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Updated on Friday, July 1 at 11:44 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Cutias,©BirdQuest

1 Jul Whimbrel ["Robert A. Proniewych" ]
1 Jul Re: Ruff - No [Andrew Baksh ]
1 Jul Re: Ruff - No [Robert Taylor ]
1 Jul Re: Ruff - Yes [Corey Finger ]
1 Jul Re: Ruff - Yes [Robert Taylor ]
1 Jul Ruff - Yes [Corey Finger ]
30 Jun Information for JBWR shorebirders... [Andrew Baksh ]
30 Jun Ruff - looks like the same bird [Andrew Baksh ]
30 Jun Rockefeller State Park [Jack Rothman ]
30 Jun White Ibis flyby on belt Parkway [Isaac Grant ]
30 Jun Ruff ["Robert A. Proniewych" ]
29 Jun Whimbrel at West End, Jones Beach State Park (Nassau Co.) [Ken Feustel ]
28 Jun JBWR East Pond and Fort Tilden Report [Andrew Baksh ]
28 Jun Re: Whimbrel @ the Coast Guard Station Jones Beach [Michael Zito ]
28 Jun Whimbrel @ the Coast Guard Station Jones Beach [Andrew Baksh ]
28 Jun Thank you [Sean Sime ]
28 Jun No sightings: request for hold mail info [Sean Sime ]
27 Jun Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
27 Jun Reminder: BBC Evening Presentation Tomorrow [Dennis Hrehowsik ]
27 Jun JBWR East Pond Ruff NO (6-27-16) [Andrew Baksh ]
26 Jun RE: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler [Deborah Allen ]
26 Jun Re:[ebirdsnyc] Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Ruff NO! [Joshua Malbin ]
26 Jun RE: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler [Shaibal Mitra ]
26 Jun Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler [Deborah Allen ]
26 Jun Re:[ebirdsnyc] Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Ruff NO! [Donna Schulman ]
26 Jun Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Ruff NO! [Andrew Baksh ]
26 Jun Ruff - East Pond Intel and suggestion on working this bird... [Andrew Baksh ]
26 Jun Re:Ruff - Now not at the Raunt [Corey Finger ]
26 Jun Ruff - Yes [Corey Finger ]
25 Jun New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Saturday June 25, 2016 [Deborah Allen ]
25 Jun Bank Swallows on Road [Bradley Klein ]
25 Jun Croton Point [Larry Trachtenberg ]
25 Jun White-faced Ibis currently present South End of East Pond JBWR [Gail Benson ]
25 Jun Ruff @ JBWR 3:00 [Tim Healy ]
25 Jun Re: Ruff Update @ JBWR 1:59 pm [Andrew Baksh ]
25 Jun Ruff Update [Ken ]
25 Jun Ruff at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge (Queens Co} [Ken ]
25 Jun Sandwich Tern Cupsogue CP, Suffolk Co. [Patricia Lindsay ]
25 Jun White-faced Ibis, Jamaica Bay (Yes) [Anthony Collerton ]
25 Jun Suffolk County Goatsuckers 6-24-16 [Arie Gilbert ]
24 Jun NYC Area RBA: 24 June 2016 [Ben Cacace ]
24 Jun Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge -- No White-face this AM ["syschiff" ]
24 Jun Re: [Bruce Horwith ]
24 Jun Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation [Dennis Hrehowsik ]
24 Jun Massapequa Raven [Robert Taylor ]
24 Jun Wood and Hermit Thrushes Southern Tier of NY [David Nicosia ]
22 Jun Leucistic Robin at Brooklyn Botanic Garden [BradleyKlein mail ]
22 Jun Orchard Beach Cliff Swallows [Jack Rothman ]
21 Jun White-faced Ibis and Hooded Merganser Jamaica Bay [Adrian Burke ]
21 Jun Acadian Flycatcher and Jamaica Bay East Pond Water Level Update... [Andrew Baksh ]
21 Jun Royals Terns on Great Gull Island [Joseph DiCostanzo ]
21 Jun Cupsogue Birding 6-19 [Andrew Baksh ]
21 Jun Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [Robert Paxton ]
21 Jun Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. ["Matthew A. Young" ]
20 Jun Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [David Nicosia ]
20 Jun Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
20 Jun RE: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [Shaibal Mitra ]
20 Jun New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [David Nicosia ]
20 Jun New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. [David Nicosia ]
19 Jun Central Park NYC - Sunday June 19, 2016 - incl. R-t hummingbird & 4 sp. of Wood Warblers [Deborah Allen ]
19 Jun Cliff Swallows at Van Cortlandt Park ["Carney, Martin" ]
19 Jun Cliff Swallows Van Cortlandt Park Bronx- YES [Dawn Hannay ]
19 Jun Re:speaking of cliff swallows and Van Cortlandt's [Larry Trachtenberg ]
18 Jun Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx Co. 6/18 [Thomas Fiore ]
18 Jun possible Siberian Common Tern, WESA, etc - Cupsogue, Suffolk Co []
18 Jun Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at Montezuma [Donna Schulman ]
18 Jun Tri-colored Heron @ Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge [Andrew Baksh ]
18 Jun Van Cortlandt Ciiff Swallows. [Nadir Souirgi ]
18 Jun Re: White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR) [Andrew Baksh ]
18 Jun White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR) [Gail Benson ]
17 Jun NYC Area RBA: 17 June 2016 [Ben Cacace ]
17 Jun Garganey at Montezuma NWR: Friday Si!!! [BOB WASHBURN ]
17 Jun Re: Any recent Garganey info? [Robert Lewis ]
17 Jun Re: Any recent Garganey info? [Scott Haber ]
17 Jun Re: Any recent Garganey info? [Karyn ]
16 Jun Re: Garganey YES [Liz Martens ]

Subject: Whimbrel
From: "Robert A. Proniewych" <baobabbob AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 12:43:41 -0400
The previously reported Whimbrel was found a few minutes ago by Bill
Hanley. It continues on the sandspit by the West End 2 Coast Guard station
which is located at Jones Beach State Park.
Robert Proniewych

--

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--
Subject: Re: Ruff - No
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 11:01:35 -0400
Too bad. As I noted before, that Ruff is extremely jumpy and once you see that 
bird, it is highly advisable to observe from a distance unless you have Ninja 
skills. 


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jul 1, 2016, at 10:53 AM, Robert Taylor  wrote:
> 
> Thanks
> 
> Checked the north end, raunt and south end without any luck
> 
> Rob from Massapequa 
> Mike Zito
> 
>> On Friday, July 1, 2016, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> wrote:
>> It flew north before I left - sorry for forgetting to update. But be 
patient, it came in out of nowhere earlier. 

>> 
>> Corey
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On Jul 1, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Robert Taylor  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Anyone have a visual on the Ruff? Cant locate it at the south end
>>> 
>>>> On Friday, July 1, 2016, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Spotted by Tom Preston at the south end of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay.
>>>> 
>>>> Good Birding,
>>>> Corey Finger
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>> 
>>>> --
>>>> 
>>>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>>>> 
>>>> ARCHIVES:
>>>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
>>>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
>>>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>>>> 
>>>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>>>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>>> 
>>>> --
> 
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

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ARCHIVES:
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2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Re: Ruff - No
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 10:53:04 -0400
Thanks

Checked the north end, raunt and south end without any luck

Rob from Massapequa
Mike Zito

On Friday, July 1, 2016, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> wrote:

> It flew north before I left - sorry for forgetting to update. But be
> patient, it came in out of nowhere earlier.
>
> Corey
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 1, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Robert Taylor  > wrote:
>
> Anyone have a visual on the Ruff? Cant locate it at the south end
>
> On Friday, July 1, 2016, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com
> > wrote:
>
>> Spotted by Tom Preston at the south end of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay.
>>
>> Good Birding,
>> Corey Finger
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> --
>>
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>>
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>>
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>
>> --
>>
>

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Re: Ruff - Yes
From: Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 08:17:57 -0400
It flew north before I left - sorry for forgetting to update. But be patient, 
it came in out of nowhere earlier. 


Corey

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 1, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Robert Taylor  wrote:
> 
> Anyone have a visual on the Ruff? Cant locate it at the south end
> 
>> On Friday, July 1, 2016, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> wrote:
>> Spotted by Tom Preston at the south end of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay.
>> 
>> Good Birding,
>> Corey Finger
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Re: Ruff - Yes
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 07:32:21 -0400
Anyone have a visual on the Ruff? Cant locate it at the south end

On Friday, July 1, 2016, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Spotted by Tom Preston at the south end of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay.
>
> Good Birding,
> Corey Finger
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Ruff - Yes
From: Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 06:13:27 -0400
Spotted by Tom Preston at the south end of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay.

Good Birding,
Corey Finger

Sent from my iPhone

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Information for JBWR shorebirders...
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 16:04:29 -0400
Apologies for inundating your inbox but this is an important service 
announcement :-) 


I just got a text that the "boot washing station" is up and running at the 
refuge (I asked about it this AM). Let the games begin and yes, you do need 
knee high boots. Always, in my opinion. 


Also, one shorebird species I forgot to mention in my previous post was the 
arrival of Short-billed Dowitchers. I counted 12 today. 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Ruff - looks like the same bird
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 15:38:22 -0400
I have posted two videos (poor quality ones at that) on my blog (

http://birdingdude.blogspot.com/2016/06/jamaica-bay-wildlife-refuge-tale-of-two.html) 

showing what I am convinced is the same Ruff from the 25th and then
re-found this AM by Robert Proniewych. I am fascinated because this is
exactly a repeat of 2012 by what I am presuming is the same bird. I have
mused about "reverse migration" or another site nearby that is hosting
these birds when they disappear for a few days.

Other shorebirds on the East Pond this morning included, Greater
Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, Spotted Sandpiper, Killdeer, Eastern Willet,
Least Sandpiper and American Oystercatcher.

For those interested, last night I published an updated map of the East
Pond which you could also access on my blog.

Cheers,


On Thu, Jun 30, 2016 at 10:37 AM, Robert A. Proniewych 
wrote:

> Continuing at south end of East Pond ar Jamaica Bay.
> Robert Proniewych
> --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
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> 
> *Archives:*
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> 
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> *Please submit your observations to **eBird*
> *!*
> --
>



-- 

"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the
ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own
abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu   *The Art of War*


(\__/)
(= '.'=)

(") _ (")


Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

--

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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
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2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
Subject: Rockefeller State Park
From: Jack Rothman <jacroth1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 13:43:15 -0400
Gerry McGee, my wife Jane and I strolled through Rockefeller State park this 
morning for a few hours and were pleasantly surprised by the birds there for a 
summer day. Bluebirds were all over and we were surprised to find a Scarlet 
Tanager. It’s a very pleasant place to walk and the birds only enhanced the 
experience. 

 
Scarlet Tanager
Yellow Warbler (2)
Eastern Bluebird (many, especially around their boxes.)
American Redstart
Warbling Vireo (few)
Red-eyed Vireo (few)
Downy Woodpecker
White-breasted Nuthatch
Baltimore Oriole (3)
Orchard Oriole
Turkey Vulture
Great-crested Flycatcher (4)
Black-capped Chickadee (2)
Chipping Sparrow (3)
Gray Catbird (numerous)
Tree Swallow (numerous, some nesting in the Bluebird boxes)
Barn Swallow
Song Sparrow
American Robin 
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
American Crow
Northern Cardinal
Brown-headed Cowbird
Mourning Dove
Blue Jay

Jack Rothman
CityIslandBirds.com


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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: White Ibis flyby on belt Parkway
From: Isaac Grant <hosesbroadbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 12:15:14 -0400
Just had an adult white ibis fly by while I'm sitting in traffic on the belt 
parkway. The bird was near exit 6S while I'm traveling west. Bird was flying 
east towards Coney Island. Hopefully it will touch down someplace where others 
can see it. 


Isaac Grant
Senior Loan Officer
--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Ruff
From: "Robert A. Proniewych" <baobabbob AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 10:37:55 -0400
Continuing at south end of East Pond ar Jamaica Bay.
Robert Proniewych

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Whimbrel at West End, Jones Beach State Park (Nassau Co.)
From: Ken Feustel <feustel AT optonline.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 10:54:09 -0400
At 9:00AM there was a Whimbrel feeding on the exposed mud flats just east of 
the West End 2 marina, perhaps the same bird reported yesterday. The 
basic-plumaged Red-throated Loon continued in the boat basin, in the company of 
three Black Scoters. 


Ken Feustel
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: JBWR East Pond and Fort Tilden Report
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 22:20:29 -0400
I did two tours on the East Pond today (AM & PM), in the hopes that the Ruff 
might be re-found. Alas, I was unsuccessful. There was nothing of note save for 
the continuing White-faced Ibis which was on the south end in the afternoon. It 
was loafing with around 17 Glossy Ibis', in the cove near a fallen tree on the 
east side of the south end. 


A word of caution when looking for the WFIB. This bird is fast losing its 
snappy breeding plumage so getting good looks at the face especially the eyes 
are important to clinch the ID. 


Thinking that the weather might be good for a seawatch, I did attempt one late 
in the afternoon at Fort Tilden. However that attempt was stymied by a dense 
fog. When the fog did clear up slightly for about 20 mins. AlI I managed were a 
few Laughing Gulls and Common Terns. 


Cheers,


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Re: Whimbrel @ the Coast Guard Station Jones Beach
From: Michael Zito <michaelzito AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:38:56 -0400
For anyone thinking of trying for the whimbrel, a group of birders and myself 
saw it fly off towards the third Wantagh Bridge about 30 minutes ago. 


Mike Z.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 28, 2016, at 10:13 AM, Andrew Baksh  wrote:
> 
> I just received a phone call from Robert Proniewych who reported that Bob 
Anderson found a Whimbrel on the flats near the Coast Guard Station. 

> 
> Cheers,
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule 
of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ 
Frederick Douglass 

> 
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu  The Art of War
> 
>> (__/)
>> (= '.'=)                                            
>> (") _ (")                                     
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 
> 
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
> --
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Subject: Whimbrel @ the Coast Guard Station Jones Beach
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 10:13:00 -0400
I just received a phone call from Robert Proniewych who reported that Bob 
Anderson found a Whimbrel on the flats near the Coast Guard Station. 


Cheers,
--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Thank you
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 08:50:39 -0400
Many people have responded to my request for information. For those who
would like the link on file it is copied below.

http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm


It was pointed out that the above (working) link is in the series of links
at the bottom of all posts if you scroll down far enough.

Cheers,

Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

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Subject: No sightings: request for hold mail info
From: Sean Sime <sean AT seansime.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 06:45:15 -0400
The link I had on file which gave directions on list member settings
doesn't seem to be active anymore.

If someone has directions on how to change account settings to not receive
posts while staying subscribed could you please post or email me?

Thank you,

Sean Sime
Brooklyn, NY

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--
Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 20:16:30 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - June 27, 2016
*  NYSY  06. 27. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):June 20, 2016 
- June 27, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: June 27  AT 4:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of June 20, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
LEAST BITTERNEURASIAN WIGEONBLACK-NECKED STILTUPLAND SANDPIPERPEREGRINE 
FALCONACADIAN FLYCATCHER.GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERCLAY-COLORED SPARROWORCHARD 
ORIOLE 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     Only eight species of shorebirds were reported from the complex this 
week. However   one of them was a BLACK-NECKED STILT so that made it very 
exciting. Unfortunately the last sighting was on 6/21. Also there have been no 
new reports of the Gargeny.     6/21: A male EURASIAN WIGEON was again seen 
from East Road.     6/23: LEAST BITTERNS were seen on Towpath Road and 
VanDyne Spoor Road.     6/24: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on VanDyne Spoor 
Road. 


Onondaga County------------
     6/25: 6 ORCHARD ORIOLES were found at Green Lakes State Park on an 
Onondaga Audubon Field Trip. An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was found at Whiskey Hollow, 
about a month later than usual. 


Oswego County------------
     6/25: A GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER was seen along the power lines near 
O’connor Road in the Town of Scriba. 


Oneida county------------
     6/22: 4 PEREGRINE FALCONS were seen near the Seneca Street Park in 
Utica.     6/23: A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was again seen at the Spring Farm 
Nature Sanctuary south of Clinton. 

               --end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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--
Subject: Reminder: BBC Evening Presentation Tomorrow
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 09:23:04 -0400
*Tuesday, June 28th, 7:00 P.M.*

*The Wondrous World of Fireflies*

*Presenter: Sarah Lewis*


*Location: Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch
 at Grand Army Plaza*

Sara Lewis will present her research on the evolutionary role of the
flashing lights of fireflies, which is detailed in her new book: *Silent
Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies * Sara’s talk will be followed by
an evening walk in search of fireflies.

Sara is a professor of Biology at Tufts University and has presented her
fascination with fireflies in a popular TED  talk.
http://www.ted.com/talks/sara_lewis_the_loves_and_lies_of_fireflies


http://www.brooklynbirdclub.org/meetings.htm

Dennis Hrehowsik
Brooklyn

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--
Subject: JBWR East Pond Ruff NO (6-27-16)
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 06:37:52 -0400
NO sign of the Ruff this AM.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
--

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Subject: RE: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 16:53:09 -0400
Thank you Shai, 

For the Kingbird links. The previous early fall arrival date for Red-breasted 
Nuthatch for Central Park was July 8, 2007 right in line with the other early 
arrivals listed in Ken Feustel's paper. 


Winter finch forecast anyone?

Deb Allen
 


-----Original Message-----
>From: Shaibal Mitra 
>Sent: Jun 26, 2016 4:33 PM
>To: NYSBIRDS-L 
>Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b 
Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler 

>
>Hi Deborah and all,
>
>The nearly simultaneous appearance of this species at three sites in coastal 
New York strongly suggests an early irruption. A precedent that comes to mind 
is June 2007, when this species surprised many of us with its early 
appearances. We can only hope that fall 2016 shapes up like that one, in terms 
of irruptive species reaching the coast! 

>
>http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y2007v57n4/y2007v57n4p295-297feustel.pdf#
>http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y2007v57n4/y2007v57n4rgn10.pdf#
>http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y2008v58n1/y2008v58n1rgn10.pdf#
>
>Shai Mitra
>Bay Shore
>________________________________________
>From: bounce-120587102-11143133 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120587102-11143133 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Deborah Allen 
[dallenyc AT earthlink.net] 

>Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2016 4:04 PM
>To: NYSBIRDS-L
>Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch 
Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler 

>
>Central Park NYC - Ramble
>Sunday June 26, 2016
>OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from 
Turtle Pond at 9am 

>
>Highlights: Jeff Ward spotted a Red-breasted Nuthatch at the Maintenance 
Field. Red-breasted Nuthatch does not summer in Central Park, and today's 

>Red-breasted Nuthatch represents the park's earliest fall arrival date.
>We found two Red-breasted Nuthatches yesterday, June 25th, at the NYBG
>(Bronx), so these birds may also have been very early fall arrivals. A
>Red-breasted Nuthatch was also reported today from Brooklyn by Tom
>Preston via twitter.
>
>The group found two Black-and-white Warblers, one in Mugger's Woods, the other 
at the Tupelo Field. This is the latest spring date we know of for 
Black-and-white Warbler in Central Park. The previous record was June 25, 2006 
(spotted by Sandra Critelli on another of our bird walks). One of the birds 
(female - Mugger's Woods) is likely the bird we saw last week, the other was an 
adult male still in alternate plumage at the Tupelo Field. It becomes difficult 
to tell at this time of year whether this new Black-and-white Warbler 
represents a lingering spring migrant, an early fall migrant or "post-breeding 
dispersal." 

>
>________________________________
>Take a picture. Write a caption. Win a prize. Where’s Danny the Dolphin 
today? 

>
>--
>
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>
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--
Subject: Re:[ebirdsnyc] Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Ruff NO!
From: Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 16:49:55 -0400
The White-faced Ibis is present now toward the south end of the pond. I am
viewing it from Big John's overlook. No Ruff.
On Jun 26, 2016 3:13 PM, "Donna Schulman"  wrote:

> eBird report of the White-faced Ibis seen today at 7:45am.
>
> White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)
> - Reported Jun 26, 2016 07:45 by null
> - Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Queens, New York
> - Map:
> 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=40.6170296,-73.8244561&ll=40.6170296,-73.8244561 

> - Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30400658
>
> *---------------------------------------*
>
>
>
>
> *Donna L. SchulmanForest Hills, NY + North Brunswick,
> NJqueensgirl30 AT gmail.com *
>
>
> * *
>
> On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 3:02 PM, Andrew Baksh birdingdude AT gmail.com
> [ebirdsnyc]  wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> A strategic vigil with eyes on the North End, South End and the Overlook
>> has NOT resulted in a Ruff re-sighting after the early morning post.
>>
>> Many of us, who were on stakeout duties are pulling out. Let's hope
>> someone has a positive report before the day is out.
>>
>> Birds of note seen on the East Pondincluded, Greater Yellowlegs, (2),
>> Lesser Yellowlegs (4) and 1 Gull-billed Tern.
>>
>> No positive report of the White-faced Ibis that I know of from today.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> --------
>> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the
>> ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own
>> abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
>>
>> 風 Swift as the wind
>> 林 Quiet as the forest
>> 火 Conquer like the fire
>> 山 Steady as the mountain
>> Sun Tzu   *The Art of War*
>> 
>>
>> (__/)
>> (= '.'=)
>>
>> (") _ (")
>>
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
>>
>>
>> Andrew Baksh
>> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
>>
>> __._,_.___
>> ------------------------------
>> Posted by: Andrew Baksh 
>> ------------------------------
>> Reply via web post
>> 
 

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Subject: RE: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 20:33:24 +0000
Hi Deborah and all,

The nearly simultaneous appearance of this species at three sites in coastal 
New York strongly suggests an early irruption. A precedent that comes to mind 
is June 2007, when this species surprised many of us with its early 
appearances. We can only hope that fall 2016 shapes up like that one, in terms 
of irruptive species reaching the coast! 


http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y2007v57n4/y2007v57n4p295-297feustel.pdf#
http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y2007v57n4/y2007v57n4rgn10.pdf#
http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y2008v58n1/y2008v58n1rgn10.pdf#

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: bounce-120587102-11143133 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120587102-11143133 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Deborah Allen 
[dallenyc AT earthlink.net] 

Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2016 4:04 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch 
Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler 


Central Park NYC - Ramble
Sunday June 26, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from 
Turtle Pond at 9am 


Highlights: Jeff Ward spotted a Red-breasted Nuthatch at the Maintenance Field. 
Red-breasted Nuthatch does not summer in Central Park, and today's 

Red-breasted Nuthatch represents the park's earliest fall arrival date.
We found two Red-breasted Nuthatches yesterday, June 25th, at the NYBG
(Bronx), so these birds may also have been very early fall arrivals. A
Red-breasted Nuthatch was also reported today from Brooklyn by Tom
Preston via twitter.

The group found two Black-and-white Warblers, one in Mugger's Woods, the other 
at the Tupelo Field. This is the latest spring date we know of for 
Black-and-white Warbler in Central Park. The previous record was June 25, 2006 
(spotted by Sandra Critelli on another of our bird walks). One of the birds 
(female - Mugger's Woods) is likely the bird we saw last week, the other was an 
adult male still in alternate plumage at the Tupelo Field. It becomes difficult 
to tell at this time of year whether this new Black-and-white Warbler 
represents a lingering spring migrant, an early fall migrant or "post-breeding 
dispersal." 


________________________________
Take a picture. Write a caption. Win a prize. Where’s Danny the Dolphin 
today? 


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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 26, 2016 - R-b Nuthatch Arrival, late date Black-and-white Warbler
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 16:04:49 -0400
Central Park NYC - Ramble
Sunday June 26, 2016 
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from 
Turtle Pond at 9am 


Highlights: Jeff Ward spotted a Red-breasted Nuthatch at the Maintenance Field. 
Red-breasted Nuthatch does not summer in Central Park, and today's 

Red-breasted Nuthatch represents the park's earliest fall arrival date. 
We found two Red-breasted Nuthatches yesterday, June 25th, at the NYBG 
(Bronx), so these birds may also have been very early fall arrivals. A 
Red-breasted Nuthatch was also reported today from Brooklyn by Tom 
Preston via twitter. 

The group found two Black-and-white Warblers, one in Mugger's Woods, the other 
at the Tupelo Field. This is the latest spring date we know of for 
Black-and-white Warbler in Central Park. The previous record was June 25, 2006 
(spotted by Sandra Critelli on another of our bird walks). One of the birds 
(female - Mugger's Woods) is likely the bird we saw last week, the other was an 
adult male still in alternate plumage at the Tupelo Field. It becomes difficult 
to tell at this time of year whether this new Black-and-white Warbler 
represents a lingering spring migrant, an early fall migrant or "post-breeding 
dispersal." 



The List:
Canada Goose - Turtle Pond
Gadwall - pair Turtle Pond
Mallard - female with 3 young ducklings, and others Turtle Pond
Double-crested Cormorant - Turtle Pond
Great Egret - Turtle Pond
Red-tailed Hawk - adult (Pale Male) and juvenile near Cedar Hill (after walk)
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Great Crested Flycatcher - Tupelo Field (Martin Cuntz), Azalea Pond (Karen 
Evans) 

Eastern Kingbird - Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - Warbler Rock, the Point
Red-eyed Vireo - Tupelo Field, pair Azalea Pond
Blue Jay - juvenile fed by adult on the Point
Barn Swallow - over Great Lawn (before walk)
Black-capped Chickadee - 2 Mugger's Woods
Red-breasted Nuthatch - Maintenance Field (spotted by Jeff Ward)
White-breasted Nuthatch - 2 Azalea Pond
House Wren - singing Stone Arch
Gray Catbird - 2 adults and 2 fledglings near Boathouse (Carine Mitchell), 
others elsewhere 

Cedar Waxwing - Oven
Black-and-white Warbler - Mugger's Woods (female), Tupelo Field & Azalea Pond 
(alternate-plumaged male) spotted by Martin Cuntz 

Eastern Towhee - heard from Maintenance Field (Bob before walk)
Chipping Sparrow - adult bathing at Gill Overlook (Deb before walk)
White-throated Sparrow - 2
Northern Cardinal
Baltimore Oriole - various locations, many molting
House Finch - here & there and nice looks at a hatch-year male at the Oven

Deb Allen

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Subject: Re:[ebirdsnyc] Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Ruff NO!
From: Donna Schulman <queensgirl30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:12:47 -0400
eBird report of the White-faced Ibis seen today at 7:45am.

White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)
- Reported Jun 26, 2016 07:45 by null
- Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Queens, New York
- Map:

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=40.6170296,-73.8244561&ll=40.6170296,-73.8244561 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30400658

*---------------------------------------*




*Donna L. SchulmanForest Hills, NY + North Brunswick,
NJqueensgirl30 AT gmail.com *


* *

On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 3:02 PM, Andrew Baksh birdingdude AT gmail.com
[ebirdsnyc]  wrote:

>
>
> A strategic vigil with eyes on the North End, South End and the Overlook
> has NOT resulted in a Ruff re-sighting after the early morning post.
>
> Many of us, who were on stakeout duties are pulling out. Let's hope
> someone has a positive report before the day is out.
>
> Birds of note seen on the East Pondincluded, Greater Yellowlegs, (2),
> Lesser Yellowlegs (4) and 1 Gull-billed Tern.
>
> No positive report of the White-faced Ibis that I know of from today.
>
> Cheers,
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the
> ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own
> abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
>
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu   *The Art of War*
> 
>
> (__/)
> (= '.'=)
>
> (") _ (")
>
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
>
>
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
>
> __._,_.___
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Subject: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Ruff NO!
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:02:38 -0400
A strategic vigil with eyes on the North End, South End and the Overlook has 
NOT resulted in a Ruff re-sighting after the early morning post. 


Many of us, who were on stakeout duties are pulling out. Let's hope someone has 
a positive report before the day is out. 


Birds of note seen on the East Pondincluded, Greater Yellowlegs, (2), Lesser 
Yellowlegs (4) and 1 Gull-billed Tern. 


No positive report of the White-faced Ibis that I know of from today.

Cheers,
-------- 
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Ruff - East Pond Intel and suggestion on working this bird...
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 06:52:21 -0400
For anyone thinking of checking the North End. Yesterday, I cleared the north 
west trail so it is open. Please note, that knee high boots is a MUST, if 
attempting to enter the pond at that end. 


The water is still draining and is higher there than on the south with many 
soft spots. Please be VERY careful if you venture there. 


Yesterday, while a few of us observed the bird when it was first found on the 
south end. It was noticeably jumpy and kept its distance. I would suggest 
giving this bird ample room, as it may leave the pond if pushed. It did leave 
the pond in the afternoon although this was more as a result of the tide having 
turned so that is also the other variable to consider. 


Here's to an awesome shorebirding season!

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 26, 2016, at 6:23 AM, Corey Finger 10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com 
[ebirdsnyc]  wrote: 

> 
> I walked up to the overlook and it's not here now. Incoming birders should 
check the north and south ends of the East Pond. 

> 
> Good Birding,
> Corey Finger
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Jun 26, 2016, at 5:52 AM, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> 
wrote: 

> > 
> > Currently viewing Ruff from south end of East Pond. It's at the Raunt 
though, so the view is probably better from Big John's Pond overlook. 

> > 
> > Good Birding,
> > Corey Finger
> > 
> > Sent from my iPhone
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com>
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Topic • Messages in this topic (2) 

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Subject: Re:Ruff - Now not at the Raunt
From: Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 06:23:38 -0400
I walked up to the overlook and it's not here now. Incoming birders should 
check the north and south ends of the East Pond. 


Good Birding,
Corey Finger

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 26, 2016, at 5:52 AM, Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com> 
wrote: 

> 
> Currently viewing Ruff from south end of East Pond. It's at the Raunt though, 
so the view is probably better from Big John's Pond overlook. 

> 
> Good Birding,
> Corey Finger
> 
> Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Ruff - Yes
From: Corey Finger <10000birdsblogger AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 05:52:59 -0400
Currently viewing Ruff from south end of East Pond. It's at the Raunt though, 
so the view is probably better from Big John's Pond overlook. 


Good Birding,
Corey Finger

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Saturday June 25, 2016
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 20:44:01 -0400
New York Botanical Garden, Bronx  
Saturday June 25, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. 

We set a new record for our bird walks today with five MDs attending.

Turkey Vulture - flyover (Mark S.)
Red-tailed Hawk - adult chased by Eastern Kingbird (Jeff Ward)
Mourning Dove
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - female near the previously used nest (found by Jeff 
Ward back in May) 

Chimney Swift - not many
Red-bellied Woodpecker - male, female, juvenile getting red on head
Downy Woodpecker - family & others
Hairy Woodpecker - male & female - Forest
Northern Flicker - Forest
Eastern Phoebe - one or two juveniles (fresh cinnamon wing bars & yellow gape) 
(Chris Tipton) 

Eastern Kingbird - chasing Red-tailed Hawk
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo - Forest
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2 (Bob & Deb before walk)
Black-capped Chickadee - family
Tufted Titmouse - family
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2 together (we believe these birds summered & are not 
fall arrivals) 

White-breasted Nutchatch - 2 or 3 Forest
House Wren - Swale (Jeff Ward)
Wood Thrush - Forest (Andrea Hessel, MD)
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Cedar Waxwing - 3 (Jeff Ward)
Common Yellowthroat - male singing at the Swale
Pine Warbler - female carrying food (Bob before walk), male singing (group)
Eastern Towhee - male singing - Forest
Chipping Sparrow - juvenile
Song Sparrow - singing male & others
Red-winged Blackbird - singing male
Common Grackle - begging young Swale (Deb before walk)
Orchard Oriole - adult male Swale (Beth Breakstone, MD)
Baltimore Oriole - male & female, including used nest pointed out by Jeff Ward
House Finch
American Goldfinch - many

White-tailed Deer - Bronx River (Jeff Ward) - a security guard told us he 
started seeing them in 2008. 


Deb Allen

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Subject: Bank Swallows on Road
From: Bradley Klein <mail AT bradleyklein.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 19:36:40 -0400
Just outside of Hudson, NY we came upon a flock of 150 or so bank swallows. 
Some on wires overhead, but about half on the surface of the black topped road, 
seemingly warming themselves. The sun was low, but the road surface quite warm. 
They were reluctant to fly even when I stopped a car in their midst, but all 
eventually did, except one DOR. I've never seen this behavior. Have others? 





m. 917 885 2454
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Subject: Croton Point
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 20:33:24 +0000
With a breeze the land fill was very pleasant this afternoon. With the drought 
there were no ticks (unheard of). As to birds 2 willow fly, 2 grasshopper 
sparrow (one teed up), one F bobolink, one bald eagle flyover 


There is a new informative sign installed at the beginning of the walk up the 
landfill thanks to efforts of county parks dep't and saw mill river Audubon w 
great photos of some of CPP's grassland birds. 


L. Trachtenberg
Ossining 

P.s. Alas no Ruff at the Point would be a lifer

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: White-faced Ibis currently present South End of East Pond JBWR
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:21:40 -0400
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge south end of East Pond -White-faced Ibis. (The
Ruff left the pond half an hour ago -flew over the trees. Waiting for it to
come back.)

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Subject: Ruff @ JBWR 3:00
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:03:53 -0400
The Ruff was still visible from the Big John's overlook, well south of the 
Raunt on the east side 10 mins ago. It was moving south at a very fast pace 
initially, but it has slowed to forage on a mudflat just before the cove bends 
out of view. I imagine the south end would supply good views as well, but one 
should take care not to step out and disturb the bird from the southern 
shoreline. In the process of sending this email, the bird took off and looked 
to be headed north, somewhat towards the bay. Not currently in view. 


Really handsome individual! Rufous with a somewhat darker neck ruff. Thanks to 
all who update on the whereabouts and comings and goings of the bird. 


Cheers!
-Tim H

> On Jun 25, 2016, at 2:00 PM, Andrew Baksh  wrote:
> 
> The Ruff is being seen at the north end of the East Pond. It is on the east 
side and making its way back south. If you are at the overlook at Big John's, 
look north or south along the east side and you should be able to pick this 
bird up. 

> 
> It looks a bit like "Rufous Ruff" from 2012 but it has a lot more breeding 
plumage - 
http://birdingdude.blogspot.com/2012/07/2nd-ruff-at-jamaica-bay-wildlife-refuge.html?m=1 

> 
> For anyone wondering about the various East Pond areas nomenclatures, please 
check out the map https://www.scribd.com/mobile/doc/153262543/East-Pond-Guide 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule 
of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ 
Frederick Douglass 

> 
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu  The Art of War
> 
>> (__/)
>> (= '.'=)                                            
>> (") _ (")                                     
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 
> 
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
> 
>> On Jun 25, 2016, at 12:50 PM, Ken  wrote:
>> 
>> Last seen at s/s of Raunt, best viewed from overlook east of Big John's 
Pond. 

>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> --
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>> 
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Subject: Re: Ruff Update @ JBWR 1:59 pm
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 14:00:29 -0400
The Ruff is being seen at the north end of the East Pond. It is on the east 
side and making its way back south. If you are at the overlook at Big John's, 
look north or south along the east side and you should be able to pick this 
bird up. 


It looks a bit like "Rufous Ruff" from 2012 but it has a lot more breeding 
plumage - 
http://birdingdude.blogspot.com/2012/07/2nd-ruff-at-jamaica-bay-wildlife-refuge.html?m=1 


For anyone wondering about the various East Pond areas nomenclatures, please 
check out the map https://www.scribd.com/mobile/doc/153262543/East-Pond-Guide 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 25, 2016, at 12:50 PM, Ken  wrote:
> 
> Last seen at s/s of Raunt, best viewed from overlook east of Big John's Pond.
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> --
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Subject: Ruff Update
From: Ken <feustel AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:50:45 -0400
Last seen at s/s of Raunt, best viewed from overlook east of Big John's Pond.

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Ruff at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge (Queens Co}
From: Ken <feustel AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:23:06 -0400
Male currently on east side of East Pond below Raunt, with Laughing Gulls.

Ken & Sue Feustel 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Sandwich Tern Cupsogue CP, Suffolk Co.
From: Patricia Lindsay <pjlindsay AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:16:57 -0400
This morning just before 10:00 as the tide was coming up an adult Sandwich Tern 
appeared on the flats. It remained about an hour then flew off. 


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Subject: White-faced Ibis, Jamaica Bay (Yes)
From: Anthony Collerton <icollerton AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 09:25:00 -0400
Just flew in to the SE corner of the East Pond (9:25am)

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Suffolk County Goatsuckers 6-24-16
From: Arie Gilbert <ArieGilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 09:11:39 -0400
Last night a group of us went in search of goatsuckers.

The first sucky thing we encountered was an accident on sunrise highway 
that closed all three lanes and herded the traffic off onto the service 
road. Police closed all of the lanes because it involved a death, and 
hours later on our return the road was still closed to traffic eastbound.

After finally arriving in Quogue and walking some roads we heard a Chuck 
wills widow calling, after some time, in this location: 
https://goo.gl/maps/STy7SXHkRqN2   but it was distant and came from west 
of where we were. we could not relocate it afterwards.

on our way back home we stopped at Hampton west park 
https://goo.gl/maps/JxoKFuvdM6U2  where we heard 2 distant calling whip 
poor wills.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY

WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
  WWW.qcbirdclub.org





-----

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2016.0.7640 / Virus Database: 4604/12488 - Release Date: 06/25/16


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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 24 June 2016
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 22:44:05 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 24, 2016
* NYNY1606.24

- Birds mentioned
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

American Bittern
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Piping Plover
Willet (subspecies "Western Willet")
Red Knot
White-rumped Sandpiper
WESTERN SANDPIPER
Gull-billed Tern
Black Tern
Roseate Tern
COMMON TERN (Siberian form longipennis)
Royal Tern
Barn Owl
Acadian Flycatcher
Cliff Swallow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Summer Tanager
BLUE GROSBEAK

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 24th 2016
at 6pm. The highlights of today's tape are WHITE-FACED IBIS, BLUE GROSBEAK,
WESTERN SANDPIPER, interesting COMMON TERNS and more.

An adult WHITE-FACED IBIS has been continuing its fairly regular visits to
the southeast corner of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge as
reported each day from Saturday at least through Tuesday afternoon.
Diligent scanning through the flock of Glossy Ibis gathered there as they
continuously cycle into and out of the pond plus some patience have and may
still produce views of the White-faced. Saturday morning the White-faced
stayed for about 25 minutes and then flew out alone towards the marsh south
of the former West Pond but it could not be relocated there. Also Saturday
morning a TRICOLORED and four LITTLE BLUE HERONS were feeding at mid-tide
on the flats on the former West Pond. The south marsh and adjacent area has
also been attracting one or two GULL-BILLED TERNS lately. Two ROYAL TERNS
flew east over the East Pond Saturday morning and an ACADIAN FLYCATCHER
that had been in the vicinity at Big John's Pond and was still singing
there Tuesday morning and if there one should certainly visit the bird
blind at Big John's Pond to view the young BARN OWLS in the nest box across
the pond but please do nothing to disturb them.

Out east at least 3 BLUE GROSBEAKS have been present among the nice
assemblage of birds around the grasslands at the former Grumman airport in
Calverton. The Grosbeaks, including adult and subadult plumaged males and a
female, have been in the vicinity at the southwest section of the airport
property and surrounding fields near the terminus of Line Road at Grumman
Boulevard. As these birds are hopefully nesting please do nothing that
would interrupt their activities. Also in that area could still be a SUMMER
TANAGER pair present earlier and GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS are common nesters in
the grasslands there.

At Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes where an entry fee is now
charged shorebirds present recently on the celebrated flats there featured
an apparent adult WESTERN SANDPIPER last Saturday along with some PIPING
PLOVERS, single WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER and RED KNOT, a Western WILLET among
the Easterns and small numbers of a variety of species that will not be
completing the journey farther north this summer. An AMERICAN BITTERN was
also seen Saturday along with a ROYAL TERN and two ROSEATE TERNS while
quite interesting there was a COMMON TERN showing aspects of the Siberian
form longipennis though solidifying this identification would require much
more detail than is currently available. Interestingly as well a similarly
plumaged COMMON TERN was nicely photographed yesterday at Nickerson Beach
west of Point Lookout. But again it is difficult to determine given the
variability among age groups of COMMON TERNS exactly which subspecies is
involved here. A BLACK TERN was also at Nickerson Thursday and scattered
ROYAL TERNS have occurred from Plumb Beach and Nickerson Beach all the way
out to Great Gull Island.

CLIFF SWALLOWS have been present within New York City limits recently but a
couple feeding over the fields at Van Cortlandt Park Saturday through
Wednesday and others constructing a couple of nests at Orchard Beach, these
in the Bronx.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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--
Subject: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge -- No White-face this AM
From: "syschiff" <icterus AT optonline.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 14:23:29 -0400
Jamaica Bay WR, 9:00-11:00 AM 24 June

Joe Giunta and I (Sy Schiff) went to the south end, walking on a newly created 
path through the phragmites to reach a small mud flat that held us and a scope. 
(The water is coming down and for the first time in years, early enough for the 
beginning return shorebird flight). 


We spent the morning on the East Pond, first scanning north from the south end 
and then south from Big Johns Pond. Besides the Mallard and Black Ducks, there 
were a few Gadwall. Shorebirds consisted of Willet, American Oystercatchers and 
a pair of Greater Yellowlegs. A dozen + Forster's Terns were actively feeding 
in the pond. No other terns. Willow Flycatchers were calling at the South end, 
but we did not find an earlier reported Acadian Flycatcher. 


 At Big Johns Pond, a Barn Owl looked out of the box watching the Snowy Egrets 
fishing while both Night-Herons (mostly Black-crowns) surrounded the pool. 
Catbirds and a Yellow Warbler flitted about. A tranquil and lovely view. 


A great summer birding morning on the East Pond with 38 Species seen. BUT, no 
white-faced ibis! 


Sy
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Subject: Re:
From: Bruce Horwith <bruce.horwith AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 12:14:34 -0400
Hi Chip,
Mainly I just check the NYS e-bird list since it gives me real time notes
on what's being seen, where (nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu). But you might like
this one as well: http://dereksnest.blogspot.com/

Bruce

*Bruce Horwith*
*16 Salt Marsh Path*
*East Hampton, NY 11937*
*(631) 599-0040*

On Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 11:38 AM, Chip Dineen  wrote:

> Hi Bruce, I recently purchased some stuff at your store and the salesman
> told me to reach out to you about local birding blogs.  Could you recommend
> any in particular.  I already read Eric Salzman but wonder about others.
>
> Thank you,  Chip Dineen

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Subject: Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 09:19:10 -0400
*Tuesday, June 28th, 7:00 P.M.*

*The Wondrous World of Fireflies*

*Presenter: Sarah Lewis*


*Location: Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch
 at Grand Army Plaza*

Sara Lewis will present her research on the evolutionary role of the
flashing lights of fireflies, which is detailed in her new book: *Silent
Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies * Sara’s talk will be followed by
an evening walk in search of fireflies.

Sara is a professor of Biology at Tufts University and has presented her
fascination with fireflies in a popular TED  talk.
http://www.ted.com/talks/sara_lewis_the_loves_and_lies_of_fireflies



http://www.brooklynbirdclub.org/meetings.htm

Dennis Hrehowsik

Brooklyn

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Subject: Massapequa Raven
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 09:02:08 -0400
Just seen by rte 107 x Southern State pkwy, being harassed by 2 Crows.

Rob in Massapequa

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Subject: Wood and Hermit Thrushes Southern Tier of NY
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 08:25:23 -0400
All,

I have an evening walk that I try to do every day and one of the joys of
this walk
is the presence of thrushes and their songs. For many years, HERMIT THRUSHES
were by far the more common thrush. The trail goes through a ravine with
hemlock
in the ravine and mainly a northern red oak, beech, and sugar maple forest
outside the
ravine. About a 1/2 mile up the hill you run into a fairly mature oak
forest, again mainly northern red oak, with some white oak, many sugar and
red maples, beech, some cherry and a few white pine. There is plenty of
undergrowth.  Conifers are scarce in this upland wood. The upland wood is
on one side of the trail and an abandoned Christmas tree plantation is on
the other side with balsam and fraser firs, silver fir, and white spruce,
all between about 30 and 40 feet tall.

Earlier this June I was surprised and happy to hear so many WOOD THRUSH
along this walk with as many as 5 singing males from the ravine to the
upland woods and 1 even in the abandoned Christmas tree plantation. The
HERMIT THRUSHES were scarce with only 1 singing male found in the ravine at
the beginning and none in the uplands which was unlike other years.

However, last night I walked this same trail and HERMIT THRUSHES  were
found in the upland trail with 2 counter singing males (very beautiful I
may add) and NO WOOD THRUSHES singing!!!! I could barely make out the call
of 1 wood thrush farther down in the Christmas tree plantation. But wood
thrushes were not in song at all.

The lesson here is that if censusing singing males you have to be careful.
One would assume the wood thrush was very common on the trail a week ago
with very few hermits and but if you went last evening you would say wood
thrush are scarce and hermits are more common! They seem to be sharing
similar habitat along this trail but maybe are at different life cycles
related to nesting, second broods etc??


Anyway thought I would share this and see if others have noticed this with
thrushes especially. I find it interesting on the habitat selection of the
thrushes, especially hermit and wood which share our woods in the southern
tier. Veeries are present in Broome Co as expected  but not in these drier
upland habitats on this trail.

Cheers,
Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Leucistic Robin at Brooklyn Botanic Garden
From: BradleyKlein mail <mail AT bradleyklein.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 11:02:08 -0400
The Brooklyn Botanic Garden held a Summer Solstice, Musical event the evening 
of Tuesday June 21, 2016. Hundreds of visitors attended an evening Bird Walk 
and Concert - and most got good views of a strikingly leucistic American Robin 
among the familiar Summer birds. Almost completely white with a few dark 
markings on wings. Dark eyes. Standard yellow dark-tipped robin bill. On the 
ground feeding near the Spanish Bluebell plantings. 


Bradley Klein and Danielle Gustafsons
We lead monthly nature programs for the BBG. See their website for details.


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Subject: Orchard Beach Cliff Swallows
From: Jack Rothman <jacroth1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 10:06:30 -0400
Two Cliff Swallow nests are being constructed at Orchard Beach, Pelham Bay 
Park, Bronx. 

One beginning nest is located along a beam, above the sign that says, “Cold 
Beer Only.” This is at the closed and fenced off bath house, near the beach 
police station. The birds nested in the exact spot last year. 

Directly across is another bath house. I spotted another Cliff Swallow 
scrunched into a corner where she is also just beginning to build a nest. 


At Turtle Cove there most likely is a hummingbird nest. Sunday, Bronx Brendan 
alerted me to the possibility, as he saw the hummer go in and out of a tree, 
near the place where a hummer nested a few years ago. I looked today and saw 
the bird dart from the tree but I could not locate the nest either. 



While waiting around there was a Baltimore Oriole, two Hairy Woodpeckers, a few 
Goldfinches, a Yellow Warbler and more of the usual nesting birds in our park. 


If you decide to go to Orchard Beach to find the nest, be advised the parking 
fee is now $ 7.00 M-F, $9:00 weekends. If you get to the area early, park at 
Rodman’s Neck and walk over, about 15-20 minutes. The lot fills up fast in 
the morning. 


Jack Rothman
cityislandbirds.com
 


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Subject: White-faced Ibis and Hooded Merganser Jamaica Bay
From: Adrian Burke <adrianb70 AT nyclabschool.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:27:47 -0400
White-faced ibis just picked up with about 40 glossy ibis at south end of
East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife refuge. A female hooded merganser is
present here as well.

Adrian Burke, Manhattan

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Subject: Acadian Flycatcher and Jamaica Bay East Pond Water Level Update...
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:19:25 -0400
As of this morning, an Acadian Flycatcher continues at Jamaica Bay Wildlife 
Refuge. It was actively calling before taking a bath at Big John's pond this 
AM. A word of caution to seekers, please exercise diligence in eliminating the 
more usual Willow Flycatcher. 


On the East Pond water level management: NPS, has made a concerted effort to 
get a head start with the draining of the East Pond. It started with draining 
in the spring which allowed us to identify a drainage problem, that was 
subsequently addressed. However, recently I noticed another issue with the 
drainage outflow which was slower than usual. To the naked eye it appears to be 
the build up of muck/sand at the outflow and just needs clearing to allow a 
strong flow. NPS was informed and they are working on getting that taken care 
of so we should see the outflow picking up shortly. In any event, it is my 
opinion that we are right on track to getting the water level where it needs to 
be. 


Lastly, I am working on finalizing an updated East Pond map, which will include 
some of the changes we saw from Hurricane Sandy. That map will be made 
available online, at the same link I have provided in the past. 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Royals Terns on Great Gull Island
From: Joseph DiCostanzo <jdicost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 12:13:10 -0400
Earlier this morning Peter Paton saw 2 Royal Terns flying west (towards Orient 
Pt) past Great Gull Island. He got a photo of one bird. 


Also this morning, after the sun up thunderstorms, there was a second year 
American Redstart on the island, so there is still some bird movement going on. 


Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Cupsogue Birding 6-19
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 11:57:50 -0400
On Sunday, I headed out east with the intentions of getting in a shorebird 
survey at Cupsogue. Since I got there around high tide, I spent some time doing 
a sea-watch which was non productive. 


I then birded the Cupsogue flats on a falling tide. The number of birds were 
paltry but I managed 12 species of shorebirds which is not too shabby for this 
time of the year. The shorebird highlights were 1 White-rumped Sandpiper (with 
a bum left eye), 1 non breeding plumaged Red Knot, 5 Piping Plovers, one of 
which was banded with the Virginia Tech schema and one "ratty" looking Western 
Willet, previously reported by Michael McBrien. 


The Tern numbers were not great with 127 as my high count of Common Terns. 3 of 
which were 1 st Summer types, warranting carefully study as distance and the 
uneven terrain often gave that "short-legged" look that is associated with the 
rarer Arctic Terns. 4 Forster's Terns and 3 Least Terns, rounded out the 
expected Sternas. 


1 Royal and 2 Roseate Terns were late arrivals; the latter, listed as 
endangered both federally and locally, is always a pleasing sight and these two 
were pristine looking adults. 


I opted not to bird the second tide cycle leaving that to Pat and Shai. An 
evening seawatch was also abandoned after getting Intel from Tom Burke and Gail 
Benson who reported all was quiet at Shinnecock Inlet. 


A quick stop at Epcal with Tom and Gail, did not amount to much in terms of 
Blue Grosbeaks or Summer Tanagers. I chalked that up to a case of "GI" (on my 
part) or bad time of the day where birds were singing less. I did however, 
enjoy the many Grasshopper Sparrows. If that place was managed properly, I 
wonder if Henslow's could return? 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: Robert Paxton <rop1 AT columbia.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:42:02 +0200
Hi Shai, David et al.,
    Don't forget that the Black-throated Green Warbler is not a species of
purely "northern affinities" or cool temperatures. The Wayne's
Black-throated Green Warbler is still found along the southeastern coast
from the Great Dismal Swamp of extreme s.e. Virginia south along the coast
of the Carolinas, in Atlantic White Cedar, Bald Cypress, and Loblolly Pine.
  Yrs.,  Bob Paxton

On Tue, Jun 21, 2016 at 2:18 AM, Matthew A. Young  wrote:

> Hello,
>
>
> The plantings of Norway spruce have greatly expanded the range of
> Blackburnian and Magnolia Warblers, and to a lesser extent Yellow-rumped
> Warbler in upstate NY. I find Yellow-rumps will use red pine plantations
> more than Magnolia or Blackburnians. Black-throated Green's have always
> preferred the native northern hardwoods usually with hemlock IMO. I find
> white pine to be used about equally by all of them.
>
>
> Matt
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* bounce-120575433-44102615 AT list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-120575433-44102615 AT list.cornell.edu> on behalf of David Nicosia <
> daven102468 AT gmail.com>
> *Sent:* Monday, June 20, 2016 8:12 PM
> *To:* Shaibal Mitra
> *Cc:* NYSBIRDS-L; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
> *Subject:* Re: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County,
> NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
>
> One thing I have noticed in the southern tier of NY, is that
> BLACK-THROATED GREENS tend to be the most
> common warbler of "northern" affinities, with just a few BLACKBURNIANS
> around here and there. The forests
> in the southern tier on the north slopes tend to be northern hardwoods,
> including sugar maple, beech, northern red oak
> eastern hemlock and white pine. The eastern hemlock seems to be the most
> common conifer on the northern slopes. The
> southern slopes tend to be more oak(both white and northern red), with
> white pine, the most common conifer. It is harder to find
> Black-throated Greens or any warbler of northern affinities here (although
> not impossible). We have only a
> few isolated forests where there may be a balsam fir or red spruce tree
> here or there and they are just isolated. We do have norway spruce
> plantations, but to my knowledge around the Broome county area at least,
> not as extensive as NW Chenango County. I also
> see more extensive norway spruce plantations in Cortland County, southern
> Cayuga County, southern Madison Co and southern Onondaga Co
> especially over the high terrain.   One wonders if swainson's thrush is
> found in these areas too??? I would imagine blackburnians
> are probably everywhere in these areas too. I know at Long Pond State Park
> there is a fairly large norway spruce plantation and I found
> blackburnians to be most common along with Magnolia warblers a few years
> back. Black throated greens seemed to be more common
> in the native woodlands which were maple, beech and hemlock.
>
> So, I wonder if BLACKBURNIANS prefer spruce, fir and red pine to white
> pine and hemlock, which is far more common
> in the southern tier?  Maybe Black-throated Greens prefer hemlock and
> white pine at least in central NY??
>
> Dave
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Shaibal Mitra  > wrote:
>
>> Hi Dave and all,
>>
>> I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler
>> perplexing.
>>
>> It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad
>> array of forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any
>> kind of specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look
>> superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as
>> places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both
>> this species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely
>> unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And
>> in this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar
>> bogs, another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these
>> very same habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by
>> Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes,
>> which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests).
>>
>> Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in
>> near-upstate New York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and
>> elsewhere) in nice-looking Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a
>> lot of getting used to for anyone who has seen the kind of sterile and
>> depauperate woods* they like in RI, but now that I get it, David's
>> observations from Chenango County seem just a more extreme example of a
>> pattern I see in a lot of places.
>>
>> I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the
>> vegetation type but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern
>> RI probably has lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the
>> ocean influence, than do many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In
>> addition to these two species, Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple
>> Finch, and other boreal-associated species also co-occur as breeders
>> surprisingly close to the coast in RI, in utterly non-boreal forest types:
>>
>>
>> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

>> http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6
>>
>> If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these
>> species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to
>> explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented
>> nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low
>> quality.*
>>
>> Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and
>> inspiring report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow
>> morning!
>>
>> Shai Mitra
>> Bay Shore
>>
>> *It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the
>> phrases I would use naturally when speaking .
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu [
>> bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of David Nicosia [
>> daven102468 AT gmail.com]
>> Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
>> To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
>> Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY:
>> Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
>>
>> Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
>> Today, 6/20/16.
>> This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
>> upstate NY
>> outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
>> SPRUCES
>> planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is
>> dense and fairly
>> mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
>> hardwoods type
>> forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees
>> and
>> scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.
>>
>> The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
>> BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
>> too along with
>> WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
>> mountains.
>> Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS
>> and
>> YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a
>> close
>> second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete
>> BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a
>> factor here?
>> I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
>> append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.
>>
>> In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and
>> carefully counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best
>> effort at an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to
>> double count. I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9
>> miles and a whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just
>> under 3 hours.
>>
>> see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959
>>
>> Dave Nicosia
>> Johnson City, NY
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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Subject: Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: "Matthew A. Young" <may6 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:18:26 +0000
Hello,


The plantings of Norway spruce have greatly expanded the range of Blackburnian 
and Magnolia Warblers, and to a lesser extent Yellow-rumped Warbler in upstate 
NY. I find Yellow-rumps will use red pine plantations more than Magnolia or 
Blackburnians. Black-throated Green's have always preferred the native northern 
hardwoods usually with hemlock IMO. I find white pine to be used about equally 
by all of them. 



Matt


________________________________
From: bounce-120575433-44102615 AT list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of David Nicosia 
 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 8:12 PM
To: Shaibal Mitra
Cc: NYSBIRDS-L; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: 
Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. 


One thing I have noticed in the southern tier of NY, is that BLACK-THROATED 
GREENS tend to be the most 

common warbler of "northern" affinities, with just a few BLACKBURNIANS around 
here and there. The forests 

in the southern tier on the north slopes tend to be northern hardwoods, 
including sugar maple, beech, northern red oak 

eastern hemlock and white pine. The eastern hemlock seems to be the most common 
conifer on the northern slopes. The 

southern slopes tend to be more oak(both white and northern red), with white 
pine, the most common conifer. It is harder to find 

Black-throated Greens or any warbler of northern affinities here (although not 
impossible). We have only a 

few isolated forests where there may be a balsam fir or red spruce tree here or 
there and they are just isolated. We do have norway spruce 

plantations, but to my knowledge around the Broome county area at least, not as 
extensive as NW Chenango County. I also 

see more extensive norway spruce plantations in Cortland County, southern 
Cayuga County, southern Madison Co and southern Onondaga Co 

especially over the high terrain. One wonders if swainson's thrush is found in 
these areas too??? I would imagine blackburnians 

are probably everywhere in these areas too. I know at Long Pond State Park 
there is a fairly large norway spruce plantation and I found 

blackburnians to be most common along with Magnolia warblers a few years back. 
Black throated greens seemed to be more common 

in the native woodlands which were maple, beech and hemlock.

So, I wonder if BLACKBURNIANS prefer spruce, fir and red pine to white pine and 
hemlock, which is far more common 

in the southern tier? Maybe Black-throated Greens prefer hemlock and white pine 
at least in central NY?? 


Dave



On Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Shaibal Mitra 
> wrote: 

Hi Dave and all,

I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler 
perplexing. 


It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad array of 
forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any kind of 
specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look 
superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as 
places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both this 
species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely 
unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And in 
this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar bogs, 
another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these very same 
habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by 
Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes, 
which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests). 


Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in near-upstate New 
York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and elsewhere) in nice-looking 
Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a lot of getting used to for anyone 
who has seen the kind of sterile and depauperate woods* they like in RI, but 
now that I get it, David's observations from Chenango County seem just a more 
extreme example of a pattern I see in a lot of places. 


I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the vegetation type 
but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern RI probably has 
lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the ocean influence, than do 
many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In addition to these two species, 
Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple Finch, and other boreal-associated 
species also co-occur as breeders surprisingly close to the coast in RI, in 
utterly non-boreal forest types: 



http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6

If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these 
species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to 
explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented 
nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low quality.* 


Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and inspiring 
report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow morning! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

*It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the phrases I 
would use naturally when speaking . 




________________________________________
From: 
bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] 
on behalf of David Nicosia 
[daven102468 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; 
broomebirds AT googlegroups.com 

Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: 
Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. 


Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning Today, 
6/20/16. 

This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in 
upstate NY 

outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense and 
fairly 

mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern 
hardwoods type 

forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of BLACKBURNIAN 
WARBLERS. In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here too along with 

WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger 
mountains. 

Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a factor 
here? 

I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and 
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below. 


In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully 
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at an 
"exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count. I was 
amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a whopping 86 
OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3 hours. 


see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY




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Subject: Re: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:12:11 -0400
One thing I have noticed in the southern tier of NY, is that BLACK-THROATED
GREENS tend to be the most
common warbler of "northern" affinities, with just a few BLACKBURNIANS
around here and there. The forests
in the southern tier on the north slopes tend to be northern hardwoods,
including sugar maple, beech, northern red oak
eastern hemlock and white pine. The eastern hemlock seems to be the most
common conifer on the northern slopes. The
southern slopes tend to be more oak(both white and northern red), with
white pine, the most common conifer. It is harder to find
Black-throated Greens or any warbler of northern affinities here (although
not impossible). We have only a
few isolated forests where there may be a balsam fir or red spruce tree
here or there and they are just isolated. We do have norway spruce
plantations, but to my knowledge around the Broome county area at least,
not as extensive as NW Chenango County. I also
see more extensive norway spruce plantations in Cortland County, southern
Cayuga County, southern Madison Co and southern Onondaga Co
especially over the high terrain.   One wonders if swainson's thrush is
found in these areas too??? I would imagine blackburnians
are probably everywhere in these areas too. I know at Long Pond State Park
there is a fairly large norway spruce plantation and I found
blackburnians to be most common along with Magnolia warblers a few years
back. Black throated greens seemed to be more common
in the native woodlands which were maple, beech and hemlock.

So, I wonder if BLACKBURNIANS prefer spruce, fir and red pine to white pine
and hemlock, which is far more common
in the southern tier?  Maybe Black-throated Greens prefer hemlock and white
pine at least in central NY??

Dave



On Mon, Jun 20, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Shaibal Mitra 
wrote:

> Hi Dave and all,
>
> I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler
> perplexing.
>
> It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad
> array of forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any
> kind of specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look
> superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as
> places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both
> this species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely
> unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And
> in this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar
> bogs, another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these
> very same habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by
> Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes,
> which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests).
>
> Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in
> near-upstate New York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and
> elsewhere) in nice-looking Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a
> lot of getting used to for anyone who has seen the kind of sterile and
> depauperate woods* they like in RI, but now that I get it, David's
> observations from Chenango County seem just a more extreme example of a
> pattern I see in a lot of places.
>
> I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the vegetation
> type but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern RI probably
> has lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the ocean influence,
> than do many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In addition to these
> two species, Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple Finch, and other
> boreal-associated species also co-occur as breeders surprisingly close to
> the coast in RI, in utterly non-boreal forest types:
>
>
> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6
>
> If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these
> species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to
> explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented
> nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low
> quality.*
>
> Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and
> inspiring report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow
> morning!
>
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
>
> *It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the
> phrases I would use naturally when speaking .
>
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu [
> bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of David Nicosia [
> daven102468 AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
> To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY:
> Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
>
> Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
> Today, 6/20/16.
> This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
> upstate NY
> outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
> SPRUCES
> planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is
> dense and fairly
> mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
> hardwoods type
> forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees
> and
> scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.
>
> The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
> BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
> too along with
> WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
> mountains.
> Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS
> and
> YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a
> close
> second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete
> BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a
> factor here?
> I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
> append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.
>
> In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and
> carefully counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best
> effort at an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to
> double count. I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9
> miles and a whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just
> under 3 hours.
>
> see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959
>
> Dave Nicosia
> Johnson City, NY
>
>
>
>
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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:48:28 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - June 20, 2016
*  NYSY  06. 20. 16 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):June 13, 2016 
- June 20, 2016to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: June 20  AT 4:00 p.m. 
(EDT)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of June 13, 2015. 

Highlights--------------
LEAST BITTERNSNOWY EGRETGARGANEYEURASIAN WIGEONRUDDY DUCKBLACK-NECKED 
STILTSWAINSON’S THRUSHPROTHONOTARY WARBLERORCHARD ORIOLE 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

          The big news this week is the mega-rarity BLACK-NECKED STILT 
that was found in Knox-Marsellus Marsh on 6/18. Luckily this bird has stuck 
around and has been seen by almost everyone who has looked for it. It was 
present this morning at the west end of Knox-Marsellus and easily picked out 
with a scope from East Road. Unfortunately the even more rare GARGANY has not 
been seen since 6/16.      6/17: A LEAST BITTERN was found at the Morgan 
Road marsh.      6/18: BLACK-NECKED STILT discovered at Knox-Marsellus Marsh 
from East Road.  An ERUASIAN WIGEON was also seen from East Road. A 
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was again found in the forested area on Armitage Road.   
  6/19: A LEAST BITTERN was found along Towpath Road. 


Onondaga County------------
     6/18: A SNOWY EGRET was found on Onondaga Lake from the new walking 
trail starting at the State Fair area.     6/20: Two adult male RUDDY DUCKS 
were seen on Beaver lake. 


Oneida County------------
     6/17: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen at Utica Marsh.

Oswego County------------
     6/15: 3 SWAINSON’S THRUSHES were heard along Otto Mills Road north of 
Redfield. 


Cayuga County------------
     6/19: 6 PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS were seen and photographed by birders 
paddling around Howland’s Island. They appear to be in areas inaccesible by 
foot.      

     
 
--end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.

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Subject: RE: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:10:09 +0000
Hi Dave and all,

I also find the breeding distribution of Black-throated Green Warbler 
perplexing. 


It is common and widespread over what strikes me as an unusually broad array of 
forest types, giving absolutely no indication to my eye of any kind of 
specialized preference. Yet it is absent from many places that look 
superficially as good (or better, in terms of the density of conifers) as 
places where they are numerous. For example, in southern Rhode Island both this 
species and also Hermit Thrush breed quite commonly in extremely 
unimpressive-looking* oak woods with just a few pitch or white pines. And in 
this same area, BT Green Warbler also breeds in Atlantic White Cedar bogs, 
another southern-style forest type. But on nearby Long Island, these very same 
habitats (along the very same moraines) are completely shunned by 
Black-throated Green Warblers (and support just a very few Hermit Thrushes, 
which here are restricted to the very "best" Pitch Pine forests). 


Even more striking is the scarcity of both of these species in near-upstate New 
York (e.g., Westchester and Orange Counties, and elsewhere) in nice-looking 
Transition Zone woods. This disparity takes a lot of getting used to for anyone 
who has seen the kind of sterile and depauperate woods* they like in RI, but 
now that I get it, David's observations from Chenango County seem just a more 
extreme example of a pattern I see in a lot of places. 


I've always wondered if the limiting factor was not so much the vegetation type 
but some combination of temperature and humidity; southern RI probably has 
lower maximum temps at this time of year, owing to the ocean influence, than do 
many low-mid elevation places in upstate NY. In addition to these two species, 
Northern Waterthrush, Canada Warbler, Purple Finch, and other boreal-associated 
species also co-occur as breeders surprisingly close to the coast in RI, in 
utterly non-boreal forest types: 



http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L732767?yr=all&m=6&rank=mrec&hs_sortBy=taxon_order&hs_o=asc 

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L335600/all/6

If this temp/humidity explanation is true, the absence/scarcity of these 
species on similarly ocean-cooled eastern Long Island is more difficult to 
explain but might be attributable to the very small and highly fragmented 
nature of its woodlands, in addition to their already emphasized low quality.* 


Anyway, these were my thoughts when I read this very interesting and inspiring 
report. I think I'll count some Ovenbirds somewhere tomorrow morning! 


Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

*It took me a while to come up with these euphemisms to replace the phrases I 
would use naturally when speaking . 




________________________________________
From: bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120574834-3714944 AT list.cornell.edu] on behalf of David Nicosia 
[daven102468 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 2:28 PM
To: NY Birds; Cayuga birds; broomebirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [nysbirds-l] New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: 
Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers. 


Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning Today, 
6/20/16. 

This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in 
upstate NY 

outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense and 
fairly 

mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern 
hardwoods type 

forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of BLACKBURNIAN 
WARBLERS. In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here too along with 

WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger 
mountains. 

Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS out-compete 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock ravines more a factor 
here? 

I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and 
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below. 


In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully 
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at an 
"exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count. I was 
amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a whopping 86 
OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3 hours. 


see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY




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Subject: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:28:49 -0400
Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
Today, 6/20/16.
This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
upstate NY
outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense
and fairly
mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
hardwoods type
forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
too along with
WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
mountains.
Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS
out-compete BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock
ravines more a factor here?
I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.

In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at
an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count.
I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a
whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3
hours.

see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY

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Subject: New Michigan State Forest NW Chenango County, NY: Swainson's Thrush and Lots of Warblers.
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:28:49 -0400
Had a chance to bird New Michigan State Forest from mid to late morning
Today, 6/20/16.
This forest is a high elevation boreal-type forest which is quite rare in
upstate NY
outside the Adirondacks and Catskills. There are areas of dense NORWAY
SPRUCES
planted by the CCC groups back in the 1930s so much of this forest is dense
and fairly
mature. There are also areas of RED PINE within a more typical northern
hardwoods type
forest of SUGAR MAPLE, AMERICAN BEECH, CHERRY  and other deciduous trees and
scattered native BALSAM FIR and to a lesser extent EASTERN HEMLOCK.

The deep spruce woods are homes to a large population (locally) of
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS.  In addition, you can find SWAINSON'S THRUSH here
too along with
WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS which again are quite rare outside our bigger
mountains.
Once thing that puzzled me was the lack of BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS and
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The most common warbler was the OVENBIRD but a close
second was the BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER. Do BLACKBURNIANS
out-compete BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS? Or was the lack of hemlock
ravines more a factor here?
I also was able to record the beautiful song of the SWAINSON'S THRUSH and
append to my e-bird list which can be linked below.

In any event, I drove for over 9 miles in this beautiful area and carefully
counted as many birds as I could hear. My e-bird list is my best effort at
an "exact" count. I was conservative and very careful not to double count.
I was amazed that I totaled 69 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS in 9 miles and a
whopping 86 OVENBIRDS with a total of 50 species. I took just under 3
hours.

see e-bird list here....  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30317959

Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY

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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sunday June 19, 2016 - incl. R-t hummingbird & 4 sp. of Wood Warblers
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 18:00:30 -0400
Central Park NYC - Ramble
Sunday June 19, 2016
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the 
dock on Turtle Pond at 9am. 


Highlights today included four species of Wood Warblers and a male 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird. 


Reservoir birds seen before the walk (Deb). 

Canada Goose - 35 plus 2 families with 3 goslings each Reservoir
Gadwall - 3 males & 2 females Reservoir
Mallard - at least 6 Reservoir, others Turtle Pond
Double-crested Cormorant - around 20 Reservoir, 2 Turtle Pond
Great Egret - 4 Reservoir
Black-crowned Night-Heron - adult in flight Reservoir (spotted by Wolfgang 
Demisch) 

Red-tailed Hawk - Reservoir
Herring Gull - 4 or 5 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 7 Reservoir
Chimney Swift - 3 Castle collecting twigs
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - adult male Shakespeare Garden
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker - family Weather Station Circle with adult feeding young 
(Sandra Critelli), imm. Shakespeare Garden 

Northern Flicker - Azalea Pond
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair Azalea Pond
Eastern Kingbird - pair nesting at Turtle Pond 
Warbling Vireo - several heard/singing (Reservoir, Warbler Rock, Azalea Pond, 
Maintenance Field) 

Red-eyed Vireo - east of Evodia Field (Bob before walk)
Blue Jay - several locations
Barn Swallow - 2 adults Reservoir, 4 adults & fledgling Turtle Pond
Black-capped Chickadee - several locations
White-breasted Nuthatch - immature male molting (black feathers coming in on 
head) Gill Overlook 

House Wren - 2, one singing Mugger's Woods
American Robin
Gray Catbird - several locations
Black-and-white Warbler - female Upper Lobe
American Redstart - immature male Warbler Rock (Sandra Critelli)
Northern Parula - male Summer House
Yellow Warbler - adult female Upper Lobe
Eastern Towhee -male singing east of Evodia Field (Bob before walk)
Red-winged Blackbird - singing male Turtle Pond
Common Grackle
Baltimore Oriole - several locations
House Finch - Upper Lobe, Balancing Rock

Tom Walsh reported another Black-crowned Night-Heron in the Ramble. 

Deb Allen

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Subject: Cliff Swallows at Van Cortlandt Park
From: "Carney, Martin" <carneym AT fordhamprep.org>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:01:57 -0400
Still present at 1 pm, southeast quadrant of Parade Grounds, near tennis
courts...Martin Carney

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Subject: Cliff Swallows Van Cortlandt Park Bronx- YES
From: Dawn Hannay <dawnvla AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 10:54:26 -0400
The Cliff Swallows reported yesterday by Nadir Souirgi and Tom Fiore were still 
present this morning at 9 AM, over the SE quadrant of the Parade Ground in Van 
Cortlandt Park in the Bronx. 

Dawn Hannay

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re:speaking of cliff swallows and Van Cortlandt's
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 11:40:14 +0000
At the northern tip of the river walk in Croton (along the Hudson north of 
Croton Harmon station) I was surprised to see a cliff swallow giving great 
looks at about 7:45 pm. They are known to breed - don't know about this year -- 
under the Rte. 9 / Croton River bridge right by Van Cortlandt Manor. 


L. Trachtemberg
Ossining

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 18, 2016, at 11:11 PM, Thomas Fiore  wrote:
> 
> Saturday, 18 June 2016
> 
> Two Cliff Swallows with other more-regular swallows as reported to this list 
earlier by Nadir Sourgi were still present, flying low around the SE quadrant 
(areas where no sports were being played at the later hour) of the Parade 
Ground ballfields, at Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx Co., late in the day. Although 
the species has bred in the Bronx, & may have attempted to in the west Bronx, 
it is at least uncommon if not somewhat rare in this month. At least 3 of us 
were observing in the 4-5 p.m. hour. 

> 
> The Parade Ground part of that park is adjacent to Broadway (yep, the same 
long thoroughfare that runs past Times Square, when it gets into midtown 
Manhattan). 

> 
> good birds,
> 
> Tom Fiore
> Manhattan
> 
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> 
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Subject: Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx Co. 6/18
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 20:48:05 -0400
Saturday, 18 June 2016

Two Cliff Swallows with other more-regular swallows as reported to  
this list earlier by Nadir Sourgi were still present, flying low  
around the SE quadrant (areas where no sports were being played at the  
later hour) of the Parade Ground ballfields, at Van Cortlandt Park,  
Bronx Co., late in the day.  Although the species has bred in the  
Bronx, & may have attempted to in the west Bronx, it is at least  
uncommon if not somewhat rare in this month.  At least 3 of us were  
observing in the 4-5 p.m. hour.

The Parade Ground part of that park is adjacent to Broadway (yep, the  
same long thoroughfare that runs past Times Square, when it gets into  
midtown Manhattan).

good birds,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan

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Subject: possible Siberian Common Tern, WESA, etc - Cupsogue, Suffolk Co
From: <mcb3mb AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:47:57 -0500




Subject: Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at Montezuma
From: Donna Schulman <queensgirl30 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 19:36:18 -0400
Another bird to look for if you're going to Montezuma.

Donna Schulman
Forest Hills, NY

* *

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kevin J. McGowan 
Date: Sat, Jun 18, 2016 at 6:05 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at
Montezuma
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 


It doesn't look like this ever got posted on this list. This morning,
Saturday, 18 June 2016, Stacy Robinson was looking for the Garganey at
Knox-Marsellus and found a Black-necked Stilt instead!!! Although the
Garganey remained elusive and had not been seen by the time I left this
afternoon, the stilt was seen throughout the day. When I was there just
past noon, the looks were horrible because of the distance and heat
shimmer. But, fortunately, a stilt is a giant shorebird that is boldly
patterned in simple black and white, and so is easily identified with
confidence from a great distance.

Although Black-necked Stilt is an expected vagrant along the New York
coast, it is rare in the state even there. I haven't done the research, but
I believe this may be the third upstate record of the species in New York
and the first for the Cayuga Lake Basin. It certainly was a new state bird
for me!

Kevin
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Subject: Tri-colored Heron @ Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 12:39:23 -0400
For the folks birding at the bay who might be interested. A Tri-colored Heron 
is currently feeding on the north side edge of the area "formerly known as the 
West Pond." 


With Tom Burke and Gail Benson.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: Van Cortlandt Ciiff Swallows.
From: Nadir Souirgi <nadir75 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 11:02:15 -0400
There are currently a pair of Cliff Swallows, along with Tree, Barn, and 
Rough-winged, actively feeding over the southwest section of the Parade 
Grounds. Aside from being flagged on eBird as RARE, this is the first time I've 
encountered this species in Van Cortlandt Park. 


Happy birding,

Nadir Souirgi
Inwood, NYC

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR)
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:41:04 -0400
An update for those thinking of twitching the WFIB (White-faced Ibis), The bird 
just flew out from the East Pond, over Crossbay seemingly heading towards the 
south marsh. 


Other highlights included 2 Royal Terns that just flew over the south end of 
the East Pond heading north east. 


Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 18, 2016, at 10:05 AM, Gail Benson  wrote:
> 
> White-faced Ibis present now in Southeast corner of East pond (Jamaica Bay 
Wildlife Refuge). Tom Burke, Andrew Baksh, Gail Benson 

> 
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Subject: White-faced Ibis present now (JBWR)
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:05:37 -0400
White-faced Ibis present now in Southeast corner of East pond (Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge).  Tom Burke, Andrew Baksh, Gail Benson

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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 17 June 2016
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:02:50 -0400
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 17, 2016
* NYNY1606.17

- Birds mentioned
GARGANEY+ (extralimital in Seneca County)
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Gadwall
Greater Scaup
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Black Vulture
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Virginia Rail
Semipalmated Plover
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Wilson's Phalarope
Parasitic Jaeger
Gull-billed Tern
Black Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barn Owl
Barred Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Merlin
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Common Raven
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Grasshopper Sparrow
Blue Grosbeak
Pine Siskin

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

        Gary Chapin - Secretary
        NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
        125 Pine Springs Drive
        Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 17th 2016
at 6pm. The highlights of today's tape are WHITE-FACED IBIS, WILSON'S
PHALAROPE, GULL-BILLED TERN, BLACK TERN, PARASITIC JAEGER, BLUE GROSBEAK,
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and an extralimital GARGANEY.

As the Summer season settles in excitement continues at Jamaica Bay
Wildlife Refuge. A WHITE-FACED IBIS has maintained its seemingly
unpredictable visits to the south end of the East Pond Thursday evening.
Sitting in among the many Glossy Ibis that continue to cycle into and out
of the pond. On Saturday a WILSON'S PHALAROPE was also spotted on the East
Pond and was present around the Raunt on Sunday but not seen thereafter.
Young BARN OWLS can periodically be seen in the nest box that is across Big
John's Pond as viewable from the bird blind. Please do not do anything to
disturb these birds. Waiting patiently in the blind will ultimately provide
pleasing views of the young owls. Also at Jamaica Bay a GULL-BILLED TERN
has, as in past years, been appearing along the marsh and beach south of
the former West Pond. Hopefully at some point we can stop saying "former"
if restoration were ever to begin. An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was also singing
along the Big John's Pond trail last Sunday and later.

Other recent tern sightings include a BLACK TERN at Nickerson Beach
Wednesday and single ROYAL TERNS at Great Kills Park and Shinnecock Inlet
Saturday with 3 at Jones Beach West End Tuesday. Two PARASITIC JAEGERS were
also reported off Shinnecock Inlet Saturday. Though seawatching generally
has not been very productive lately though it should be rewarding with the
appropriate winds.

Also out east two BLUE GROSBEAKS were still present Tuesday around the
southwest end of the former Grumman airport in Calverton. This area also
home for numerous GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS and other grassland birds. A very
valuable but rapidly declining habitat in our region certainly worthy of
preservation.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was reported Wednesday flying along the median at
the western end of Robert Moses State Park and another continues at Muscoot
Farm in northern Westchester County.

The Greenwich-Stamford Summer Bird Count including much of eastern
Westchester County recorded an average 135 species last weekend. New for
the count was a MERLIN in Chappaqua. The 243rd species all time for this 41
year old endeavor. Other highlights featured 10 species of waterfowl
including GADWALL, GREATER SCAUP and HOODED and RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, 3
BLACK VULTURES, nesting BALD EAGLE, at least 6 RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS, a few
VIRGINIA RAILS, 10 species of shorebirds including SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and
SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING and DUNLIN, a BLACK SKIMMER, both
cuckoos at least 12 BARRED OWLS, 4 YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, two ALDER
FLYCATCHERS, over a dozen COMMON RAVENS, 14 species of warblers including
HOODED and MOURNING and a feeder visiting PINE SISKIN.

For those who may somehow not have heard, a drake GARGANEY has been present
since at least June 5th at the Knox-Marsellus Marsh part of the Montezuma
NWR just west of the town of Montezuma in Seneca County. The duck is mostly
seen from East Road where visibility is usually best in the afternoon. This
will be a first New York record pending acceptance by NYSARC.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or
weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Subject: Garganey at Montezuma NWR: Friday Si!!!
From: BOB WASHBURN <nyc_bob AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 14:35:29 -0400
The bird was viewed by a handful of folks in one of the smaller ponds in the SE 
corner. A Bald eagle just put everything up. Trying to relocate. 


BOB WASHBURN

On the East Road

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Subject: Re: Any recent Garganey info?
From: Robert Lewis <rfermat AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 13:56:33 +0000 (UTC)
Thanks for the update.
Not to be a broken record, as I've asked this before, but has anyone 
investigated the possibility that this bird is an escapee?   Any informed 
opinion on this topic? 

Now I know Montezuma refuge is a beautiful place, as many years ago I lived 
nearby, but it's a long trip for me now, and I can see Garganeys in a zoo. 

Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY

      From: Scott Haber 
 To: Karyn  
Cc: BOB WASHBURN ; NYSbirds 
 Sent: Friday, June 17, 2016 7:37 AM
 Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Any recent Garganey info?
   
Mike Powers reported on the Cayugabirds list that the Garganey was present 
yesterday (Thursday), and visible from East Rd. 

-Scott
On Jun 17, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Karyn  wrote:


If you receive any positive replies, please let me know. I am traveling through 
the area. 

Thank you, 
Karyn Delaney -- 



  
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Subject: Re: Any recent Garganey info?
From: Scott Haber <scotthaber1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 07:37:52 -0400
Mike Powers reported on the Cayugabirds list that the Garganey was present 
yesterday (Thursday), and visible from East Rd. 


-Scott

> On Jun 17, 2016, at 7:32 AM, Karyn  wrote:
> 
> If you receive any positive replies, please let me know. I am traveling 
through the area. 

> Thank you, 
> Karyn Delaney
> 
> --
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Subject: Re: Any recent Garganey info?
From: Karyn <kdelaney17 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 07:32:23 -0400




Subject: Re: Garganey YES
From: Liz Martens <birder428 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 22:07:00 +0000 (UTC)
I was there on Tuesday 6/14 from 1:30-3pm and 4-4:45pm.  There were about 10 
people looking for the bird during those times, and it was not seen.  

Good Luck! 
Liz Martens 

 On Thursday, June 16, 2016 3:31 PM, BOB WASHBURN  
wrote: 

 

 

BOB

Whereabouts unknown 

> On Jun 12, 2016, at 10:10 PM, Carena Pooth  wrote:
> 
> Correction (with apologies and profuse thanks)....this afternoon the bird
> was found by Mike Zebehazy. 
> Many thanks also to the others who helped me get on the bird, to Jay McGowan
> for initially discovering the bird and getting the word out, and to all who
> posted updates and kept me jealous enough to inspire me to make the 4-hour
> drive there & back today. 
> Carena Pooth
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu
> [mailto:bounce-120556317-74633745 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carena
> Pooth
> Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2016 3:27 PM
> To: NYSBIRDS-L 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Garganey YES
> 
> Knox-Marcellus Marsh. Found by Mike H. 2pm today in the water, feeding in
> scattered vegetation along western edge of the big rectangular pond. Seen by
> about 10-15 others, very good scope views. Still there at 3pm when I left. 
> 
> 
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