 
not allowed on this road but apparently you may walk it. 



Oswego County
------------

 10/8: 3 PARASITIC JAEGERS, a LITTLE GULL and a FORSTER’S TERN were all seen 
from the overlook at Derby Hill. The next day one of the JAEGERS and the LITTLE 
GULL were seen again. 



Cayuga County
------------

 10/7: 7 FORSTER’S TERNS were spotted from the beach at Fair Haven State 
Park. 

     10/8: A LITTLE GULL was seen at West Barrier Park in Fair Haven.
 10/12: An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen at Great Bear Recreation Area north 
of Phoenix. 

     

Oneida County
------------

     10/10: 4 PINE SISKINS were seen at Spring Farm Nature Center near Clinton.



--  end report



Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y.  13027  U.S.A.
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Subject: Queens County Bird Club Inc. - Upcoming Meeting Info - Janet Zinn presents "The Birds and Beasts of Tanzania"
From: Nancy Tognan <nancy.tognan AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 17:02:35 -0700
The *Queens County Bird Club Inc.* will be meeting at the Alley Pond
Environmental Center, 228-06 Northern Blvd Douglaston, NY 11362-1906
 >Map of location<  

at 8pm on Wednesday, October 15, 2014{ the third Wednesday of the month} 

Our speaker will be Janet Zinn, presenting "The Birds and Beasts of
Tanzania"

Come on safari with photographer Janet Zinn as she presents images from her
recent birding and wildlife expedition to northern Tanzania. Experience the
thrill of Africa's predators and the beauty of its avian inhabitants while
picking up some useful tips for planning your own trip of a lifetime.

Janet picked up her first camera at age 8 and has never looked back. Her
work has appeared in National Geographic's Global Birding, in print and web
advertising, and in literature for non-profit organizations such as the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, International Rivers, Audubon, and the Sierra
Club. To see her work, visit her website at http://www.jczinn.com/



Non-members and guests are invited to join us for our meetings featuring
noted guest speakers and to join us on our renowned field trips. 

* QCBC is a tax exempt, charitable organization {501c3}.  *


Nancy Tognan
Vice President: *Queens County Bird Club Inc*. 
See   http://www.qcbirdclub.org/ for more
information on trips, speakers, and other events! 
See our 'Birding Maps & Locations' page for directions to and info about
many local birding hotspots

 


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Subject: Jones Beach
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 16:03:37 -0400
Jones Beach West End 13 Oct.

There were many less birds today. Still, of interest were 422 AMERICAN 
OYSTERCATCHERS (count cur testy of Paul Gildersleve), a MARBLED GODWIT on the 
bar, approx. 50 BLACK SKIMMER (mostly young), a dozen FORSTER'S TERNS feeding 
in the inlet, 13 LESSER BLACK-BACK GULLS on the east West End #2 parking lot 
(full adult to first year) , WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS including 2 breeding 
plumage males and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW feeding with House Sparrows at the 
Coast Guard Parking Lot. 


Sy Schiff

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Subject: Re: Common Gallinule Continues at Patchogue Lake (Suffolk Co.)
From: Joe Jannsen <jjannsen AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 18:42:14 +0000
2:30 PM: Common Gallinule continues in same location along eastern shore of 
Patchogue Lake. Best views from end of E. 2nd Street. 


Joe

On Oct 13, 2014, at 11:53 AM, "Ken Feustel" 
> wrote: 


The previously reported Common Gallinule continued at Patchogue Lake this 
morning, as viewed from East 3rd Street, and was joined by a molting male 
Eurasian Wigeon among the many American Wigeon. Also present were Wood Duck, 
Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall and eight Pied-billed Grebes. 


Ken & Sue Feustel
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Subject: Common Gallinule Continues at Patchogue Lake (Suffolk Co.)
From: Ken Feustel <feustel AT optonline.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 11:52:56 -0400
The previously reported Common Gallinule continued at Patchogue Lake this 
morning, as viewed from East 3rd Street, and was joined by a molting male 
Eurasian Wigeon among the many American Wigeon. Also present were Wood Duck, 
Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall and eight Pied-billed Grebes. 


Ken & Sue Feustel

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Subject: Linnaean Society of NY: Glimpses into unfamiliar worlds (Tues Oct 14, 6-9 pm)
From: Angus Wilson <oceanwanderers AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 19:31:14 -0400
*** THE LINNAEAN SOCIETY OF NEW YORK - MEETING PROGRAM - AMERICAN MUSEUM OF
NATURAL HISTORY, NEW YORK CITY ***



This coming Tuesday (14 October 2014) the evening program will take a
slight detour away from the normal focus on birds to consider two very
different biological topics that impact birds and the environment. First we
will hear from Andrea Suhrbier about his studies of viruses in seabirds and
marine mammals of the remote Southern Ocean. Then we will hear from Hugh
McGuinness, a well-known birder in the region about his other great
passion: moths. Please join us.



*6:00 pm – Macquarie Island: Penguins, Seals, and Viruses, Andreas Suhrbier
*

Join Andreas Suhrbier aboard the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis as
he investigates the fauna and flora of the small subantarctic Macquarie
Island, pristine home to Rockhopper, Royal, and King Penguins as well as a
large population of elephant seals. This is no pleasure cruise: Suhrbier
and his team study viruses transmitted by seabird ticks and seal lice.
Remote Macquarie Island (some 1,300 miles south of the Australian mainland)
is the perfect wilderness laboratory to observe the evolution of viruses
that are spread by migratory and far-ranging birds and mammals. Suhrbier, a
biologist at the Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane, is also
associated with the Australian National Health and Medical Research
Council. He is the author of over 130 scientific publications and the
inventor of 17 patents in the fields of virology, immunology, and cancer
therapeutics.



*7:30 pm – The Moths of Long Island, Hugh McGuinness*

Long Island has an abundant native fauna of Lepidoptera: there are at least
1,500 (and perhaps as many as 2,000) species of moths and butterflies. But
there has been relatively little moth-collecting, which is surprising given
the large number of rare species known to occur there, as listed by the New
York Natural Heritage Program. With the help of grants from the Nature
Conservancy and the New York State Museum, in 2002 Hugh McGuinness began
photographing and collecting moths on the East End. Much of his work has
focused on searching for rare moths to determine their status; using moths
as indicator species for managing habitat; and elucidating the range of
moths on Long Island. These efforts have yielded nearly 20,000 specimens
and a list of more than 1,000 species. His talk will give an overview of
Lepidoptera biodiversity, explaining how moths can be useful as management
tools. In addition, he will dispel pernicious myths about moths and will
discuss the joys of mothing.



*WHERE & WHEN*

Both programs are open to the public FREE OF CHARGE and will be held in the
Linder Theater of the AMNH. Enter the museum from the 77th Street entrance,
where the route to the auditorium will be sign posted. The first program
will last approximately one hour with time before the second program to
talk to the speakers, and mingle with LSNY officers and council members,
who can provide information on becoming a part of this thriving and
historic natural history society.



*MORE INFORMATION ON LSNY PROGRAMS*

Please check out (and bookmark) our website:



http://linnaeannewyork.org/calendar-programs-trips/programs2014-2015.html



or visit us on Facebook



http://www.facebook.com/pages/Linnaean-Society-of-New-York/335385365977?ref=ts



Look forward to seeing you on Tuesday (no reservations necessary).



Angus Wilson

President, The Linnaean Society of New York (LSNY)

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Subject: Pathogue Common Gallinule--YES
From: John Gluth <jgluth AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 18:17:15 -0400
The COMMON GALLINULE was still present on Patchogue Lake late this afternoon 
(5:15-5:40). When I first arrived at the lake overlook at the end of E. 2nd 
Ave., my first few scope scans did not turn up the gallinule, but I eventually 
spotted it standing along the eastern shore under the overhanging branches of a 
large willow, where it spent at least 10 minutes preening and resting before 
eventually returning to the water to feed. Other notable waterfowl present 
included 23 Coot, 

7 Pied-billed Grebe, 8 American Wigeon, and 18 Ruddy Ducks.

John Gluth

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Pelham Bay Park- Bronx
From: Jack Rothman <jacroth1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 16:03:43 -0400
A dozen people birded the edge of the lagoon, alongside the parking lot at 
Orchard Beach and then on Hunter Island on a CityIslandBirds walk from 
8:00-12:00. 

Highlight was a Clay-colored Sparrow found by Matthieu Benoit near the kayak 
launch. There were many sparrows and we could have spent the entire day 
investigating this area. We found several White-throated, Chipping, White 
Crowned, (both adult and first winter), Song, Swamp and Savannah Sparrows. 
Because of the relatively low foliage in this park, it is possible to see many 
birds close by and at eye level. We had some great looks at a close by overhead 
Coopers Hawk and an immature Bald Eagle. 


American Crow
Marsh Wren
Great Egret (several)
Killdeer
Eastern Towhee
Yellow-rumped Warbler (several)
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Osprey
Song Sparrow
White-crowned sparrow
Clay-colored Sparrow
White- throated Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
House Sparrow
Brown Thrasher
Gadwall 
Mallard
Peregrine Falcon
Coopers Hawk
Bald Eagle 
White-breasted Nuthatch
Downy Woodpecker
Dark-eyed Junco
Eastern Phoebe
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Swainsons Thrush
Hermit Thrush
House Wren
Black and White Warbler
Yellow- bellied Sapsucker
Gray Catbird
American Robin
European Starling
Blue Jay
Hering Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Laughing Gull

Jack Rothman
cityislandbirds.com






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Subject: Jones Beach West End
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 15:56:45 -0400
Jones Beach West End 12 Oct

A birdy morning with lots to look at and an interesting mix of species. This is 
a composite list from the 7 or 8 of us enjoying the company and birding 
together. Raptors included OSPREY, NORTHERN HARRIER, SHARP-SHINNED AND COOPER'S 
HAWK, MERLIN AND PEREGRINE FALCON plus a fly over GREAT BLUE HERON. 


Beside the lingering 100+ AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, there were only DUNLIN and 
RUDDY TURNSTONE. Three ROYAL TERNS joined them on the bar before flying off. 
The 7 LESSER BLACK-BACK GULLS reported by Peter Post seemed to be 3 first year 
and 4 second year. Only one of the ones that were standing had yellowish legs. 


The NORTHERN FLICKERS were joined by a RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER (rare on the 
beach), a few BROWN CREEPERS and lots of EASTERN PHOEBE, RUBY and 
GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS. Some RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES continue in the pines. 


The few VIREOS included RED-EYED, WHITE EYED and BLUE-HEADED. Still many TREE 
SWALLOWS, but the enormous thousands of last week have moved on. Lots of 
warblers of the YELLOW-RUMPED persuasion but only a few PALM and PINE with a 
single BLACK-THROATED BLUE. 


There were 8 species of sparrow including CLAY-COLORED and WHITE-CROWNED plus 
EASTERN TOWHEE, DARK-EYED JUNCO, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, 
EASTERN GOLDFINCH and a few PINE SISKIN. 


Sy Schiff

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Subject: Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 15:38:59 -0400
I've been developing a wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots. I'm working through
each of the counties based on total number of species. The progress is
posted on the 'Alphabetical List' of counties on the link below. Those
highlighted yellow have the top 10 location pages created. Those in green
are complete:

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

One of my local patches on Manhattan is setup with content that I feel
makes the page worth going to on a daily basis. For any location I'm
interested in I'll bring up the location page and click on 'View Details'
to see the latest checklists. For public transportation click on
'Directions'. Then on the Google Map click on the directions arrow, select
the bus icon and you're a few steps away from a number of route options:

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Swindler+Cove+Park+and+Sherman+Creek

The table labeled 'Checklists by Season by Month' gives you easy access to
all the checklists at the state, county or location levels. When there are
multiple hotspots for a single location these are combined so there's no
need to go through the process of selecting these from all the NYS hotspots
on eBird.

To see a bigger view of the hotspot map shown on the right side click on
the link above the map which will bring you to eBird's Hotspot Explorer.

The directions link under each hotspot (which is highlighted in the color
representing the # of species seen) should go to a public parking lot or
entrance. If you seen an error in the placement please let me know. There
is a 'Contact' button in the left panel of the wiki or contact me off list.

If you submit your checklists to a personal location and not to one of the
hotspots listed then your species will not aggregate at the shared location
(hotspot) level but only at the county level and higher.

If you wish to merge your personal location with an existing hotspot here
are the steps:

— Sign into eBird.org
— Go to "My eBird" & select "Manage My Locations" in the right panel
— Select your personal location (it will show a letter "P" under Type*) &
click "Edit"
— Select the "Merge" button and you'll see all nearby hotspots as red icons
— Make sure the checkmark is selected for "Delete after merging"
— Click the icon that best fits your location
— ... then you'll see the hotspot description above the 'Merge' button
along with the # of checklists you'll be merging your checklists to
— Click on the 'Merge' button
— Answer Yes to the 'Yes or No' query

All checklists for that personal location will be combined with the hotspot
with this process.

Any comments, critiques or additional content for the pages would be much
appreciated. You can find a contact button in the left sidebar on the wiki
or leave a message here.

Enjoy!
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Sparrows at Jamaica Bay NWR
From: "Joseph O'Sullivan" <josullivan58 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 14:46:07 -0400
I went to Jamaica Bay this morning and there was lots of bird activity but
not many people.

I started on the trail from the visitor's center to the breach and I
immediately noticed many sparrows which I assumed were Song Sparrow or
White-throated Sparrows. There were a few Song Sparrows, but the majority
of the ones I identified were Swamp Sparrows. I started to look closely at
all the sparrows I was seeing and I soon also saw a Vesper Sparrow, my
first in years, a Clay-colored Sparrow, my first this year, and a Nelson's
Sparrow, my first ever. On the east pond I saw a White-crowned Sparrow, and
my first of the fall White-throated Sparrow.

On the West Pond I saw my first of the fall Brants and a pair of of Snow
Geese. On the East pond there were many birds on the north end. More
cormorants than I have ever seen at one time (200+) and many white birds
that were a mix of gulls, swans, and egrets.

I saw a total of 43 species for the trip. The full list is on ebird.

I was there from about 9:00 am to 11:00 am and surprisingly I only saw two
people on the trails.

-- 
Joseph O'Sullivan

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Subject: Fly over Bald Eagle
From: <lstocker AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 11:59:36 -0400
A few minutes of backyard birding in Bayport produced a Bald Eagle soaring to 
the southwest. Also observed were 3 merlin and several accipiter. A mixed flock 
consisting of chickadees, white-breasted nuthatch, phoebes (5-6), yellow-rumped 
warblers and blue headed vireo also moved through the area. 


Thanks,
Lee Stocker

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Subject: Clay colred sparrow
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 11:38:01 -0400
Shirley marina park. Suffolk co.
10/12/2014  AT  11:37 AM

Arie Gilbert 
No. Babylon NY 

For this location, click on the link below, or copy it and place it in a web 
browser. If you don't have a GPS,'Right-click' on the map to get directions 
that you can print out. 



https://www.google.com/maps/place/40.74487233114537+-72.87003491073847

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Sent using GPS Share: http://goo.gl/VOcnaD



Sent from "Loretta IV" in the field
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Subject: Re: Common Gallinule Patchogue Lake Suffolk Co
From: Mike <mikec02 AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 11:22:40 -0400
The Common Gallinule found yesterday by Derek Rogers is still present today on 
Patchogue Lake, Suffolk Co. Park at the west side of the lake at the dead end 
near East 3rd Ave and scan the opposite shoreline. 


Mike Cooper
Ridge, LI, NY
  
Sent from my iPhone



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Subject: Lesser-blacked Gulls
From: Peter Post <pwpost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 09:34:14 -0400
There are currently 7 Lesser-backed Gulls in the West End 2 parking lot at 
Jones Beach in various plumages. 


Peter Post
NYC

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Subject: Turtle Cove, Pelham Bay Park
From: "Editconsul AT aol.com" <Editconsul@aol.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 07:10:42 -0400
Turtle Cove at Pelham Bay Park also turned out to be a sparrow paradise. 

Savannah
White crowned
Vesper
American Tree 
Field
Swamp
Song
White throated 
Peregrine falcon
Sharp shinned hawk
Common yellowthroat 
Palm warbler
Ruby crowned kinglet
Northern flicker
Great white egret
Cormorant 
Marsh wren
Belted kingfisher
Clapper rail- heard 

Good Birding,
Debbie Becker
BirdingAroundNYC.com


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Subject: The New York Botanical Garden
From: "Editconsul AT aol.com" <Editconsul@aol.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 07:03:42 -0400
Fantastic Sparrow Day at NYBG yesterday. Even though it was raining five 
birders arrived ready to search for sparrows. We headed straight to the Native 
Plant Garden and we were not disappointed! 

Pine Siskin- large flock + 75
Lincoln
Field
Clay colored
Savannah
Chipping
Swamp
Song
White throated
Eastern towhee
Indigo Bunting
Palm warbler
Common yellowthroat
American goldfinch 
Sharp shinned hawk
Red tailed hawk
White breasted nuthatch
Northern flicker
Catbird
Wilson's Snipe -heard
Winter wren

I will post photographs later today. 

Good Birding,
Debbie Becker
BirdingAroundNYC.com



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Subject: Croton point park
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 00:05:36 +0000
For you sparrow folks the Point was active this afternoon. Besides the landfill 
only a portion of which I walked, other productive areas by were grass by 
(never used) swimming pool, the grassy knoll (b/w the gazebo and the road to 
the nature center) and the "low" road w the wine cellars: sparrows identified 
included vesper (perhaps 2) on landfill second path on right starting from the 
top), many Savannah, imm. white crowned, lincoln's, swamp (4), chipping (2), 
field (1), song, white throated, junco, towhee (1), also of note Amer. Pipit 
(2) at swimming beach on sand at water's edge which I only noticed driving out 
b/c I saw several killdeer there (6), n. harrier (3), kestrel (2), adult 
peregrine, osprey, good sized waxwing flock -- the Point does not disappoint 


L. Trachtenberg
Ossining, NY 

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Subject: Central Park Incl. Black-billed Cuckoo etc.
From: gabriel willow <gabrielwillow AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 23:42:25 +0000
I led two tours for NYC Audubon in Central Park today, mostly around Strawberry 
Fields and The Ramble.  We saw 48 species of birds, not bad considering the 
rain.  Actually, there was quite a bit of activity!  Towhees seemed to be 
everywhere, along with Hermit Thrushes and of course White-throated Sparrows 
which have arrived by the hundreds if not thousands in the park. 

Highlights included several Swamp Sparrows; 4 White-crowned Sparrows (an adult 
and an immature at Strawberry Fields, an immature by Tupelo Meadow, and an 
immature at Maintenance); a Black-billed Cuckoo sitting quietly in the rain in 
an oak by the westernmost edge of the Ramble by the lake a bit south of the 
Upper Lobe; and a Tennessee Warbler feeding from Sapsucker wells right by the 
72nd St. entrance (plus 9 other species of warbler). 

Full list:
Canada Goose MallardNorthern ShovelerSharp-shinned HawkRing-billed GullRock 
PigeonMourning DoveBlack-billed CuckooRed-bellied WoodpeckerYellow-bellied 
SapsuckerDowny WoodpeckerNorthern FlickerEastern PhoebeBlue-headed VireoBlue 
Jaycrow sp. Corvus sp. (crow sp.)Tufted TitmouseWhite-breasted NuthatchBrown 
CreeperHouse WrenWinter WrenGolden-crowned KingletRuby-crowned KingletHermit 
ThrushWood ThrushGray CatbirdEuropean StarlingOvenbirdBlack-and-white 
WarblerTennessee WarblerCommon YellowthroatAmerican RedstartNorthern 
ParulaMagnolia WarblerBlackpoll WarblerBlack-throated Blue WarblerYellow-rumped 
WarblerEastern TowheeChipping SparrowSong SparrowSwamp SparrowWhite-throated 
SparrowWhite-crowned SparrowDark-eyed JuncoNorthern CardinalRose-breasted 
GrosbeakIndigo BuntingCommon GrackleHouse Sparrow 

Soggy Birding,
Gabriel WillowNYC AudubonWave HillThe WildLab
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Subject: Common Gallinule - Patchogue Lake (Suffolk)
From: Derek Rogers <drogers0031 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 14:25:24 -0400
There's a Common Gallinule feeding along the east side of Patchogue Lake within 
a mixed flock of waterfowl. It's been quite a while since I've heard this 
species reported in Suffolk and figured it may be of interest to some folks. 


Best viewing is from the west side of the lake at the dead end of East 2nd 
Street, accessed via Waverly Ave. A scope would be very useful for relocating 
this bird. 


Best,

Derek Rogers
Sayville 


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Subject: Junco x White-throated Sparrow hybird, Central Park, New York City
From: Joe DiCostanzo <jdicost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 23:35:38 -0400
This morning while leading the Friday morning AMNH bird walk in Central
Park, I found an apparent hybrid Junco x White-throated Sparrow in the
Ramble. The bird was on the paved path by the northeast corner of the
"Swampy Pin Oak" fenced in area east of the Rustic Shelter. Photos of this
interesting form can be seen on my blog
 .

 

Joe DiCostanzo

www.greatgullisland.org  

www.inwoodbirder.blogspot.com

 


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Subject: Jones Beach
From: Tim Dunn <timdunn AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 22:02:41 -0400
After seeing this morning's reports of significant bird movement, but being 
stuck going to work, I was able to swing past Jones Beach west end at 
lunchtime. What was most interesting was the sheer volume of migrants around 
the Coast Guard station. So many passerines were moving around that I actually 
had to duck to avoid 2 different GC Kinglets and my FOS RB Nuthatch as I stood 
along the edge of the parking lot by the CG Sta. 


YR Warblers were the most abundant, but E. Phoebes, N. Flickers, and GC 
Kinglets were also strongly represented. Brown Creepers were in, and several RB 
Nuthatches were heard. RC Kinglets were present in smaller numbers than GC. 


Other warblers included Common Yellowthroat, Pine, Black-and-white, 
Black-throated Blue, eastern and western Palm. A Red-eyed Vireo bathed in a 
puddle, giving me the rare chance to look down on one of these birds, rather 
than the usual overhead views. 


The hedgerow area produced several each of Chipping, Field, Savannah, 
White-throated and Song Sparrows and one White-crowned Sparrow. I didn't have 
any of the Pine Siskins that were present earlier, but a lone Bobolink was a 
bit of a surprise. 


Raptors included a Kestrel, Cooper's Hawk and a couple of Merlins. All were 
perching and seemed quite interested in the busy scene and accompanying 
potential meal opportunities. 


Two Royal Terns did a fly-by and the Skimmer flock was around 65 birds, 
including mostly adults. Black-bellied Plovers and Ruddy Turnstones were on the 
sandbar, but all shorebirds were flushed before I could look for anything more 
unusual. 


Tree Swallows swirled overhead, easily numbering into the thousands and 
impossible to count as they moved about, occasionally swirling into a funnel 
and giving me the feeling of one of those David Attenborough documentary 
moments. 


Nothing terribly rare, but an inspiring hour of birding. 

Thanks,
Tim Dunn
Babylon NY
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Subject: Re:CONNECTICUT WARBLER @ Hoyt Farm Park
From: John Gluth <jgluth AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 20:29:21 -0400
Three photos of the Connecticut Warbler at Hoyt Farm can be viewed here: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jgluth_brb/sets/72157648208873737/ 

Coordinates for the area I described in my earlier post are 40.820629, 
-73.271779. 



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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 10 October 2014
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 20:19:42 -0400
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 10, 2014
* NYNY1410.10

- Birds Mentioned

SAY’S PHOEBE+
NORTHERN WHEATEAR+
BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

EURASIAN WIGEON
Red-necked Grebe
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden-Plover
American Oystercatcher
Whimbrel
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
BAIRD’S SANDPIPER
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
PHILADELPHIA VIREO
Common Raven
American Pipit
CONNECTICUT WARBLER
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
Lincoln’s Sparrow
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Rusty Blackbird
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber:  Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]
Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 10th at
6:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are NORTHERN WHEATEAR, SAY’S PHOEBE,
BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, EURASIAN WIGEON, MARBLED and HUDSONIAN GODWITS,
BAIRD’S SANDPIPER, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, CONNECTICUT
WARBLER, and CLAY-COLORED and GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS.

Happily, the NORTHERN WHEATEAR found Wednesday October 1 at Plumb Beach in
Brooklyn continued at that site through the weekend, but unfortunately it
could be very difficult to locate at times as it ranged around the eastern
tip of the park.  It was actually easier to find Saturday in the driving
wind and rain than on much improved Sunday, when seen only briefly.  It
posed nicely for photographs Tuesday, but just a single e-bird report from
Wednesday might have marked its departure, though its reclusive habits at
times give some hope it may still linger there.

Another very nice find was a SAY’S PHOEBE spotted Sunday at the Edgemere
Landfill, now also known as Rockaway Community Park, in Far Rockaway.  This
capped landfill, covered with fairly dense low vegetation but providing
numerous perches, many used by the Phoebe, is reached from the northern
terminus of Beach 51st Street.  A very narrow gravel road encircles and
crosses over the landfill, so be careful if using it.  The Phoebe was not
seen after Sunday, when other birds present included numerous hunting
hawks, including three species of falcons.

Perhaps the most intriguing report of the week was a BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK
at Heckscher State Park on Wednesday morning.  Subsequent searches for this
bird had uncertain results, and the key would be to separate this bird from
what can be an extremely similar plumage in 1st fall male Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks.  The Heckscher bird was initially heard calling, a slightly
different note than that of Rose-breasted, and the darker upper mandible
was noted, a field mark for Black-Headed but perhaps not as consistent
among 1st fall birds.  Unfortunately the color of the wing linings was not
seen, this a more positive point of separation.  Photographs of this bird
would be much desired.

At Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge the drake EURASIAN WIGEON was still on the
East Pond Wednesday, and a BAIRD’S SANDPIPER found on the pond Sunday was
joined by a 2nd as of Wednesday.  Other birds noted on Wednesday included
CASPIAN TERN, COMMON RAVEN and AMERICAN PIPIT, and an HUDSONIAN GODWIT was
spotted flying by the former West Pond last Saturday, that area apparently
in too poor a condition to induce it to land.

Other shorebirds locally featured an AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER at Floyd
Bennett Field with BLACK-BELLIEDS on Saturday, 2 MARBLED GODWITS flying
over Plumb Beach Saturday morning, and a WHIMBREL at Jones Beach West End
Tuesday.  Other birds at Jones Beach West End included the large gatherings
of AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, and BLACK SKIMMERS, and ROYAL TERN.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were noted Thursday at Robert Moses State Park,
these among a decent coastal flight that also featured a good number of
PINE SISKINS and PURPLE FINCHES, plus a few RUSTY BLACKBIRDS.  A larger
flight Friday morning along the coast featured many hundred PINE SISKINS
and a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER again at Moses.

One or two PHILADELPHIA VIREOS and a decent variety of warblers continue to
be seen, a CONNECTICUT WARBLER was reported at Hoyt Farm Park in Commack,
today and a large influx of sparrows Thursday and today included a
GRASSHOPPER at Jamaica Bay yesterday, a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW in Brookhaven
today, and several LINCOLN’S.

The RED-NECKED GREBE was still at Mecox Saturday.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126, or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483 <%28212%29%20372-1483>.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Subject: Central Park NYC Bird Walk - North End on Friday October 10th
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 20:09:16 -0400




Subject: South Shore Beaches
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 16:50:12 -0400
Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) encountered the fallout at Jones Beach West End. 
Surprisingly, the number of species was modest, but some of the numbers made up 
for it. Starting with Quantity, TREE SWALLOW-3-5.000 (hard to count or 
guesstimate when the sky was covered and full of them); PINE SISKIN-400 
(streaming through early in the morning in medium sized flocks); YELLOW-RUMPED 
WARBLER-hundreds; BLACK SKIMMER-100+; NORTHERN FLICKER-scores;EASTERN 
PHOEBE-50+ (they were everywhere, there were 5 closely lined up on the Coast 
Guard fence at one time); only 6 species of warbler and 7 species of sparrows. 
Other birds included 3 widely scattered BLUE-HEADED VIREO, BROUN CREEPER, RUBY 
and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS and INDIGO BUNTING. 


Hawks were few but included TWO BALD EAGLES, adult and immature; a COOPER'S 
HAWK, PEREGRINE FALCONS and several MERLIN. (Eagles at the beach are always 
special.) 


We arrived at Robert Moses SP later in the morning where the activity had died 
down. Just before the turnaround to Field #2 we encountered Shai Mitra, who was 
focused on a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER. We stopped to look.. The Hawk Watch 
counters starting earlier in the morning, reported few hawks, but much greater 
numbers of Yellow-rumped Warblers and Pine Siskin than we had seen at the other 
end of the Jones strip. They had not seen any eagles. 


Beautiful Fall day, Great to be out.
Sy 

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Subject: Re: Goose me, please
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 15:00:12 -0400
Allan,

Word from individuals is always best but you can track all the birds
reported to eBird.org with the following webpage that shows all species for
2014 for both Oct. and Nov. When you click on the MAP icon next to each
bird it'll bring up a map with Red icons for observations within the past
30 days:

eBird.org Bar Charts: NYS for 2014 (Oct & Nov)

 


On Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 2:47 PM, Allan Mueller  wrote:

> I am working on my New York list and noticed that I need several geese -
> White-fronted Goose, Ross's Goose, Cackling Goose, and Brant.
>
> Sometime in the next week or so, my wife and I will be traveling across
> New York, so if you find any of these species, please contact me.
>
> I will also need directions (Lat Long works great).
>
> Thanks,
>
> --
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
>
>
> "I ain't never did no wrong."
> Elvis Presley in "One Night"
>
>  --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
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>

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC

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--
Subject: Goose me, please
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 14:47:26 -0400
I am working on my New York list and noticed that I need several geese -
White-fronted Goose, Ross's Goose, Cackling Goose, and Brant.

Sometime in the next week or so, my wife and I will be traveling across New
York, so if you find any of these species, please contact me.

I will also need directions (Lat Long works great).

Thanks,

-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"

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--
Subject: CONNECTICUT WARBLER @ Hoyt Farm Park (Commack, Suffolk Co.)
From: John Gluth <jgluth AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 14:07:40 -0400
I found a CONNECTICUT WARBLER earlier this afternoon (~12:40) at Hoyt Farm in 
Commack. It flushed from dense mugwort and perched up nicely for a couple of 
minutes within the locust grove in the center of the field adjacent to a dried 
up ephemeral pond. There were loads of sparrows--primarily White-throated 
(100+) and Swamp (~20)--and abundant Common Yellowthroats (~15) in this field 
and in other areas of the park. Other notable finds included 1 House Wren, 2 
Blue-headed Vireos, several Y-b Sapsuckers, and 2 Hermit Thrushes. 


John Gluth

Sent from my iPhone

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--
Subject: Holtsville Ecology Site
From: <rtmanddgm AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:35:34 -0400
Steve Walter's post got me moving to the nearest site for migrants as Jones 
Beach wasn't in the timeline for the day. This Brookhaven town facility is 
actually situated on a closed landfill, but can at times support a fair number 
of nice species. It is one of the few locations in western Brookhaven where 
Northern Bobwhite still can be found, heard, and presumably breeding. Notable 
species encountered during a one hour walk were: 

Clay-colored Sparrow (drinking water from a puddle in the maintenance area)
Savannah Sparrow
Black-throated Blue warbler
Western and Eastern races of Palm Warbler
Eastern Phoebe
Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireo(s)
Ruby and Golden-crown Kinglet(s)
American Redstart
All in all a productive hour of birding
Bob McGrath



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Subject: Manitou Marsh Report, Putnam County, NY
From: "Ryan J. Bass" <ryan.j.bass AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 11:47:07 -0400
Echoing the reports ~50 miles south in NYC and LI, Putnam County, NY in the
Lower Hudson Valley was very "birdy" this morning. I walked approximately
2.5 miles in Manitou Marsh in Garrison, NY. In the very short stretch of
road from the Manitou MTA - Metro North Station to the Manitou Marsh gate,
there were approximately (3) dozen individual sparrow species and their
allies:

2 Lincoln's Sparrow
1 Field Sparrow
11 Song Sparrow
14 White-throated Sparrow
8 Swamp Sparrow
4 Dark-eyed Junco
Notable lack of Savannah Sparrow (0)

Yellow-rumped Warblers (14) were ubiquitous, but diversity was
non-existent, as somewhat expected given the mid-Oct date and location. The
only other warbler sp. was a Blackpoll.

Good numbers and diversity among woodpeckers: Pileated (1), Downy (5),
Red-bellied (4), Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (4), N. Flicker (1)...

A Blue-headed Vireo came in close, (surprisingly) singing in a halfhearted
manner... Other birds included a brilliant adult male Purple Finch and a
smattering of kinglets...

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20187090

Cheers,
Ryan
Garrison, NY
www.bassbirding.com
Twitter  AT BassBirder
Instagram #BassBirding

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--
Subject: Kissena Park morning report, Queens NY
From: Cesar Castillo <czar3233 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 08:15:02 -0700
Hi all,

Thought it was worth mentioning that Kissena Park was very birdy this morning. 
Birds were everywhere and the common invasives were low in numbers. I didn't 
even see any house sparrows! 


Highlights included 11 Warbler species with 1 Nashville Warbler and 1 Wilson's 
Warbler, Several BT-Blues and the yellow-rumps were out in force. 

Blue-headed and Red-eyed vireos were still around.
Found 1 Red-breasted Nuthatch, WB Nuthatches. Brown Creeper and two Brown 
Thrashers too. 

There were several groups of Purple Finches, many Samp & Savannah Sparrows, a 
few of Chipping Sparrows, 1 Field Sparrow, 1 White-crowned Sparrow, and 1 
Lincoln's Sparrow, also 1 Indigo. 

In total I saw 58 species in two hours 40 minutes, and this did not include 
Kissena Corridor. 

 
Csar Castillo
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--
Subject: Fwd: Coastal Fallout
From: Peter Reisfeld <drpinky AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 10:15:16 -0400
There was nice correlation of last night's radar and Steve's observations at 
Jones Beach. The density of radar reflectivity was moderate, but the overall 
migration appeared to be southeasterly, with peaks ending centered on the 
Nassau-Suffolk border. Looks like there might be some corrective east-west 
migration on the island during the day. 


Link to loop of last night's radar follows. Most intense reflectivity, 
corresponding to bird density, is in green: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/50403904 AT N03/15492631781/

NEXRAD images from the National Center for Atmospheric research 
(http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/). 


Happy fall birding!

Peter

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Steve Walter 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Coastal Fallout
> Date: October 10, 2014 8:42:05 AM EDT
> To: "nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu" 
> Reply-To: Steve Walter 
> 
> Just want to get the word out that Jones Beach and the coast are loaded with 
birds this morning. Good variety. 

> 
> Steve Walter
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Shaibal Mitra
> Date:10/09/2014 1:09 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu
> Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK - Heckscher SP, East Islip, 
Suffolk Co. 

> 
> Sean Sime and I searched without success late this morning, and Sean is still 
on site. 

> 
> I heard third hand through Pat of a possible re-sighting earlier this 
morning, in the same area as Phil's last night and of Pat's yesterday morning, 
but I don't have any details about how well this last bird was seen. 

> 
> For those considering trying for this bird, I would caution that there is a 
prodigious amount of fruiting tupelo in the area, attracting hordes of Robins, 
Waxwings, Starlings, and other birds. Although this enhances the likelihood 
that the Black-headed Grosbeak might have remained in the area, it also means 
that it would be natural to expect Rose-breasts to be present also. 

> 
> Sean had a Red-headed Woodpecker and a Bay-breasted Warbler before I joined 
him, while I had two Red-headed Woodpeckers at Robert Moses SP, on the beach, 
earlier in the morning (in addition to large flocks, some >100, of Pine 
Siskins, many Purple Finches, more than a dozen Rusty Blackbirds, etc.). 

> 
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
> ________________________________________
> From: bounce-118156826-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-118156826-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of 
pjlindsay AT optonline.net [pjlindsay AT optonline.net] 

> Sent: Wednesday, October 08, 2014 10:08 AM
> To: nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK - Heckscher SP, East Islip, 
Suffolk Co. 

> 
> Seen around 8:35 AM from along the bike/exercise trail in the
> southwest corner of the parking lot at Field 1. The call, lower and less
> squeaky than Rose-breasted, reminiscent of a short Downy Woodpecker
> note, got
> my attention and I made a concerted effort to locate it. I had decent
> views of
> the bird for several minutes high in a tree, showing fine streaking on
> the
> sides of the buffy upper breast, and noted the dark upper mandible
> though I did
> not remember the significance of this field mark at the time. The bird
> flew
> across the bike trail towards the north and I lost sight of it behind
> the
> treetops; I did not see the underwings. Very late for work, I had to
> abandon
> the area. Shai Mitra is searching now.
> 
> I apologize for not posting sooner--a busy morning at work delayed me.
> 
> Patricia Lindsay
> Bay Shore
> 
> 
> --
> 
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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> 
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> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> Celebrate Italian Heritage with a Special Broadway Benefit Concert by the 
Worlds Longest Running Phantom in support of the CSI Italian Studies 
program> 

> 
> --
> 
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
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> Please submit your observations to eBird!
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--
Subject: Coastal Fallout
From: Steve Walter <swalter15 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 08:42:05 -0400
Just want to get the word out that Jones Beach and the coast are loaded with 
birds this morning. Good variety. 


Steve Walter


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Shaibal Mitra
Date:10/09/2014 1:09 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK - Heckscher SP, East Islip, Suffolk Co.
Sean Sime and I searched without success late this morning, and Sean is still on site. I heard third hand through Pat of a possible re-sighting earlier this morning, in the same area as Phil's last night and of Pat's yesterday morning, but I don't have any details about how well this last bird was seen. For those considering trying for this bird, I would caution that there is a prodigious amount of fruiting tupelo in the area, attracting hordes of Robins, Waxwings, Starlings, and other birds. Although this enhances the likelihood that the Black-headed Grosbeak might have remained in the area, it also means that it would be natural to expect Rose-breasts to be present also. Sean had a Red-headed Woodpecker and a Bay-breasted Warbler before I joined him, while I had two Red-headed Woodpeckers at Robert Moses SP, on the beach, earlier in the morning (in addition to large flocks, some >100, of Pine Siskins, many Purple Finches, more than a dozen Rusty Blackbirds, etc.). Shai Mitra Bay Shore ________________________________________ From: bounce-118156826-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu [bounce-118156826-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of pjlindsay AT optonline.net [pjlindsay AT optonline.net] Sent: Wednesday, October 08, 2014 10:08 AM To: nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu Subject: [nysbirds-l] BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK - Heckscher SP, East Islip, Suffolk Co. Seen around 8:35 AM from along the bike/exercise trail in the southwest corner of the parking lot at Field 1. The call, lower and less squeaky than Rose-breasted, reminiscent of a short Downy Woodpecker note, got my attention and I made a concerted effort to locate it. I had decent views of the bird for several minutes high in a tree, showing fine streaking on the sides of the buffy upper breast, and noted the dark upper mandible though I did not remember the significance of this field mark at the time. The bird flew across the bike trail towards the north and I lost sight of it behind the treetops; I did not see the underwings. Very late for work, I had to abandon the area. Shai Mitra is searching now. I apologize for not posting sooner--a busy morning at work delayed me. Patricia Lindsay Bay Shore -- NYSbirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm ARCHIVES: 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html Please submit your observations to eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ -- ________________________________ Celebrate Italian Heritage with a Special Broadway Benefit Concert by the World’s Longest Running Phantom in support of the CSI Italian Studies program> -- NYSbirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm ARCHIVES: 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html Please submit your observations to eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ -- -- NYSbirds-L List Info: http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm ARCHIVES: 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html Please submit your observations to eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ --