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Updated on Monday, March 20 at 07:25 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Shoebill,©Tony Disley

20 Mar Reminder: Tomorrow BBC Evening Presentation Tuesday March 21st [Dennis Hrehowsik ]
20 Mar TONIGHT Queens County Bird Club - Monday, March 20 - Mike Bottini presents "Flying Squirrels, Coyotes, and River Otters" ["Nancy Tognan" ]
20 Mar Goshawk update from Yesterday KINGS Prospect Park []
19 Mar Do you have half hour to help 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters? [Thomas Robben ]
19 Mar Fwd: Do you have one hour to help our 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters? [Thomas Robben ]
19 Mar Do you have one hour to help our 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters? [Thomas Robben ]
19 Mar Woodcocks [Michael Higgiston ]
19 Mar Central Park, NYC 3/19 - Glaucous Gull, Pine Warblers, R.-h. Woodpecker, Am. Woodcock, spring-ish [Thomas Fiore ]
19 Mar Next Big Migratory Push Friday / Saturday [David Nicosia ]
19 Mar Next Big Migratory Push Friday / Saturday [David Nicosia ]
19 Mar Glaucous Gull Central Park []
19 Mar Keene Great Gray Owl [Sean Camillieri ]
19 Mar Euro Goldfinch. Prodpect Park [Arie Gilbert ]
19 Mar No. Goshawk Prospect park [Arie Gilbert ]
19 Mar Oak Beach Eared Grebe - YES [Tim Healy ]
18 Mar Woodcocks ["Carney, Martin" ]
17 Mar NYC Area RBA: 17 March 2017 [Gail Benson ]
18 Mar eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace ]
18 Mar Goshawk update Prospect kings []
18 Mar NYS eBird Hotspots: New/Renamed Shared Locations (16-Mar-'17) [Ben Cacace ]
17 Mar NY Times: An Early Bird Gets Caught in the Snowstorm [Ardith Bondi ]
17 Mar Central Park [plus], NYC 3/16, & 3/17 [Thomas Fiore ]
17 Mar prospect park goshawk [Joe T ]
16 Mar Hendrickson Park update, RHWO yes, geese no [Tim Healy ]
16 Mar Two new marine birding opportunities, including NY LIS waters [Thomas Robben ]
16 Mar Re:Woodcocks around Manhattan [Zack ]
16 Mar American Woodcock Event in NYC Parks. [Anders Peltomaa ]
15 Mar Bryant Park Woodcocks [Alan Drogin ]
16 Mar Top 10 Locations Reviewed (NYS eBird Hotspots) [Ben Cacace ]
15 Mar Re:Ramble, Central Park NYC: Baker's Dozen of American Woodcocks [Anders Peltomaa ]
15 Mar Ramble, Central Park NYC: Baker's Dozen of American Woodcocks [Anders Peltomaa ]
16 Mar Woodcock-wonders, Central Park, NYC 3/15 [Thomas Fiore ]
15 Mar Queens County Bird Club - Monday, March 20 - Mike Bottini presents "Mammals of Long Island: Flying Squirrels, Coyotes, and River Otters" ["Nancy Tognan" ]
14 Mar NYC AUDUBON Lecture Thursday March 16 [Lynne Hertzog ]
13 Mar BBC Evening Presentation Tuesday March 21st [Dennis Hrehowsik ]
12 Mar Central Park, NYC 3/12 - 12 spp. of ducks, Black Vulture, Ravens, RHWP, Loon, Woodcock; Snipe (3/11), & more [Thomas Fiore ]
12 Mar Central Park, NYC - Sunday March 2, 2017 - Green-winged Teal Pair near the Point [Deborah Allen ]
12 Mar Prospect Park Goshawk [Joshua Malbin ]
18 Mar Fox sparrow bonanza - croton [Larry Trachtenberg ]
13 Mar Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin ]
16 Mar Woodcocks around Manhattan [Ardith Bondi ]
11 Mar Sandhill Cranes [Michael Farina ]
11 Mar Tufted duck crown point ny [Arie Gilbert ]
11 Mar Red-shouldered Hawk, Nassau [d Futuyma ]
10 Mar Massapequa Preserve: Northern Goshawk [Robert Taylor ]
8 Mar Central Park, (Bryant Park Lincoln's Sparrow question), NYC 3/6-7-8 [Thomas Fiore ]
10 Mar Piping Plover, Eastern Phoebe + other notables - Queens co. Roundup [Andrew Baksh ]
10 Mar NYC Area RBA: 10 March 2017 [Gail Benson ]
11 Mar RE: Sandhill Cranes []
9 Mar Central Park, & Bryant Park Lincoln's, Manhattan (& spring-a-ling, Kings Co.-Prospect Park), 3/9 [Thomas Fiore ]
9 Mar eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace ]
9 Mar Re: Central Park, (Bryant Park Lincoln's Sparrow question), NYC 3/6-7-8 [Dominic Garcia-Hall ]
9 Mar Upcoming Birding Program: Thu Mar 16 Chappaqua/Westchester County [Anne Swaim ]
1 Mar Black Vultures Broome County [David Nicosia ]
9 Mar Clark's Grebe No [Mary Magistro ]
7 Mar Re: Brooklyn Eared Grebe update [Andrew Baksh ]
7 Mar 03/07- Brooklyn: Eared Grebe and more [Doug Gochfeld ]
7 Mar Central Park Reservoir [Patricia Pollock ]
7 Mar Re: Brooklyn Eared Grebe Continues [Andrew Baksh ]
07 Mar Brooklyn Eared Grebe now [Doug Gochfeld ]
6 Mar Re: Clark's Grebe - yes [Brent Stephenson ]
6 Mar Central Park, NYC & Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx - Sunday March 5, 2017 [Deborah Allen ]
06 Mar Re: Poss. Great-gray Owl report - Washington County, NYhm [zach schwartz-weinstein ]
6 Mar Call for volunteers: Mulching event at Forest Park, Queens this Saturday, March 11, 9 am ["Nancy Tognan" ]
6 Mar NYS eBird Hotspots: New/Renamed Shared Locations (4-Mar-'17) [Ben Cacace ]
6 Mar Re: Fwd: [nysbirds-l] Yellow-headed Blackbird - Staten Island YES [Mike ]
5 Mar Central Park, NYC 3/5 (& otherwhere in Manhattan) [Thomas Fiore ]
4 Mar Clark's Grebe [Mary Magistro ]
06 Mar Yellow-headed Blackbird - Staten Island YES [Jose Ramirez-Garofalo ]
05 Mar Thayer's gull phoenix ny yes. [Arie Gilbert ]
3 Mar Central Park, NYC 3/3; & a thought on SI's YHBL's [Thomas Fiore ]
5 Mar Re:Alphabetized List of NYS Hotspots with Links [Ben Cacace ]
5 Mar Great Great Owl Hotspots for Essex County ... [Ben Cacace ]
5 Mar Keene Great Gray Owl [Joshua Malbin ]
5 Mar Re: Keene Great Gray Owl [Scott Gilbert ]
05 Mar Clark's Grebe - yes [John Kent ]

Subject: Reminder: Tomorrow BBC Evening Presentation Tuesday March 21st
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 08:13:55 -0400
*Tomorrow Tuesday, March 21st, 7:00 P.M.*

*Penguins, Albatross, Leopard Seals: The Abundant Life of Wild Antarctica*

*Presenters: Tom Stephenson and Rob Bate*

*Location: Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch
 at Grand Army Plaza*

Antarctica remains one of the most remote and natural places on earth. The
wild, rugged scenery includes spectacular icebergs the size of city blocks,
snow-covered mountainous peaks, and huge glaciers. It is the breeding
grounds for thousands of birds including Snow Petrels, Cape Petrels, Giant
Petrels; many species of Penguins, Albatross with wingspans up to 12 feet,
and the Skuas and Sheathbills that come to scavenge the nesting areas. It
also hosts thousands of huge Elephant, Weddell, Leopard and other seal
species along with many whales that all come to feast on the abundant life
of the southern ocean.

Join the Brooklyn Bird Club for a photographic extravaganza of this
exciting destination.
Tom Stephenson has been birding since he was a kid under the tutelage of
Dr. Arthur Allen of Cornell University. His articles and photographs are in
museums and many publications including Birding, Birdwatcher’s Digest,
Handbook of the Birds of the World, Handbook of the Mammals of the World,
Birds of Madagascar, and Guide to the Birds of SE Brazil.

Rob Bate is the president of the Brooklyn Bird Club, an artist, and an avid
Brooklyn birder and photographer. He very much enjoyed testing out his new
gear in Antarctica.


http://www.brooklynbirdclub.org/meetings.htm

Dennis Hrehowsik

Brooklyn

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: TONIGHT Queens County Bird Club - Monday, March 20 - Mike Bottini presents "Flying Squirrels, Coyotes, and River Otters"
From: "Nancy Tognan" <nancy.tognan AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:41:50 -0400
Note:  This meeting is TONIGHT.  It was originally scheduled for last week,
postponed due to weather.

 

 

The Queens County Bird Club will be meeting at the Alley Pond Environmental
Center, 228-06 Northern Blvd Douglaston, NY 11362   
>Map of location<  

at 8:00 pm on Monday, March 20, 2017.  Free admission.  Refreshments served.

 

Public transit users:  Meeting location is one mile from Bayside LIRR
station;  you may either walk, take the Q12 bus, or use car service located
at the station.

 

Mike Bottini will present "Mammals of Long Island:  Flying Squirrels,
Coyotes, and River Otters"      

Mike Bottini is a veteran naturalist, outdoor educator, and environmental
consultant. After completing graduate studies in wildlife ecology at the
University of British Columbia, Mike worked for fourteen years at the Group
for the South Fork, a non-profit environmental advocacy organization. He has
taught field ecology, environmental science, and natural history courses at
St. Lawrence University, Southampton College, and CUNY, has published three
books, and is an award-winning columnist. Mike's wildlife research studies
have included elk, spotted and tiger salamanders, spotted turtles, piping
plovers, and river otters. At St. Lawrence, he designed and taught Winter
Field Ecology, and has slept in igloos and snow caves in the mountains of
New England, Colorado, Scotland, Labrador and Baffin Island. He continues to
introduce people to the outdoors through his field naturalist classes,
nature walks, and paddling trips.   

Mike is also one of the founders of the annual Long Island Natural History
Conference, which will be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on March
24-25, 2017  -    www.longislandnature.org 

      

Nancy Tognan 

nancy.tognan AT gmail.com     

Vice President, Queens County Bird Club 

 

See http://www.qcbirdclub.org/   for more information on trips, speakers,
and other events.

See our 'Birding Maps & Locations' page for directions to and info about
many local birding hotspots

 

* QCBC is a tax exempt, charitable organization {501c3}.  *


--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Goshawk update from Yesterday KINGS Prospect Park
From: prosbird AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:30:22 -0400
See my link


http://prospectsightings.blogspot.com/2017/03/goshawk-provides-spectacle.html



Peter
BBC 

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Do you have half hour to help 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters?
From: Thomas Robben <robben99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 22:53:41 -0400
Do you have half an hour to help us count gulls/waterfowl on 3/25?

SuperSeaWatch DOT blogspot DOT com

Thanks, Tom (robben99 AT gmail.com)

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Fwd: Do you have one hour to help our 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters?
From: Thomas Robben <robben99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 22:41:53 -0400
Do you have one hour to help our 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS
waters?

​"​
SuperSeaWatch.blogspot.com 
​".  ​

Including LIS coast of Westchester, Bronx, Queens, Nassau and Suffolk.​
​  ​

Thank you, Tom Robben (robben99 AT gmail.com)

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Do you have one hour to help our 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters?
From: Thomas Robben <robben99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 22:30:13 -0400
Do you have one hour to help our 3/25 gull/waterfowl count in NY LIS waters?

http://SuperSeaWatch.blogspot.com

Including LIS coast of Westchester, Bronx, Queens, Nassau and Suffolk.​

Thank you, Tom Robben (robben99 AT gmail.com)

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Woodcocks
From: Michael Higgiston <mikehigg AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 21:49:59 -0400
Had about 10 woodcocks displaying in North Fork Preserve in Riverhead, Suffolk 
County this evening between 7 and 7:30. 

Mike Higgiston 

Sent from my iPhone

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Central Park, NYC 3/19 - Glaucous Gull, Pine Warblers, R.-h. Woodpecker, Am. Woodcock, spring-ish
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 19:00:01 -0400
"Roll over Beethoven - and tell Tchaikovsky the news.”
"Roll over Beethoven - and dig these rhythm & blues.”
- Charles Edward Anderson Berry, - Oct.18, 1926 - March 18, 2017 - R.I.P. 
___________________________________________
Sunday, 19 March, 2017
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City 
A Glaucous Gull remained on the CP reservoir, & thanks to Peter Post posting 
quickly, the gull was observed by a number of birders in the afternoon. A 
Common Loon also continued there. 

At least 2 male Pine Warblers appeared in the park today, one seen by several 
observers in the north end of the park (on the great hill), and another 
‘elsewhere'. 

(A modest number of Pine Warblers may have overwintered in the area, at least a 
few attempting to - and probably successfully - in New York City.) 

Eastern Phoebe was at least seen in a few areas in the north end, and there was 
very modest evidence of a smattering of other mid-March migrant activity. 

A Red-headed Woodpecker, now in near-adult-like plumage, is maintaining its 
winter territory just west of the East 68th Street area within the east side of 
the park. 

There were insects for these birds in the well-above freezing temp’s, with 
brilliant sun. 

The mega-occurrence and near-literal fall-out of American Woodcock in Central 
faded by this day, and was far less even by Saturday, but there were still 
some, now able to find more areas to feed & rest in, thru the areas of the park 
where they had been seen since the ice-snow storm this past week. Sadly, there 
were many casualties amongst the woodcocks, but I believe a far greater number 
(within the park, at least) made it & were eventually able to work their way to 
or towards breeding grounds as among our earliest of “spring” migrants. 

Nearly 70 species of birds continued this weekend in &/or over the park, a 
majority of those seen in the past week, with just very modest migrant influx, 
and a bit of exodus from the park, in particular as noted above. Further 
reports this week, with the arrival of spring on the calendar, and - just maybe 
- some evidence arriving in the form of further migrations. 


- - - - - -
“If you tried to give rock-and-roll another name,
 you might call: it ‘Chuck Berry’” - John Lennon

Out there, beyond a small solar system with a planet its inhabitants call Earth 
- travel the NASA-borne spacecraft Voyager, with capsules that contain, among 
other gleanings of all of human civilization, a recording of the song “Johnny 
B. Goode” by Chuck Berry - the only rock-and-roll song included with other 
music in those two interstellar spacecrafts' capsules. 

Five pieces of recorded music from North America were among the other 
humans-on-Earth-music selected for inclusion on the first interstellar space 
mission, according to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California: 

“El Cascabel”, performed by Lorenzo Barcelata and the Mariachi Mexico;  
“Dark was the Night”, written & performed by Blind Willie Johnson;  
traditional Navajo 'Night Chants’;  
“Melancholy Blues”, performed by Louis Armstrong & his Hot Seven - and, 
“Johnny B. Goode” written & performed by Chuck Berry.  

A full list of the music aboard Voyager is shown here: 
http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/music.html 
 


NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was launched in September 1977 and flew by Jupiter 
and Saturn before continuing on toward interstellar space. 



good birding,

Tom Fiore,
manhattan










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--
Subject: Next Big Migratory Push Friday / Saturday
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 18:50:31 -0400
All,

The next period of sustained southerly winds and eventually some
decent rainfall looks to begin early Friday and last into Saturday for NY
state

I imagine a lot of our migrants are holding up given the massive
snowstorm and unseasonably chilly air the northeast has seen.
My experience is after these periods, the first day of south winds
its like an "explosion" of migrants.

Best,

Dave Nicosia

--

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--
Subject: Next Big Migratory Push Friday / Saturday
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 18:50:31 -0400
All,

The next period of sustained southerly winds and eventually some
decent rainfall looks to begin early Friday and last into Saturday for NY
state

I imagine a lot of our migrants are holding up given the massive
snowstorm and unseasonably chilly air the northeast has seen.
My experience is after these periods, the first day of south winds
its like an "explosion" of migrants.

Best,

Dave Nicosia

--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Glaucous Gull Central Park
From: <pwpost AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:55:07 -0400
On reservoir

Sent from my iPhone

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--
Subject: Keene Great Gray Owl
From: Sean Camillieri <scamillieri AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:40:11 -0400
Currently being seen in its previously reported location.

Sean Camillieri & Melissa Murgittroyd

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--
Subject: Euro Goldfinch. Prodpect Park
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 20:37:42 +0300
.
viewed from this location at 1.37pm on 03-19-2017
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=40.65890635,-73.96687859

Arie Gilbert 
No. Babylon NY 
www.powerbirder.blogspot 
www.qcbirdclub.org
--
Sent from "Loretta IV" in the field. 
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--
Subject: No. Goshawk Prospect park
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 19:52:02 +0300
.
viewed from this location at 0.51pm on 03-19-2017
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=40.65661201,-73.97068192

Arie Gilbert 
No. Babylon NY 
www.powerbirder.blogspot 
www.qcbirdclub.org
--
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--
Subject: Oak Beach Eared Grebe - YES
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 10:37:37 -0400
The Eared Grebe is currently in view, foraging close to shore. Visible west of 
the main entrance and lot, just beyond the first point of rocks west of the 
gravelly area with the blue portable toilet. Small, distant flock of goldeneye 
present but no sign of the Barrow's when I scanned. 


Also notable were two first-year Bald Eagles flying north over the marshes at 
Cedar Beach Marina. 


Cheers!
-Tim H
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--
Subject: Woodcocks
From: "Carney, Martin" <carneym AT fordhamprep.org>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 17:31:52 -0400
A group of us saw 3 Woodcocks in the New York Botanical Garden between
Azalea Rock and the small stream just west of it.  Thrilling....Martin
Carney

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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 17 March 2017
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 19:49:59 -0400
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Mar. 17, 2017
* NYNY1703.17

- Birds Mentioned

TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE+

(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

EURASIAN WIGEON
BARROW’S GOLDENEYE
EARED GREBE
SANDHILL CRANE
Wilson’s Snipe
American Woodcock
ICELAND GULL
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
NORTHERN GOSHAWK
Great Horned Owl
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Horned Lark
LAPLAND LONGSPUR
Orange-crowned Warbler

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber:  Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, March 17, 2017
at 7:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are SANDHILL CRANE, TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE,
EARED GREBE, BARROW’S GOLDENEYE, EURASIAN WIGEON, NORTHERN GOSHAWK,
GLAUCOUS and ICELAND GULLS, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and LAPLAND LONGSPUR.

In a week stymied by 2 snow storms, most unexpected was the appearance of 2
SANDHILL CRANES flying over the Oceanside Marine Nature Study Area last
Saturday; the Cranes were not subsequently relocated, and there were also
no reports this week of the Wainscott Crane out on Eastern Long Island.

The TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE was noted as recently as yesterday on the North
Fork, still in the vicinity of blue house #1625 North Sea Drive in Southold.

In Fire Island Inlet off Oak Beach last weekend the EARED GREBE was spotted
again Saturday and the female BARROW’S GOLDENEYE on Sunday, though both
have been difficult to locate recently.

Two drake EURASIAN WIGEONS, both still around Wednesday, continue at the
Salt Marsh Nature Center in Marine Park, Brooklyn and on Fresh Pond in Fort
Salonga.

The immature NORTHERN GOSHAWK seen lately often near the feeders in
Prospect Park was still present there today, and a 2nd immature was noted
again at Massapequa Preserve last Saturday.

A GLAUCOUS GULL was still visiting Bellport Bay last Saturday, and on
Wednesday single ICELAND and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were sitting on the
Home Depot parking lot off Route 58 in Riverhead.

One result of the heavy snow Tuesday was to displace and expose a large
number of AMERICAN WOODCOCKS both in city parks and surrounding regions,
birds often popping up in rather unexpected locations.  They also become a
preferred target of raptors such as the Prospect NORTHERN GOSHAWK and GREAT
HORNED OWLS.  A few WILSON’S SNIPE have also been noted during these grave
circumstances, both species now moving regularly through our region.

RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS, now becoming more colorful, continue in Central
Park just west of East 68th Street and at Hendrickson Park in Valley Stream.

A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was present again with HORNED LARKS on Wednesday at
Robert Moses State Park on the oval in Parking Field 5.

An ORANGE–CROWNED WARBLER was in Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn last Sunday.

To phone in reports call Tom Burke weekdays at 212-372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 22:33:40 -0400
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar
chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or
deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the
date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted
checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the
'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't
added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.

For each county on the wiki click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a
Location' line:
— http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Yellow highlights a species added for the first time over the past few
months. Red represents species removed from the New York State list.

*Chautauqua County:*
Smith's Longspur (11-Mar-2017)

*Monroe County:*
Pink-footed Goose (1-Mar-2017)

*Nassau County:*
Sandhill Crane (11-Mar-2017)

*Wayne County:*
Red Crossbill (12-Nov-2010)

*Queens County:*
Eurasian Linnet (Not tracked)

*Suffolk County:*
Muscovy Duck (Reclassified as 'Domestic type')

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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--
Subject: Goshawk update Prospect kings
From: prosbird AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 23:17:35 -0400
http://prospectsightings.blogspot.com/2017/03/pp-gos-american-patriot.html?m=1

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
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Subject: NYS eBird Hotspots: New/Renamed Shared Locations (16-Mar-'17)
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 01:37:03 -0400
Thanks to  AT Team_eBird for their dedication keeping eBird.org running
smoothly and for the group of New York State hotspot moderators for working
on shared location suggestions.

New and renamed shared locations (hotspots) have been updated for the 62
county wiki pages. You can find a summary of the changes below with
clickable links where pages exist for a dedicated hotspot.

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/NewHotspots
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/RenamedHotspots

The above links now appear on the home page (see below) on the 'Shared
Location Updates' line eliminating the need to refer back to this message:

Home page: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

The page with all hotspots alphabetized (5,549) has also been updated.
Links to both the New and Renamed pages appears on the 'Shared Location
Updates' line:

Alphabetical list of hotspots:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/AlphaHotspots

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: NY Times: An Early Bird Gets Caught in the Snowstorm
From: Ardith Bondi <ardbon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 22:05:29 -0400

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/17/nyregion/an-early-bird-gets-caught-in-the-snowstorm.html 



Say what you will about the could-have-been-worse winter storm on 
Tuesday: it still made for difficult traveling. Flights were canceled, 
buses rerouted, subway and train lines shut down.

But it was much worse for many American woodcocks, one of the 
Northeast’s most peculiar migratory bird species, whose yearly spring 
commute through the city en route to destinations up north was rudely 
and disastrously interrupted by the snow.

Reports of woodcock sightings from around the city started piling in 
after the snowstorm, according to people who track the bird populations 
in the city. And a large number of the birds were injured or dead.

“All day long,” Susan Elbin, the director of conservation and science at 
New York City Audubon, said of the calls that began pouring into her 
office about birds in distress. “It’s an unprecedented amount of birds.”

The woodcock, a short, rotund bird with a long beak that can be quite 
accurately described as “cute,” is known for its elaborate courtship 
routine, which begins with a song, continues with an ascent into the air 
and finishes with a spiraling return back to the ground and perhaps a 
mate. It is not a rare bird, but it is shy and it is uncommon for the 
casual bird-watcher to spy one in New York, experts said.

The birds spend the colder months as far south as Florida. During the 
rest of the year, they are found across the Northeast and into Canada. 
They migrate early in the spring season, and as falls turns into winter, 
they are some of the latest birds to migrate back down south.

The late-winter snowstorm, which likely caused masses of the bird to 
break, or in birding terms “fallout,” from their migration, seems to 
have grounded many in New York, at least temporarily. Some may have been 
planning to stay here already.

Rita McMahon the director of the Wild Bird Fund, a nonprofit 
organization that treats sick wildlife in New York, said that the group 
had received about 55 woodcocks after the storm — and that it had 
treated about 75 during all of 2016. Ms. McMahon said the storm had done 
more than simply obstruct the birds’ progress — it had left them 
starved, unable to find or forage for food in the snow-covered city.

“If the ground is frozen, then they can’t get bugs or insects,” she 
said. “We’re seeing a lot of emaciated birds.”

When it is not covered in snow, New York, with its wetlands and open 
spaces, usually presents a decent place for woodcocks to stop over 
during the migration or mate. With eyes set far back on their heads, the 
birds are built to stay aware of predators while they root in the ground 
for foods.

But the rest of the city can be challenging to navigate, and some of the 
injured birds had flown into building windows, Ms. McMahon said. Many 
take the reflections they see in windows for the sky, leading them to 
crash into buildings and fall — sometimes dozens of stories.

The Wild Bird Fund has been nursing the flock back to strength through 
force feeding. Some had to be euthanized, Ms. McMahon said. So that they 
do not try to leap or fly away, the birds are housed in small shelters 
with soft sides, which prevent them from injuring themselves. The Wild 
Bird Fund had flirted with the idea of taking them back to a warmer 
state, like Virginia, but it has been taking the healthy birds to Long 
Island, where there are some marshy areas free of snow and ice.

“It’s an amazing bird,” said Ms. Elbin, noting that a birder who went to 
Central Park on Thursday said he saw or heard 50 woodcocks that were 
alive and, he hoped, well.

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Subject: Central Park [plus], NYC 3/16, & 3/17
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:45:00 -0400
Friday, 17 March, 2017 - Happy Saint Patrick's Day -

A Wilson's Snipe was continuing -as of 8-9 a.m.- in the same area of  
Central Park at the West 77th Street 'streamlet' (75 yards or so east  
of the NE corner of that street & Central Park West.  Some raptor &  
vulture movement is also apparent from appropriate vantage points.  A  
first-year Red-headed Woodpecker continues, and now has attained  
nearly-full adult-like plumage, with bright red on much of the head -  
this woodpecker remains in areas within Central Park just west of East  
68th Street.
- - - - - - - -
A Northern Goshawk continues today in Prospect Park, Brookyn [Kings  
County] NYC, thanks to Rob Bate for his eBird reporting.

-------------
Thursday, 16 March, 2017 -
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

Wilson's Snipe, seen in 2 locations - one, as kindly reported by  
Anders Peltomaa in a good location (reasonable for the bird, as well  
as for birders to see; a second snipe,  although ''accessible'', would  
have made for troubles for that other bird, as well as for delicate  
habitat the second bird was in) - almost all observers (80++ , thru  
the day, to sunset) at the West 77th Street 'streamlet' were behaving  
with the best interests of the bird[s] in mind.

A Common Loon was again on the CP reservoir & also at the reservoir  
had been Red-breasted Merganser, 140+ Northern Shovelers, & other  
species as noted in a list, below.

As air temperatures rose above the freezing-mark, by mid-day, some of  
the dozens-upon-dozens (-upon dozens-) of American Woodcock, present  
in many corners, reported and unreported, thru the park [and in his  
rather rare event in many smaller parks, as well] were able to begin  
to feed, at least to some extent - the same of course true for many of  
the other birds, foraging & finding what they could in the snow & ice  
of the past few days here.

In addition, as seen & noted by many, a number of the woodcocks ( of  
course, other birds )  were predated on by raptors - that's natural &  
normal, even if the specific circumstances were rather 'abnormal' -  
and a sight some observers may or may not have seen much in Central  
Park many -or any- times previously.

The ''Woodstcock'' event, 'round the Ides of March 2017, is one that I  
have not seen the likes of in now 20+ years around here - & possibly  
surpassed the prior generation-ago ('spring', storm-related) event  
[N.B., the far greater number of observers, & the use of 'social  
media', & 'smart-phone' bird-alerts, in addition to creating a bit of  
FOMO [''FOMO'': http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=fomo ],  
and ''flash-mobs'', has brought far more reporting than was once  
available] - but that can be a topic for a very long & possibly  
acrimonious discussion, which I'm not interested in provoking just  
now...

American Woodcocks were found in a wide variety of locations again on  
Thursday in Manhattan; in Central Park alone, probably more than 50  
were remaining - alive  - with an additional 15-20+ being observed  
etiher taken by raptors, or having been seen with just parts of their  
carcasses found - woodcock feathers were seen scattered to the winds  
in many areas...

Also found in quite good numbers on Thursday in Manhattan were Fox  
Sparrow, with as many as 40+ in Central, and 10+ in just the 108-118th  
St. portion of Riverside Park, as well as some in Morningside, & some  
other smaller parks.

A modestly annotated list for (just Central Park), on Thursday, 3/16 -  
[I was out for 9+ hours, & saw many other birders thru the day]

Common Loon - 1, reservoir
Pied-billed Grebe - 2, reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron - 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1
Turkey Vulture - several flyovers
Canada Goose
Wood Duck - several locations, Meer, The Pond, The Lake
Gadwall
American Wigeon - 1, female plumage, Meer
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail - 1, The Pond
Green-winged Teal - 2, The Lake
Ring-necked Duck - 2, Meer
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser - 8+, several locations, Meer, reservoir, etc.
Red-breasted Merganser - 1, female-type plumage, reservoir
Ruddy Duck
Bald Eagle - 1, flyover
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon - flyover
American Coot - 10+, a majority are on reservoir
Wilson's Snipe - 2
American Woodcock - 50+++
Ring-billed Gull - majority are on reservoir
[American] Herring Gull - majority are on reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - majority are on reservoir
['feral'] Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-headed Woodpecker - 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted  Flicker
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Blue Jay
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1
Hermit Thrush - 1
American Robin - 150++
Gray Catbird - 1
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher - 4
European Starling
Eastern Towhee - 3
Field Sparrow - 1
[Red] Fox Sparrow - 40+
Song Sparrow - 60+
Swamp Sparrow - 4+
White-throated Sparrow - 300+
Dark-eyed Junco - 35+
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird - 5, several locations
Common Grackle - 450+
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

-   -   -   -   -   -   -
"A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability  
and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends  
otherwise." - Aldo Leopold (18871948), U.S. wildlife biologist,  
conservationist, professor, author, best known for his book "A Sand  
County Almanac" (1949), which has sold more than two million copies.
  - -
good -and ethical- birding - and say NO to bullying,

Tom Fiore
manhattan


















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--
Subject: prospect park goshawk
From: Joe T <jbirds268 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 17:30:19 +0000 (UTC)
Sorry for the late post but I'm surprised to not see anything about this bird 
on this list already. The goshawk was seen very well yesterday (March 16) 
afternoon by a group of birders in the vicinity of the feeders at Prospect Park 
in Brooklyn. It was hunting woodcock in the snow. Well worth the trip.  

Thanks again to the birders who helped spot it!
JT
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Subject: Hendrickson Park update, RHWO yes, geese no
From: Tim Healy <tph56 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 18:29:45 -0400
If any folks are interested for year listing purposes, photography, or general 
bird enjoyment in the chilly doldrums of March, the Red-headed Woodpecker 
continues at Hendrickson Park in Valley Stream. It is approaching full adult 
plumage, with a more-red-than-not head developing that crushed velvet look even 
though the black and white aren't totally sleek and crisp yet. The large flocks 
of overwintering geese have left the lake, taking the rarities with them. Dad 
last saw the Pink-footed Goose on February 28, so it didn't quite make it to 
the 4-month marker. Killdeer have been back for a few weeks and Red-wings are 
singing. 


Cheers!
-Tim H



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Subject: Two new marine birding opportunities, including NY LIS waters
From: Thomas Robben <robben99 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 20:21:45 -0400
PLEASE JOIN US:
Two new events open to everyone who loves marine birds, pelagic birds,
marine science, science, oceans, conservation, etc:

March 25th: SEAWATCH
​spanning LIS​
​

​(​
Long Island Sound
​)​
.
If you would like to contribute an hour or two, at a location of your
choice, please see this website:
http://SuperSeaWatch.blogspot.com 
​Started in CT and now expanded to include LIS coast of Westchester, Bronx,
Queens, Nassau and Suffolk.​

June 11th: PELAGIC TRIP from Gloucester MA.
Combining marine biology with seabirds, whales, fish, plankton.
Comparing LIS with these Gulf Of Maine waters.
And continuing where our October 22 trip left off last year:
http://trips33.blogspot.com

For both events
​ (info or sign-up)​
please email to:  robben99 AT gmail.com
Thank you,
Tom Robben

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--
Subject: Re:Woodcocks around Manhattan
From: Zack <info2 AT statesofcontrol.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:32:59 -0400
I just saw an American Woodcock about 25 minutes ago on a handicapped access 
ramp leading to 799 Washington Street at the northeast corner of Horatio and 
Washington Streets in Manhattan's Far West Village (kitty corner from the small 
"park" where the Couch's Kingbird was first seen two years ago). He seemed a 
little disoriented, and was fluttering about a bit. I went home to see if I 
could find anything to feed him (no grubs handy, but I thought if he was 
desperate enough he might go for some nuts or seeds), but when I returned a few 
minutes later he was gone. No luck trying to refind him. 


Best wishes,

Zack Winestine

On Mar 15, 2017, Ardith Bondi wrote:

> At least four American Woodcocks had to be rescued across midtown Manhattan 
on Wednesday, March 15. 



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Subject: American Woodcock Event in NYC Parks.
From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:30:37 -0400
Hi all,
This morning I counted 21 (yes Twenty-one!!) American Woodcocks on my
morning walk in Central Park, and I only covered the Ramble Area. In
addition to the Woodcocks I also found a Wilson's snipe.

Here is a link to my Flickr page with some photos:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/landp/with/32633210374/

good birding,

Anders Peltomaa

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Subject: Bryant Park Woodcocks
From: Alan Drogin <drogin AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 20:25:34 -0400
Co-worker Bill on his way home alerted me to multiple American Woodcock 
sightings in Central Park (probably meant Prospect). So I resumed my daily 
watch just before dusk today. All the daffodils, which were days away from 
blooming on Monday, were covered in snow so that only a few green tips peaked 
above the frozen white expanse as if in a sick replay of breaking ground two 
weeks earlier. Many of the paths were not plowed or blocked off for the 
demolition of the skating rink, but nevertheless, even in the failing light, 
the vast whiteness would make the woodcocks easy to spot. Sure enough, I found 
two in the northwest corner close to the plowed paths. One under the evergreen 
in the corner of the lawn’s cement colonnade, the other under a bush 
perpendicular to the welcome sign and Wafels & Dinges. Both puffed up and 
perfectly still. The latter looked okay, eyes closed, breathing, although it 
had some reddish debris at its bill tip. I feel some guilt about writing 
“harbingers of Spring”, they appear to bearing the brunt of some joke 
played by Old Man Winter on us all. 


Happy (real soon) birding,
Alan Drogin
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Subject: Top 10 Locations Reviewed (NYS eBird Hotspots)
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:14:54 -0400
The wiki pages for the Top 10 locations (singles and grouped) have been
reviewed for the 21 counties that currently have dedicated pages for
hotspots. The locations promoted to top 10 are highlighted green.

Check out Putnam County which now has pages for all locations. The color
coding on the alphabetical listing of counties is violet for Putnam to show
that *all shared locations* have 'static' pages including the Top 10. The
counties highlighted with the duller purple color, called 'Fog', have *Top
10 pages only*.

*JEFFERSON COUNTY*
(+) Chaumont Barrens Preserve

There's a tie for 10th in Jefferson County. Both 'Black Pond WMA' and
'Chaumont Barrens Preserve' currently have 121 spp. making this a Top 10
plus 1 county.

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Enjoy and let me know if you see any issues.
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Re:Ramble, Central Park NYC: Baker's Dozen of American Woodcocks
From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 20:46:13 -0400
The line breaks in my email seem to have be have been messed up. I guess it
happened because I copied and pasted the link and messages from my
friends...

Here is the correct link to the photo if you want to see the Woodcock that
visited our Upper West Side backyard today.

https://flic.kr/p/SMM8ua


- Anders Peltomaa
Manhattan


On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 8:21 PM, Anders Peltomaa 
wrote:

> Hi all,
> Between 6:20 and 7:15pm I rallied around the Ramble and found THIRTEEN
> Woodcocks:
> 2 in the stream from Azalea to Oven,
> 5 in the Oven (thanks to Ed Gaillard for the tip of those two locations),
> 1 by rustic bridge where the Gill flows into Lake,
> 1 in the Upper Lobe,
> 4 by Triplets Bridge.
>
> Woodcock BONANZA for a birder, not sure how good they themselves were
> feeling...
>
> My wife and I saw another one in our backyard earlier in the day, of which
> I got a photo:
>
> https://flic.kr/p/SMM8ua
>
> good birding,
>
> Anders Peltomaa
> Manhattan
>
> PS. Debra Kriensky of NYC Audubon wrote on Facebook:  "Between the Wild
> Bird Fund, D-Bird, and calls to NYC Audubon, there were about 30 injured or
> dead just today (that we know about). We've never seen anything like this!
> Please be on the lookout this week for ones that might be injured and in
> need of rehab/rescue!"
>
> A friend that volunteers at WBF gave me tips on how to take care of
> injured Woodcocks. Basically, if you see one that doesn't look so great
> please place it in a paper bag and bring them to the Center. Also, punch a
> couple of holes in the bag, and if possible, add terry cloth for perching.
> With such big birds, a big box is also suitable."
>

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Subject: Ramble, Central Park NYC: Baker's Dozen of American Woodcocks
From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 20:21:35 -0400
Hi all,
Between 6:20 and 7:15pm I rallied around the Ramble and found THIRTEEN
Woodcocks:
2 in the stream from Azalea to Oven,
5 in the Oven (thanks to Ed Gaillard for the tip of those two locations),
1 by rustic bridge where the Gill flows into Lake,
1 in the Upper Lobe,
4 by Triplets Bridge.

Woodcock BONANZA for a birder, not sure how good they themselves were
feeling...

My wife and I saw another one in our backyard earlier in the day, of which
I got a photo:

https://flic.kr/p/SMM8ua

good birding,

Anders Peltomaa
Manhattan

PS. Debra Kriensky of NYC Audubon wrote on Facebook:  "Between the Wild
Bird Fund, D-Bird, and calls to NYC Audubon, there were about 30 injured or
dead just today (that we know about). We've never seen anything like this!
Please be on the lookout this week for ones that might be injured and in
need of rehab/rescue!"

A friend that volunteers at WBF gave me tips on how to take care of injured
Woodcocks. Basically, if you see one that doesn't look so great please
place it in a paper bag and bring them to the Center. Also, punch a couple
of holes in the bag, and if possible, add terry cloth for perching.  With
such big birds, a big box is also suitable."

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Subject: Woodcock-wonders, Central Park, NYC 3/15
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 01:25:00 -0400
Wednesday, the 15th of March, 2017
Central Park - in Manhattan, N.Y. City

''beware the ices of March'', the soothsayer -sort of- sayth, for  
which this day, in addition to weather-related perils to creatures of  
the genus Homo, brought dramatics of a Scolopax-ian sort to inner/uber  
Central Park (Scolopax is an avian genus, in which American Woodcock  
is placed).

At an absolute minimum, there were 35-40 American Woodcock within the  
park we know as Central, and those numbers, conservative as can be -  
the true numbers may have been as much as triple what I am reporting  
and saw for myself in 8 hours out in the cold, ice, and wind (far less  
than what some of these birds are going thru - but, see below, as well).

I remained in the field until 2 hours past sunset (yes, I was wearing  
'arctic' gear), and thru afternoon-evening hours, visited parts of  
Central Park, & much more briefly, in Morningside Park (2 more  
woodcocks found there, in just 20 minutes - that park, smaller than  
Central, & a short way off to the northwest, is west of Frederick  
Douglass Boulevard, and beneath/east of Morningside Drive).

Amid excitement of an historic day for the species in Central,  
observations were and are very much tempered by the grave difficulty  
these individual lives are in, just now. That said, birds that migrate  
to and from, or reside in, temperate or cold-temperate climes, such as  
American Woodcock - & many, many, many other species moving at the  
''end'' of winter! - have faced these rough-weather issues over  
millennia, and they are adapted, as species, to withstand such  
'infrequent' situations as this seems to us to be.  It has been about  
twenty years (i.e., about one generation in the genus Homo, in  
contemporary times), or a bit more, since an event of his magnitude in  
the city of New York took place (in my memory) however some others,  
with longer memory &/or deeper notes, may have more to say on this  
subject.

- to add a bit to the city-wide (at least) scope of this day's  
woodcock-event, there are sightings from some other areas - from each  
borough (county) in city of New York, that (at least) suggest this may  
have involved many, many, many dozens of woodcocks in each (of 5, in  
NYC) counties - and possibly in the many many hundreds, if not even  
more, thru this region in just the past 24-36 hours.  Nature IS  
prolific, in some (many) instances.

Higher numbers of some other species noted - Rusty Blackbirds (at  
least 9), [Red] Fox Sparrows, (at least 20), & to (somewhat) lesser  
extent, Hooded Merganser (at least 7), Ring-necked Duck (at least 6,  
reservoir), & Dark-eyed Junco (at least 120) - these all counted in  
Central Park on Wednesday, 3/15.  A Red-headed Woodpecker continues in  
the park, in areas west of East 68th Street.

A bird-list for Central Park on Wednesday, 3/15:

Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser (reservoir)
Ruddy Duck
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
American Coot
American Woodcock
Ring-billed Gull
[American] Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
[feral] Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Eastern Phoebe [1]
Blue Jay
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet [1]
Hermit Thrush [1]
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow [1]
[red] Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

--------------
This thing of darkness I acknowledge - is mine.
- The Tempest - WiIIiam Shakespeare

Youre on Earth. Theres no cure for that."
  -'Endgame' - a 1957 Samuel Beckett play.

kiusaamista vastaan! - at any place & at any time.
-  -  -
good birding - and be careful on the ice,
Tom Fiore
Manhattan
















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Subject: Queens County Bird Club - Monday, March 20 - Mike Bottini presents "Mammals of Long Island: Flying Squirrels, Coyotes, and River Otters"
From: "Nancy Tognan" <nancy.tognan AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 12:45:44 -0400
This meeting was originally scheduled for tonight, but the date has been
changed to Monday, March 20, due to weather.

 

The Queens County Bird Club will be meeting at the Alley Pond Environmental
Center, 228-06 Northern Blvd Douglaston, NY 11362   
>Map of location<  

at 8:00 pm on Monday, March 20, 2017.  Free admission.  Refreshments served.

 

Public transit users:  Meeting location is one mile from Bayside LIRR
station;  you may either walk, take the Q12 bus, or use car service located
at the station.

 

Mike Bottini will present "Mammals of Long Island:  Flying Squirrels,
Coyotes, and River Otters"      

Mike Bottini is a veteran naturalist, outdoor educator, and environmental
consultant. After completing graduate studies in wildlife ecology at the
University of British Columbia, Mike worked for fourteen years at the Group
for the South Fork, a non-profit environmental advocacy organization. He has
taught field ecology, environmental science, and natural history courses at
St. Lawrence University, Southampton College, and CUNY, has published three
books, and is an award-winning columnist. Mike's wildlife research studies
have included elk, spotted and tiger salamanders, spotted turtles, piping
plovers, and river otters. At St. Lawrence, he designed and taught Winter
Field Ecology, and has slept in igloos and snow caves in the mountains of
New England, Colorado, Scotland, Labrador and Baffin Island. He continues to
introduce people to the outdoors through his field naturalist classes,
nature walks, and paddling trips.   

Mike is also one of the founders of the annual Long Island Natural History
Conference, which will be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on March
24-25, 2017  -    www.longislandnature.org 

      

Nancy Tognan 

nancy.tognan AT gmail.com     

Vice President, Queens County Bird Club 

 

See http://www.qcbirdclub.org/   for more information on trips, speakers,
and other events.

See our 'Birding Maps & Locations' page for directions to and info about
many local birding hotspots

 

* QCBC is a tax exempt, charitable organization {501c3}.  *


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Subject: NYC AUDUBON Lecture Thursday March 16
From: Lynne Hertzog <lynnehertzog AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 19:40:43 +0000
Coming up this week.
Free to all.
Support Science!

COASTAL CHANGE, OCEAN CONSERVATION AND RESILIENT COMMUNITIES

By Marcha Johnson and Eric Rothstein
Thursday, March 16, 7pm
Reidy Hall at the Unitarian Church of All Souls
1157 Lexington Avenue (between 79th and 80th Streets)

With the publication of *Coastal Change, Ocean Conservation and Resilient
Communities*, editors Marcha Johnson and Amanda Bayley have brought
together essays by leading practitioners in the fields of coastal science,
community resilience, habitat restoration, sustainable landscape
architecture, and floodplain management. Johnson will share what she has
learned compiling the book, and introduce us to exciting projects underway.
Joining her will be Hydrologist Eric Rothstein, addressing sustainable
water resource planning for several NYC Projects.

www.nycaudubon.org/lectures
-- 

[image: www.nycaudubon.org] 

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Subject: BBC Evening Presentation Tuesday March 21st
From: Dennis Hrehowsik <deepseagangster AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 2017 21:34:25 -0400
*Tuesday, March 21st, 7:00 P.M.*

*Penguins, Albatross, Leopard Seals: The Abundant Life of Wild Antarctica*

*Presenters: Tom Stephenson and Rob Bate*

*Location: Brooklyn Public Library Central Branch
 at Grand Army Plaza*

Antarctica remains one of the most remote and natural places on earth. The
wild, rugged scenery includes spectacular icebergs the size of city blocks,
snow-covered mountainous peaks, and huge glaciers. It is the breeding
grounds for thousands of birds including Snow Petrels, Cape Petrels, Giant
Petrels; many species of Penguins, Albatross with wingspans up to 12 feet,
and the Skuas and Sheathbills that come to scavenge the nesting areas. It
also hosts thousands of huge Elephant, Weddell, Leopard and other seal
species along with many whales that all come to feast on the abundant life
of the southern ocean.

Join the Brooklyn Bird Club for a photographic extravaganza of this
exciting destination.
Tom Stephenson has been birding since he was a kid under the tutelage of
Dr. Arthur Allen of Cornell University. His articles and photographs are in
museums and many publications including Birding, Birdwatcher’s Digest,
Handbook of the Birds of the World, Handbook of the Mammals of the World,
Birds of Madagascar, and Guide to the Birds of SE Brazil.

Rob Bate is the president of the Brooklyn Bird Club, an artist, and an avid
Brooklyn birder and photographer. He very much enjoyed testing out his new
gear in Antarctica.


http://www.brooklynbirdclub.org/meetings.htm

Dennis Hrehowsik

Brooklyn

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Subject: Central Park, NYC 3/12 - 12 spp. of ducks, Black Vulture, Ravens, RHWP, Loon, Woodcock; Snipe (3/11), & more
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Mar 2017 20:28:00 -0400
''Oh GOS, where art thou''
- I'm quoting a beloved Brooklyn [Kings County] birder here, so don't  
'snipe' at me - anyhow, Northern Goshawk of juvenile flavor has again  
graced he vigilant birders of Prospect Park - thus a bird lingering on  
for a bit more even if not seen there on a daily basis.   And -  
Setophaga pinus, too.

------------
SUNDAY, the 12th March, 2017 -
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

Some of the highlights from the day in Central, as seen by me and  
about 28 other observers in total:

A young Red-headed Woodpecker in first-year plumage continues just  
west of East 68th Street within Central Park, a good amount of red now  
showing on this bird.

Nice, if modest diversity of ducks - at least 12 species in total,  
listed below (no-accountin' the feral &/or intro'd. few duck-a-doos,  
alhough we love and adore them!)

Black Vulture, once a very rare bird for Manhattan, overflew Central  
Park again today, seen with some of the passing turkey vultures, after  
mid-day.

A modest 'movement' of Northern Ravens, with at least 6 seen Friday, 4  
on Saturday, & several today - these may be rather 'local', &/but this  
species can be moving this time as well.     A Bald Eagle overflew the  
park as well as 9 or more Turkey Vultures, quite in the day- seen by  
other observers as well.     There were also a modest number of  
American Robins, & smaller passerines in flight in the morning, as  
well - despite this freeze, winds were quite light - in morning hours.

A Wilson's Snipe flew past Turtle Pond on Saturday (3/11), just before  
sunset; but NOT re-found Sunday - the snipe gave distinctive -and  
diagnostic- alarm calls as it went northward.   American Woodcock  
showed again this Sunday evening in a few locations, but were missed  
by some who may have sought them.

An annotated list for some of Sunday's sightings, observations from 8  
am - 7 pm [daylight savings time]

Common Loon (1, CP reservoir - & not the same individual seen here few  
weeks ago)
Pied-billed Grebe (2 continue at the CP reservoir)
Double-crested Cormorant (several locations)
Great Blue Heron (Central Park, The Pond - SE part of the park)
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture (9)
Canada Goose

Wood Duck (several, Central Park in usual locations - Meer, Pond)
Gadwall (8)
American Black Duck
American Wigeon (continuing Sunday, since I re-found Friday 3/10 -  
'rarest' water-bird now in park, Meer)
Green-winged Teal (pair, again on Central Park Lake)
Mallard (ubiquitous)
Northern Shoveler (good numbers continue in Central Park)
Northern Pintail (breeding-plumaged drake still at The Pond)
Ring-necked Duck (1, reservoir)
Bufflehead (numerous)
Hooded Merganser (2 pairs, Central Park)
Ruddy Duck (96)

Bald Eagle (1)
Sharp-shinned Hawk (1)
Cooper's Hawk (1)
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel (2)
Peregrine Falcon (1 noted)
American Coot (11, in total, in Central Park, on 4 water-bodies but  
most on the reservoir, as is typical)
Ring-billed Gull (many)
[American] Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-headed Woodpecker (1, as noted above!)
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (few)
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker (3)
Blue Jay (rather common)
Northern Raven (as noted above!)
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse (many)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (2)
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper (2)
Carolina Wren (2)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  (2, overwintered)
Hermit Thrush (1, overwintered)
American Robin (as noted above)
Gray Catbird (1, overwintered)
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher (3, overwintered)
European Starling
Eastern Towhee (3, overwintered)
[Red] Fox Sparrow (14 - some new arrivals)
Song Sparrow (many - some new arrivals )
Swamp Sparrow (overwintered)
White-throated Sparrow (many)
Dark-eyed Junco (various areas, few new arrivals)
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird (25)
Common Grackle (400)
Brown-headed Cowbird (few)
House Finch
American Goldfinch ('uncommon' now)
House Sparrow

----
"A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability  
and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends  
otherwise."

- Aldo Leopold (18871948), U.S. wildlife biologist, conservationist,  
professor, author, best known for his book "A Sand County  
Almanac" (1949), which has sold more than two million copies.

--------
"Love does not begin and end the way we seem to think it does -
     Love is a battle   -    Love is a war    -    Love is growing up"

- James Baldwin, American author & activist, and French expatriate- 
American, 1924-1987, posthumously awarded the title of 'Commandeur de  
la Lgion d'Honneur' by France. His debut novel, Go Tell It on the  
Mountain, may be his best known work. Time Magazine included that  
book in its 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.

good birding, and thanks to those respecting all wildlife and other  
park users.

Tom Fiore,
manhattan


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Subject: Central Park, NYC - Sunday March 2, 2017 - Green-winged Teal Pair near the Point
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Mar 2017 19:54:18 -0400 (EDT)
Central Park, NYC
Sunday March 2, 2017
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the 
Boathouse at 9:30am. 


Highlights: Green-winged Teal pair near the Point, Red-headed Woodpecker at the 
Dene, Brown Thrasher on island near Bow Bridge, and a Red-breasted Nuthatch 
continues at the feeders. 


Birds at the Reservoir were seen before the walk from the south & west sides. 

Canada Goose - around a dozen on the Lake (at least a hundred north end of 
Reservoir) 

Wood Duck -  male at the Pond (Sandra Critelli)
American Black Duck - 4 (2 at the Pond, 2 at the Reservoir)
Mallard - at least 30 Reservoir, others at the Pond & Lake
Northern Shoveler - around 90 (4 Reservoir, around 85 Lake)
Green-winged Teal -  drake & hen Lake near the Point
Bufflehead - female Reservoir
Ruddy Duck - 53 NW corner Reservoir
Mourning Dove
American Coot - 5 (1 at the Pond, 4 west side Reservoir)
Ring-billed Gull - very few Reservoir
Herring Gull - very few Reservoir 
Double-crested Cormorant - flyover (Andrea Hessel)- maybe the same bird later 
swimming near the Point 

Cooper's Hawk - 2 - one chasing the other over Bethesda Terrace
Red-tailed Hawk - flyover (Jeff Ward)
Red-headed Woodpecker - first-winter bird at the Dene (Linda Yuen & Mayra Cruz)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - various locations
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2 (the Dene & Source of the Gill)
Downy Woodpecker - 2 or 3
Northern Flicker - 2 males Falconer's Hill
Peregrine Falcon - female on Central Park West nest ledge
American Crow - at least 7 flyovers - some vocalizing
Blue Jay - many locations
Black-capped Chickadee - feeders & Ramble
Tufted Titmouse - more than 20 
Red-breasted Nuthatch - feeders
White-breasted Nuthatch - 6-7
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - male continues in Shakespeare Garden
American Robin - 42 on lawns
Brown Thrasher - island near Bow Bridge
House Finch - male & female feeders
American Goldfinch - 2 feeders
Eastern Towhee - male continues near Boathouse (before walk)
Song Sparrow - 5 (Falconer's Hill, Mineral Springs, Sheep Meadow), others 
before walk 

Swamp Sparrow - the Pond (Jeff Ward)
White-throated Sparrow - many
Dark-eyed Junco - at least 4 Sheep Meadow
Northern Cardinal - residents
Red-winged Blackbird - 2 island near Bow Bridge
Common Grackle - many flyovers


Jeffrey M. Ward reported that the female American Wigeon continued at the Meer 
this morning (before the walk). 


We looked for but didn't find the Northern Pintail and Great Blue Heron at the 
Pond. Terence Collins later reported the Great Blue Heron there shortly after 
5pm via twitter. 


Ed Gaillard reported an American Woodcock at the Upper Lobe at 4:21pm via 
twitter. 



Deb Allen

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Subject: Prospect Park Goshawk
From: Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Mar 2017 22:40:56 +0000
Information about this bird has been circulated on many platforms already,
but I have not seen it posted on this listserv. The immature Goshawk that
has apparently been in Prospect Park since mid-January (though most of us
only learned about it a little over a week ago) was seen again today by
about 10 people. It has been seen most often in the area of the Terrace
Bridge and feeders, but has also been seen flying toward the Midwood, the
Ravine, and Quaker Cemetery. It can be difficult to see; a group staked out
the Terrace Bridge through much of Friday and I staked it out all of
yesterday afternoon, both without results. Most of us who got to see it
today got only brief looks, though good clear ones. Good luck if you try.

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Subject: Fox sparrow bonanza - croton
From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 16:01:31 +0000
>> At croton point park I had at least 13 fox sparrows at various places in the 
park. Also of note 1 adult peregrine perched, 1 imm. Coop, 5 bald eagle (4 
adult), 1 swamp sparrow, 1 catbird and a few tree sparrow, also good size raft 
of ruddy duck on bay side. Back in Ossining 2 fox sparrow at feeders (a yard 
rarity). 

>> 
>> L. Trachtenberg
>> Ossining 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
From: Joseph Brin <brinjoseph AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 2017 22:02:27 +0000 (UTC)
*  New York*  Syracuse   
   - March 13 2017
*  NYSY  03.13.17 Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):March 06, 2017 - 
March 13, 2017to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY 
counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands 
Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, 
Oneida, Herkimer,  Madison & Cortlandcompiled: March 13  AT 5 p.m. 
(EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: 
www.onondagaaudubon.org  Greetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for 
the week of March 06, 2017. 

Highlights--------------
CLARK’S GREBEROSS’S GOOSEGREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSEEURASIAN WIGEONGOLDEN 
EAGLESANDHILL CRANETHAYER’S GULLGLAUCOUS GULLICELAND GULLNORTHERN SAW-WHET 
OWLGREAT GRAY OWL (Extralimital) 


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex 
(MWC)------------ 

     3/8: A male EURASIAN WIGEON and a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE were seen 
at Tschache Pool.     3/10: 2 SANDHILL CRANES were seen at Knox-Marsellus 
Marsh. 


Derby Hill------------
     Cold weather and unfavorable winds made for a slow week at Derby Hill. 
Only 163 raptors were recorded. Highlights were 7 GOLDEN EAGLES on 3/8 and 
another today. 


Oswego County------------
     3/6: This was the last day the CLARK’S GREBE was seen.     3/7: 
The THAYER’S GULL was present at Phoenix at the lock and has been reported 
daily including today.     3/8: A GLAUCOUS GULL was seen at Phoenix.     
3/11: An ICELAND GULL was seen at Phoenix.     3/13: 3 ICELAND GULLS were 
seen today at Phoenix. 


Onondaga county------------
     3/11: The SAW-WHET OWL was seen on the Bog Trail at Beaver Lake Nature 
Center but was not seen the last two days.     3/12: A male EURASIAN WIGEON 
was found at the outlet of Nine Mile Creek on the west side of Onondaga lake in 
Lakeland. The bird was relocated today. 


Oneida county------------
     3/6: The pair of PEREGRINE FALCONS are again at the nesting site on the 
Adirondak Bank in Utica. 


Extralimital------------
     3/12: GREAT GRAY OWLS are continuing at both Robert Moses State Park on 
Barnhart Island in Massena in St. Lawrence County and on Lime Kiln Road in the 
Town of Keene in Essex county.               



-end report 
    
Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027  U.S.A.  
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Subject: Woodcocks around Manhattan
From: Ardith Bondi <ardbon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 01:20:35 -0400
At least four American Woodcocks had to be rescued across midtown 
Manhattan on Wednesday, March 15.

Ardith Bondi

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Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Michael Farina <michfar AT tohmail.org>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 11:10:50 -0500
Marine Nature Study Area, Nassau, New York, US
Mar 11, 2017 10:15 AM
Protocol: Incidental
Comments:	 A 1st!!!! (2) Sandhill Cranes heading west towards
Oceanside Landfill but my have stopped in Oceanside Park, or any of the
school fields between here and there.
1 species
 
Sandhill Crane  2     A 1st!!!! (2) Sandhill Cranes heading west
towards Oceanside Landfill but my have stopped in Oceanside Park, or any
of the school fields between here and there.
 
View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35103405 
 
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 
 
Michael Farina, CWB®
Conservation Biologist
Marine Nature Study Area
Dept. Conservation & Waterways
Town of Hempstead
http://mnsa.info
https://www.facebook.com/MNSA1970
email: michfar AT tohmail.org

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Subject: Tufted duck crown point ny
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 21:55:04 +0300
.
viewed from this location at 1.54pm on 03-11-2017
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=44.03099245,-73.42627757

Arie Gilbert 
No. Babylon NY 
www.powerbirder.blogspot 
www.qcbirdclub.org
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Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk, Nassau
From: d Futuyma <dfutuyma AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 13:23:51 -0500
At about noon, I had two sightings of an adult in Massapequa Preserve, perched 
and in flight along the west trail, first opposite Jerusalem Avenue, then a 
short distance to the south. 

Doug Futuyma

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Massapequa Preserve: Northern Goshawk
From: Robert Taylor <rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 20:42:35 -0500
There's been a continuing immature Northern Goshawk in the western part of
Massapequa Preserve - I've seen it 4 times in the last 2 weeks. (I live a
block away from the Preserve) From what I know it has been seen in the
Preserve as far north as the Walker Street parking lot and as far south as
Pittsburgh Ave.  I last saw it yesterday afternoon flying over the
neighborhood west of the preserve around Jerusalem Ave.  I know of another
occasion where it hunted a rabbit in someone's yard so it might pay to
check the trees in the surrounding area.  Except for one occasion where it
was resting it seems very active, seemingly disappearing into the woods
however I believe it's accustomed to human activity and not skittish.

Good luck if anyone tries to find it- it's not easy to find - wanted to get
the word out before the weekend in case anyone was up for a challenge.

Rob in Massapequa

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Subject: Central Park, (Bryant Park Lincoln's Sparrow question), NYC 3/6-7-8
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 21:55:44 -0500
First, the Bryant Park (Manhattan) Sparrow question - are there good  
photos that UNequivocally show a Lincoln's Sparrow wintering in Bryant  
Park, midtown Manhattan? I've reviewed some of my photos from there in  
this new year, and do not find any to document occurrence since late  
December, 2016.  On Tues., 3/7, a search there found just a few Song  
Sparrows, and more White-throated Sparrows, as well as one Gray  
Catbird - and I for one am not certain there is a wintering Lincoln's  
there, based on any definitive photos from this new year, that I've  
seen--- so has anyone?

(1 photo'd. Lincoln's Sparrow did stay at least into 2017 on Staten  
Island, N.Y. City)

- - - - - - - - -
MON. to WED. 6-7-8 March, 2017
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

A young Red-headed Woodpecker in 'transitioning' first-year plumage  
continues just west of East 68th Street within Central Park, a good  
amount of red now showing on this bird.

More Eastern Phoebes have arrived - 2 seen by Tuesday, 3/7 - and in  
more locations as of today.
Black-crowned Night-Heron, Tuesday, 3/7 (reservoir), 5+ by Wednesday,  
3/8 (various locations).

Other species noted in Central the past 3 days:

Pied-billed Grebe - 2 (reservoir)
Red-necked Grebe - Monday, 3/6, but not (by me) since then.
Double-crested Cormorant (various locations)
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail (drake , The Pond - there in various locations)
Ring-necked Duck (reservoir)
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
American Coot
American Woodcock
Ring-billed Gull
[American] Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow
[red] Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

---------
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you  
know for sure that just ain't so.
[Mark Twain]


good birding, and thanks to those respecting all wildlife and other  
park users.

Tom Fiore,
manhattan






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Subject: Piping Plover, Eastern Phoebe + other notables - Queens co. Roundup
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 11:39:54 -0500
Over the past few days, I have spent some time exploring a few known and 
unknown sites in Queens co. My efforts were aimed at getting a snap shot of 
what new species might have arrived and what might still be lingering. 


One bit of tracking note: before the last snow storm, one exploratory visit, 
revealed quite a few winter hardies including Chipping Sparrow and Ruby-crowned 
Kinglet. That run also turned up a high number of Field and Tree Sparrows, a 
few days later after the storm, the site was devoid of any of the same species. 


March 9th:

At Brookville Park, 3 Greater Yellowlegs were seen between the north and south 
end of the park. No sign of the Wilson's Snipe, that I had a few weeks ago but 
given how stealthy these birds are, I would not be surprised if it was still 
hanging in. A good number of American Black Ducks were in the area, including a 
few hybrids. Always nice to look at. 


At Idlewild Park, there was a lot of activity from a team of NYC Parks 
restoration workers. I engaged with them and had a good chat about "manicured" 
parks vs natural habitats. They seemed quite keen on doing what was right so I 
am hopeful my efforts in discussing the importance of the natural habitats will 
pay dividends in such that they will plant so there is less disturbance to the 
natural topography. If only I could bill them for my consulting efforts :-) 


While the work probably interfered with birds in area. It was this site that I 
pulled out an Eastern Phoebe. No doubt an early spring arrival that will rue 
its decision to travel south once the snow arrives. Multiple Killdeers were 
also seen in the area. 


Springfield Park was quiet save for a few expected waterfowl. I did pick up one 
Greater Yellowlegs here. This is another site, 

I have put in some effort in learning the migration pattern of likely visitors.

Baisley Pond Park saw a significant drop in waterfowl numbers. Northern 
Shoveler (2) American Wigeon (37), Redhead (5) and Ringneck Duck (1), were some 
of the notables still lingering. 


March 7
 
A day spent mostly along Queens coastal: Notables included 1 Piping Plover at 
Rocky Point Marsh. 1 American Oystercatcher at Breezy Point, seen from the Fort 
Tilden Fisherman's Parking Lot. 


That day saw a lot of Northern Gannets doing a sort of reverse migration - 
heading east instead of west as they were doing on March 5th. Also observed 
were decent numbers of Black and White-winged Scoters and Red-throated Loons. 


It appears that the number of Gulls are down at least on the Queens side. Some 
of the roosting areas on the beach did have habitat disturbance and could be 
the reason why I have not had the pleasure of sorting through the usual large 
flocks. 


Cheers,

"This game is rigged, man. We like the little b*** on a chessboard." -Preston 
'Bodie' Broadus 


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


LSwift as the wind
֡Quiet as the forest
Conquer like the fire
ɽSteady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 10 March 2017
From: Gail Benson <gbensonny AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 20:19:04 -0500
-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Mar. 10, 2017
* NYNY1703.10

- Birds Mentioned

TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE+
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD+

(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

ROSS’S GOOSE
Eurasian Wigeon
KING EIDER
BARROW’S GOLDENEYE
Horned Grebe
EARED GREBE
Black Vulture
Northern Goshawk
SANDHILL CRANE
Piping Plover
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
Red-headed Woodpecker
EVENING GROSBEAK

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report
electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at
http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to
nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or
sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber:  Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, March 10, 2017
at 7:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE, SANDHILL CRANE,
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD, EARED GREBE, ROSS’S GULL, BARROW’S GOLDENEYE, KING
EIDER, GLAUCOUS GULL, and EVENING GROSBEAK.

Perhaps a familiar ring to this week’s tape as we await more variety
promised by the upcoming spring, wherever it is.

Two Eastern Long Island rarities were still on territory this week, the
TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE continuing to feed and roost near the blue house #1625
North Sea Drive in Southold through today, and the SANDHILL CRANE remaining
around the north end of Wainscott Pond or visiting the fields along
Wainscott Hollow Road at least through Wednesday.

On Staten Island the female YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD was reported again
Monday in a mixed flock around Oakwood Beach, just north of Great Kills
Park, where it had been seen back on the 2nd.

An EARED GREBE appeared on Gravesend Bay in Brooklyn and was enjoyed by
many on Tuesday, this following the Oak Beach bird which was still being
reported around the western end of Fire Island Inlet near the Sore Thumb to
yesterday.  This time of year correctly identifying an EARED GREBE becomes
more of a challenge, with good numbers of HORNED GREBES now moving through,
many in transitional plumage, looking more an EARED than their traditional
winter plumage.  Of the 51 HORNED GREBES counted off Playland Park in Rye
Monday, several were looking rather dusky, so it is important to rely more
now on structure than plumage – especially note EARED’s usually fluffy
raised rear end, a good long distance mark.

For the still remaining waterfowl, a ROSS’S GOOSE was spotted again on
Oregon Road in Cutchogue last Sunday, a drake EURASIAN WIGEON was still
present Thursday at the Salt Marsh Nature Center section of Marine Park in
Brooklyn, with another on Eastport Lake again last Saturday, the female
BARROW’S GOLDENEYE was reported again Sunday off Oak Beach, and a female
KING EIDER remained off Orient Point County Park to Wednesday.

Single GLAUCOUS and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were still around Bellport
Bay last Sunday, and an ICELAND GULL was still visiting Prospect Park Lake
Wednesday.

Separate immature NORTHERN GOSHAWKS were still being seen Thursday both in
Prospect Park and at Massapequa Preserve.

Three BLACK VULTURES seen over Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn Sunday, plus
a few others locally, indicate these as well as various other raptors are
beginning to move back north.

RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS this week included one still in Central Park just
west of East 68th Street and one at Blydenburgh County Park in Smithtown
Sunday.

A PIPING PLOVER was back at Oak Beach last Saturday, with a few others
subsequently arriving, and interesting was a report from last Saturday of
two EVENING GROSBEAKS flying west over Jones Beach West End.

To phone in reports call Tom Burke at 212-372-1483 on weekdays.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the
National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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Subject: RE: Sandhill Cranes
From: <jsparacin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 11:30:20 -0500
Sandhill cranes migrating. I wonder where they are going? They are over NY and 
maybe NJ. 

I hope they like snow. We are expecting a nor’easter here and of course 
Boston. 

Has Wosey got her vittles in? 
I have to get some gas for my snow blower. 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Michael Farina
Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2017 11:11 AM
To: nysbirds-l AT cornell.edu
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Sandhill Cranes

Marine Nature Study Area, Nassau, New York, US
Mar 11, 2017 10:15 AM
Protocol: Incidental
Comments:     A 1st!!!! (2) Sandhill Cranes heading west towards Oceanside 
Landfill but my have stopped in Oceanside Park, or any of the school fields 
between here and there. 

1 species
 
Sandhill Crane  2     A 1st!!!! (2) Sandhill Cranes heading west towards 
Oceanside Landfill but my have stopped in Oceanside Park, or any of the school 
fields between here and there. 

 
View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35103405 
 
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 
 
Michael Farina, CWB®
Conservation Biologist
Marine Nature Study Area
Dept. Conservation & Waterways
Town of Hempstead
http://mnsa.info
https://www.facebook.com/MNSA1970
email: michfar AT tohmail.org
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Subject: Central Park, & Bryant Park Lincoln's, Manhattan (& spring-a-ling, Kings Co.-Prospect Park), 3/9
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 23:33:11 -0500
Topping 60 degrees today, Pine Warbler has arrived in Prospect Park,  
Brooklyn (Kings Co.), and Eastern Bluebird added yet more color to  
that park - these species seen today by Brooklyn birders. ;-)

------------
Revisiting my Bryant Park (Manhattan) sparrow question - there are  
photos that unequivocally showed a Lincoln's Sparrow wintering in  
Bryant Park, midtown Manhattan-
thanks to those who responded (off-list and on); I knew that other  
keen observers saw Lincolns, but I had not seen aII of their photos  
(now I have, and found another of my own that's just ok for ID) - so  
I'd seen the bird as weII, but not most recently or another time in  
Iate Feb - & now wonder if it has survived.

- - - - - - - - -
Thursday, 9 March, 2017
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

A Red-headed Woodpecker continued just west of East 68th Street within  
Central Park, that sighting reported from Ken Chaya for this afternoon.

Eastern Phoebes - harder to find for me today; locations today, Turtle  
Pond, near sw part of reservoir, and in the loch.
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2, by west shore of lake.

More blossoms on trees, shrubs, forbs - some Forsythia just beginning,  
but more important for those kinglets, gnatcatchers, warblers and  
other insectivores (when they come) are the many deciduous trees of  
multiple species now with ripe buds, and some now in flower.  Insects  
of many species have been seen, by those seeking or not, and many are  
earlier than expected.

Other avian species noted - 3/9/17:

Pied-billed Grebe - 2 (reservoir)
Double-crested Cormorant (various locations)
Great Blue Heron (the Pond)
Turkey Vulture (2)
Canada Goose
Wood Duck (the Pond, Meer)
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail (drake , The Pond)
Bufflehead (25, reservoir)
Ruddy Duck
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
American Coot
Ring-billed Gull
[American] Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Eastern Towhee
[red] Fox Sparrow - (1)
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow (fewer)
Dark-eyed Junco (fewer)
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle (1,000-plus)
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

---------
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you  
know for sure that just ain't so.
[Mark Twain]


good birding, and thanks to those respecting all wildlife and other  
park users.

Tom Fiore,
manhattan


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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 20:11:26 -0500
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar
chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or
deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the
date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted
checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the
'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't
added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.

For each county on the wiki click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a
Location' line:
— http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Yellow highlights a species added for the first time over the past few
months.

*Oneida County:*
Northern Bobwhite (28-Jan-2017)

*Richmond County:*
Yellow-headed Blackbird (2-Mar-2017)

*Washington County:*
Eurasian Wigeon (8-Mar-2017)

*Lewis County:*
Trumpeter Swan (Removed)
Boreal Chickadee (Removed)

*Suffolk County:*
Helmeted Guineafowl (Deleted and removed from NYS list)

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Re: Central Park, (Bryant Park Lincoln's Sparrow question), NYC 3/6-7-8
From: Dominic Garcia-Hall <dominic.hall AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 10:39:38 -0500
Hi Tom
There are phone pics on my ebird report from mid Feb when I last passed
through the park.-
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34390179
It's basically not moved from its corner all winter. Unequivocally a LISP -
just a bit scruffy ;)

Cheers
Dom

www.antbirds.com

+ 1 646 429 2667 <(646)%20429-2667>

On Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 9:57 PM Thomas Fiore  wrote:

> First, the Bryant Park (Manhattan) Sparrow question - are there good
> photos that UNequivocally show a Lincoln's Sparrow wintering in Bryant
> Park, midtown Manhattan? I've reviewed some of my photos from there in this
> new year, and do not find any to document occurrence since late December,
> 2016.  On Tues., 3/7, a search there found just a few Song Sparrows, and
> more White-throated Sparrows, as well as one Gray Catbird - and I for
> one am not certain there is a wintering Lincoln's there, based on *any
> definitive photos* from this new year, that I've seen--- so has anyone?
>
> (1 photo'd. Lincoln's Sparrow did stay at least into 2017 on Staten
> Island, N.Y. City)
>
> - - - - - - - - -
> MON. to WED. 6-7-8 March, 2017
> Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City
>
> A young *Red-headed Woodpecker* in 'transitioning' first-year plumage
> continues just west of East 68th Street within Central Park, a good amount
> of red now showing on this bird.
>
> More *Eastern Phoebes* have arrived - 2 seen by Tuesday, 3/7 - and in
> more locations as of today.
> *Black-crowned Night-Heron*, Tuesday, 3/7 (reservoir), 5+ by Wednesday,
> 3/8 (various locations).
>
> Other species noted in Central the past 3 days:
>
> Pied-billed Grebe - 2 (reservoir)
> *Red-necked Grebe* - Monday, 3/6, but not (by me) since then.
> Double-crested Cormorant (various locations)
> Great Blue Heron
> Turkey Vulture
> Canada Goose
> Wood Duck
> Gadwall
> American Black Duck
> Mallard
> Northern Shoveler
> Northern Pintail (drake , The Pond - there in various locations)
> Ring-necked Duck (reservoir)
> Bufflehead
> Hooded Merganser
> Ruddy Duck
> Red-tailed Hawk
> American Kestrel
> American Coot
> American Woodcock
> Ring-billed Gull
> [American] Herring Gull
> Great Black-backed Gull
> Rock Pigeon
> Mourning Dove
> Belted Kingfisher
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Downy Woodpecker
> Hairy Woodpecker
> Yellow-shafted Flicker
> Blue Jay
> American Crow
> Black-capped Chickadee
> Tufted Titmouse
> Red-breasted Nuthatch
> White-breasted Nuthatch
> Brown Creeper
> Carolina Wren
> Golden-crowned Kinglet
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> American Robin
> Northern Mockingbird
> Brown Thrasher
> European Starling
> Eastern Towhee
> Field Sparrow
> [red] Fox Sparrow
> Song Sparrow
> Swamp Sparrow
> White-throated Sparrow
> Dark-eyed Junco
> Northern Cardinal
> Red-winged Blackbird
> Common Grackle
> Brown-headed Cowbird
> House Finch
> American Goldfinch
> House Sparrow
>
> ---------
> It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you
> know for sure that just ain't so.
> [Mark Twain]
>
>
> good birding, and thanks to those respecting all wildlife and other park
> users.
>
> Tom Fiore,
> manhattan
>
>
>
>
>
> --
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Subject: Upcoming Birding Program: Thu Mar 16 Chappaqua/Westchester County
From: Anne Swaim <anneswaim AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 09:42:12 -0500
Corey Finger, author of American Birding Association's Field Guide to Birds
of New York, will be presenting a program for Saw Mill River Audubon on
Thursday, March 16, 2017, 7:00pm at the Chappaqua Library, 195 South
Greeley Avenue, Chappaqua, NY 10514.

Chappaqua Library, located in northern Westchester County, is about three
blocks from the Metro North RR Chappaqua station and also easily accessible
from the Saw Mill River Parkway. (Free library lot & street parking
available.)

This program is free and open to the public.
Co-sponsored by Chappaqua Library, www.chappaqualibrary.org

Chappaqua Library Theater doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Light refreshments. Book sales & signing follow program.

More details & Google map link here:
http://www.sawmillriveraudubon.org/events.html#upcoming

-- 

Anne Swaim, Executive Director
Saw Mill River Audubon
www.sawmillriveraudubon.org
O: 914-666-6503

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Subject: Black Vultures Broome County
From: David Nicosia <daven102468 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2017 22:25:37 -0500
We had 7 black vultures today in Vestal, NY. This is a high count for our
county of which this specie is rare. Adrian Burke first found them this
morning.

Dave Nicosia.

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Subject: Clark's Grebe No
From: Mary Magistro <mcmagistro AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 03:24:06 +0000
I have not personally seen the Clark's Grebe since Saturday. I check every
day from 7:30AM-8:30AM. I even have gone back a second time in the
afternoon for the last two days but no luck locating it. Our weather was very 
cold overnight Saturday and the winds have been 20-35mph which I feel may have 
added to the reason 

I can not locate the Clark's Grebe .
Mary Magistro

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Brooklyn Eared Grebe update
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 15:54:41 -0500
Eric Miller, just called to report that he is looking at the Eared Grebe. It 
has apparently moved closer to Ceaser's Bay, although further out as indicated 
by Eric who was viewing the subject via spotting scope. 


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Mar 7, 2017, at 11:40 AM, Andrew Baksh  wrote:
> 
> I was just up the road, looking at Gulls from what is termed the "middle 
parking lot" of Gravesend Bay when I picked up Doug's report (see e-mail below 
for those on Nyc ebirds). 

> 
> The Eared Grebe continues in the same vicinity as reported earlier. At one 
point, it showed quite nicely with a Horned Grebe but is now by itself. It 
seems to be drifting north but still in close for good binocular views. 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> "Sometimes you must be profane in order to be profound." - Black Eagle 🦅 
> 
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule 
of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ 
Frederick Douglass 

> 
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu  The Art of War
> 
>> (__/)
>> (= '.'=)                                            
>> (") _ (")                                     
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 
> 
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
> 
>> On Mar 7, 2017, at 10:23 AM, Doug Gochfeld  wrote:
>> 
>> There is currently an Eared Grebe in Gravesend Bay. It is adjacent to the 
southernmost parking area along the eastbound Belt Parkway, just before the Bay 
Parkway exit (Exit 5). You can only access this parking area from the eastbound 
Belt, but you can park at nearby Ceaser's Bay or in the muni meter lot at the 
end of Bay Parkway coming from either direction. 

>> 
>> The bird is close to shore and very actively diving, staying up for ~10 
seconds each time, but overall being very cooperative. 

>> 
>> Good Birding
>> -Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.
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Subject: 03/07- Brooklyn: Eared Grebe and more
From: Doug Gochfeld <fresha2411 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 21:43:07 -0500
This morning, I was fortunate enough to come across an *EARED GREBE* very
shortly after I started birding at Gravesend Bay. I was scanning from the
end of Bay Parkway, adjacent to Ceaser's Bay Bazaar, and the bird was
initially out in the bay between the pedestrian overpass over the Belt
Parkway, and the southernmost parking lot along the Gravesend Bay stretch
of the Belt. Luckily, as I closed the distance, it decided to make a
beeline towards shore, and then directly towards me, until it was fairly
close to shore and directly off the southernmost lot (easily walkable from,
and less than a quarter of a mile away from, the end of Bay Parkway). Bear
this in mind if it is not easily visible from the spot where it spent most
of today.

It settled into this spot and people continued to see it here through
sunset. Though it didn't move from this area, it was visible scoping from
several vantage points, including from Coney Island Creek Park, more than a
mile across Gravesend Bay to the south.

While the bay did not have many Horned Grebes this morning, there were a
bunch more around in the afternoon, and caution is warranted when trying to
pick out the EAGR if it gets farther offshore. There are a couple of Horned
Grebes beginning to transition into breeding plumage (and there was one in
almost full breeding plumage in Jamaica Bay today), so rather than plumage,
I would rely first and foremost on the distinctive shape and structure of
the species when trying to track it down.

Here is an eBird checklist with a few photos of the EAGR embedded:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35024075


A few of other observations of interest around Brooklyn today included an
adult *American Oystercatcher* on the flats at the western end of Plumb
Beach, with almost 40 Red-throated Loons inside Rockaway Inlet seen from
Plumb, and at least 18 Killdeer scattered around Floyd Bennett Field.

At Coney Island there were no less than *3,200* Long-tailed Ducks well to
the SW of Coney Island Pier late this evening, mostly counted in one long
flight stream heading towards the mouth of Lower NY Bay. Several hundred
Northern Gannets persist in the Coney Island/Breezy Point area, where over
*2,000* have been seen recently. A flock of ~10 male Slate-colored Juncos
around the bare trees that make up Coney Island Creek Park's winter plumage
were undoubtedly fairly new northbound arrivals as well.

Good Birding
-Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.

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--
Subject: Central Park Reservoir
From: Patricia Pollock <ppoll9870 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 18:46:01 +0000 (UTC)
Pat PollockMon., 3/6/17, 1:20-3 pm
3 (m)Wood Ducks south end 1 Pied-billed Grebe SE2 American Blk Ducks9 
Buffleheads6 American Cootsmany Northern ShovelersRed-tailed Hawk flew off from 
high perch NERuddies 

(did not see Common Loon, nor Red-Necked Grebe - saw both on Friday,3/3)
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Subject: Re: Brooklyn Eared Grebe Continues
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 11:40:04 -0500
I was just up the road, looking at Gulls from what is termed the "middle 
parking lot" of Gravesend Bay when I picked up Doug's report (see e-mail below 
for those on Nyc ebirds). 


The Eared Grebe continues in the same vicinity as reported earlier. At one 
point, it showed quite nicely with a Horned Grebe but is now by itself. It 
seems to be drifting north but still in close for good binocular views. 


Cheers,

"Sometimes you must be profane in order to be profound." - Black Eagle 🦅 

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass 


風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Mar 7, 2017, at 10:23 AM, Doug Gochfeld  wrote:
> 
> There is currently an Eared Grebe in Gravesend Bay. It is adjacent to the 
southernmost parking area along the eastbound Belt Parkway, just before the Bay 
Parkway exit (Exit 5). You can only access this parking area from the eastbound 
Belt, but you can park at nearby Ceaser's Bay or in the muni meter lot at the 
end of Bay Parkway coming from either direction. 

> 
> The bird is close to shore and very actively diving, staying up for ~10 
seconds each time, but overall being very cooperative. 

> 
> Good Birding
> -Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.
> --
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--
Subject: Brooklyn Eared Grebe now
From: Doug Gochfeld <fresha2411 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 15:23:17 +0000
There is currently an Eared Grebe in Gravesend Bay. It is adjacent to the
southernmost parking area along the eastbound Belt Parkway, just before the
Bay Parkway exit (Exit 5). You can only access this parking area from the
eastbound Belt, but you can park at nearby Ceaser's Bay or in the muni
meter lot at the end of Bay Parkway coming from either direction.

The bird is close to shore and very actively diving, staying up for ~10
seconds each time, but overall being very cooperative.

Good Birding
-Doug Gochfeld. Brooklyn, NY.

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Subject: Re: Clark's Grebe - yes
From: Brent Stephenson <brent AT eco-vista.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 14:35:17 -0500
The grebe is present now - 2:34pm - halfway between the Museum and lighthouse 
presumably in the same place it was seen yesterday. 

Regards,
Brent

Brent Stephenson PhD (Ornithology)
Eco-Vista: Photography & Research Ltd + Wrybill Birding Tours, NZ - "Great 
birds, real birders" 

PO Box 157, Bay View, Napier 4149, New Zealand
Phone +64 6 836 7406   Cell +64 274 426 638
email brent AT eco-vista.com or brent AT wrybill-tours.com
web http://www.eco-vista.com and http://www.wrybill-tours.com

"Birds of New Zealand: A Photographic Guide" Scofield & Stephenson – 
available NOW – email for details. 


> On Mar 5, 2017, at 9:37 AM, John Kent  wrote:
> 
> The Clark's Grebe in Oswego is present as of 9:35 AM, about halfway between 
the museum and the lighthouse. 

> 
> John Kent
> Selkirk, NY
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--
Subject: Central Park, NYC & Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx - Sunday March 5, 2017
From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 13:09:23 -0500 (EST)
Central Park, NYC 
Sunday March 5, 2017
Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting from the 
Boathouse at 9:30am 


Highlights on a windy & cold day: Central Park:Red-headed Woodpecker, Fox 
Sparrows, and Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers. 


Central Park notes include a brief walk along the south end of the Reservoir 
before the walk (DA). 



Canada Goose - Reservoir & Lake
American Black Duck - 2 Reservoir
Mallard - 55+ Reservoir
Northern Shoveler - at least 60 Lake
Bufflehead - 3 Reservoir
Ruddy Duck - around 60 SW Reservoir
Mourning Dove - a few under feeders
Herring Gull - 2 Reservoir (no other gulls observed there at 8am)
Cooper's Hawk - immature male
Red-tailed Hawk - 2 (Pine Hill & feeders)
Red-headed Woodpecker - first-winter bird continues at the Dene (inside the 
park at about E. 68th Street) 

Red-bellied Woodpecker - residents
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 4 at 3 locations 
Downy Woodpecker - stealing some sap
Blue Jay - many
Black-capped Chickadee - several
Tufted Titmouse - 24
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch - feeders & elsewhere
Brown Creeper - east side of Belvedere Castle (Bruno Boni)
American Robin - small numbers
House Finch - at least 6 feeders
American Goldfinch - 2
Fox Sparrow - 3 south of Azalea Pond
Song Sparrow - 2 (one singing at Bow Bridge)
White-throated Sparrow - many
Northern Cardinal - residents
Common Grackle - at least 70 Shakespeare Garden

--

On Saturday (March 4th) a Long-eared Owl reported on ebird.org by David Barrett 
was seen by many observers in Central Park. One of the birds that came in to 
mob the owl was a nice surprise, a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. (Golden- and 
Ruby-crowned Kinglets over-winter in Central Park in very small numbers). 


--

Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx 
Sunday March 5, 2017
Robert DeCandid, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob. on bird walk starting at 6:30 pm. 

Three Eastern Screech-Owls were present in two different parts of the park 
Sunday evening, one of these heard-only, the other two birds were both 
gray-morphs that perched close together. We did not see the red-morph owl that 
we found on our last visit two weeks ago. 


Numbers of Canada Geese on the Parade Ground have dropped-off dramatically. 


Deb Allen

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Subject: Re: Poss. Great-gray Owl report - Washington County, NYhm
From: zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 2017 18:13:44 +0000
Three birders scoured the area this morning for several hours and came up
with nothing.  It may be worth returning in the afternoon.  The sighting is
unconfirmed, though, and barred owls are pretty common along that stretch.
There is some decent habitat, especially on the beginning stretch of county
route 54 just a bit north of the Llama Farm.


On Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 10:11 AM Richard Guthrie 
wrote:

> Forwarding from an eBird report:
>
> Great Gray Owl (American) (Strix nebulosa nebulosa) (1)
> - Reported Mar 06, 2017 07:25 by Susan DeWolfe Burns
> - River Road, Schagticoke, Washington, New York
> - Map:
> 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.9772743,-73.6125398&ll=42.9772743,-73.6125398 

> - Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35001538
> - Comments: "It was perched in a tree near a small farm on River Road in
> Schaghticoke/Easton, near the border of Rensselaer and Washington Counties,
> not far from Stillwater NY.  If you know the area, it was near the farm
> that has llamas, across from which is a small seasonal store/farmstand.  I
> am quite sure this was a gray owl. I'm not an ornithologist, but I have
> spent decades watching and studying birds.  I did a double-take while
> driving and when I got to work, looked carefully at owl pictures on line to
> make sure that's what I saw.  It's not the first time I've seen gray owls
> in upstate NY, but it is admittedly a very rare and unusual sighting."
>
> --
> Richard Guthrie
>
> --
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>
-- 
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

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--
Subject: Call for volunteers: Mulching event at Forest Park, Queens this Saturday, March 11, 9 am
From: "Nancy Tognan" <nancy.tognan AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 12:47:00 -0500
PLEASE HELP:  Community Service at Forest Park this Saturday, March 11, 9
am, Wallenberg Square (Metropolitan Ave and Park Lane South)
		
Please show some love for Forest Park, Queens!  The park administrator has
asked for birders' help in two volunteer events per year, to show
appreciation for a Parks promise to provide a pole for bird feeders.  The
first event will entail spreading mulch on trails that birders use.  Various
community groups are invited, so at the sign-in, please indicate that you
are a birder so your help can be counted.  Below is an email by the
volunteer coordinator, Mike Moore, of the Friends of Forest Park - that
website lists various other volunteer events.

Nancy Tognan
VP, Queens County Bird Club
www.qcbirdclub.org  
nancy.tognan AT gmail.com    

		-------------------
		Greeting Queens Birdwatchers:
		The Friends of Forest Park and you will be spreading mulch
provided by NYC Parks on the Park trails.  Please join us at Raoul
Wallenberg Square (Park Lane South & Metropolitan Avenue) on Saturday, March
11, 2017 at 9 a.m.
		We will mulch trails inside the Park including The Watering
Hole, Forest Park's fantastic bird watching area. Mulching the trails helps
to define the trails and make your hiking boots just a little less muddy.
		This family friendly event will run between 9 a.m. to 2
p.m., but feel free to come and go.  We will meet at Raoul Wallenberg Square
and move over to Forest Park Drive (the Closed Road) to begin our fun.
Please join us and bring a friend.  
		All tools, gloves and mulch will be provided.
		If you have any questions, please call Mk Moore 917-282-0754
or email  friendsofforestpark AT yahoo.com
  
		 We can found on our Facebook Group:  Friends of Forest Park
and website www.friendsofforestpark.com 



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--
Subject: NYS eBird Hotspots: New/Renamed Shared Locations (4-Mar-'17)
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 10:39:00 -0500
Thanks to  AT Team_eBird for their dedication keeping eBird.org running
smoothly and for the group of New York State hotspot moderators for working
on shared location suggestions.

New and renamed shared locations (hotspots) have been updated for the 62
county wiki pages. You can find a summary of the changes below with
clickable links where a dedicated hotspot (shared location) page exists.

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/NewHotspots
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/RenamedHotspots

These links now appear on the home page (see below) on the line 'Shared
Location Updates' so you don't have to refer back to this message:

Home page: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Clickable map:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York#ClickableMap

Alphabetical list of counties:
http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York#Alphabetical

-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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--
Subject: Re: Fwd: [nysbirds-l] Yellow-headed Blackbird - Staten Island YES
From: Mike <falecore AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2017 09:01:21 -0500
YHBB continues at same spot 8:45am.

-Mike Shanley 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 6, 2017, at 8:31 AM, Andrew Baksh birdingdude AT gmail.com [ebirdsnyc] 
 wrote: 

> 
> See below.
> 
> --------
> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule 
of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ 
Frederick Douglass 

> 
> 風 Swift as the wind
> 林 Quiet as the forest
> 火 Conquer like the fire
> 山 Steady as the mountain
> Sun Tzu  The Art of War
> 
>> (\__/)
>> (= '.'=)                                            
>> (") _ (")                                     
>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 
> 
> Andrew Baksh
> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: Jose Ramirez-Garofalo 
>> Date: March 6, 2017 at 7:48:45 AM EST
>> To: "" , 
"sinaturalist AT yahoogroups.com"  

>> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Yellow-headed Blackbird - Staten Island YES
>> Reply-To: Jose Ramirez-Garofalo 
>> 
>> I currently have a female Yellow-headed Blackbird in Oakwood Beach, Staten 
Island. 

>> 
>> It is feeding with a flock of Red-winged Blackbirds and Brown-headed 
Cowbirds. They are moving between a cleared housing plot (Hurricane Sandy 
Recover area) and the marsh bordering the neighborhood. 

>> 
>> Given its proximity to Great Kills Park, this could be the same bird that 
was found by Dr. Veit last week. 

>> 
>> Here is the approximate location: 
>> 
>> https://goo.gl/maps/He4jsAAcqKq 
>> 
>> Good birding,
>> -- 
>> Jose
>> 
>> Research Assistant 
>> College of Staten Island
>> --
>> NYSbirds-L List Info:
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>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
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>> The Mail Archive
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>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
> 
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: Andrew Baksh 
> Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New 
Topic • Messages in this topic (1) 

> 
> Have you tried the highest rated email app?
> With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated email app 
on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can access all your inboxes 
(Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one place. Never delete an email again with 
1000GB of free cloud storage. 

>          
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--
Subject: Central Park, NYC 3/5 (& otherwhere in Manhattan)
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 2017 21:19:19 -0500
There were a modest number of birders out Sunday in the area where, on  
Saturday 3/4, a Long-eared Owl was reported (elsewhere, not to this  
list, and seen Saturday by 50+ observers, all on best-behavior with a  
bird that was rather low in a tree but did move a bit to a -slightly-  
more protected bit of cover (this may have been the first of the year  
in Central Park, but is not the first for Manhattan island - the story  
on that, perhaps, in another month or so).  Saturday's CP owl sighting  
was posted to the eBird site and thus was fully-accessible to the  
public by afternoon & many birders responded; a fly-out was observed  
at dusk as well, by a respectful -and much smaller- group of birders.  
Thanks to the keen birder & to the blue jays who assisted him on the  
find, and those discriminating reports.  To my knowledge this owl was  
not re-found on Sunday - if it, or any were in Central Park, it's  
assumed that any who enjoyed it did so with the greatest respect for  
the well-being of the bird, above all - and thanks to all for that  
which was seen on Saturday.

------------
SUNDAY, 5 March, 2017 -
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City

Some of the highlights from the day in Central, & some other areas in  
Manhattan as noted, & as seen by myself and about 30 other observers  
in total:

A young Red-headed Woodpecker in first-year plumage continues just  
west of East 68th Street within Central Park, a good amount of red now  
showing on this bird.

A modest movement of, in particular, Vultures, with at least 2 Black  
Vultures and up to 14 Turkey Vultures, all noted in mid-day hours,  
thru about 3 pm, from Central Park's northern half & then from the  
Upper East Side including Carl Schurz Park - seen by other observers  
as well, in varying numbers & possibly representing different &  
additional individuals, esp. of Turkey Vultures - additional 'light'  
movement added 2 near-adult-plumaged Bald Eagles, 1 Cooper's Hawk (sub- 
adult plumage), 1 American Kestrel (this perhaps not a migrant), &  
several Red-tailed Hawks that appeared to be migrating; the general  
direction of all of these headed north/northeast; and of other birds  
-   It might be added that of Black Vulture, there have been sightings  
and reports coming from almost across the continent - including in  
some states & a few provinces where these are relatively scarce, or  
were not so many years ago - this "feels" like an ongoing range- 
extension for this species - first record for Barrow, AK, anyone?!   
(And in NY state, please name the county that has not had this species  
by now - in this decade, that is?)

Some waterfowl (not much, but some Canada Geese, and a few Aythya- 
genus ducks that I took to be Ring-necked, but a bit too high to know,  
as well as some Red-breasted Mergansers along the East River, those  
perhaps just moving more locally), and a nice, if modest movement of  
Killdeer, with at least 7 in total (I said modest!), perhaps 3  
lingering a bit - 1 seen & tellied-texted-tweeted-eBirded, etc. from  
Riverside Park near West 80th, 2 seen & still around 2 hours later  
near East 116 Street public school-yard, 2 more at a site off East  
Dyckman Street (edge of Sherman Creek), & 2 in a small not-so-open  
part of a trail south of Dyckman Street at the Hudson river, which is  
a 'dead-end' ped-bike path. I was actually on that path seeking  
potential passerines, & did find some, but none notable at that area.   
There was again a modest movement of icterids, all identified (in  
flight, by sight as well as calls) were either Red-winged Blackbird or  
Common Grackle, a total of perhaps 200+ of the former and 400+ of the  
latter species, in the 2nd hour of the day, all moving north, seen  
from Central Park. There were also a very modest number of American  
Robins & some smaller passerines in flight in the morning, northbound  
as well - despite the freeze, the winds were quite light in morning  
hours and never that strong all day, at least at the surface.

An annotated list for some of today's sightings:

Red-throated Loon (1 non-breeding plumage, East River off about East  
91st Street)
Pied-billed Grebe (2 continue at the Central Park reservoir)
Red-necked Grebe (1 - that which was rehabbed & released weeks ago  
continues at the CP reservoir)
Great Cormorant (1, East River - distant but ok views near end of the  
day)
Double-crested Cormorant (several locations including in Central  
Park's waters)
Great Blue Heron (Central Park, The Pond - SE part of the park)
Black Vulture (as noted above)
Turkey Vulture (" " ")
Canada Goose
Brant (usuals, East River areas; all presumed Atlantic Brant as is  
usual, too)
Mute Swan (very distant, from East River shore path)
Wood Duck (several, Central Park in 'usual locations')
Gadwall (various areas in 2 rivers, & in Central Park)
American Black Duck (" " " " " " " ")
Mallard (ubiquitous)
Northern Shoveler (good numbers continue in Central Park)
Northern Pintail (fabulous breeding-plumaged drake still at The Pond,  
in Central)
Ring-necked Duck (possible high fly-overs, see note above)
Bufflehead (numerous on East River, and as typical, in Central)
Common Goldeneye (1 drake, East River - not unusual, but my first in a  
while - not checking there often however)
Hooded Merganser (2 pairs, Central Park)
Red-breasted Merganser (a few, East River; & noted by Karen Fung at  
the Hudson river north of West 96th Street)
Ruddy Duck (some on East River north of 86th Street to East 116th  
which is typical in winter, & as usual in Central's water-bodies)
Bald Eagle (as noted above)
Sharp-shinned Hawk (in Central Park)
Cooper's Hawk (in Central Park, and as noted above in potential  
migration)
Red-tailed Hawk (with a note above)
American Kestrel (noted above)
Peregrine Falcon (1 noted)
American Coot (11, in total, in Central Park, on 4 water-bodies but  
most on the reservoir as is typical)
Killdeer (as noted above)
American Woodcock (**1, in part of Central Park not far from where 2  
where released the other day from rehab, thus perhaps one of them)
Ring-billed Gull (many)
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Long-eared Owl (pellet found, from Saturday's occurrence, by the  
finder of the bird, but tmk, not the bird today)
Belted Kingfisher (seen from East River path at a known area on west  
edges of Randall's island - which is 'politically' part of Manhattan- 
NY County)
Red-headed Woodpecker (as noted above!)
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (few, Central Park)
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker (Central Park)
Yellow-shafted Flicker (" ")
Blue Jay (rather common)
American Crow
Fish Crow (East River area, seen & heard)
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse (many)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Central Park and Washington Heights area of  
Manhattan)
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper (Central Park)
Carolina Wren (3, Central Park)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  (1, Central Park - overwintered)
Hermit Thrush (1, Central Park - overwintered)
American Robin (as noted above, & in Central Park)
Gray Catbird (1, Central Park - overwintered)
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher (Central Park - overwintered)
European Starling
Eastern Towhee (3, Central Park - overwintered)
[Red] Fox Sparrow (Central Park, and 1 found in Riverside Park)
Song Sparrow (many)
Swamp Sparrow (Central Park - overwintered)
White-throated Sparrow (many)
Dark-eyed Junco (35+, through various areas)
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird (in part, as noted above)
Common Grackle (in part, as noted above)
Brown-headed Cowbird (few)
House Finch
American Goldfinch (uncommon just now)
House Sparrow

-------
"All ethics so far evolved rest upon a single premise: that the  
individual is a member of a community of interdependent parts. ~

The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to  
include soils, waters, plants, and animals, or collectively: the land. ~

A land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens from conqueror of the  
land-community to plain member and citizen of it.   It implies respect  
for his-her fellow-members, and also respect for the community as such."

- Aldo Leopold (18871948), U.S. wildlife biologist, conservationist,  
professor, author, best known for his book "A Sand County  
Almanac" (1949), which has sold more than two million copies.

good birding, and thanks to those respecting all wildlife and other  
park users.

Tom Fiore,
manhattan









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Subject: Clark's Grebe
From: Mary Magistro <mcmagistro AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Mar 2017 13:22:47 +0000
Still present in Oswego river behind H Lee White Marine Museum about 75 ft out 
south of red buoy #4. 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Staten Island YES
From: Jose Ramirez-Garofalo <jose.ramirez.garofalo AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 2017 12:48:45 +0000
I currently have a female Yellow-headed Blackbird in Oakwood Beach, Staten
Island.

It is feeding with a flock of Red-winged Blackbirds and Brown-headed
Cowbirds. They are moving between a cleared housing plot (Hurricane Sandy
Recover area) and the marsh bordering the neighborhood.

Given its proximity to Great Kills Park, this could be the same bird that
was found by Dr. Veit last week.

Here is the approximate location:

https://goo.gl/maps/He4jsAAcqKq

Good birding,
-- 
Jose

Research Assistant
College of Staten Island

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Subject: Thayer's gull phoenix ny yes.
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT optonline.net>
Date: Sun, 05 Mar 2017 16:46:57 +0300
.
viewed from this location at 8.46am on 03-05-2017
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=43.22804733,-76.30019235
43.22804733,-76.30019235
Arie Gilbert 
No. Babylon NY 
www.powerbirder.blogspot 
www.qcbirdclub.org
--
Sent from "Loretta IV" in the field. 
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Subject: Central Park, NYC 3/3; & a thought on SI's YHBL's
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 2017 17:15:01 -0500
It might be worth anyone who is checking out areas around Great Kills  
Park on Staten Island (Richmond Co., part of NYC) for possible  
lingering Yellow-headed Blackbirds to try at other sites in the  
vicinity, as the flocks the Yellow-headeds (an adult male on Tuesday  
2/28 - that bird was in a cowbird-icterid flock at Wolfe's Pond Park  
when noticed, then the other individual in less-ostentatious color,  
from Thursday 3/2 which was at Great Kills - there are other sites  
within a short distance where icterids might be flocking, feeding or  
roosting; there are in fact many such potential sites in the SE  
portion of the island-borough-county alone, & far more sites around  
the entire county!)

---
Of possible interest to some readers:
http://wildlife.org/migratory-bird-phenology-in-a-changing-climate/

---------
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City
Friday, 3 March, 2017 -

A less-windy day after Thursday's 50-60mph gusts, but back to 'normal'  
for early March, weather-wise, at least for this day - yet, with buds,  
blooms and some small leaves appearing that would, in decades past,  
suggest a mid-April day!  But for birds, it is much the expected for  
the date - and some of the same lingering species are still about -

Red-necked Grebe (this bird, on the CP reservoir, has been present for  
some weeks since being released after rehabilitation with the Wild  
Bird Fund on Manhattan's west side - it was present today, Friday on  
the reservoir past mid-day, & a "report" from another water-body in  
the park seems odd, since this grebe has not been seen in the multiple  
this year - there have been Double-crested Cormorants in the lake &  
elsewhere, & I have seen a few folks make an initial identification  
error on a cormorant, wanting this grebe as the sighting; the RN Grebe  
was photographed by several observers at the reservoir today, in  
morning & afternoon hours - it continues to roam the entire reservoir,  
sometimes very near shore and sometimes not near.)

Common Loon (on the reservoir for many days now, in non-breeding  
plumage, as with the above grebe; this bird has often been hard to  
spot as it may be in the central area of the reservoir, & can be  
diving or simply keeping a lower profile at times)

Red-headed Woodpecker - a young bird gaining color by the week is  
continuing in the area of the park just west of East 68 Street,  
sometimes can be quite high in branches, & may or may not be that  
active; patience is a virtue awaiting this bird to show itself. It is  
sometimes rather aggressive with other nearby birds of various species.

Other birds include the reported release of 2 rehabbed American  
Woodcock into the park's north end, on Thursday afternoon (3/2), these  
also coming from the Wild Bird Fund of Manhattan's west side.  There  
have been some other & prior woodcocks in the park as well.  Ongoing,  
or passage-migrant birds this Friday include -

Pied-billed Grebe (2, still at reservoir)
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser (few)
Ruddy Duck
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
American Coot
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
[feral] Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Winter Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Eastern Towhee
[red] Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
Evening Grosbeak
House Sparrow

- - - - - -
Youre on Earth. Theres no cure for that."
  -'Endgame' - a 1957 Samuel Beckett play.

Thanks to all who are respectful of wildlife and other human beings,
Good -and ethical- birding,

Tom Fiore
manhattan

















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Subject: Re:Alphabetized List of NYS Hotspots with Links
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 2017 16:12:50 -0500
I've added a feature on the alphabetized list of the current 5,520
hotspots. I found I wanted to look at the county list of hotspots while
browsing the alphabetized list so I added a link to the county page. To get
there just click on the county name to the right of each hotspot name.

Alphabetized list: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/AlphaHotspots

You can get to this list from the main page on the 'Go to >' line by
selecting 'Alphabetized List of Hotspots':

http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York

Ben

On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 5:34 PM, Ben Cacace  wrote:

> I've just setup a page showing all hotspots for New York State
> alphabetized on a single page. There are 'quick links' for every
> alphabetical section from # - Z.
>
> Alphabetical list of hotspots:
> http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/AlphaHotspots
>
> This is based on a page created by Ken Ostermiller for the Ohio state
> wikipage which was the first state with pages setup on the wikispaces site.
> All states with wikipages can be found in the left sidebar of the NYS page
> under 'wikis for eBird Hotspots'.
>
> There is a link to the Alphabetical list of hotspots on the main page
> below on the 'Go To >' line above the bar charts table:
>
> http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+New+York
>
> Enjoy!
> --
> Ben Cacace
> Manhattan, NYC
> Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots
> 
> Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots
> 
>



-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Great Great Owl Hotspots for Essex County ...
From: Ben Cacace <bcacace AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 2017 18:02:07 -0500
Please note that you will no longer see the markers for 'Bark Eater Inn'
and 'Lime Kilm Rd. & Alstead Hill Rd. vicinity, Keene'. These have been
merged into the hotspot 'stakeout Great Gray Owl, Town of Keene (2017)' by
the hotspot moderator for the county.

I much prefer hotspots that can be used after the stakeout bird is no
longer around.

Clearly this is good birding habitat.

Thanks.
-- 
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYC
Wiki for NYS eBird Hotspots

Facebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots


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Subject: Keene Great Gray Owl
From: Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 2017 00:14:54 -0500
I have not seen a post from today with an update, though there may have
been one on the NNY list. The owl appeared today at around 5:10 and was
still hunting in the fields when I gave in to the cold and left at around
5:50. We got to see it catch and swallow at least one small mammal.

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Subject: Re: Keene Great Gray Owl
From: Scott Gilbert <scottgilbert02 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 2017 08:27:41 -0500
It was out again in same location this morning. I observed it hunting from
7 am to 7:30 am.

Scott Gilbert
Huntington

On Mar 5, 2017 12:16 AM, "Joshua Malbin"  wrote:

> I have not seen a post from today with an update, though there may have
> been one on the NNY list. The owl appeared today at around 5:10 and was
> still hunting in the fields when I gave in to the cold and left at around
> 5:50. We got to see it catch and swallow at least one small mammal.
> --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
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> 
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> ABA 
> *Please submit your observations to **eBird*
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Subject: Clark's Grebe - yes
From: John Kent <jwkent AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sun, 05 Mar 2017 09:37:08 -0500
The Clark's Grebe in Oswego is present as of 9:35 AM, about halfway between the 
museum and the lighthouse. 


John Kent
Selkirk, NY
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