Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The New York Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Sunday, May 1 at 02:28 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Tree Sparrow,©David Sibley

1 May Central Park mystery warbler: photo link [Karen Fung ]
1 May Central Park NYC - Sunday May 1, 2016 [Deborah Allen ]
1 May RE:CP Hermit Warbler [syschiff ]
1 May Central Park, NYC: friendly reminder [Thomas Fiore ]
1 May eBird.org Shared Location - Central Park--Triplets Br. area (btwn 77th-79th St. transv.) [Ben Cacace ]
1 May Re: Hermit Warbler Central Park [Morgan Tingley ]
1 May Hermit Warbler Central Park [Anthony Collerton ]
1 May East Patchogue and Bellport Village Birds ["leormand ." ]
1 May Inwood Cerulean Warbler [Nadir Souirgi ]
1 May Turtle Cove- Pelham Bay Park, Bronx [Jack Rothman ]
1 May Central Park, NYC 5/1 [Tom Fiore ]
1 May Work first, then play...makes for a great day ! [robert adamo ]
30 Apr Central Park NYC - Saturday April 30, 2016 - Horned Grebe Additional Info & Photo [Deborah Allen ]
30 Apr Jones Beach shorebirds - Nassau County [David Klauber ]
30 Apr Central Park NYC - Saturday April 30, 2016 [Deborah Allen ]
30 Apr Central Park birds [Andrew Block ]
30 Apr Re: Better Riverhead than Ithaca ! [Richard Guthrie ]
30 Apr White-eyed Vireo, Rockefeller Preserve, Westchester [Robert Lewis ]
30 Apr Better Riverhead than Ithaca ! [robert adamo ]
30 Apr Central Park, NYC 4/30 [Thomas Fiore ]
30 Apr Hunting season opens tomorrow, May 1. [Richard Guthrie ]
30 Apr NYC Area RBA: 29 April 2016 [Ben Cacace ]
30 Apr Brooklyn Grasshopper Sparrow - Yes [Rob Jett ]
29 Apr Central Park NYC - Friday April 29, 2016 incl. Orange-crowned Warbler [Deborah Allen ]
29 Apr Kings County Grasshopper Sparrow and caution [Sean Sime ]
29 Apr Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside [syschiff ]
29 Apr Re: Swainson's Warbler NOT seen as of 7:20 a.m., C.P. NYC 4/29 [Robert Lewis ]
29 Apr Bohemian Waxwings/N. Saw-whet Owl/Red Crossbills/Rusty Blackbirds/Black-backed Woodpeckers & more [Joan Collins ]
29 Apr Swainson's Warbler NOT seen as of 7:20 a.m., C.P. NYC 4/29 [Thomas Fiore ]
29 Apr SWWA, Central Park - No [Corey Finger ]
29 Apr Central Park: Pulitzer Fountain Common Grackle Roost [Ben Cacace ]
28 Apr Central Park, NYC 4/28 [Thomas Fiore ]
28 Apr Central Park NYC - Thursday April 28, 2016 [Deborah Allen ]
28 Apr Additonal Info - Central Park NYC - Swainson's Warbler [Deborah Allen ]
28 Apr Swainson's Warbler update, Central Park NYC 4/28 [Thomas Fiore ]
28 Apr Swainson's Warbler Manhattan NYC 4/28 - Finder & Identifiers [Donna Schulman ]
28 Apr alley pond park, queens, ny [Rick & Linda ]
28 Apr Raven flyover - Valley Stream State Park [Michael Zito ]
28 Apr Swainson's Warbler Manhattan NYC continues 4/28 [Thomas Fiore ]
28 Apr Swainson's warbler [Peter Reisfeld ]
28 Apr civil behavior while birding [Thomas Fiore ]
28 Apr SWAINSON'S WARBLER, Central Park NYC 4/28 (Thursday) [Thomas Fiore ]
28 Apr Fwd: [geneseebirds-googlegroup] Loggerhead Shrike YES - Twitchell Rd #5279 - Alec Humann [Richard Guthrie ]
28 Apr REPORT: Swainson's Warbler, Central Park, NYC 4/28 [Thomas Fiore ]
28 Apr Central Park, NYC 4/27 (Wednesday) [Thomas Fiore ]
27 Apr Central Park NYC - Wednesday April 27, 2016 [Deborah Allen ]
27 Apr Adult Bald Eagle - Yaphank []
27 Apr Warblers ["Robert A. Proniewych" ]
27 Apr Solitary Sandpiper [Rob Bate ]
27 Apr Central Park this morning: Warblers [Robert Taylor ]
27 Apr Inwood Hill Park, NYC - Grasshopper Sparrow [Joe DiCostanzo ]
27 Apr Re:Worm-eating and Blackburnian Warbler, Hempstead Lake [Tim Healy ]
27 Apr Worm-eating and Blackburnian Warbler, Hempstead Lake [Tim Healy ]
27 Apr Two Red-headed Woodpeckers, Muscoot Farm, Westchester [Anne Swaim ]
27 Apr Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside [syschiff ]
27 Apr Timber Point Ruff - NO [Tim Healy ]
26 Apr Manhattan, NYC 4/26 (Central Park, etc.) [Thomas Fiore ]
26 Apr Hempstead Lake SP (Nass Co) and Alley Pond Park (Queens Co) [syschiff ]
26 Apr Re: Ruff - Timber Point East Marina (Suffolk) [Tim Healy ]
26 Apr Ruff - Timber Point East Marina (Suffolk) [Derek Rogers ]
26 Apr Hempstead and Valley Stream migrants [Tim Healy ]
26 Apr my error and apology [Eileen Mathers ]
26 Apr Red-headed Woodpecker - Flanders, LI [Eileen Schwinn ]
26 Apr Croton point park [Larry Trachtenberg ]
25 Apr L.Shrike request/NY DEC, & Central Pk., NYC 4/25 [Thomas Fiore ]
25 Apr Forest Park, Forest Hills, Queens County, NY [Eileen Mathers ]
25 Apr June 5th/6th Overnight Pelagic out of Brooklyn [Sean Sime ]
25 Apr Wertheim Bald Eagle Pair [Jim Osterlund ]
25 Apr Central Park NYC - Monday April 25, 2016 - 10+ Warbler species [Deborah Allen ]
25 Apr Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
25 Apr Prospect Park Monday [Rob Bate ]
25 Apr Forest Park, Queens County NY [Eileen Mathers ]
25 Apr Forest Park, Queens County [Eileen Mathers ]
25 Apr RE Doodletown/Iona Spring Migrant Trips on May 15 [Alan Wells ]
25 Apr Loggerhead Shrike report, western NY, 4/25 [Thomas Fiore ]
25 Apr Fwd: Forest Park - Queens County correction 24 species [Eileen Mathers ]

Subject: Central Park mystery warbler: photo link
From: Karen Fung <easternbluebird AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 15:23:46 -0400
I just uploaded four photos of the warbler, and the link is here:

http://www.birdsiviews.com/Birds/Warblers/

Unfortunately, they were taken with my lightweight mirrorless camera, which
does ok with close, slow-moving subjects on sunny days, but none of those
conditions applied today :-).  A big plus is that the camera is waterproof,
and it continued to function during a steady drizzle.

The pics are cropped and blurry, but show features of the bird that could
be diagnostic for Hermit.

A big thank you to Alexis Lamek for insisting that this bird deserved a
second look.

Karen Fung
NYC
http://www.birdsiviews.com

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Sunday May 1, 2016
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 15:11:30 -0400
Central Park NYC  
Sunday May 1, 2016
Robert DeCandido, PhD & others on a bird walk starting from Turtle Pond at 9am 
to around noon 


The group tallied eight warbler species in spite of the rain. 

Double-crested Cormorant - adult & immature Turtle Pond
Great Egret - Turtle Pond
Black-crowned Night-Heron - Turtle Pond
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - male & female Shakespeare Garden
Blue-headed Vireo - Shakespeare Garden & Ramble
Warbling Vireo - singing in the Ramble
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - few
Hermit Thrush - a few in the Ramble
Wood Thrush - Gill Source
Gray Catbird - establishing territories
Ovenbird - at least 5 Iphigene's Walk, Shakespeare Garden, etc. 
Northern Waterthrush - Oven
Blue-winged Warbler - Azalea Pond
Black-and-white Warbler - several Upper Lobe, Humming Tombstone, Turtle Pond, 
Ramble 

Common Yellowthroat - male north side of Azalea Pond
Northern Parula - Humming Tombstone
Blackburnian Warbler - male Humming Tombstone
Yellow-rumped Warbler - Turtle Pond, Ramble, etc.
Eastern Towhee - male Ramble
Chipping Sparrow Upper Lobe
Swamp Sparrow - 5 Ramble
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - male feeding on elm seeds Gill Source
Indigo Bunting - male feeding on elm seeds Maintenance Field
Baltimore Oriole - male feeding on oak flowers in the Ramble
House Finch - 4 in Bald Cypress at Turtle Pond
American Goldfinch - Ramble

Deb Allen


Wolfgang Demisch reported a Horned Grebe continuing at the Reservoir.

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: RE:CP Hermit Warbler
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 14:55:03 -0400
My own experience with this species was an 11/29/2002 bird at Jones Beach and a 
12/21/2010 bird at Sunken Meadow. Both were in winter plumage without black on 
the throat. The early bird had a bit of yellow on the throat where it would 
have been replaced by black in the Spring, the later one did not and this was 
specifically looked for by all to make certain.. NYSARC ruled the first bird a 
hybrid amid some controversy. (My take was Hybrid in the Fall, Hermit in the 
Sparing). 


As to the current bird, any YELLOW in the under parts would make this bird 
suspect. I hope there are photos as this species is a notorious hybridizer with 
Townsend's Warbler. 


Sy Schiff

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park, NYC: friendly reminder
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 14:24:55 -0400
Sunday, 1st of May, 2016 -

As with the occurrence of a rare Swainson's Warbler several days ago  
at Central Park (Manhattan, N.Y. City) there is a possibility a good  
many people might converge on the area where another (new) potential  
rarity was, and may still be, today:

the management of the park as well as city agencies, & the N.Y.P.D.  
(Police) may be notified as to this rare bird's possibly bringing in  
unusual numbers of people, some laden with optical equipment.  Since  
we know all will be on best behavior while seeking, or seeing, any  
birds in this park, there ought be no issues for which the police or  
park's management need be concerned.

good luck & great birding,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: eBird.org Shared Location - Central Park--Triplets Br. area (btwn 77th-79th St. transv.)
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 14:13:40 -0400
For those that don't use the overall 'Central Park' eBird hotspot a marker
was created for 'Central Park--Triplets Br. area (btwn 77th-79th St.
transv.)' for New York County (Borough of Manhattan). The hotspot should be
available within 12 hours.

If you wish to merge your personal location with an existing hotspot here
are the steps:

— Sign into eBird.org
— Go to "My eBird" & select "Manage My Locations" in the right panel
— At the bottom of the screen click "Show All" to see all locations on one
page
— You can sort the list by clicking on any of the headers: Location,
Country, State/Province, County, Type* or # of Checklists
— Select your personal location (it will show a letter "P" under Type*) by
clicking "Edit" on the right side of the line
— Select the "Merge" button and you'll see all nearby hotspots as red icons
— Keep the checkmark for "Delete after merging" selected
— Click the icon that best fits your location
— ... now you'll see the hotspot description above the 'Merge' button along
with the # of checklists you'll be merging
— Click on the 'Merge' button
— Answer Yes to the 'Yes or No' query

All checklists for your personal location will be combined with the hotspot
with this process.
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Hermit Warbler Central Park
From: Morgan Tingley <mtingley AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 12:06:42 -0400
To add to Anthony's comments, there are no *documented* cases of Hermit x
Black-throated Green hybrids that I am aware of (e.g., none are listed in
the Handbook of Avian Hybrids). Furthermore, it would be highly unlikely as
the two species do not overlap in any part of their breeding range.  Hermit
Warblers are known to hybridize extensively with Townsend's Warblers,
however, so this individual should be scrutinized for Townsend's
characteristics.

It's also worth noting that Hermit Warblers have quite variable songs that
change a bit throughout their range and often in the presence of
conspecifics (e.g. Townsend's). So song oddities in the absence of plumage
oddities would not overly alarm me.

Good birding,
Morgan Tingley
Hartford, CT

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Hermit Warbler Central Park
From: Anthony Collerton <icollerton AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 11:56:46 -0400
Re. Karen Fung's earlier post. Having had time to reflect on the bird found by 
Alexis Lamek and also seen by Karen and I - I believe that this bird is a 
Hermit Warbler singing an odd BTGreen-like song rather than some kind of 
hybrid. Plumage was good for Hermit (hybrids usually have something odd about 
them) and warblers sometimes sing odd songs. There are actually a few Spring 
records of Hermit Warbler on the East Coast so not as unprecedented as I 
thought it was at the time. 


The bird was present for quite a while near the W77th Street entrance and the 
Triplets Area. Hopefully it'll show up again for others to see. 






Sent from my iPhone
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: East Patchogue and Bellport Village Birds
From: "leormand ." <leormand AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 11:16:25 -0400
On my morning run I noticed three (3) species of swallows hawking insects
over Robinsons pond (north side of S. Country Road) - Northern
Rough-winged, Tree and Barn.  Additionally, there was a lone Glossy Ibis on
the east side of the pond mixed among several species of gulls including a
few breeding plumaged Laughing Gulls.  A handful of Male Goldfinches were
observed as well.

While running down S. Howell's Lane in Bellport I watched an American Crow
snap sticks off a tree and then carry them to a nearby under-construction
nest in a large pine.  Mother's Beach at the end of the road was quiet with
one osprey on a nest.

-- 
- Luke
​ Ormand ​

Instagram:  AT JrookPhotos

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Inwood Cerulean Warbler
From: Nadir Souirgi <nadir75 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 10:59:38 -0400
There is currently a male CERULEAN WARBLER working the east ridge trail in 
Inwood Hill Park. Hard to see, the bird is however singing clearly and 
repeatedly. That aside, diversity and overall numbers are disappointingly low 
as compared to many other locations throughout the city. 


Good birding,

Nadir Souirgi,
Inwood, NYC



Sent from my iPhone
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Turtle Cove- Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
From: Jack Rothman <jacroth1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 10:46:42 -0400
“Bronx" Brendan Keogh and I walked through the Turtle Cove area of Pelham Bay 
Park yesterday. Although there was nothing too exciting, it seems more species 
are finally filtering in. 

It was nice to see several Yellow Warblers and some Killdeer chicks, newly 
hatched. 


5 Yellowlegs (most likely Greater but I didn’t bring my scope.)
1 Spotted Sandpiper
2 Eastern Kingbird
6 Yellow Warbler
4 Common Yellowthroat
1 Field Sparrow
6 White-throated Sparrows
5 Chipping Sparrows
5 Killdeer (two looked newly hatched, one pair nesting in the Turtle Cove 
driving range parking lot. These birds seem to nest in the worst locations. 
Every year we find them nesting in the most heavily trafficked areas of the 
park.) 

2 Swamp Sparrows
4 Song Sparrows
12 Savannah Sparrows
1 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Osprey (carrying breakfast)
3 Great Egret
2 Snowy Egret
1 Northern Mockingbird
3 Double-crested Cormorants
X  Red-winged Blackbirds (too many to count.)
3 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
3 Ring-billed Gull
2 Hering Gull
4 American Goldfinch
2 Mallard
3 Northern Flicker

Jack Rothman
CityIslandBirds.com






--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park, NYC 5/1
From: Tom Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 09:42:16 -0400




Subject: Work first, then play...makes for a great day !
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 03:09:45 -0400
Today, Earth Day was celebrated at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, where the
weather encouraged participants to wear short-sleeved shirts, or even just
T-shirts ! The Eastern L.I.Audubon Society was one of the sponsoring
organizations (under the leadership of the QWR) and had the fun task of
leading the scheduled bird trips at both 11:30 AM & 1:30 PM. The first walk
(lead by Eileen Schwinn & myself) had just about equal numbers of kids &
adults...totaling ~ 8 participants, in all. They all appreciated what they
saw and learned, including nice looks at a House Wren, Purple Martins, Tree
Swallows, Downy Woodpecker and especially the 2, Great-horned Owl
nestlings, living in an old Osprey platform nest ! The 1:30 group was
smaller in size, consisting of only a Father & Son team and your's truly !
Group 2 managed to see all of the birds group 1 saw, plus an additional
sighting of a Pine Warbler. While on this walk, Simon (who is all of 9
years old) correctly called out Purple Martin, Tree Swallow, most of the
common species, and even found a Box Turtle, in addition to an
unidentified, small, brown Butterfly - I got a photo, so maybe we'll be
able to come up with a name ! Sure sounds like Simon and NYSYBC are in
each-others

Following the Earth Day celebration, I went down to Dune Rd. {Post La.
Bridge, Quogue to the Ponquogue Bridge, Hampton Bays, and saw some evidence
of migration, namely, 1 highly-colored Black-bellied Plover,a flock of 8
Semipalmated Plovers feeding , and an American Bittern.  This bird was
actively feeding on the n/s marsh, opposite house # 28, ~ 1/4 mile w/o
Tiana Beach.

Cheers,
Bob

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Saturday April 30, 2016 - Horned Grebe Additional Info & Photo
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 20:23:30 -0400
Central Park NYC  - Reservoir
Saturday April 30, 2016 

The Horned Grebe continuing at the Reservoir was first reported yesterday 
(4/29/16) by Junko Suzuki who tweeted it at 9:35AM. Others saw it later on 
Friday and also today. I spent around 2 hours at the Reservoir this morning 
from 6:09 to a little after 8am and saw the grebe immediately, feeding actively 
on the east side of the Reservoir from about 89th Street to just a bit south of 
the NE corner. 


It was quite a treat to see a breeding-plumaged Horned Grebe up close.

Here's one of the photos from this morning: 

http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=18226104


A big thank you to Junko for getting the word out on this bird.

Deb Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Jones Beach shorebirds - Nassau County
From: David Klauber <davehawkowl AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 18:34:50 -0400
Late this afternoon around 5 there was a nice collection of shorebirds on the 
spit opposite the gazebo at the Coast Guard station, many in breeding plumage, 
highlighted by about 5 Red Knots. Also present were Dunlin, SB Dowitchers, 
Sanderlings, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Piping & Black-bellied Plover, and 
Oystercatchers. 3 lingering Black Scoters were also in the area. 

Passerine-wise it was dead - not a single warbler, vireo, etc, only Towhees, 
Mockers, House Finch and Tree Swallows 

 		 	   		  
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Saturday April 30, 2016
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 18:12:38 -0400
Central Park NYC 
Saturday April 30, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. bird walks starting at the 
Boathouse at 7:30 & 9:00am to around noon. 


Fifteen species of warblers during the 7:30-noon time frame. 

Before the Walk: 
Upper Lobe 7:15am Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

At the Reservoir 6:09 to around 8am: Horned Grebe in alternate/breeding plumage 
(continuing from 4/29), Gadwall pair, Bufflehead (3 males & 2 females), Ruddy 
Duck 9, Double-crested Cormorant at least 32, Great Egret, Spotted Sandpiper, 
Great Black-backed, Herring, and Ring-billed Gulls, and 2 Canada Goose nests, 
and Northern Rough-winged and Barn Swallows. 


Great Egret - flyover Boathouse
Red-tailed Hawk - (Will Papp)
Chimney Swift - over Warbler Rock
Belted Kingfisher - female continues at Turtle Pond
Red-bellied Woodpeckers - pair at various locations
Downy Woodpecker - several
Northern Flicker - several
Peregrine Falcon - over the Lake (Matthieu Benoit)
White-eyed Vireo - Maintenance Field
Yellow-throated Vireo - east of Castle
Blue-headed Vireo - 5+
Warbling Vireo - pair Iphigene's Walk
Barn Swallow - over Warbler Rock (Matthieu Benoit)
Black-capped Chickadee - pair & at feeders
Tufted Titmouse - at least one pair in the Ramble
White-breasted Nuthatch - Mugger's Woods
House Wren - 5 total including Upper Lobe (Nancy), Laupot Bridge, etc. 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5+
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - everywhere
Veery - Gill near Azalea Pond
Hermit Thrush - 4 Summer House, others elsewhere
Wood Thrush - Maintenance Field (Philip and Susan Sugar)
Gray Catbird - 5
Ovenbird - Stone Arch, Summer House (after lunch)
Worm-eating Warbler - Upper Lobe (both walks), Summer House (after lunch)
Louisiana Waterthrush - Oven (Jeffrey Ward)
Northern Waterthrush - Triplet's Bridge, Laupot Bridge, Swampy Pin Oak/Summer 
House Meadow 

Blue-winged Warbler - Upper Lobe (Matthieu Benoit)
Black-and-white Warbler - several locations incl. Upper Lobe (Matthieu Benoit), 
the Point, Triplet's Bridge, Bow Bridge 

American Redstart - female Upper Lobe (Matthieu Benoit), Humming Tombstone
Northern Parula - Upper Lobe (Matthieu Benoit), Summer House (after lunch)
Cape May Warbler - first spring/first-cycle female (Orig. found by Jeff Ward) 
continuing at the Oven 

Chestnut-sided Warbler - Upper Lobe (both walks)
Palm Warbler - Swampy Pin Oak/Summer House Meadow, in willow at the Point
Yellow Warbler - singing male in willow at the Point
Black-throated Blue Warbler - adult male with large primary patch Humming 
Tombstone (Carine Mitchell) also Weather Station and south end of Tupelo 

Yellow-rumped Warbler - fewer than last week, but many locations
Prairie Warbler - male singing relentlessly at Willow Rock
Eastern Towhee - less than 5
Chipping Sparrow - Tupelo Field, etc. 
Field Sparrow - singing between the Boathouse and Maintenance Field
Song Sparrow - the Point
Swamp Sparrow - 2 Triplet's Bridge, 3 along the Gill
Northern Cardinal - re-nesting after a failed attempt
Indigo Bunting - male Swampy Pin Oak (Jeff Ward & Tom Ahlf)
Red-winged Blackbird - 2 males singing feeders
Brown-headed Cowbird - male
Orchard Oriole - male at the Oven (Emily Peyton & Tom Ahlf)
Baltimore Oriole - female getting nesting material Tupelo Field
House Finch - male singing Triplet's Bridge
Pine Siskin - possible (Matthieu Benoit)
American Goldfinch - several locations males & females

Doug Kurz reported a Yellow-throated Warbler at the Source of the Gill. 

Deb Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park birds
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 20:35:42 +0000 (UTC)
4/30/16 - Central Park, Manhattan, New York Co., NY
Time:  7:30am to 3:30pmObservers:  Andrew Block, Wendy Rihner & her family 
(til 10:30am) 

5 Canada Geese7 Mallards1 Belted Kingfishermany Mourning Dovesmany Rock 
Pigeons3+ Red-bellied Woodpeckers1 Downy Woodpecker3 Northern Flickers1 
White-eyed Vireo1 Yellow-throated Vireo2 Blue-headed Vireos2 Warbling 
Vireosmany Blue Jays4 Black-capped Chickadees3 Tufted Titmice1 White-breasted 
Nuthatch2 House Wrens2 Winter Wrensseveral Ruby-crowned Kinglets3 Blue-gray 
Gnatcatchers5+ Hermit Thrushesmany American Robins4 Gray Catbirds1 Brown 
Thrashermany European Starlings3 Blue-winged Warblers2+ Nashville Warblers3+ 
Northern Parulas1 Yellow Warbler1 Chestnut-sided Warbler2 Black-throated Blue 
Warblers5+ Yellow-rumped Warblers1 Prairie Warbler1 Palm Warbler4 
Black-and-white Warblers3 Northern Waterthrushes1 Common Yellowthroat2 Eastern 
Towhees4 Chipping Sparrows1 Song Sparrow1 Swamp Sparrowmany White-throated 
Sparrowsseveral Northern Cardinals5+ Red-winged Blackbirdsseveral Common 
Grackles2 Brown-headed Cowbirds4+ American Goldfinchesmany House Sparrows 

Also had many Red-eared Sliders, a Northern Raccoon, many Eastern Gray 
Squirrels, and a couple Cabbage Whites. 

Andrew Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist/Wildlife Biologist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629
Phone: 914-963-3080; Cell: 914-319-9701 


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Better Riverhead than Ithaca !
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 13:31:43 -0400
Nathan is a super up and coming birder. Talk about the good ol' college
try....  He's the guy who scooped up the "Western" Flycatcher's poop to try
to see if we can get a DNA reading to determine the species.

See you at the next mega.

Rich Guthrie
New Baltimore
The Greening County
New York
http://blog.timesunion.com/birding

On Sat, Apr 30, 2016 at 10:21 AM, robert adamo  wrote:

> Sorry this post is late...blame it on yesterday's 5 AM rise, combined with
> a lot of walking !  I tried for the Swainson's Warbler at Central Park from
> mid-morning to early afternoon, only to come up  "a day late and a dollar
> short"  !  Birding was slow, by C. Pk's standards, with the highlights for
> me being a FOY Cape May Warbler (female) seen at  "The Oven", thanks to a
> chance meeting with Doug Futuyama near "Azalea Pond", as well as a FOY
> White-eyed Vireo !
>
> Although my trip into the city was accomplished by the use of car, train
> and subway, as I was back on the train heading toward Rockville Centre, I
> couldn't help but think of Nathan Goldberg, a young man I  met earlier,
> while looking for the Swainson's. He could only spend a short time longer
> looking for the bird, due to his having to get back to Ithaca in time to
> take a test at 3 PM. He had been looking for the warbler since 6 AM, after
> only getting ~ 45 minutes sleep prior to "giving it the old college try" !
> I can only hope he arrived safely and aced the test...what spirit, optimism
> and intrepidness !
>
> Cheers,
> Bob
> --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to **eBird*
> *!*
> --
>



-- 
Richard Guthrie

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: White-eyed Vireo, Rockefeller Preserve, Westchester
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:04:32 +0000 (UTC)
About 11:30 am today I encountered a singing White-eyed Vireo at the 
Rockefeller Preserve, Westchester County. 

Park at the free area on Sleepy Hollow Road, walk up the trail (called Tower 
Hill Road on Google), turn left on "Natures Way."  Walk about 100 yards to the 
bird. 


approximately here:  41.107795, -73.842014
This is the third year there has been at least one White-eyed Vireo in this 
general area. 

Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY



  
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Better Riverhead than Ithaca !
From: robert adamo <radamo4691 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 10:21:50 -0400
Sorry this post is late...blame it on yesterday's 5 AM rise, combined with
a lot of walking !  I tried for the Swainson's Warbler at Central Park from
mid-morning to early afternoon, only to come up  "a day late and a dollar
short"  !  Birding was slow, by C. Pk's standards, with the highlights for
me being a FOY Cape May Warbler (female) seen at  "The Oven", thanks to a
chance meeting with Doug Futuyama near "Azalea Pond", as well as a FOY
White-eyed Vireo !

Although my trip into the city was accomplished by the use of car, train
and subway, as I was back on the train heading toward Rockville Centre, I
couldn't help but think of Nathan Goldberg, a young man I  met earlier,
while looking for the Swainson's. He could only spend a short time longer
looking for the bird, due to his having to get back to Ithaca in time to
take a test at 3 PM. He had been looking for the warbler since 6 AM, after
only getting ~ 45 minutes sleep prior to "giving it the old college try" !
I can only hope he arrived safely and aced the test...what spirit, optimism
and intrepidness !

Cheers,
Bob

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park, NYC 4/30
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 09:11:44 -0400
Saturday, 30 April, 2016 -
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

A variety of species, both reported earlier this month as well as some  
not (in Central before) are being observed in the park so far this  
morning.

Orange-crowned Warbler & also Hooded Warbler are being seen around the  
Lily Ponds area, east of the Blockhouse in the far north woods of the  
park (not far from 110 St. & just west of the w. side of the Meer),

and there is a YELLOW-THROATED Warbler found at the "source" of the  
Gill, near the Azalea Pond area in the Ramble, as reported thru Doug  
Kurz, & known to me via personal messages from folks out in the field  
with their text-twitter-smart systems engaged.

The Orange-crowned Warbler at the n. end was spotted at location as  
above by Isaiah, one of our fine "young birders" (a member of that NYS  
club), and Tom Perlman, of Manhattan.

The breeding-plumaged Horned Grebe noted first on Friday by Debbie  
Becker at the reservoir is still present this morning.

No one has been finding / reporting a Swainson's Warbler again, as  
seen on Thursday (only, thus far) but that rare migrant could still be  
in the park, somewhere.

Thanks to the several who sent a few notes on morning discoveries.

good luck & keep it on the quiet-side, the birds thank you for that,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan



--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Hunting season opens tomorrow, May 1.
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 07:49:07 -0400
Just a reminder, for upstate counties, turkey hunting season opens
tomorrow, May 1st. See below:

One-half-hour before sunrise to noon One-half-hour before sunrise to noon
Area Open All of upstate New York north of the
Bronx-Westchester County boundary
Season Dates May 1 - May 31
Season Bag Limit Two bearded turkeys (one bird per day)

-- 
Richard Guthrie
New Baltimore,
The Greene County,
New York
http://blog.timesunion.com/birding

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: NYC Area RBA: 29 April 2016
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 06:57:48 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Apr. 29, 2016
* NYNY1604.29

- Birds mentioned
WILSON'S PLOVER+
RUFF+
SWAINSON'S WARBLER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Clapper Rail
Virginia Rail
Common Gallinule
Semipalmated Plover
Solitary Sandpiper
Willet (subspecies "Western Willet")
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Lesser Black-backed Gull
CASPIAN TERN
Red-headed Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Veery
Wood Thrush
Ovenbird
Worm-eating Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Cape May Warbler
Cerulean Warbler
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, April 29th 2016
at 7pm. The highlights of today's tape are SWAINSON'S WARBLER, RUFF,
WILSON'S PLOVER, CASPIAN TERN and other Spring migrants.

While Spring migration remains somewhat spotty one or two decent days of
movement surrounded by periods of northerly and easterly winds are keeping
numbers down at least variety continues to improve and this week some nice
rarities were also uncovered.

Seen by literally hundreds of birders in Central Park all day Thursday was
a male SWAINSON'S WARBLER found next to Strawberry Fields first heard
singing as it foraged in a small but dense area of barberry bushes the
SWAINSON'S would periodically walk through an opening and provide decent
views for the gathered throng with some nice photos taken. This location
just east of the West 72nd Street entrance to the park unfortunately did
not produce the SWAINSON'S today.

Back on Tuesday a RUFF in fairly advanced breeding plumage visited the
marsh at the East Marina at Timber Point Golf Course in Great River but its
stay was brief with the bird soon flying off to the northwest it has not
been reported since.

Last Saturday afternoon on a rising tide at Shinnecock a male WILSON'S
PLOVER was spotted on the bay side just west of the Ponquogue Bridge
feeding on a sand flat with a large flock of Dunlin and a few Black-bellied
Plover and Sanderling. The flocks of predominantly Dunlin continuing to
move west past the site the flock with the WILSON'S also soon took off in
that direction and could not subsequently be relocated.

Out at Mecox a CASPIAN TERN present late last week was joined by two others
by Wednesday and on Tuesday a single CASPIAN put in a rare appearance at
Southards Pond in Babylon.

The larger regional parks like Central and Prospect have been producing
reasonable numbers of warblers lately some perhaps a little sooner than
expected though it's likely global warming could push the arrival dates
gradually earlier.

Including the SWAINSON'S and a few YELLOW-THROATED one of which lingered in
Central Park Monday about 27 species of warblers have already visited the
region. Some arrivals this week have included a CAPE MAY in Central Park
from Sunday and BLUE-WINGED, MAGNOLIA, BLACK-THROATED BLUE and BLACKBURNIAN
noted Monday with Tuesday adding CHESTNUT-SIDED and a BLACKPOLL reported in
Central. A few more WORM-EATING arrived this week and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH
now outnumbers LOUISIANA. Also increasing have been OVENBIRD,
BLACK-AND-WHITE, NASHVILLE, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, AMERICAN REDSTART,
NORTHERN PARULA, YELLOW, PRAIRIE and BLACK-THROATED GREEN. An
ORANGE-CROWNED was still being seen in Prospect Park at least to Wednesday.
A couple of HOODEDS included one at Jones Beach West End Wednesday evening
and some CERULEANS are among the several species already on territory to
our north. Still moving through are PINE, PALM and the ubiquitous
YELLOW-RUMPED.

Five species of vireos are also now present with RED-EYED, WHITE-EYED,
WARBLING and YELLOW-THROATED still in low numbers.

GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were noted this week at Inwood Hill Park last Saturday
and at Drier-Offerman Park and nearby Six Diamonds Ballfields in Brooklyn
from Wednesday on. Other sparrows have included some WHITE-CROWNED,
SEASIDE, VESPER and LINCOLN'S while flycatchers have featured EASTERN
KINGBIRD, GREAT CRESTED and a LEAST FLYCATCHER in Central Park Monday.
CLIFF and BANK SWALLOWS also appeared this week along with VEERY and more
WOOD THRUSHES.

Shorebird arrivals have included SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and SOLITARY, LEAST
and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and a Western WILLET was present today at Plumb
Beach in Brooklyn.

RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS included one in Riverdale Park Sunday, one in Forest
Park Queens Wednesday, one in Maple Swamp County Park in Flanders from
Tuesday on and two at Muscoot Farm in northern Westchester Wednesday.

An adult LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was on a field off Mill Lane south of
Oregon Road in Mattituck Tuesday and other regional arrivals have included
CLAPPER RAIL and VIRGINIA RAILS and COMMON GALLINULE.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Brooklyn Grasshopper Sparrow - Yes
From: Rob Jett <citybirder AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 06:23:07 -0400
The previously reported Grasshopper Sparrow at 6 Diamonds Park is still present 
this morning. It is frequenting the area adjacent the fencing at the south west 
edge of the ball fields and along the dirt path. 


Good birding,

Rob

Sent via digital smoke signals
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Friday April 29, 2016 incl. Orange-crowned Warbler
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 20:11:08 -0400
Central Park NYC - North End
Friday April 29, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the Conservatory Garden 
at 9am until around noon. 


Gadwall - pair Meer
Mallard - several Meer
Double-crested Cormorant - flyovers
Great Egret - flyovers
Snowy Egret - flyovers
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1
Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Chimney Swift - 6 (over Meer) but no swallows today
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3 pairs
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1 female
Northern Flicker - 2 pairs
Blue-headed Vireo - 4
Warbling Vireo - 8
House Wren - 5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - less than 10 (not common today after being very common 
for 3 days) 

Gray Catbird - few

Ovenbird - before walk; Loch
Northern Waterthrush - 3 along the Loch
Black-and-white Warbler - 7 (6 males)
Blue-winged Warbler - 3 males, 1 female - Loch and North Woods
Orange-crowned Warbler - west of Ft. Clinton/photographed by Bruno B. de 
Oliveira (tweeted at 9:15am) 

Nashville Warbler - 2 males photographed by Bruno B. de Oliveira
Northern Parula - 1 males west of Blockhouse
Yellow Warbler - male SW corner of Meer
Palm Warbler - none
Yellow-rumped Warbler - not many today males & females (7 total)
Black-throated Green Warbler - 2 males along the Loch

Eastern Towhee - 2
Chipping Sparrow - 10
Swamp Sparrow - 3 (before walk)
White-throated Sparrow - fairly common
Baltimore Oriole - 1
American Goldfinch - 20 along Loch

plus Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle, American Robin, etc. 

Deb Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Kings County Grasshopper Sparrow and caution
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 13:25:05 -0400
The Grasshopper Sparrow found by Alex Wilson at the 6 Diamonds Ballfields
in southern Brooklyn an subsequently reported by Shane Blodgett and others
was seen briefly mid day along the southernmost fence line paralleling
Coney Island Creek loosely associating with Savannah and Chipping Sparrows.
I also encountered a group of 6 or 7 men behind the ballfields along the
creek who seemed different from the occasional homeless person I run into
back there. Without assuming much I will say that the mix of people and
behavior was somewhat intimidating and please take this into account if you
are planning on visiting this site. Use judgement and trust your instincts.


Good (and safe) birding,

Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 11:05:15 -0400
Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) accompanied by Mike Farina (staff biologist) 
birded Oceanside on an overcast windy morning. Breeding birds nesting or 
feeding in the marsh, consisted of OSPREY, GLOSSY IBIS, GREAT and SNOWY EGRETS, 
TRICOLORED HERON, CLAPPER RAIL (calling in the marsh), AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, 
WILLET, LAUGHING GULLS. PEREGRINE FALCON.and TREE SWALLOWS on their boxes. 


Migrants included GREATER YELLOWLEGS, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS and LEAST 
SANDPIPER. 


Nice to be out in spite of the weather.  Sy


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Swainson's Warbler NOT seen as of 7:20 a.m., C.P. NYC 4/29
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 14:13:38 +0000 (UTC)
Thanks.  Please post updates.
Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY


      From: Thomas Fiore 
 To: nysbirds-l  
 Sent: Friday, April 29, 2016 7:52 AM
 Subject: [nysbirds-l] Swainson's Warbler NOT seen as of 7:20 a.m., C.P. NYC 
4/29 

   
Friday, 29 April, 2016 -

To add to Corey's note, and for those not doing bander's [ringer's]  
codes, the Swainson's Warbler present at the sw edges of Strawberry  
Fields in Central Park  (Manhattan, N.Y. City) on THURSDAY, had not  
been seen nor heard as of about 7:20 a.m. Friday, despite a lot of  
folks in that area, & beyond.

There are still plenty of other migrants in the park so it is  
plausible the rare warbler is still present somewhere - but unless  
singing, it can be exceedingly difficult to even know about that  
species precise whereabouts (& that is true even on prime breeding  
areas in the southern U.S.)

good luck & hope to hear of some other sightings in the park as well  
as (hopefully) the desired rare bird.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan

  
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Bohemian Waxwings/N. Saw-whet Owl/Red Crossbills/Rusty Blackbirds/Black-backed Woodpeckers & more
From: Joan Collins <joan.collins AT frontier.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 09:51:30 -0400
Huge numbers of Pine Siskins continue at our feeders - they are consuming
over 10 pounds of Thistle seed a day.  I haven't figured out how much weight
they are consuming of the sunflower heart seeds, but it is less than 10
pounds per day.  Others still feeding birds in Long Lake are reporting the
same experience - they can't keep their feeders filled.  A pair of Raccoons
were a problem for several nights, so we brought the feeders in at night and
they finally disappeared.  One night, I was photographing the Raccoons on
our front porch, and one tried to get around me to enter the house - it
could obviously smell the bird seed just inside the door!

 

The mouse population appears to be increasing and Barred Owls are heard
outside our home nearly every night.  The excellent cone crop on most
coniferous tree species led to an exciting winter for irruptives, but the
Red Squirrels also benefited and it will be a difficult nesting year for
many birds as a result (often, more than half of the Black-backed Woodpecker
nests are predated in such years).

 

I've been noting a very quiet, almost inaudible, vocalization that Gray Jays
give near their nest site.  I really need good recording equipment!

 

Some recent observations (first of the season: *):

 

April 28, 2016 Long Lake (Hamilton Co.)

 

Barred Owl - outside our home

Black-backed Woodpecker - a pair in the same tree at the Round Lake
Trailhead.  I watched them for a long time until a Broad-winged Hawk's
sudden appearance overhead led them to fly off.

Gray Jay - I bushwhacked to an area where Gray Jays usually find me and 2
Gray Jays came over for food, but also, seemingly, to just hang out.  I had
traveled the night before to give a presentation, and had little sleep after
arriving home late, so I laid down in the grass and slept on and off for 1.5
hours.  It was sunny and in the 50s - a perfect day.  The Grays Jays stayed
with me quietly vocalizing and were in the trees nearby every time I woke up
- wonderful companions.  It was the most peaceful time I've had in a long
time.  At one point, I was awakened by what sounded like people, but it was
a Common Raven viciously attacking a Broad-winged Hawk (the ravens have
young in nests right now).  The last time I heard that vocalization, a raven
was attacking a Golden Eagle outside our home over a decade ago.  Also, two
adult Bald Eagles soared around overhead.  Blue-headed Vireos, Winter Wrens,
and Yellow-rumped Warblers sang nearby.

*Barn Swallow - over Little Tupper Lake

 

April 27, 2016 Long Lake

 

Gray Jay - 5 (1 along Rt. 30, 2 at the Round Lake Trailhead, and 2 at
Sabattis Bog)

*Brown Thrasher - Little Tupper Lake outlet/Round Lake inlet

Palm Warbler - many at Sabattis Bog

*Rusty Blackbird - at least 3 at the Little Tupper Lake inlet (more were
unseen in the muddy marsh below them)

Red Crossbill - birds heard calling near the Little Tupper Lake outlet/Round
Lake inlet

 

April 26, 2016 Long Lake

 

Black-backed Woodpecker - 1 at Sabattis Bog

Gray Jay - 4 (1 Rt 30, 2 at the Round Lake Trailhead, and 1 at Sabattis Bog)

Palm Warbler - many singing in what appeared to be winter conditions with 3
inches of snow on the ground!

 

On a half-day tour with 2 birders from White Plains & Garnet Hill, NY, on
April 25, 2016 we visited Newcomb and Minerva (both in Essex Co.) with their
goal of finding a Black-backed Woodpecker.  We had a great morning and found
6!  Here are some of the 32 species found:

 

Black-backed Woodpecker - 6 (including 2 pairs)

Gray Jay - 1

Boreal Chickadee - at least 3

Brown Creeper

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird - Newcomb

Hermit Thrush

Yellow-rumped Warbler

*Black-throated Green Warbler - 2 singing in Newcomb (This is one day
earlier than the early date listed in "Birds of Essex County, New York")

 

I continued to go birding the rest of day since it was beautiful out.
Additional sightings in Long Lake:

 

Ruffed Grouse - 5 along Sabattis Circle Road

Common Loon

Osprey - carrying a stick

Broad-winged Hawk - 3 (including a pair)

Barred Owl - 2

Gray Jay - 6

Boreal Chickadee - another flock found in Minerva later in the afternoon

Palm Warbler

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

April 22, 2016 Long Lake

 

Osprey - mating several times in their nest on Minnow Pond (a nest they took
over from Great Blue Herons)

Black-backed Woodpecker - 2 (1 along Route 30 and 1 at Sabattis Bog)

Gray Jay - 5

Bohemian Waxwing - 5 at the Little Tupper Lake inlet!

*Swamp Sparrow

 

April 21, 2016 Newcomb

 

*Blue-headed Vireo

 

April 20, 2016 Long Lake and Tupper Lake (Franklin Co.)

 

Bald Eagle - adult eating a fish along the Raquette River in Tupper Lake

*Wilson's Snipe - marshes in Tupper Lake

Gray Jay - 7

*Chipping Sparrow - Tupper Lake

*White-throated Sparrow - Long Lake

Palm Warbler - several birds feeding in the road by Sabattis Bog

 

April 18, 2016 Owling in Long Lake (cold, calm, and clear)

 

I couldn't sleep and went owling from midnight to 1:30 a.m.  On Sabattis
Circle Road, I heard several Barred Owls echoing along Little Tupper Lake -
also Common Loons, Amer. Woodcocks, Wood Frogs, and Spring Peepers all
vocalizing under a brilliant star-lit sky.  I saw two different Snowshoe
Hares along the road.  On my drive back, I stopped in one spot along Route
30 and heard a howling Coyote.  I howled too and we went back and forth for
a long time - a primal experience.  I doubled back since I forgot to stop in
a few locations to listen for Northern Saw-whet Owls - I didn't hear any.  I
stopped again where the Coyote had been howling, and didn't hear it, but a
*Northern Saw-whet Owl* was tooting!  It was a wonderful ending for this
nocturnal excursion!

 

For those interested in Corvids, this interesting article was a headline on
the Huffington Post site 2 days ago - I particularly enjoyed the last
paragraph - a quote from Kevin McGowan - perfectly stated!:

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/big-brain-cognitive-function_us_5718f789
e4b0479c59d7447e

 

I added many photos of the above sightings to my Facebook page below.

 

Joan Collins

President, NYS Ornithological Association

Editor, New York Birders

Long Lake, NY

(315) 244-7127 cell       

(518) 624-5528 home

http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/  

http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian

 


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Swainson's Warbler NOT seen as of 7:20 a.m., C.P. NYC 4/29
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 07:52:05 -0400
Friday, 29 April, 2016 -

To add to Corey's note, and for those not doing bander's [ringer's]  
codes, the Swainson's Warbler present at the sw edges of Strawberry  
Fields in Central Park  (Manhattan, N.Y. City) on THURSDAY, had not  
been seen nor heard as of about 7:20 a.m. Friday, despite a lot of  
folks in that area, & beyond.

There are still plenty of other migrants in the park so it is  
plausible the rare warbler is still present somewhere - but unless  
singing, it can be exceedingly difficult to even know about that  
species precise whereabouts (& that is true even on prime breeding  
areas in the southern U.S.)

good luck & hope to hear of some other sightings in the park as well  
as (hopefully) the desired rare bird.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan



--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: SWWA, Central Park - No
From: Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 07:20:55 -0400
Lots of birders looking but it hasn't yet been heard or seen.

Good birding (hopefully),
Corey Finger

Sent from my iPhone

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park: Pulitzer Fountain Common Grackle Roost
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 07:12:23 -0400
Last night I swung by one of Central Park's Common Grackle roost sites
outside of the park. The location is off the southeast corner of the park
in front of the Plaza Hotel and Bergdorf Goodman's in the Linden Trees
surrounding Pulitzer Fountain. It was dark at 8:30p and grackles were
visible naked eye. In a small section covered by a binocular field there
were around 10 birds sitting close to each other.

There are links to the discovery post of this location back in the Fall of
2005 and a chronological list of Marie Winn's follow-up observations during
the Fall/Winter of 2005/2006.


http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Grand+Army+Plaza%2C+Pulitzer+Fountain+%28grackle+roost%29 


My only observation was on 30-Sep-2005 and I started counting after the
birds were already streaming into the roost. This was around 20 minutes
before sunset.

A possible simultaneous dual count from Belvedere Castle where I've seen
them heading south at the end of the day and at the roost should be
interesting.

I'm not sure what the numbers are like in the Spring but that Fall
observation back in 2005 was impressive.
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park, NYC 4/28
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 23:10:15 -0400
Thursday, 28 April, 2016 -
Central Park, Manhattan...

While enjoying the rarity of the day in the area of Strawberry Fields  
in Central Park, I had a very cordial conversation with a member of  
the N.Y.P.D., who is also a veteran of the force in N.Y.C. and will be  
following up on some complaints that a very few individuals may have  
stepped into and overstepped their rights and gone a bit too far in  
where they went in seeking to get close to the rare bird. In more  
general terms there may also be some checking into the activities of  
individuals who might be doing things they ought not to be in a public  
space. The vast majority of birders of course were being model  
citizens, and happily talking up the rare bird to curious passersby  
including many tourists from all around the world, some quite  
interested in the details of the bird we all were working to observe.  
It was also great to see so many birders who came in from elsewhere  
out of the borough or out of the city to enjoy part of a day in  
Central Park, and with a great bird to add to the experience.  As far  
as I could see, most who stayed in the area for a half-hour or more  
got decent views, some working quite hard to and some also obtaining  
fine photos and/or videos without "pushing" the bird or acting in any  
way 'pushy' themselves.  Most walk-leaders also respectfully took  
their groups on to other areas soon after the group had enjoyed the  
rarity and were well-behaved.  And there was no one who behaved badly  
by reprimanding a very few who stepped into the area where the rare  
bird was feeding & foraging.  Incidentally, that officer of the peace  
(in uniform) got down on the ground with other birders to have a close  
look at the Swainson's Warbler too as many of us were doing, so as to  
have good line of sight and not block many others views. (Indeed this  
was how many obtained very good views.) This was also done literally  
by those from 8 to 80.  That uniformed member of the N.Y.P.D.? He came  
up smiling, and maybe we will see him with a pair of compact bino's  
added on to his equipment belt!

As for birds found in Central Park, many of those seen over the past 3  
days were still to be found, and many dozens & dozens of observers  
were finding them.  Like many hundreds of other birders, I spent a  
considerable amount of time with the SWAINSON'S Warbler, and thanks to  
Katie Kleinpeter of Long Island NY for finding this bird and to Andrew  
Rubenfeld, and Alice Deutsch of Manhattan for giving it a name and  
then putting word out rather quickly.  (Thanks also to Donna Schulman  
of Queens Co. for getting the info. on the original finders &  
identifiers, for this rarity in NY County's Central Park.    Many will  
recall fondly the Swainson's Warbler that showed so well for days in  
Forest Park in Queens Co. and which was joined there by a less-rare  
but always-enjoyed Prothonotary Warbler, each of them record-early for  
the state in addition to being so relatively visible in a rather  
barren early-spring season, some years back.)

Incidentally there have been other reports of this species in Central  
Park including much more recently than some are aware, however it is  
many many years since one had been seen by so many, & it may be safe  
to say that in just today's sightings there may have been more  
observers than in any previous single day of watching this particular  
usually-skulking species in this park.     The normal breeding range  
of Swainson's Warbler is (barely) into Maryland, & mostly from the VA- 
NC border area south & southwest just into Texas.  It is also one of  
the least-observed of the regularly-breeding warblers of eastern N.  
America (north of Mexico), in great part due to its very retiring  
nature - although the song can often be heard with far less difficulty  
in the season & breeding areas.

A minimum of 21 species of Warblers were seen in Central Park on  
Thursday, with the Swainson's the obvious top highlight of all - it  
was a lifer for many of those coming in to see, and certainly for many  
in the younger (under-50) crowd - and incidentally it was wonderful to  
see so many very young birders alongside those of us with grey or  
white hair (or little to none left), and to see the enthusiasm,  
knowledge, courtesy, and good energy that all these birders generated  
in watching the southern visitor as well as so many other spring  
migrants.

Other interesting finds in the park included 5 species of Vireo: Red- 
eyed (still quite uncommon), White-eyed (1), Warbling (few so far), &  
Yellow-throated (which had a good showing these past several days),  
and by far the most numerous still, as expected, Blue-headed.  In  
addition, some birders are reporting as many as 4 spp. of Catharus  
thrush, although caution is advised as these are not as  
straightforward an ID as one may at first believe. Most of the  
thrushes are still Hermit at this point, with just a few Veery and  
some Wood certainly present, & the possibility of others as May  
approaches.  Sparrow diversity continues with up to nine species in  
the tribe being seen, including E. Towhee, White-crowned, White- 
throated, Swamp, Savannah, Field, Chipping, Song, & Dark-eyed Junco  
all still around. In finches there have been a few Purple Finch in  
various areas and also an occasional sighting of Pine Siskin, while  
American Goldfinch are still going strong as their migrations pick  
up.  In Swallows, at least 4 spp. were again going over the Meer:  
Bank, Barn, N. Rough-winged & Tree, with the latter 2 spp. the most- 
common.

Responsible birding, reasonable behavior, and great birds to all.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Thursday April 28, 2016
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 18:09:51 -0400
Central Park NYC  
Thursday April 28, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from Turtle 
Pond at 9am until around 12:30pm. 



Canada Goose - 2 Turtle Pond
Gadwall - pair Turtle Pond
Double-crested Cormorant - with crests Turtle Pond
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3 Turtle Pond, 1 eating a fish at the Point (Jeff 
Ward) 

Chimney Swift - over the Upper Lobe
Belted Kingfisher - female Turtle Pond
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - female Shakespeare Garden
Eastern Kingbird - pair Turtle Pond
Blue-headed Vireo - Upper Lobe, Shakespeare Garden
Warbling Vireo - Upper Lobe
Common Raven - 2 together flyover
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2 over the Lake
White-breasted Nuthatch - the Point
House Wren - Upper Lobe
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - several Upper Lobe
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - still many
Hermit Thrush
Louisiana Waterthrush - very nice looks atTriplet's/Balcony Bridge
Northern Waterthrush - the Point, Laupot Bridge, Upper Lobe (7:30am)
Blue-winged Warbler - Upper Lobe (Patty Pike)
Black-and-white Warbler - several locations
Swainson's Warbler - Strawberry Fields (tweeted by Alice Deutsch at 7:25AM)
Nashville Warbler - Upper Lobe (7:30am)
American Redstart - Upper Lobe, Gill Overlook
Northern Parula - singing male south of Evodia (Jeff Ward)
Yellow Warbler - the Point (Jeff Ward)
Chestnut-sided Warbler - Upper Lobe (Bob before the walk)
Palm Warbler - Wagner Cove
Yellow-rumped Warbler - still many
Eastern Towhee - heard several locations
Chipping Sparrow - Upper Lobe, Humming Tombstone
Swamp Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
House Finch - singing
Purple Finch - female Upper Lobe
American Goldfinch - singing
Jeffrey Ward reported an American Kestrel perched on the AMNH before the walk. 

Sorry if I've left anything out - that Swainson's Warbler was a real 
distraction. 


Deb Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Additonal Info - Central Park NYC - Swainson's Warbler
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 17:35:02 -0400
Additonal Info - Central Park NYC - Swainson's Warbler

A photo of the bird from 7:48am this morning:

http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=18225236

Today's Swainson's Warbler was not, of course, the first record for Central 
Park, NYC. 


Here are the previous records with multiple observers:

May 7, 2000
May 1, 1990
May 7-11, 1979
May 11, 1973

All of these records have appeared in the Kingbird. 

The Swainson's Warbler on May 7, 2000 was found by Ed Lam and Nick Wagerik. 

Many of you will also remember Arthur Swoger whose photo of the 1979 Swainson's 
Warbler appeared in Kingbird. 


An article in the Wilson Bulletin by Irwin Alperin about the first record of a 
Swainson's Warbler in Brooklyn on May 5-6, 1950 can be found here: 

  
https://sora.unm.edu/node/127163

Let's hope this little beauty sticks around for the weekend so even more people 
can enjoy it, 


Deborah Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Swainson's Warbler update, Central Park NYC 4/28
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 17:21:21 -0400
Thursday, 28 April, 2016 - Central Park, Manhattan, New York City

the Swainson's WARBLER is still being seen & heard, thru 4:30 P.M.  
this afternoon at Strawberry Fields, nearest the West 72 Street park  
entrance, with multiple observers on-scene.  THE place to check is  
along the park drive (roadway) next to shrubberies at the south /  
southwest edge of Strawberry Fields site proper & this is immediately  
outside to the SW of the "Imagine" mosaic that is on the junction of  
main paths in the entry part of Strawberry Fields - assuming a park  
entry from the park entrance at West 72 St. - look for birders &  
photographers, some of whom may be prone "horizontal" at the edge of  
the park roadway at the warbler location.  It has not moved more than  
perhaps 10 yards at max. in all the hours of observations thus far,  
and has stayed in the fairly dense low shrubs, often feeding on the  
leaf-littered ground below, mainly in shade. It was starting to sing  
again by 3:30 - 4 p.m. & might do so a bit more as the evening goes  
along.

good luck (persistence may pay a dividend),

Tom Fiore
Manhattan

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Swainson's Warbler Manhattan NYC 4/28 - Finder & Identifiers
From: Donna Schulman <queensgirl30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:37:28 -0400
From Alice Deutsch on the New York Birders FB page: Note that it was
spotted by Katie (correction from Kathy) from Long Island and she asked me
and Andrew R to id it. After recovering from our OMG moment we told her
what the bird was and I tweeted it.

Katie is Katie Kleinpeter. Thank you Katie!!! and thank you Alice and
Andrew for the identification and getting the word out so quickly.

*---------------------------------------*



*Donna L. SchulmanForest Hills, NY + North Brunswick,
NJqueensgirl30 AT gmail.com *

* *

On Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 12:14 PM, Thomas Fiore  wrote:

> The Swainson's Warbler is continuing to be seen at nearly-noon, and
> possibly heard singing at intervals as well, in the area already described
> for this morning - at Strawberry Fields within Central Park (Manhattan,
> NYC) & nearest park entrance being West 72 Street & Central Park West.
>
> Closest possible subway stop is a local-only "B" or "C" train at West 72
> St. & Central Park West, i.e. within yards of where the bird is being
> seen.  Transfer point is one stop away on those lines, at Columbus Circle
> (West 59 Street) station, which is a #1 train stop as well as for the "A" &
> "D" express trains - all of which stop at the latter. The West 72 St. stop
> on Central Park West is local-only, no express trains stop there.  (a
> farther-away express stop is also located at Broadway and West 72 Streeet,
> on the #2 and #3 train lines (as well as #1 local) but will take a fast
> walker 15 minutes or more to walk up from Broadway, east to Central Park.
> There are also a number of bus lines that are in the immediate area, & even
> a few possible express-bus stops, for which I do not have any details.
>
> Parking could be problematic as always in week-day mid-Manhattan.
>
> Tom Fiore
> Manhattan
> --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to **eBird*
> *!*
> --
>

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: alley pond park, queens, ny
From: Rick & Linda <kedenbird AT optonline.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 14:09:44 -0400
Alley pond park
Little alley pond

Blue-winged warbler,

American Redstart.

Yellow warbler

Rufous-sided Towhee

Cat birds in nuptial display.

Also the usual set of bird suspects and many families enjoying the week from 
school and BBQing, diversity of food very impressive. Yum Yum 


Rick & Linda
kedenbird AT optonline.net




--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Raven flyover - Valley Stream State Park
From: Michael Zito <michaelzito AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 12:36:03 -0400
This morning before heading to HLSP, I did a quick walk through of Valley 
Stream. A single Raven flew over carrying sticks in its beak. It was being 
harassed by two crows. With all the Raven sightings going on in this area, I 
wonder if this is indicative of a pair trying to nest. 

Mike Z.

Sent from my iPhone
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Swainson's Warbler Manhattan NYC continues 4/28
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 12:14:45 -0400
The Swainson's Warbler is continuing to be seen at nearly-noon, and  
possibly heard singing at intervals as well, in the area already  
described for this morning - at Strawberry Fields within Central Park  
(Manhattan, NYC) & nearest park entrance being West 72 Street &  
Central Park West.

Closest possible subway stop is a local-only "B" or "C" train at West  
72 St. & Central Park West, i.e. within yards of where the bird is  
being seen.  Transfer point is one stop away on those lines, at  
Columbus Circle (West 59 Street) station, which is a #1 train stop as  
well as for the "A" & "D" express trains - all of which stop at the  
latter. The West 72 St. stop on Central Park West is local-only, no  
express trains stop there.  (a farther-away express stop is also  
located at Broadway and West 72 Streeet, on the #2 and #3 train lines  
(as well as #1 local) but will take a fast walker 15 minutes or more  
to walk up from Broadway, east to Central Park.  There are also a  
number of bus lines that are in the immediate area, & even a few  
possible express-bus stops, for which I do not have any details.

Parking could be problematic as always in week-day mid-Manhattan.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Swainson's warbler
From: Peter Reisfeld <drpinky AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 11:39:01 -0400
Video of the Central Park star
https://flic.kr/p/GzajmK

Happy spring birding

Peter

Sent from who knows where
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: civil behavior while birding
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:55:29 -0400
hi again folks,

the rare bird appearing in Central Park (Manhattan, N.Y. City) has  
been possible for well over 200 to see rather well, and even  
photograph without undue difficulties or "dramas".  Please be civil  
with your fellow birders & the many other people who make use of this  
area in this park at all times. Let's show our best side, New York!

thanks and good luck to all who may come to see & hear this rare  
warbler at Strawberry Fields.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: SWAINSON'S WARBLER, Central Park NYC 4/28 (Thursday)
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:39:11 -0400
Thursday, 28 April, 2016 -

Central Park, Manhattan, New York City (in the Strawberry Fields area  
of the park) -

The SWAINSON'S WARBLER is & has been observed & well-photographed as  
well as video'd & audio'd by at least 150 (+) observers so far this  
morning at a well-known birding site within Central Park, which is  
easily reached from the West 72 Street entrance, and many have found  
viewing to be good (with some CAUTION as there is an active roadway  
with occasional vehicles & many passers-by) from a point roughly 50-75  
yards (meters) east down along the park roadway from the  
aforementioned park entrance, looking into low & dense barberry  
shrubberies that line the park road there, as well as forming the SW  
edge to the Strawberry Fields area.  Alternatively (and a safer place  
to stand) one may watch & listen - the warbler has been singing thru  
10:15 a.m. at intervals of every few minutes to as much as 5+ minutes  
between songs) from just within the Strawberry Fields location and  
just south-west of the "Imagine" mosaic tile that honors John Lennon  
and is found on the pathway into the western entry point to Strawberry  
Fields.

This among the most heavily-walked areas (esp. by tourists and  
visitors) of the entire Central Park, thus consideration of the  
general public is requested - and great care if going onto the roadway  
to observe, which many including myself have done - so far. all  
present have been very considerate, and many passers-by including a  
few in vehicles, have asked what the excitement is all about, & some  
of us have been explaining the rarity of the sighting.

The Swainson's Warbler was seen at least briefly earlier in the  
morning, out on a more-open perch, singing but has been behaving more  
typically of the species over the last 2+ hours, skulking & enjoying  
the shaded leaf-litter under the barberry shrubs & adjacent area on  
the southern - southwestern edges of the area (Strawberry Fields  
area).  It may take some patience & perhaps kneeling or even nearly- 
lying on ground or paved road to view the bird well, if it does not  
come out & sing as it had early in the day.

There have been 150+ observers, likely more, already and some have  
come some distance to enjoy the bird.
....................
This may be about the 5th, perhaps 6th record, & is certain to be the  
most strongly documented of the records for this park. (the one prior  
record of the species in NYC that may have been even more potentially  
cooperative and viewable was the occurrence in Forest Park Queens  
County NY some years agom which was also stunningly early for that  
species in our region (far north of typical range).

good luck, & thanks to all including those who originally spotted &/or  
heard this warbler, recognizing it as a special sight.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Fwd: [geneseebirds-googlegroup] Loggerhead Shrike YES - Twitchell Rd #5279 - Alec Humann
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 09:36:20 -0400
Forwarding::

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Alec Humann 
Date: Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 9:35 AM
Subject: [geneseebirds-googlegroup] Loggerhead Shrike YES - Twitchell Rd
#5279 - Alec Humann
To: "geneseebirds-l AT geneseo.edu" , "
geneseebirds-googlegroup AT geneseo.edu" 


Bird currently present and actively feeding, occasionally singing! Great
looks and super cooperative!

Alec Humann


Sent from my iPhone

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
"Geneseebirds" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
email to geneseebirds-googlegroup+unsubscribe AT geneseo.edu.
To post to this group, send email to geneseebirds-googlegroup AT geneseo.edu.
To view this discussion on the web visit

https://groups.google.com/a/geneseo.edu/d/msgid/geneseebirds-googlegroup/SN1PR14MB0269BC33DBBAE16E64FABAC7DF650%40SN1PR14MB0269.namprd14.prod.outlook.com 

.



-- 
Richard Guthrie

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: REPORT: Swainson's Warbler, Central Park, NYC 4/28
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 08:15:10 -0400
Thursday, 28 April, 2016 -

A Swainson's Warbler at Central Park's Strawberry Fields, near the  
entry point to that area at the "Imagine" circle, closest to the park  
entrance at C.P. West & W. 72 St. - this is a report from Alice  
Deutsch of Manhattan, and is being confirmed by songs heard.  (and  
that it is not a typo of that sp. of catharus).  Report is from this  
past hour & currently...

Incidentally this would be perhaps the 5th or so record for Central  
Park. Others with longer experience in Central can add to that note at  
a later time.

good luck,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park, NYC 4/27 (Wednesday)
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 01:50:09 -0400




Subject: Central Park NYC - Wednesday April 27, 2016
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 17:44:08 -0400
Central Park NYC -
Wednesday April 27, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, m.ob. on bird walk from Turtle Pond starting at 9am 
until around noon. 


Gadwall - pair Turtle Pond
Red-tailed Hawk - pair in Ramble & carrying sticks to San Remo south tower
Belted Kingfisher - female Turtle Pond
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - female Shakespeare Garden
Northern Flicker - male south of Summer House
Eastern Kingbird - pair at Castle
Yellow-throated Vireo - Upper Lobe
Blue-headed Vireo - 5 to 10
Warbling Vireo - pair at Maintenance Field
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5 Turtle Pond
Barn Swallow - over Maintenance Field
House Wren - a few
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4 females, 1 male
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 150
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush - source of the Gill
Gray Catbird - 5 to 10 (an influx)
Northern Mockingbird - Oven
Ovenbird - Upper Lobe, Mugger's Woods
Northern Waterthrush - Laupot Bridge, Upper Lobe & Oven
Black-and-white Warbler - 6 males, 2 females
Common Yellowthroat - the Point
Blue-winged Warbler - singing male Gill Source
Cape May Warbler - the Oven (seen with Doug Kurz, Ben King, m.ob.)
Northern Parula - heard
Black-throated Blue Warbler - singing male Gill Source
Palm Warbler - Turtle Pond, the Point
Yellow-rumped Warbler - fairly common males & females in equal numbers
Eastern Towhee - 10 mostly males
Chipping Sparrow - 6+ Tupelo Tield, others high in trees
Field Sparrow - Turtle Pond
Song Sparrow - the Point
Swamp Sparrow - 5 total, Bow Bridge (Tom Socci) and the Gill
Red-winged Blackbird - several singing in the Ramble
Orchard Oriole - adult male south side of Turtle Pond
Baltimore Oriole - in oak in the Ramble
House Finch - singing
American Goldfinch - singing in elms

Noa & Mayra Cruz reported Ruddy Ducks and a Great Egret at the Reservoir. 

Deb Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Adult Bald Eagle - Yaphank
From: leormand AT gmail.com
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 16:05:09 -0400
For at least two (2) days there has been an Adult Bald Eagle at the Suffolk 
County Department of Health Services facility in Yaphank, just south of the LIE 
(next to the SC Farm for those familiar). The bird can at least fly short 
distances, however it is allowing close approach and may have an issue with one 
eye. The NYSDEC and Fish and Wildlife have been advised. 


If anyone has any additional information or observations that may be helpful 
please email me, thanks. 


- Luke 
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Warblers
From: "Robert A. Proniewych" <baobabbob AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:43:51 -0400
Following up on Tim Healy's post from Hempstead Lake State Park, the
Worm-eating Warbler was refound as well as an Orchard Oriole. Ovenbird was
present as were both Waterthrushes. Veery and Wood Thrush this morning as
well. Ed Becher also found a Red-eyed Vireo and Bob Kurtz found a Solitary
Sandpiper in the stream south of Hendrickson's Road near Valley Stream
State Park. Just received word that the Blackburnian has also been refound.
Robert A. Proniewych

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Solitary Sandpiper
From: Rob Bate <robsbate AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 13:30:53 -0400
A Solitary Sandpiper found by Peter Dorosh in Prospect Park at the Lower Pool 
was later refound at the Lilly Pond seen from the back platform. 


Rob Bate 
Brooklyn
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park this morning: Warblers
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 12:56:52 -0400
After a slow start at Strawberry Fields, things picked up in the ramble.  I
personally had 13 warblers, other birders saw additional types. In the
ramble I saw: Northern Waterthrush, Ovenbird, Palm, Yellow, Common
Yellowthroat, Blue Winged, Northern Parula,  Blackburnian, Nashville,
Yellow Rumped, good looks at a female Cape May, Black and White, and
Chestnut Sided.

Also saw Warbling and Blue Headed Vireos, Veery, Baltimore and Orchard
Orioles.

Was great seeing birders I know and birders I just met today.  Special
thanks to the charming British man and his lady friend who connected me to
my lifer Orchard Orioles and Kathleen who was helpful guiding me through
the Ramble.

Good spring birding,
Rob in Massapequa

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Inwood Hill Park, NYC - Grasshopper Sparrow
From: Joe DiCostanzo <jdicost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 16:37:35 +0000
This a belated report of a Grasshopper Sparrow found on the north edge of the 
soccer fields at the north end of Inwood Hill Park by Ricki Ravitts and Danny 
Karlson on Saturday, April 23. 


I have posted two of Ricki's pictures on my blog at 
http://inwoodbirder.blogspot.com/2016/04/april-23-inwood-hill-park-grasshopper.html 


I have looked for the bird since Saturday with no luck.

Joe DiCostanzo

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re:Worm-eating and Blackburnian Warbler, Hempstead Lake
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:56:56 -0400
Immediately after hitting send, I heard Brendan's Yellow-throated Vireo as 
well. Add that to a few Blue-headeds and a Warbling. 


More cheers!
-Tim H

> On Apr 27, 2016, at 11:55 AM, Tim Healy  wrote:
> 
> Worm-eating Warbler showing cooperatively at dog walk trails between the 
field and the stream near the south lake. Blackburnian, found earlier by 
Brendan Fogarty, in the treetops between the road and the open space on the way 
to MacDonald Pond. Both singing sporadically. Also multiple Parulas, 
Black-throated Greens, Yellows, Yellow-rumps. Singles of Black-and-white and N. 
Waterthrush. Still exploring. 

> 
> Cheers!
> -Tim H

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Worm-eating and Blackburnian Warbler, Hempstead Lake
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:55:08 -0400
Worm-eating Warbler showing cooperatively at dog walk trails between the field 
and the stream near the south lake. Blackburnian, found earlier by Brendan 
Fogarty, in the treetops between the road and the open space on the way to 
MacDonald Pond. Both singing sporadically. Also multiple Parulas, 
Black-throated Greens, Yellows, Yellow-rumps. Singles of Black-and-white and N. 
Waterthrush. Still exploring. 


Cheers!
-Tim H
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Two Red-headed Woodpeckers, Muscoot Farm, Westchester
From: Anne Swaim <anneswaim AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:35:39 -0400
For at least third year, red-headed woodpecker at Muscoot Farm. This time two 
adults, perhaps a pair. First located by Paul Lewis this morning. 


Male drumming and calling. Some hole excavation apparently happening this am as 
well. 


In woods between farm bldgs and small ed building along dirt road out to 
fields. 


Heads up that farm gates close 4pm. Open 10am. 

Anne Swaim
Saw Mill River Audubon
www.sawmillriveraudubon.org
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:58:23 -0400
Not much doing other than an influx of shorebirds and Ibis.

13 Glossy Ibis, flying around, finally landing in the puddle to the west of the 
pond and fed with a Snowy Egret, Least Sandpiper, Lesser Yellowlegs and 3 
Greater Yellowlegs. In the puddle on the east side there were 3 Short-billed 
Dowitchers. Elsewhere, the Willets are in and scattered about; 2 more Least 
Sandpipers were along the path. 


Sy Schiff

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Timber Point Ruff - NO
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:22:43 -0400
I stopped by Timber Point's East Marina at 8 am and 10 am. Yesterday's Ruff was 
unfortunately absent on both searches. Consolation birds included singing 
Seaside Sparrows, some Willets, and a small flock of Glossy Ibis. Between 
visits to the marina, I stopped at Connetquot but failed to locate the 
Yellow-throated Warblers. As a final note, Green Herons were seen at the state 
park and Timber Points West Marina. 


Cheers!
-Tim H
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Manhattan, NYC 4/26 (Central Park, etc.)
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 23:01:01 -0400
Weather is playing some havoc with the birds many are watching  
recently. A surge of tropical air* is responsible for bringing so many  
species that winter in the Caribbean (islands) basin, as well as in  
Central & even a few species from South America into this region. A  
lot of these birds are a week or so earlier than any more-typical  
early dates, & some species are as much as 2 weeks ahead of what has  
been seen as typical peak dates (which may still hold despite what we  
are seeing the past couple of days, wit hints at this scenario over a  
week ago).  What is certain is that most of these arriving birds are  
going to be under a LOT of stress, trying to feed & get ready for the  
further migration, as well as the courtship / breeding season, with  
the weather change that is about to occur region-wide, and of course  
from their very long migrations, despite & in addition to any "tail"  
winds they may have had. [*if some were unaware, temperatures got in  
the mid-80's F. today, in areas as nearby as central N.J. & Penn.,  
while in the great North Country of NY & New England's northerly  
regions, it was snow on the lilacs (or whatever was already locally in  
bloom up north) - perhaps fun & unique to see but a stress to any  
arriving migrants, from "summer" to "winter" in an overnight or two.  
This is unusual weather, not altogether best for birders even while we  
are excited to see what is showing up.

It should be obvious, these birds need to feed & obtain rest, ahead of  
the onward migration & the breeding time, and all that we as observers  
can do to allow them just that, & not disturb to any unnecessary  
extent - which means, not playing their songs & calls to any extent, &  
not approaching for views or photos if the bird[s] move off at   the  
observer's approach. This is not just common-sense, it's also  
intelligent conservation science.  Every action does make a difference  
to the lives of these migratory creatures, & we can be good models of  
best behavior with our fellow observers of the migrations. This should  
be (& is in many public recreational places in this nation) the law as  
well. The ban on playing of recordings in many highly-birded areas  
(also many places around the globe) is in place for good &  
scientifically-sound reasons!

............................
Tuesday, 26 April, 2016 -

Manhattan island, New York City (with emphasis on central sections of  
the island)

A serious storm system passed over the region as a very strong  
migration was underway late Monday night into Tues. morning... that  
storm crossed parts of this area in the wee hours of the morning,  
roughly 2 hours before the first-light, or perhaps 3 hours ahead of  
sunrise hour in the NYC area.

Fall-out-like conditions were to be seen in some places in the greater  
region, but it's not clear that that much of that was (or was not)  
found in NYC, or in particular in Manhattan... it certainly did not  
seem so in lower Manhattan, as I visited a half-dozen of the smaller  
parks in midtown - into the W. Village, as well as portions of Central  
& Riverside Parks in the morning. (My passage thru parks such as  
Bryant, Madison Square, Union Square, Washington Square, & a couple of  
other parks & green-spaces as well as the Hudson River greenway path  
and adjacent park-space was limited to at most 20 minutes per, other  
than the lengthy greenway to northern Riverside Park, & not as  
thorough as could've; had their clearly been fall-out of birds in any  
of these places, my visits could have extended significantly. I did  
note some thrush & sparrow activity, and what I'd call rather limited  
warbler activity (the latter relevant to what's been going on in  
Central the last 2 days!) in both Madison & Union Square[s], with even  
at least 2 thrush species (Wood & Hermit, mainly the latter) in each,  
as well as some sparrow variety (Chipping, Swamp, a Field or two, & a  
prob. Lincoln's glimpsed in Union Square, with of course White- 
throateds in no's. and some Song hanging in), while at Bryant, it felt  
as if the winter's birds were still there, with a few Gray Catbirds, a  
couple of E. Towhees, and the usual sort of sparrows, & more Hermit  
Thrushes.  A more skilled & attentive observer might have found, well,  
who knows, but things were on the quieter side (again, by relevant  
comparisons) from the early hours I was in these small parks. The  
weather had a role again as the day went on, & there were surely some  
birds, even all those passerine and kin-birds, going on thru the mist  
& making way towards more wide-open-treed places to the n. of the  
urban oases. The simple thing is, there often ain't enough food in  
these early-spring days, as "too many" migrants get bunched up in a  
city as dense as the center of NYC can be. It's basic physics, or  
biology, these birds need to feed, & with not enough, on go many if  
they are able to.

At least 22 Warbler species were seen in Central Park alone Tuesday;  
this in part reflects a lot of observer effort, meaning combined time  
put in by many dozens of observers in almost all areas of the park.   
The tally of warblers was quite similar to Monday's but at least 2  
more species of them were added - Blackpoll (no that's not an  
indication migration is near-peak, etc.; it's been found that a  
relative few Blackpoll Warblers will be seen well ahead of the main  
push of that species later-than-other spring movement) and Chestnut- 
sided Warbler (which is also on the early side, but the bulk of that  
species also may not show for a week or two or even more from now). It  
is not clear if a Yellow-throated Warbler (seen again Monday) was  
found in Central Tuesday (?) but one could be hanging in, and like  
those that sometimes do, be moving very locally just within the park.   
Again & with no surprise whatsoever, Myrtle/Yellow-rumped & Palm  
Warblers were in that order of most-numerous, although plenty o' palms  
get by without all the looks that other yellow-y warblers and what-not  
receive, as the spring gears up. It's an odd but oft-seen situation  
too, that many of the species that don't breed a huge distance from  
NYC are already in some of those breeding areas, including a modest  
few that have been barely-reported in the city parks & other local  
migration hot-spots.  It's also rather remarkeable just how quickly  
some neotropical migrants have made it into areas well north, in some  
places in modest no's, rather than just stray early-ish singles or  
scattered few.

Folks here have been finding some thrushes other than the most-likely  
& by far most-numerous of April's Catharus species: Hermit Thrush -  
after Wood Thrush, which have come thru in pretty much the numbers  
that are as if it were near-peak (& early to see that), a few Veery  
including one singing, yes also seen (no one hiding behind the shrubs  
with their little gizmo), and some seen well enough without singing or  
calling... plus a few mentions of other, usually-May-arrival spp. - I  
had one thrush which I wanted to & tried briefly to photo, with cheeks  
of faint gray, grayish overall coloration, dark spotting in the  
breast, & no red showing anywhere.  But, not enough and not heard  
saying anything. I have seen Hermit Thrushes (both in the area &  
certainly in other parts of the continent) that could fool me, until a  
song or a tail-rise was also noted, or really good views obtained.   
Some folks think the brown-backed Catharus thrushes are easy- 
straightforward... maybe so if they are heard singing, but these can  
also be tricky & the best birders don't get them ID'd every single  
view.  Some Hermit Thrush & not just a few Wood Thrush are being heard  
at appropriate hours & with cloudy-overcast conditions.  Incidentally  
it makes a lot of sense the woodies would sing here in NYC since they  
do breed in the city's larger green-spaces, including even in Central  
Park, with some challenges!

As of now all the sparrow species certain to occur annually in spring  
in Central Park have been seen, with Lincoln's in this week, & a few  
more White-crowned also appearing...  it's possible to think of at  
least 2 more sparrow spp. that certainly may, and often do get  
discovered in spring in C.P. but they are not a guaranteed sighting  
there for spring migration... both are partly a question of looking a  
lot for them, and maybe ignoring some of the other more-colorful  
migrants. (the 2 are Clay-colored which can be expected to increase in  
migration-sightings in NY since their breeding range has & still is  
expanding east; and Vesper which is not as rare as some newer birders  
in Central would believe, but is still and always a special that is  
uncommon & less-seen in spring there... either of these two could  
occur virtually anywhere, as I know since the superb bird illustrator  
& naturalist Michel Kleinbaum* (R.I.P.) quietly showed me & a few  
others one some decades ago in the heart of the Ramble, "hiding in  
plain sight" under the noses of some of us, yours truly included,  
amongst the most-typical other sparrows... *for examples of M.  
Kleinbaum's stunning pen&ink-work see some of his, in "The Birds of  
Colombia", "The Birds of Venezuela", (Princeton U. Press) and "The  
Birds of China" (Smithsonian Inst.), as well as other publications.

I rather quickly checked the CP reservoir & a few other waterbodies  
(including a bit of the Hudson river in the a.m.) after both the last- 
night storms, as well as the others that rolled thru, but only the 3  
a.m. storm was a heavy-enough one that some species may have been put  
down in the rains - & even so most of the heavy storm activity was  
north of Manhattan. In any event, I was unable to find any uncommon or  
even common shorebird or such in the time I checked.  Birds seen on  
the reservoir were lingering Ruddy Ducks (at least 1 dozen),  
Buffleheads (6+), & Gadwall, as well as more than 40 (at one point)  
Double-crested Cormorants, & a smattering of gulls of just 3 usual  
spp. & also a smattering of swallows over the water: N. Rough-winged &  
Barn that I was able to spot...  I tried also checking some puddly  
places, but in Central, "play ball" takes precedence even moments  
after rain was done, so the chance of a Temminck's stint at the n.  
meadow were that much more reduced (from the zero% that that species  
already had for showing...)

Lots of other migrants, some of which included at least 4 Vireo spp. -  
Blue-headed by far most numerous, with Warbling, Yellow-throated, &  
White-eyed in that order of decreasing numbers;  the typical Tanager -  
Scarlet, in low no's.- and still on the early side; Blue-gray  
Gnatcatchers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, House Wrens, E. Kingbird, E.  
Phoebe, Great Crested Flycatcher (a couple - very wiped-out-looking as  
they tried to feed...), Chimney Swifts (must be finding... some bugs,  
some-how), both usual Oriole spp. (but mainly Baltimore, & still  
mostly males of that sp.), and many other migrants...
...........................
In Riverside Park, up to 15 warbler spp. have been seen in the last 3  
days, with much of the activity north of W. 83 St. & all the way to at  
least 120 St. within the park.  Thrushes there also, including a few  
Wood & many Hermit, & Vireos of 3 spp., esp. Blue-headed but also  
Yellow-throated & Warbling; & various other passerines & kin.

Some folks messaged that they had some migrants in various sites  
around Manhattan such as Carl Schurz park, Battery Park & Battery Park  
City (park), Tompkins Square, Morningside Park, St. Nicholas Park,  
Sherman Creek park (with Swindler Cove adjacent), & of course Inwood  
Hill & Fort Tryon Parks. As near as I could tell, at least 15 Warbler  
spp. were noted in these various parks, with (I think) Inwood Hill not  
surprisingly having the most variety of them. (But bring 20 or fifty  
of Manhattan's best to Inwood, let 'em loose & I have no doubts the  
variety on strong migration days could easily equal what is seen for  
Central, esp. so as waterfowl clear out and many other species become  
more likely.  For that matter, just bring out all the upper Manhattan  
birders in a great day, it is just as birdy "up north" as any other  
part of the island, and occasionally, it may be more so. And then  
there's Highbridge Park, the great (almost) unknown, with trees, a bit  
of water & not a whole lot of coverage.) The northern end of Manhattan  
has had birds that would make any birder go 'wow', & it's sure that  
that will happen again.
......
N.B., a Loggerhead Shrike that has been seen from Sunday 4/24-4/26 in  
Ontario County of western NYS is apparently not banded, which in a way  
makes it that much more significant a sighting, given that Ontario  
(the province in Canada, rather than the aforementioned NY county) has  
a banding program in place with the regionally-rare and endangered  
Loggerhead Shrikes which come into that province's potential breeding  
grounds. Thus any seen without bands is a "new" arrival to the general  
region. Thanks to those keeping watch on that region and to the folks  
working on trying to give a species a leg up in the region - &, thanks  
to Paul Novak of NYDEC for some good information.  If anyone finds  
that that, or any Loggerhead Shrike in the northeast is banded, the  
info should be shared with that state's endangered-species unit &  
others who would greatly appreciate the info.

good luck, & please remember, these migrants are potentially exhausted  
& need to forage, feed, then rest as much as they are able to; give  
them space where possible and do not attempt to disturb or distract  
them in any way as the weather has been & will be especially hard on  
them. Yes, every bit of their daily activity is important to their  
survival and good condition right now, & we who observe can be good &  
respectful of the enormous journeys most of these birds have been on,  
and will be on in these weeks, of what is usually the peak of spring  
migration about upon-us.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Hempstead Lake SP (Nass Co) and Alley Pond Park (Queens Co)
From: syschiff <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 18:13:26 -0400
Joe Giunta and I birded Hempstead Lake SP. Still early in the season, but there 
are a few early migrants and breeding birds; namely CHIMNEY SWIFT, EASTERN 
KINGBIRD, WARBLING VIREO, HOUSE WREN, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, OVENBIRD, NORTHERN 
WATERTHRUSH, OVENBIRD, BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, YELLOW, PALM and YELLOW-RUMPED 
WARBLER. 


We then moved to Alley Pond Park. The usually more prolific (closer to the 
west) local was a disappointment. Birding was no where as good as at Hempstead. 
Here we found a BLUE-HEADED VIREO, HOUSE WREN, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, , 5 
YELLOW WARBLERS, YELLOW-RUMPED and our first BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER.. 


Sy

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Ruff - Timber Point East Marina (Suffolk)
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 17:45:27 -0400
To any curious birders who just got off work: the Ruff apparently took off and 
flew west around 2:30, high and far. A bit disappointing, but you never know 
what tomorrow will bring. Tonight's winds don't look favorable for landbird 
migration, so I will probably check Timber Point tomorrow morning to see if the 
bird returns. I'd advise birders in the area to keep an eye out. 


Cheers!
-Tim H



Sent from my iPhone
> On Apr 26, 2016, at 1:59 PM, Derek Rogers  wrote:
> 
> Greetings,
> 
> Phil Uruburu asked me to get the word out that he found a Ruff at Timber 
Point's East Marina in Great River, Suffolk County. 

> 
> Good luck if you try for it.
> 
> Best,
> 
> Derek Rogers
> Sayville
> 
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Ruff - Timber Point East Marina (Suffolk)
From: Derek Rogers <drogers0031 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 13:59:51 -0400
Greetings,

Phil Uruburu asked me to get the word out that he found a Ruff at Timber
Point's East Marina in Great River, Suffolk County.

Good luck if you try for it.

Best,

Derek Rogers
Sayville

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Hempstead and Valley Stream migrants
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:45:08 -0400
I was surprised when I woke up to clear skies and sun, so I took advantage and 
headed out. Hempstead and Valley Stream SPs featured similar spreads of 
migrants. For warblers, both locations had Blue-winged (at least 3 at VS), 
Parula, N. Waterthrush, Ovenbird, Yellowthroat, Yellow, and Yellow-rump. 
Hempstead had Black-throated Green and Palm as well as Solitary Sandpiper, and 
Valley Stream hosted singles of Baltimore Oriole, Blue-headed, and Warbling 
Vireo. 


Cheers!
-Tim H
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: my error and apology
From: Eileen Mathers <mathers_eileen AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:22:40 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday, Iposted the same post four times because I did not think my e-mails 
were goingthrough. 


Through theguidance of other members, I learned that one does not always 
receive one’s ownlistserv e-mails.  I did not know this important fact, Inow 
know, and I apologize for my oversight.  



 
Sincerely,

Eileen M.Mathers

Queens, NY


 

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker - Flanders, LI
From: Eileen Schwinn <beachmed AT optonline.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:14:01 -0400
An adult Red-headed Woodpecker was seen this AM at 10:30 by Vincent Cagno, 
along Pleasure Drive/near Maple Swamp gated entrance, in Flanders/Riverhead. It 
was relocated 10 minutes later, when it was seen flying and landing in the 
trees between the barn-like structure and Pleasure Drive. The bird was being 
harassed by a Red-bellied WP, and was last seen in the woods near home #300. I 
have been unable to relocated the bird again. 

Eileen Schwinn 

Sent from my iPhone

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Croton point park
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 12:27:59 +0000
CPP was hopping a bit this am as the rain put down some birds -- not like CP or 
Prospect or High Island -- but hey it's our "patch" in the river towns of 
northern Westchester -- in a brief 45 minute visit w K. T. Bardwell we had 


Warblers (7 species)
Black and white - x
Yellow rumped - x
BT Green - 2
Ovenbird - 2 
Yellow - X 
Redstart - 1 (Kyle only) 
Pine - 1

Also of note at least 3 BH Vireo and a loon low flying through. 

L. Trachtenberg
Ossining


Sent from my iPhone
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: L.Shrike request/NY DEC, & Central Pk., NYC 4/25
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 22:59:44 -0400
On the sighting of a Loggerhead Shrike in western NY, there is a  
request from the NY D.E.C. for any information if it is noticed that  
the individual observed was banded, or if any Loggerhead Shrike seen  
anywhere in NY at any time, is banded.  Researchers in Ontario are  
conducting ongoing programs, and there could be both color leg bands  
as well as the standard aluminum type.  Please report any band  
sightings on any Loggerhead Shrikes seen, to Paul Novak, at 
paul.novak AT dec.ny.gov 

   and give all details, as much as could be observed.  Thank you.

...........................
Monday, 25 April, 2016
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

As the day began, it was fairly clear early on that there were more  
than a few migrants around, and by one hour past first light, clearer  
still that a bit of a fall-out had taken place.  Also apparent,  
particularly at the far north end of the park, was that birds were  
still moving, & that those still on the move were in the many  
thousands. By mid-afternoon, it seemed at least some of the frenetic  
activity of the earlier parts of the day had calmed down & that birds  
had somewhat dispersed, not only to varied places within Central but  
also out to other parks, and above all, to directions-northerly. The  
northern part of the park was busy while the Ramble & vicinity, very  
busy as well. Some of the more-common migrants were in almost corners  
of the park.

Since warblers were a big part of the migrants seen this day, & a lot  
of birders were particularly focused on seeing a lot of them, a list  
of those seen is above other species also recorded.  I know of 21  
Warbler species found this day, & may easily have missed hearing of  
some additional.

Ovenbird (multiple)
Northern Waterthrush (multiple)
Louisiana Waterthrush (multiple)
Blue-winged Warbler (multiple, more than 6, in all areas of park)
Nashville Warbler (at least several in several discrete locations)
Northern Parula (more than several)
Yellow Warbler (multiple)
Magnolia Warbler (1 definite sighting, & possibly 1 or 2 others)
Cape May Warbler (at least 2 individuals, 1 of them lingering)
Black-throated Blue Warbler (in more than several locations)
Myrtle/Yellow-rumped Warbler (1,000+ in first hour of daylight)
Black-throated Green Warbler (multiple)
Blackburnian Warbler (minimum of five adult males, 4 locations)
Yellow-throated Warbler (Ramble, area as previously reported)
Pine Warbler (not that many but still in multiple)
Prairie Warbler (multiple)
Palm Warbler (estimate 300+ in first hour of daylight)
Black-and-white Warbler (25+ throughout the park)
American Redstart (several)
Worm-eating Warbler (minimum of 3, perhaps more)
Common Yellowthroat (at least several)

Also seen in migrant species were:
Common Loon (several fly-overs)
Double-crested Cormorant (30+ on the reservoir in p.m.)
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Bufflehead (fewer but still in the multiple)
Ruddy Duck (15 counted)
Osprey
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk (on all 4 sides of park's perimeters: nesting!)
American Kestrel
Solitary Sandpiper (Meer, early a.m.)
Spotted Sandpiper (reservoir edges)
Wilson's Snipe (location in north part of park)
American Woodcock (south half of the park)
Laughing Gull (1 photographed at Reservoir)
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Least Flycatcher (seen calling, Great Hill)
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Blue-headed Vireo (many all around the park)
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Tree Swallow
N. Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Wren
House Wren (multiple)
Winter Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (very common)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Veery
Hermit Thrush (100's thru park; 30+ at Summit Rock alone)
Wood Thrush
Brown Thrasher
Cedar Waxwing
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow (many, in small flocks)
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow (possibly several)
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow (common)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Rusty Blackbird  (Ramble area)
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole (multiple)
Purple Finch (multiples, many giving song)
American Goldfinch

good birding,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Forest Park, Forest Hills, Queens County, NY
From: Eileen Mathers <mathers_eileen AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 21:57:58 +0000 (UTC)
East side of Forest Park, Queens24 bird species in a ~90 minute walk

Red-Tailed Hawk
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Norther Flicker
Blue Headed Vireos (2)
Blue Jay
White-breasted Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglets (5)
Hermit Thrush (2)
American Robin
European Starling
Ovenbird (10+)
Black-&-white Warblers (20+)
Northern Parula (5+)
Palm Warblers (10+)
Yellow-rumped Warblers (100+)
Black-throated Green Warblers (5+)
Eastern Towhee (5+)White-Throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Thank You,Eileen M. MathersJamaica, NY (Queens County)
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: June 5th/6th Overnight Pelagic out of Brooklyn
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 16:17:55 -0400
The second annual Paulagics spring overnight pelagic trip out of Brooklyn
is now just over a month away, and there are still spots available on the
boat. Our first year sailing out of Brooklyn was a tremendous success and
we are eager to get back out to the deep!

The plan for the trip is to leave the dock at 8 PM on Sunday, June 5th,
aboard the 110' Brooklyn VI, and be at the Hudson Canyon, laying down a
chum slick, well before the sun rises. At 22 hours, this trip is 4 hours
longer than some of the similar mid-Atlantic pelagic trips running this
year, in order to give us time to more thoroughly explore these interesting
and seldom-birded far off shore areas.

This is classically one of the most desirable times of the year for pelagic
trips in the region, especially deep water ones, and in addition to more
expected species like Cory's, Great, Manx, and Sooty Shearwaters, Red &
Red-necked Phalaropes, and all 3 species of Jaegers (often adults in great
plumage at this time of year!), it is a great window for SOUTH POLAR SKUA
(probably the best time of year in the area for this species), LEACH'S
STORM-PETREL, and ARCTIC TERN, and things like Northern Fulmar, Bridled
Tern, and even a late deepwater alcid or two are legitimate possibilities.
However, there is also the "Home Run" factor that is always there in late
spring in deep water. The majority of records of YELLOW-NOSED ALBATROSS
records in the Northeast are from this time window (including the first New
York record, a scene which we are all dearly hoping to re-enact!).

Last year we had South Polar Skua behind the boat before the sun was up and
for much of the morning a small flock (!!!) of 3 were buzzing the boat,
much to the delight of photographers. Specialties like Long-tailed and
Pomarine Jaeger, Arctic Tern, Red-necked Phalarope and Leach's Storm Petrel
were also seen. A small selection of images from the trip can be seen here-

https://www.flickr.com/photos/103866258 AT N08/albums/72157653758717610

There will be food on board (a nice selection of freshly made human food,
and plenty of chum for the birds as well), and there will be several
experienced leaders to help people see and identify whatever we come
across. It is also a great time of year for cetaceans, and there is a very
good chance to run into at least some of Fin, Humpback, Minke, and Pilot
Whales, as well as Risso's, Common and Offshore Bottlenose Dolphin

The trip returns to the dock the evening of Monday, June 6.

If you have any questions or would like to reserve a spot please contact us.
*You can register/reserve space for the trip by E-Mail or phone:
E-Mail: info AT paulagics.com
Call Paulagics at 215-234-6805.

*Full information on registering with the always helpful and friendly Paul
or Anita Guris here:
http://paulagics.com/?page_id=41

The boat is a fast, stable platform.  It is 110' long, 26' wide, has a
cruising speed of 18 knots, and is licensed for 132 passengers.  A full
overnight trip for us is about 42 people so there will be room for people
to sleep.

Hope to see you aboard!!
Sean Sime. Brooklyn, NY.
--

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Wertheim Bald Eagle Pair
From: Jim Osterlund <jamesost AT optonline.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 15:48:28 -0400
Much to the displeasure of the Osprey at the Wertheim Preserve, Shirley, 
Suffolk County, the pair of adult Bald Eagles are much in evidence along 
Carman’s River there. 

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Central Park NYC - Monday April 25, 2016 - 10+ Warbler species
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 15:44:09 -0400
Central Park NYC  
Monday April 25, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, m.ob. on bird walks starting from Strawberry Fields 
8:00am to around noon. 



Gadwall - pair on the Lake
Great Egret - flyover
Red-tailed Hawk - pair carrying many sticks to San Remo
Belted Kingfisher - flyover with fish in bill Upper Lobe (Patricia Essler 
reported 2 on the same branch at Turtle Pond) 

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker - 2 or 3
Blue-headed Vireo - 10 total (3 or 4 Strawberry Fields, 1 Shakespeare Garden, 
Weather Station Circle, Mugger's Woods, 2 Warbler Rock, etc.) 

Black-capped Chickadee - pair east side of Oven hand fed by Mayra Cruz
Tufted Titmouse - 2 Laupot Bridge
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 150+ (Strawberry Fields, Shakespeare Garden, Warbler 
Rock, etc) 

Hermit Thrush - not many
Ovenbird - east side of the Point (Tom Ahlf)
Louisiana Waterthrush - east shore of the Point (near Boathouse)
Northern Waterthrush - Triplet's Bridge, Oven
Black-and-white Warbler - 10 - 8 males & 2 females (Upper Lobe, Mugger's Woods, 
Warbler Rock, etc.) 

Blue-winged Warbler - 1 or 2 Strawberry Fields (found by Doug Kurz & Ben King) 
one singing a partial song 

Northern Parula - Gill Overlook
Palm Warbler - 40-50 (5 Upper Lobe, Oven, etc.)
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 100-150 various locations males & females in roughly 
equal numbers 

Prairie Warbler - male Weather Station Circle, male on the Point
Black-throated Green Warbler - male Weather Station Circle, male Oven
Eastern Towhee - 5
Chipping Sparrow - 50-60 foraging in elms
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird - Upper Lobe (found by Jeff Ward, i.d. by Doug Kurz)
House Finch - heard
Purple Finch - female Laupot Bridge, female top of the Point
American Goldfinch - around 50 feeding in elms


Yesterday's Cape May Warbler was seen again today at the Oven by Doug Kurz and 
others. 


Others reported Black-throated Blue Warblers.

Deb Allen

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 19:34:31 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - April 25, 2016
*  NYSY  04. 25. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):April 18, 2015 
- April 25, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: April 25  AT 3:00 p.m. 
(EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of April 18, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
EURASIAN WIGEONPEREGRINE FALCONSANDHILL CRANEUPLAND SANDPIPERSAW-WHET 
OWLLOGGERHEAD SHRIKE (Extralimital) 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     4/24: An EURASIAN WIGEON and 3 SANDHILL CRANES were seen at Tschache 
Pool. 4 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS were found on Towpath Road.     4/25: The 
EURASIAN WIGEON (male) was again seen in Tschache Pool. 


Derby Hill------------
     After a good day on 4/18 (1145 raptors counted) the rest of the week 
was uneventful with no day even approaching a thousand birds. The weeks total 
was 3,295 raptors counted. On 4/21 5 SANDHILL CRANES were seen. 


Oswego County------------
     4/21: An UPLAND SANDPIPER continues at the Oswego County Airfield on 
Howard Road east of Fulton. 


Oneida County------------
     4/20: A SAW-WHET OWL was reported at Castlebrook Farm on Miller Road 
south of Williamstown. 


Herkimer County------------
     4/18: A PEREGRINE FALCON was seen on Rt. 169 between Little Falls and 
Middleville.  


Extralimital------------
     4/24: A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was found and well photographed on Twitchell 
Road in the Town of Rushville in Ontario County. No update for today yet. 


Migrants reported this week------------
GREEN HERONSOLITARY SANDPIPERCOMMON TERNBLUE-HEADED VIREOBANK SWALLOWNASHVILLE 
WARBLERNORTHERN WATERTHRUSHCHIMNEY SWIFT 



          
    .--end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Prospect Park Monday
From: Rob Bate <robsbate AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 14:45:57 -0400
Great numbers of migrants fell into Prospect Park overnight and continued
falling into the early morning.  All the birders who could be out were in
the park today and were rewarded with some great new birds for the year and
great numbers of some of the earlier migrants; hundreds of Yellow-rumps,
tens of Blue-headed Vireos, lots of Palms and 3 Louisianna Waterthrushes.

New for the year: Yellow-throated Vireo, Lincoln Sparrow, Blue-winged
Warblers, Prairie Warblers, Black-throated Green and Black-throated Blue
Warblers, Ovenbirds, Veery, Worm-eating Warbler, Nashville Warbler and an
out of sequence Ring-necked Duck.

Rob Bate
Brooklyn

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Forest Park, Queens County NY
From: Eileen Mathers <mathers_eileen AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 18:41:11 +0000 (UTC)
East side of Forest Park, Queens 

24 bird species in a ~90 minute walk in the 

Red-Tailed Hawk
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Norther Flicker
Blue Headed Vireos (2)
Blue Jay
White-breasted Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglets (5)
Hermit Thrush (2)
American Robin
European Starling
Ovenbird (10+)
Black-&-white Warblers (20+)
Northern Parula (5+)
Palm Warblers (10+)
Yellow-rumped Warblers (100+)
Black-throated Green Warblers (5+)
Eastern Towhee (5+)

White-Throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Thank You,

Eileen M. Mathers

Jamaica, NY (Queens County)

 

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Forest Park, Queens County
From: Eileen Mathers <mathers_eileen AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 18:04:28 +0000 (UTC)
East side of Forest Park, Queens 

24 bird species in a ~90 minute walk in the 

Red-Tailed Hawk
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Norther Flicker
Blue Headed Vireos (2)
Blue Jay
White-breasted Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglets (5)
Hermit Thrush (2)
American Robin
European Starling
Ovenbird (10+)
Black-&-white Warblers (20+)
Northern Parula (5+)
Palm Warblers (10+)
Yellow-rumped Warblers (100+)
Black-throated Green Warblers (5+)
Eastern Towhee (5+)

White-Throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Thank You,

Eileen M. Mathers


 

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: RE Doodletown/Iona Spring Migrant Trips on May 15
From: Alan Wells <awells AT bestweb.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:45:50 -0400
Anyone planning a trip to the popular Doodletown and Iona Island sites (Bear
Mountain State Park) on Sunday, May 15, 2016 may want to reschedule for some
other day. The Campagnolo Gran Frodo bike race is scheduled for that day. We
just spoke to the Palisades Interstate Park Police and the Bear Mountain
Administration staff, who confirmed that Route 9W in that area will be
completely closed from Sunday morning (12 AM) to 1:00 PM Sunday afternoon,
thereby blocking access to both Doodletown and Iona Island. It also appears
that part of Seven Lakes Drive will also be closed thereby blocking entrance
to the small parking area that allows access to Doodletown via Lemmon Road
(we did not confirm this with Park staff, but is indicated by the race map).
Definitely poor planning on someone's part! This race started several years
ago and has been growing in popularity ever since (https://gfny.com/). It
seems unlikely that birders and hikers can do little to change the closure
for this year, but maybe we can lobby for input regarding future races.

 

Alan Wells

Rockland Co.

 

 


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Loggerhead Shrike report, western NY, 4/25
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:10:02 -0400
Monday, 25 April, 2016 -

I'm writing FIRST that this is a NY State-ENDANGERED species, and  
anyone found using recordings to try to attract this species, or doing  
anything at all that might be deemed by state authorities as harmful  
or detrimental to the bird / species, could be subject to serious  
penalties after prosecution.

This is a species that has long been in trouble thru much of it's  
eastern range, & particularly in the northeastern portions of its  
range, including former & potentially-current breeding areas. It has  
of course been a breeder in NYS as well as in adjacent states &  
provinces, in the past, and may still be in rather difficult  
circumstances in all of these areas, when & where it occurs or may  
occur.

A Loggerhead Shrike is being viewed in western NY & reports are  
available, including links to photos & field notes from the finder- 
reporter of apparent first record on this day. 
http://digest.sialia.com/?rm=message;id=1174872 

   has the mention including a link to a photo... The noted 1st- 
observer is Leona Lauster, the sighting is from Ontario County in New  
York.

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Fwd: Forest Park - Queens County correction 24 species
From: Eileen Mathers <mathers_eileen AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 12:06:49 -0400
Also many White-throated Sparrows

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Eileen Mathers 
> Date: April 25, 2016 at 12:01:36 PM EDT
> To: NYSbirds-L AT cornell.edu
> Subject: Forest Park - Queens County
> 
> 26 bird species in a ~90 minute walk in the east side of Forest Park. 
> 
> Red-Tailed Hawk
> Rock pigeon
> Mourning Doves
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Downy Woodpecker
> Norther Flicker
> 2 Blue Headed Vireos
> Blue Jay
> White-breasted Nuthatch
> 5 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
> 2 Hermit Thrush
> American Robin
> European Starling
> 10+ Ovenbirds
> 20+ Black-&-white Warblers
> 5+ Northern Parula
> 20+ Palm Warblers
> 100+ Yellow-rumped Warblers
> 5+ Black-throated Green Warblers
> 5+ Eastern Towhee
> Northern Cardnal
> American Goldfinch
> House Sparrow
> 
> Eileen Mathers
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--