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Updated on Thursday, April 24 at 08:23 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Snow Goose,©David Sibley

24 Apr [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
24 Apr RBA: Portland, OR 4-24-14 [Harry Nehls ]
24 Apr Re: ID help with Empid @ Malheur HQ [David Irons ]
23 Apr Tricolored Blackbird at Crown Zellerbach - Columbia County [Aaron Beerman ]
23 Apr Fwd: Re: News from the Moderator: gmail accounts [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
23 Apr Song Sparrow update & other interesting yard birds [Jack Williamson ]
23 Apr Re: ID help with Empid @ Malheur HQ [Jeff Gilligan ]
23 Apr FOY Black-headed Grosbeak [Jean Baecher Brown ]
23 Apr Grouse near The Dalles? [Rob Neyer ]
23 Apr ID help with Empid @ Malheur HQ ["Garlick, Niels" ]
23 Apr Great-tailed Grackle, Bank Swallow and Ash-throated Flycatcher [Alan Contreras ]
23 Apr Re: Smith-Bybee (vole ID) [Mike Patterson ]
23 Apr Re: Smith-Bybee [David Irons ]
23 Apr Monmouth Sewage Ponds and Baskett Slough area [Brandon Wagner ]
23 Apr Smith-Bybee [Andy Frank ]
23 Apr Wed morning addendum [Larry McQueen ]
23 Apr Philomath Sewage Ponds [Hendrik Herlyn ]
23 Apr Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 4/23/14 [Wink Gross ]
23 Apr Wed morning, Eugene [Larry McQueen ]
23 Apr News from the Moderator: gmail accounts [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
23 Apr lesser goldfinch [Stephanie Hazen ]
23 Apr Night walk at Tualatin Hills Nature Park [Steve Valasek ]
23 Apr Philomath poo ponds ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
23 Apr [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
22 Apr Re: Burrowing Owl [Christopher Hinkle ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early? [Lars Per Norgren ]
23 Apr The Fancy Chickens of Timber, Oregon (Washington Co)-Sooty Grouse and Mountain Quails [Khanh Tran ]
22 Apr Semipalmated Plovers? [Joel Geier ]
22 Apr GREATER YELLOWLEGS - Clackamas County [Richard Leinen ]
22 Apr Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds [Brandon Green ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early? ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
22 Apr Re: dead bird [Steve Valasek ]
22 Apr Oregon Spring Migration Count May 10-11th [Joel Geier ]
22 Apr Oregon Spring Migration Count May 10-11th [Joel Geier ]
22 Apr dead bird [Marlowe Kissinger ]
22 Apr Coos 'n Curry of Late [Tim Rodenkirk ]
22 Apr Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
22 Apr Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds [Thomas Meinzen ]
22 Apr FOY Western Tanager, north Salem [john shewey ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early? [Alan Contreras ]
22 Apr Re: On Semiplover numbers [Alan Contreras ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early? [David Irons ]
22 Apr On Semiplover numbers [Mike Patterson ]
22 Apr Jo Co Yellow Warblers ["Dennis Vroman" ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 [Lars Per Norgren ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 [Alan Contreras ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 [Jamie Simmons ]
22 Apr Boiler Bay ["Phil Pickering" ]
22 Apr FW: Please post to Obol Digest this week ["Hawes, Susan" ]
22 Apr Crook County's first Snowy Plover [Charles Gates ]
22 Apr Marbled Godwit, Douglas co [Daniel Farrar ]
22 Apr Re: [birding] Benton Co. Burrowing Owl, etc. [Pam Otley ]
22 Apr Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
22 Apr [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
21 Apr Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds [Mark Nikas ]
21 Apr Mt. Tabor yesterday [Christopher Hinkle ]
21 Apr Monday, April 21, 2014 [Owen Schmidt ]
21 Apr Lincoln Co birding 4/19 ["Jamie S." ]
21 Apr Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County [David Irons ]
21 Apr Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County [David Irons ]
21 Apr Benton Co. Burrowing Owl, etc. [Oscar Harper ]
21 Apr March Lincoln Co. Bird Notes Received During 2/26-3/23 [Range Bayer ]
21 Apr Ridgefield NWR Closure - Update [Scott Carpenter ]
21 Apr Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County [Jeff Gilligan ]
21 Apr Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County [Brandon Green ]
21 Apr possible Black Vulture reported Curry County [Jeff Gilligan ]
21 Apr The warbler and the vulture [Jack Williamson ]
21 Apr Jackson County birds [Russ Namitz ]
21 Apr Jo Co Mac Warbler/ more Lazulis ["Dennis Vroman" ]
21 Apr Arrivals in W. Yamhill Co. [Floyd Schrock ]
21 Apr [Fwd: Postdoc job opportunity: Climate Change and Species Interactions] [Joel Geier ]
21 Apr Nashvilles, etc., Mt. Tabor, Portland [Jeff Gilligan ]
21 Apr Eugene Hammond's [Brandon Green ]
21 Apr Eugene/Skinner Butte this am... ["Diane Pettey" ]
21 Apr Purple Martins and Am Goldfinches [Paul Buescher ]

Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2014 05:59:45 -0700
Ross's Goose (3 Benton)
Osprey (American) (1 Deschutes)
Spotted Sandpiper (1 Hood River)
Lesser Yellowlegs (1 Jackson)
Wilson's Phalarope (1 Polk)
Hammond's Flycatcher (1 Harney)
Ash-throated Flycatcher (1 Jackson)
Swainson's Thrush (1 Lane, 1 Multnomah)
Hermit Warbler (1 Jackson)
Tricolored Blackbird (1 Columbia)
Great-tailed Grackle (1 Jackson)

---------------------------------------------
View this alert on the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated



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Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 4-24-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2014 00:05:40 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* April 24, 2014
* ORPO1404.24

- birds mentioned

American White Pelican
Swainson¹s Hawk
Black-necked Stilt
Solitary Sandpiper
Baird¹s Sandpiper
Burrowing Owl
Calliope Hummingbird
Hammond¹s Flycatcher
Dusky Flycatcher
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Cassin¹s Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Swainson¹s Thrush
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
MacGillivray¹s Warbler
American Redstart
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Grasshopper Sparrow
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday April 24. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls at
503-233-3976.

Very heavy migrations were reported during the week. Early morning at
Skinners Butte in Eugene and Mt. Tabor in Portland have been outstanding.
Swarms of Yellow-rumped and Orange-crowned warblers along with smaller
numbers of Nashville, MacGillivrey¹s, Black-throated Gray and a few other
species were well reported. Pacific-slope, Hammond¹s, and Dusky Flycatchers
were reported along with Cassin¹s and Warbling vireos. Early Swainson¹s
Thrushes were reported from Eugene.

A Swainson¹s Hawk was seen April 20 at Cape Blanco.

On April 20 a Western Kingbird was at Powell Butte Park in Gresham.  A
Black-headed Grosbeak was at a Portland feeder April 23. A Redstart was in a
Gladstone yard April 18. Two White Pelicans were at a farm pond near Carlton
April 17. On April 20 a Western Kingbird and nine Rough-winged Swallows were
near Amity. A Western Tanager was in Salem April 21. A male Calliope
Hummingbird was at an Independence feeder April 17. A BLACK-NECKED STILT and
several Rough-winged Swallows were seen April 19 at Ankeny NWR.

Three Black-necked Stilts and a Western Kingbird were at Finley NWR April
17. A rare spring Baird¹s Sandpiper was at the Philomath Sewage Ponds April
23. A Burrowing Owl was south of the Corvallis Airport along Llewellin Road
April 21. On April 20 a Grasshopper Sparrow and three Solitary Sandpipers
were at Finley NWR. A male Black-headed Grosbeak and two Western Kingbirds
were near Eugene April 19. On April 17 four Black-necked Stilts and a
Solitary Sandpiper  were at the Kirtland Road Sewage Ponds near White City.

On April 21 a Snowy Plover and a Baird¹s Sandpiper were at Houston Lake near
Powell Butte. Two Western Kingbirds and a Western Tanager were nearby.

That¹s it for this week.

- end transcirpt









Subject: Re: ID help with Empid @ Malheur HQ
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Apr 2014 05:45:23 +0000
For all the reasons already mentioned, this is definitely a Hammond's.
Dave IronsPortland, OR 

Subject: [obol] Re: ID help with Empid  AT  Malheur HQ
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:26:07 -0700
CC: obol AT freelists.org
To: garlickn AT onid.oregonstate.edu

The short bill, round large-headed appearance, short tail, and fairly long 
primary extension indicate it is a Hammond's Flycatcher, which is often the 
first of the empids to occur in Oregon. 


On Apr 23, 2014, at 5:18 PM, "Garlick, Niels"  
wrote:Image here: http://i.imgur.com/5zEl4mQ.jpg The bird was deep in some 
vegetation, so the picture had to be considerably lightened. This was the best 
shot I got, and it did not vocalize while I was watching. 

 I know Empids can be rough, but I was wondering if anyone would be able to 
give me some pointers on this one (or can tell me if it's a hopeless cause to 
begin with). I was leaning towards Hammond's, based on the primary projection, 
the gray throat, and the bill color/size. eBird seems to want me to call it a 
Pacific-slope, but the bill just seems all wrong to my (admittedly Empid 
inexperienced) eyes. 

 Thanks for any advice you can give!   - Niels G.    

 		 	   		  
Subject: Tricolored Blackbird at Crown Zellerbach - Columbia County
From: Aaron Beerman <aaron.beerman AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 22:02:43 -0700
If anyone needs a Tricolored for Columbia County, Oregon or life. I believe 
there was one there this afternoon. It was on the east end of trail, about 
halfway down the road where the main marshes are located. 

There are photos on my Flickr if you're interested.
http://flic.kr/p/niWnWZ

Aaron
Subject: Fwd: Re: News from the Moderator: gmail accounts
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:24:11 -0700
Folks,

Here is some advice from another gmail user.

Also another said she gets her emails, but she uses an ipad.

Cheers
Dave
moderator


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: 	Re: [obol] News from the Moderator: gmail accounts
Date: 	Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:50:46 -0700
From: 	Barbara Millikan 
To: 	deweysage AT frontier.com



The "fix" such as it is, is to add your own addy to the send box.
Barbara


On Wed, Apr 23, 2014 at 8:09 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein 
> wrote:

    Folks,

    If you have or are new to gmail, you may notice that you do not get
    a copy of your own posts to OBOL even if you have 'echopost'
    selected on your preferences (which means you should get your own
    email).   There is a reason for this, and it is again beyond our
    control.

    Google simply doesn't forward your own posts to you, and there
    doesn't seem to be fix for it at this time, unless Google changes
    their policy.

    You can read more about it here and find out what you may or may not
    be able to do about it:

 
https://support.google.com/mail/answer/6588?query=message+myself&topic=0&type=f&ctx=en:search 



    Cheers
    Dave and Treesa
    Moderators


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Subject: Song Sparrow update & other interesting yard birds
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:46:53 -0700
Our territorial male Song Sparrow finally attracted a mate and is active on
a nest in our neighbors yard. Two Chestnut-backed Chickadee have been
raiding our suet feeder stuffed with feathers and such, and we have a
single Audubon's Warbler that has been hanging around for three days in a
tree right outside our family room window.

-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Re: ID help with Empid @ Malheur HQ
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:26:07 -0700
The short bill, round large-headed appearance, short tail, and fairly long 
primary extension indicate it is a Hammond's Flycatcher, which is often the 
first of the empids to occur in Oregon. 



On Apr 23, 2014, at 5:18 PM, "Garlick, Niels"  
wrote: 


> Image here: 
> http://i.imgur.com/5zEl4mQ.jpg
>  
> The bird was deep in some vegetation, so the picture had to be considerably 
lightened. This was the best shot I got, and it did not vocalize while I was 
watching. 

>  
> I know Empids can be rough, but I was wondering if anyone would be able to 
give me some pointers on this one (or can tell me if it's a hopeless cause to 
begin with). I was leaning towards Hammond's, based on the primary projection, 
the gray throat, and the bill color/size. eBird seems to want me to call it a 
Pacific-slope, but the bill just seems all wrong to my (admittedly Empid 
inexperienced) eyes. 

>  
> Thanks for any advice you can give! 
>  
> - Niels G. 
>  
>  
Subject: FOY Black-headed Grosbeak
From: Jean Baecher Brown <jeanbb24622 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:59:54 -0700
Happened to glance out at my feeder (I'm in the West Hills of Portland) this 
afternoon and a FOY Black-headed Grosbeak was enjoying the sunflowers seeds. 


Jean Baecher Brown
jeanbb24622 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Grouse near The Dalles?
From: Rob Neyer <rneyer AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:24:36 -0700
Hey, this is almost an Oregon question ...

Last weekend I was hiking with a group in Dalles Mountain Ranch State Park,
just across the Columbia from The Dalles. During the hike to the top --
amazing view from up there, by the way -- I was sort of lagging behind
because I kept stopping for birds. At one point I looked up, and realized
that the hikers ahead had flushed a pair of something.

When I caught up to our leader a bit later, he said, "Did you see those
grouse we flushed?"

Me: "Yeah, but I just figured they were meadowlarks."

Him: "No, they were definitely grouse. They just exploded."

Which of course is what grouse do. And quail, but these weren't quail.

So here's my question: If they were grouse, what kind? Literally none of
the range maps in the new Sibley show grouse in Washington, just north of
The Dalles. And if not grouse, what might they have been?
Subject: ID help with Empid @ Malheur HQ
From: "Garlick, Niels" <garlickn AT onid.oregonstate.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:18:29 -0700
Image here:
http://i.imgur.com/5zEl4mQ.jpg

The bird was deep in some vegetation, so the picture had to be considerably
lightened.  This was the best shot I got, and it did not vocalize while I
was watching.

I know Empids can be rough, but I was wondering if anyone would be able to
give me some pointers on this one (or can tell me if it's a hopeless cause
to begin with).  I was leaning towards Hammond's, based on the primary
projection, the gray throat, and the bill color/size.  eBird seems to want
me to call it a Pacific-slope, but the bill just seems all wrong to my
(admittedly Empid inexperienced) eyes.

Thanks for any advice you can give!

- Niels G.
Subject: Great-tailed Grackle, Bank Swallow and Ash-throated Flycatcher
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:12:59 -0700
Forwarded from Rogue birding list.

-- 
Alan Contreras

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




From:  Frank Lospalluto 
Date:  Wednesday, April 23, 2014 4:56 PM
To:  Rogue Birds 
Subject:  [RV Birds] Great-tailed Grackle, Bank Swallow and Ash-throated
Flycatcher

 Avenue G pond : GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE male

Tou Velle Park (boat launch side): BANK SWALLOW good views of its necklace
as it cruised near the boat ramp.

Lower Table Rock : ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER (2) calling and seen near the oak
savannah trail

frank 
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Subject: Re: Smith-Bybee (vole ID)
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 15:45:56 -0700
Vole ID is hard, but this is most probably Oregon Vole (Microtus
oregoni).  It seems small and beady eyed.  Gray-tailed Vole (Microtus
canicaudus) is more mouse-like (cute, big eyes) in appearance.
Townsend's Vole is huge and almost always dark colored.  Long-tailed
Vole has a conspicuously long tail and is long-bodied for a vole.

You'd have to run it through an owl then recover the skull to eliminate
any arguments from all the volologigists out there, however.

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Some assembly required
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=1888



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Subject: Re: Smith-Bybee
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:52:47 -0700
Andy,

I think that Gray-tailed Vole is the default vole on the Willamette Valley 
floor. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as Meadow Vole, but that is a 
different species. 


Dave Irons



Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 23, 2014, at 2:23 PM, "Andy Frank"  wrote:

> Smith-Bybee today was packed with YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. It seemed like 
there were some in every tree, with Audubon's outnumbering Myrtle's about 2:1. 
I looked hard through them trying to find something different and came up with 
a single ORANGE-CROWNED. 

> 
> Hundreds of swallows were swarming over Bybee Lake with VIOLET-GREEN and TREE 
predominating with much smaller numbers of BARN and CLIFF. 

> 
> COMMON YELLOWTHROATS have arrived, and an AMERICAN ROBIN was feeding chicks 
in the nest, but the biggest surprise was coming across this vole 
http://andyfrank.blogspot.com/ on the paved path. I believe it's a GRAY-TAILED 
VOLE but welcome correction if I'm mistaken. It was initially about 10 feet 
away when I saw it. I stopped and it proceeded to walk literally within inches 
of my shoe. Several other people came by and it similarly showed no interest or 
fear in them. 

> 
> Andy Frank
Subject: Monmouth Sewage Ponds and Baskett Slough area
From: Brandon Wagner <bmwboarder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:49:35 -0700
Hey friends,

At Monmouth Sewage Ponds this morning:
-2 Wilson's Phalaropes (only saw one yesterday)
-1 Horned Grebe
-1 Green Heron (foy for me)

There were peeps in just about every muddy spot I stopped near Baskett
Slough.  The Coville Rd Conservations Wetland had quite a lot of
shorebirds: Dunlin, Long-billed Dowitchers, Greater-Yellowlegs, Snipes and
lots of peeps.  As it was raining, I didn't examine them too closely..  The
ones I saw at the Narrows in Baskett Slough were all Least Sandpipers from
what I could tell.  Farmer Rd also has a good muddy field that was full of
shorebirds too.

No Solitary Sandpipers around here yet.

Cheers!
Brandon Wagner
Independence
Subject: Smith-Bybee
From: Andy Frank <andydfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:22:48 -0700
Smith-Bybee today was packed with YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS.  It seemed like
there were some in every tree, with Audubon's outnumbering Myrtle's about
2:1.  I looked hard through them trying to find something different and
came up with a single ORANGE-CROWNED.

Hundreds of swallows were swarming over Bybee Lake with VIOLET-GREEN and
TREE predominating with much smaller numbers of BARN and CLIFF.

COMMON YELLOWTHROATS have arrived, and an AMERICAN ROBIN was feeding chicks
in the nest, but the biggest surprise was coming across this vole
http://andyfrank.blogspot.com/ on the paved path.  I believe it's a
GRAY-TAILED VOLE but welcome correction if I'm mistaken.  It was initially
about 10 feet away when I saw it.  I stopped and it proceeded to walk
literally within inches of my shoe.  Several other people came by and it
similarly showed no interest or fear in them.

Andy Frank
Subject: Wed morning addendum
From: Larry McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:12:50 -0700
I forgot to list Evening Grosbeaks, heard flying overhead on several occasions 
this morning in Hendrick’s Park 


Larry

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Subject: Philomath Sewage Ponds
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:10:44 -0700
Hi all,

Oscar and I paid a brief visit to the Philomath Sewage Ponds around noon,
hoping to relocate Doug's Baird Sandpiper and some of his other goodies
from this morning.

Unfortunately, all the peeps had left the area, along with most other
shorebirds. Still present were 2 WESTERN GREBES, 2 RED-NECKED PHALAROPES, 2
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE and a beautiful BONAPARTE'S GULL, along with
the usual suspects.

Happy migration

Hendrik and Oscar

-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 4/23/14
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 12:52:05 -0700
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 4/17/14 to 4/23/14. Species neither seen nor heard 
the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 4 days this week.

This Friday, Shawneen Finnegan and Dave Irons will be leading the Morning Bird 
Song Walk, sponsored by Portland Audubon. The walk begins at 7AM at the Pittock 
Mansion parking lot and lasts about 2 hours--but you're free to leave whenever 
you need. Free, open to the public, no pre-registration required. 

  
Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

Red-tailed Hawk             1  (1, 4/22)
Band-tailed Pigeon          4  (8, 4/18)
Anna's Hummingbird          2  (2)
Rufous Hummingbird          2  (1)
Red-breasted Sapsucker      1  (2, 4/22)
Downy Woodpecker            2  (3, 4/18)
Northern Flicker            4  (5, 4/18)
Pileated Woodpecker         1  (1, 4/22)
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER    1  (1, 4/22)
HUTTON'S VIREO              2  (2, 4/17)	
Steller's Jay               2  (2, 4/17)
Western Scrub-Jay           1  (1, 4/22)
American Crow               4  (10)
Violet-green Swallow        1  (2, 4/22)
Black-capped Chickadee      4  (7)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   4  (8)
Bushtit                     3  (4, 4/18)	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       3  (4)
Brown Creeper               1  (1, 4/18)
Pacific Wren                3  (4)
Bewick's Wren               2  (1, 4/17 & 18)
Golden-crowned Kinglet      1  (2, 4/18)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet        4  (5)
Hermit Thrush               2  (2, 4/17 & 18)
American Robin              4  (15)
Varied Thrush               2  (4, 4/17)
European Starling           4  (3)
Orange-crowned Warbler      3  (4, 4/22)
NASHVILLE WARBLER           1  (1, 4/22)
Yellow-rumped Warbler       2  (6, 4/22)
Black-throated Gray Warbler 3  (5)
Townsend's Warbler          3  (13)
WILSON'S WARBLER            1  (1, 4/22)
Spotted Towhee              3  (7)
FOX SPARROW                 2  (2, 4/17)
Song Sparrow                4  (9)
Dark-eyed Junco             3  (10)
House Finch                 2  (1)
Purple Finch                3  (6)
Lesser Goldfinch            2  (2)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: Turkey Vulture, Mourning Dove, 
VAUX'S SWIFT 


Misses (birds found at least 3 days in previous 2 weeks but not found this 
week): Evening Grosbeak 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Wed morning, Eugene
From: Larry McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 11:25:32 -0700
Starting off with a little rain, the morning was primarily dry. Some of the 
group opted for Skinner’s while the rest of us chose to walk the roads and 
trails around Hendrick’s Park. It will be interesting to compare results, but 
probably not meaningful. It was a slow morning for the Hendricks contigent, but 
we managed to run into a good warbler flock at the end of it. A real surprise 
was finding a quite vocal N. RAVEN near the top of Hendrick’s Park, where it 
flew just above the tops of firs while being harrassed by local crows. It will 
be interesting to find out if it set up home in one of the firs. The warbler 
flock moved fast through the crowns of maples, gleaning and flycatching. We 
found no flycatchers. Some singing from Townsend’s, Yellow-rumped, and 
Orange-crowned. 


Turkey Vulture - 1
Rufous Hummingbird - 2
Anna’s Hummingbird - 1
Downy Woodpecker - 2
Northern Flicker - 2
Pileated Woodpecker - 2
Northern Raven - 1
American Crow - several
Steller's Jay - several
Western Scrub Jay - several
Cassin’s Vireo - 1 
Black-capped Chickadee - 8
Bushtit - 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2 
Bewick's Wren - 1
Pacific Wren - 4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 3
American Robin - 12
Varied Thrush - 3
Orange-crowned Warbler - 4
Yellow-rumped Warbler - Formed the flock in numbers; saw only Audubon’s. Of 
course, one can’t possibly make a realistic count of indivuals. 

Black-throated Gray Warbler - 2
Townsend’s Warbler - several
Hermit Warbler - 2 
Spotted Towhee - 10
Dark-eyed Junco - 3
Song Sparrow - 15
Purple Finch - 1 singing
House Finch - 1 singing

Fred Chancey, Randy Sinnott, Judy Frazen, Don Schrouder, Dave Brown, Vickie 
Buck, and Larry McQueen. I expect a report from Sylvia Maulding, Paul Sherrell, 
and Sarah Vasconcellos who went to Skinner’s Butte. 

Subject: News from the Moderator: gmail accounts
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 08:09:07 -0700
Folks,

If you have or are new to gmail, you may notice that you do not get a 
copy of your own posts to OBOL even if you have 'echopost' selected on 
your preferences (which means you should get your own email).   There is 
a reason for this, and it is again beyond our control.

Google simply doesn't forward your own posts to you, and there doesn't 
seem to be fix for it at this time, unless Google changes their policy.

You can read more about it here and find out what you may or may not be 
able to do about it:


https://support.google.com/mail/answer/6588?query=message+myself&topic=0&type=f&ctx=en:search 



Cheers
Dave and Treesa
Moderators


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Subject: lesser goldfinch
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 08:06:26 -0700
Lesser goldfinches and juncos are making short work of the dandelion seed heads 
in our yard. 


Stephanie Hazen
Salem

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Subject: Night walk at Tualatin Hills Nature Park
From: Steve Valasek <botheringbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 07:24:38 -0700
Hello everyone,

Tualatin Hills Nature Park is having a "sounds of the night" walk Friday
night from 7-9pm. A Barred Owl was reported there again recently and this
may be a good time to hear it.  But if enough people aren't registered by
today then they may not have it.  Cost is $10 per person ages 6 years and
up.

http://www.thprd.org/activities/classsearchresultsnew.cfm?classlink=NP45211
Subject: Philomath poo ponds
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 07:17:54 -0700
This is one of those weather patterns where just about anything can appear here 
so it's worth checking the place often. 


Today:

Baird's Sandpiper, my first spring record here

Red-necked Phalarope

2 Western Grebes

5 Black-bellied Plovers

Many westerns and leasts, a few Dunlin 

Lots of stuff on the move.

Have fun!





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Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 05:20:44 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: April 23, 2014 5:16:46 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Black-necked Stilt (1 Marion)
Black-bellied Plover (3 Jackson)
Snowy Plover (1 Crook)
Snowy Plover (Snowy) (1 Crook)
Lesser Yellowlegs (3 Jackson)
Baird's Sandpiper (1 Crook)
Wilson's Phalarope (1 Polk)
Western Kingbird (1 Umatilla)
Swainson's Thrush (1 Lane)
Nashville Warbler (1 Umatilla)
Yellow Warbler (1 Josephine)
Hermit Warbler (1 Jackson)
Western Tanager (1 Crook, 1 Washington)
Lazuli Bunting (1 Jackson)

---------------------------------------------
View this alert on the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Re: Burrowing Owl
From: Christopher Hinkle <christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 23:03:07 -0700
Given the date, the Burrowing Owl that we (Adrian, Hendrik, Oscar, Jamie
and I) found on Sunday was probably a migrant. It wasn't clarified in
Oscar's post, but we flushed the owl from the edge of a roadside ditch
after dark (we saw it in the headlights). Driving roads in good habitat
after dark might be a good strategy for finding Burrowing Owls in the
Willamette Valley; I know that's a good way to see them east of the
Cascades.

Cheers,

Christopher Hinkle
Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 21:37:33 -0700
***********

I spent some time on Siletz Bay at high tide in Oct and Nov about seven years 
ago. Shorebird numbers were impressive where they roosted on the abundant logs 
and snags. I was in a kayak and probably wouldn't have seen much scoping from 
shore. Lars 

On Apr 22, 2014, at 7:33 PM, Wayne Hoffman wrote:

> Hi –
>  
> Unfortunately you are right that Yaquina Bay does not get much shorebird use. 
One problem is that it lacks good high tide roosting habitat. The marginal 
areas that it does have tend to have high levels of human traffic. The beach 
just south of the South Jetty has potential for high tide roosting, but gets a 
lot of human and dog traffic. 

>  
> I think Siletz Bay gets a bit more shorebird use, but it is much harder to 
bird. 

>  
> Wayne
>  
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf 
Of David Irons 

> Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 4:43 PM
> To: deweysage AT frontier.com
> Cc: OBOL-to post; deborah.holland AT star-thrower.com
> Subject: [obol] Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?
>  
Subject: The Fancy Chickens of Timber, Oregon (Washington Co)-Sooty Grouse and Mountain Quails
From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 03:57:20 +0000
Hi Obolers: 

We birded a few hours near the Timber area and was able to find some fun birds 
between the light rain and low light.  It was more productive than we thought-- 
especially with the fancy chickens.   


Heard at least, five SOOTY GROUSE males and a pair along the road with an 
aggressive male pursuing the female.   Another male was seen displaying high in 
the conifers, close to the trunk. They can be tough to track down, but fun, 
when you see one.   


We were lucky to glimpse on two pairs of MOUNTAIN QUAILS along the gravel road 
not far from the clear cut areas.  A Ruffed Grouse was also seen in the lower 
elevations of Round Top.   


HERMIT WARBLERS were seen along with a couple of WILSON'S and MACGILLIVRAY'S 
WARBLERS.  These were all year birds for me and it was fun to see an AMERICAN 
DIPPER along the creek.  


Close to dusk, I spotted a BARRED OWL along Hwy 6, not far from the town of 
Timber.   


For those who are interested, here are a few updated photos from this past 
month of GREAT GRAY OWL, NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL, SPRUCE GROUSE, and other fun 
birds.   


https://www.flickr.com/photos/23662496 AT N02/

Good birding and peace:)

Khanh Tran 

(www.ktbirding.com) 		 	   		  

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Subject: Semipalmated Plovers?
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:06:24 -0700
What's a Semipalmated Plover?

I vaguely recall that we used to get a few at E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area
in spring, but it's been about 10 years now. The small wetland where I
last saw some (also witnessed by Alan McGie) is now fenced off to the
public as a brand-new archery range.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: GREATER YELLOWLEGS - Clackamas County
From: Richard Leinen <rick.lumen AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:41:19 -0700
There are approximately 10 - 15 GREATER YELLOWLEGS at Coffee Creek Wetlands. 
This is on the opposite side of Grahams Ferry Road from the lake. The lake is 
high and has spilled over the dike and flooded the wetlands. I first saw them 
today during lunch, then went back after work to get pictures. Good opportunity 
to see these in Clackamas county. 


Rick
Wilsonville

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Subject: Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds
From: Brandon Green <brandon.green18 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:41:10 -0700
As of yesterday, I was still hosting WT SPARROW (both morphs) as well.  But
things are winding down quickly.

Good stuff on Skinner Butte this morning: LAZULI BUNTING, PAC-SLOPE,
WILSON'S WARBLER, WARBLING VIREO, and multiple NASHVILLES and BT GRAYS.

Brandon
Eugene
Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:33:37 -0700
Hi – 

 

Unfortunately you are right that Yaquina Bay does not get much shorebird use. 
One problem is that it lacks good high tide roosting habitat. The marginal 
areas that it does have tend to have high levels of human traffic. The beach 
just south of the South Jetty has potential for high tide roosting, but gets a 
lot of human and dog traffic. 


 

I think Siletz Bay gets a bit more shorebird use, but it is much harder to 
bird. 


 

Wayne

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
David Irons 

Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 4:43 PM
To: deweysage AT frontier.com
Cc: OBOL-to post; deborah.holland AT star-thrower.com
Subject: [obol] Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?

 

 

Greetings all,

 

Dave Lauten is spot on in this case. By the date of the report in question (19 
April), we are at the front end of the prime window for not only Semipalmated 
Plover, but all of the Arctic and sub-Arctic breeding shorebirds that pass 
through Oregon as northbound migrants. I had a few Semi Plovers in Clatsop Co. 
last Friday and was surprised to not find more than I did. 


 

Surely some will disagree with this opinion, but if your phenology for migrant 
shorebirds is calibrated based on what you see inside Yaquina Bay, it's not 
going to be very good. For all of its outward attractiveness for shorebirds 
(good-looking mudflats), the shorebirding there is pathetic. I have no 
explanation for why this is the case, but in recent years this estuary is often 
devoid of waders even right in the middle of spring or fall migration. 


 

If I'm looking for shorebirds along the northern Oregon coast, I will drive 
Clatsop Beach, go to Youngs Bay or Tillamook Bay. Even the tiny little 
Necanicum estuary is better than Yaquina Bay most of the time. Sadly, if you 
compare the 'best' Oregon estuaries to Humboldt Bay to the south or Willapa and 
Grays Harbor in Washington, you will discover that these out of state estuaries 
offer far better shorebirding and present a better picture of the phenologies 
for migrant waders. 


 

 

I am currently watching a Virginia Rail while taking a work break next to a 
little wetland in NW. McMinnville. 


 

Dave Irons

Portland, OR

 










 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: dead bird
From: Steve Valasek <botheringbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:11:05 -0700
Only if it has a band. You can just remove it and there's a number or
website on there where to report the information. Sounds to me like a Coot.
On Apr 22, 2014 6:30 PM, "Marlowe Kissinger"  wrote:

> Are you suppose to report when you see a dead bird? I don't think this one
> died of natural causes.
> Saw it by the steps of the library at Dawson Creek.  It was bigger than a
> blackbird. Maybe a duck?
>
> Just thought I'd check.
>
>           Marlowe
>
> The picture is gross.
>
>
> 
http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/134b96bd-65e5-4210-8f8e-1d57c46c807c_zps31520845.jpg?t=1398216456 

>
Subject: Oregon Spring Migration Count May 10-11th
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:47:00 -0700
Hi all,

The spring migration count is coming up May 10-11th. This count, known
as NAMC (North American Migration Count) is now going into its third
decade here in Oregon, since Pat French got us involved in 1993.

This is possibly the easiest bird count to contribute to, even easier
than CBCs. All you need to do is to keep a count of birds that you see
during the day (plus hours and mileage), and send them into your
county's coordinator.

Although this count has sometimes been criticized for its lack of
statistical rigor, it's starting to develop value based on its
longevity, as only the CBC and BBS have a longer track record here in
Oregon -- and neither of those counts covers migration.

Last year, the Oregon 2020 crew made an appeal for NAMC volunteers to
include more point counts, in order to enhance the usability of NAMC
data for their project.

While I encourage birders to contribute point counts for the OR 2020
project if you're so inclined, I'd like to add a couple of caveats.

#1: If you're not comfortable doing point counts according to a strict
protocol, don't worry -- you can still contribute to the migration
count, just by recording the birds that you find (plus your mileage &
hours). That's the way that we've always done NAMC, and it's still
valid.

#2: If you do try to do a series of point counts to contribute to OR
2020, please also keep count of birds that you see while driving (or
bicycling/walking) between your point count locations. 

Last year it was obvious from the data that volunteers who tried to
adhere to the point-count protocols were missing birds that would
typically be seen between stops. We do need to count those roadside
scrub-jays and Brewer's Blackbirds, to maintain consistency with past
years' counts!

As many of you know, I'm not the most eBird-adept individual on these
lists. I've put put a question to a few folks who are more eBird-savvy,
as to whether it's possible to keep two lists open at one time: one for
point-count birds, and another for birds detected in between stops.  For
NAMC it would be best to have both of these types of data. However, from
initial replies, it sounds as if the time-honored technology of pencil
and paper could still come in handy.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Oregon NAMC coordinator
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis





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Subject: Oregon Spring Migration Count May 10-11th
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:47:00 -0700
Hi all,

The spring migration count is coming up May 10-11th. This count, known
as NAMC (North American Migration Count) is now going into its third
decade here in Oregon, since Pat French got us involved in 1993.

This is possibly the easiest bird count to contribute to, even easier
than CBCs. All you need to do is to keep a count of birds that you see
during the day (plus hours and mileage), and send them into your
county's coordinator.

Although this count has sometimes been criticized for its lack of
statistical rigor, it's starting to develop value based on its
longevity, as only the CBC and BBS have a longer track record here in
Oregon -- and neither of those counts covers migration.

Last year, the Oregon 2020 crew made an appeal for NAMC volunteers to
include more point counts, in order to enhance the usability of NAMC
data for their project.

While I encourage birders to contribute point counts for the OR 2020
project if you're so inclined, I'd like to add a couple of caveats.

#1: If you're not comfortable doing point counts according to a strict
protocol, don't worry -- you can still contribute to the migration
count, just by recording the birds that you find (plus your mileage &
hours). That's the way that we've always done NAMC, and it's still
valid.

#2: If you do try to do a series of point counts to contribute to OR
2020, please also keep count of birds that you see while driving (or
bicycling/walking) between your point count locations. 

Last year it was obvious from the data that volunteers who tried to
adhere to the point-count protocols were missing birds that would
typically be seen between stops. We do need to count those roadside
scrub-jays and Brewer's Blackbirds, to maintain consistency with past
years' counts!

As many of you know, I'm not the most eBird-adept individual on these
lists. I've put put a question to a few folks who are more eBird-savvy,
as to whether it's possible to keep two lists open at one time: one for
point-count birds, and another for birds detected in between stops.  For
NAMC it would be best to have both of these types of data. However, from
initial replies, it sounds as if the time-honored technology of pencil
and paper could still come in handy.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Oregon NAMC coordinator
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



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Subject: dead bird
From: Marlowe Kissinger <rosebudgurl AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:30:07 -0700
Are you suppose to report when you see a dead bird? I don't think this one died 
of natural causes. 

Saw it by the steps of the library at Dawson Creek. It was bigger than a 
blackbird. Maybe a duck? 


Just thought I'd check. 

          Marlowe

The picture is gross. 


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/134b96bd-65e5-4210-8f8e-1d57c46c807c_zps31520845.jpg?t=1398216456 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Coos 'n Curry of Late
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:06:46 -0700
Knute Andersson reports his first PAC-SLOPE FLYS from this past weekend
(4/19 & 4/20), that would be SW of Langlois, Curry.  I haven't heard or
seen any yet in Coos- maybe tomorrow?!

Besides the SWAINSON'S HAWK Terry Wahl reported on Monday (thanks Jeff;
Terry has only had one other before- a very rare south coast migrant with
three records in Coos- maybe the same amount in Curry?), he has also had
several CHIPPING SPARROWS- one yesterday and 4 or 5 today.  This is
normally a species one needs to go to Agness or up Floras Creek (Curry) or
Powers (Coos) to see in their breeding locations, on the outer coast they
are uncommon but regular for about two or three weeks late April/early May
and are normally a "good" find (Terry's place is well, not normal for the
south coast, many more good birds but private ranchlands).

Out on the north spit of Coos Bay at the old Weyco pond site (now owned by
the Port of Coos Bay and open to the public) there has been several
CINNAMON TEAL easily seen from the north dike that goes out to the ocean.
 Also present since Sunday have been a couple BLUE-WINGED TEALS (males).
Green-wingeds are still around out there also, always a good spot for late
ducks. Many calling SORA and AMERICAN BITTERN there also.

The GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROWS are migrating everywhere, always cool to see
them in their spiffy breeding plumage.

Oh, the Black Vulture reported by Jeff G. was seen on 12 April, but since
no one could relocate it, and since I suspect OBRC will never see a written
record, I am not sure we have our firsrt Black Vulture record for OR.

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:52:28 -0700
Thomas

One of ours is still here too, just north of Bandon.   It's a white 
one.   There was a dark striped one too, but I'm not sure if it's still 
hanging around.

Cheers
Dave Lauten

On 4/22/2014 5:42 PM, Thomas Meinzen wrote:
> Our wintering WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continues at our feeders daily 
> here as well. Strange to have it so late.
>
> Happy migration,
> Thomas Meinzen
> Eugene
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:39 PM, Mark Nikas  > wrote:
>
>     Oscar's report of a Burrowing Owl in Benton County is 2 weeks
>     later than any previous record for wintering birds in the valley
>     and about 5 weeks later than typical late dates.Nice find.
>
>     The bird that wintered this year near Halsey departed sometime
>     between March 4th and 17th. Most years wintering birds disappear
>     in February. East side birds often return to nesting territories
>     in March.
>
>     I've had 50 species of birds from my yard in west Eugene the past
>     2 days with 42 the count for each day. There's been a lot of
>     turnover.  Every spring I hope to hit the magic 50 in one day but
>     49 has been the limit so far. After almost 20 years here new yard
>     birds are scarce but there's still a few I expect sooner or later.
>     BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was not on that expected list but as I
>     stepped out the door last evening I had 1 croaking directly
>     overhead as it flew westbound towards Fern Ridge Res. a mile away.
>
>     A male CALLIOPE HUMMER has visited apple blossoms briefly the past
>     2 days but has ignored my feeders. The wintering WHITE-THROATED
>     SPARROW continues and is quite late for here.
>
>     BAND-TAILED PIGEONS made an impressive showing today. They nest in
>     the neighborhood and first showed up last month in small numbers.
>     Today I had flocks of 12, 14 and 44 fly over. The group of 12 flew
>     to a nearby butte but the other 2 flocks continued northward. The
>     group of 44 was quite high - aprox. 1000' up. I'm guessing these
>     were late migrants.
>
>     HOUSE WREN showed up today. So did House Sparrows. They nest in
>     neighboring barns and attempt to use my nest boxes each year but
>     then disappear later in summer rarely to be seen again until the
>     following spring. I used to think of them as a more sedentary species.
>
>     Mark Nikas
>
>     Eugene
>
>
Subject: Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds
From: Thomas Meinzen <thomasmeinzen AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:42:16 -0700
Our wintering WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continues at our feeders daily here as
well. Strange to have it so late.

Happy migration,
Thomas Meinzen
Eugene


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:39 PM, Mark Nikas  wrote:

> Oscar's report of a Burrowing Owl in Benton County is 2 weeks later than
> any previous record for wintering birds in the valley and about 5 weeks
> later than typical late dates.  Nice find.
>
>
>
> The bird that wintered this year near Halsey departed sometime between
> March 4th and 17th. Most years wintering birds disappear in February. East
> side birds often return to nesting territories in March.
>
>
>
> I've had 50 species of birds from my yard in west Eugene the past 2 days
> with 42 the count for each day. There's been a lot of turnover.  Every
> spring I hope to hit the magic 50 in one day but 49 has been the limit so
> far. After almost 20 years here new yard birds are scarce but there's still
> a few I expect sooner or later. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was not on that
> expected list but as I stepped out the door last evening I had 1 croaking
> directly overhead as it flew westbound towards Fern Ridge Res. a mile away.
>
>
>
> A male CALLIOPE HUMMER has visited apple blossoms briefly the past 2 days
> but has ignored my feeders. The wintering WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continues
> and is quite late for here.
>
>
>
> BAND-TAILED PIGEONS made an impressive showing today. They nest in the
> neighborhood and first showed up last month in small numbers. Today I had
> flocks of 12, 14 and 44 fly over. The group of 12 flew to a nearby butte
> but the other 2 flocks continued northward. The group of 44 was quite high
> - aprox. 1000' up. I'm guessing these were late migrants.
>
>
>
> HOUSE WREN showed up today.  So did House Sparrows.  They nest in
> neighboring barns and attempt to use my nest boxes each year but then
> disappear later in summer rarely to be seen again until the following
> spring. I used to think of them as a more sedentary species.
>
>
>
> Mark Nikas
>
> Eugene
>
Subject: FOY Western Tanager, north Salem
From: john shewey <jshewey AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:06:45 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
Yesterday afternoon a Western Tanager was singing incessantly in my Doug fir in 
north Salem...only him, though, and earlier in the year than the usual small 
flock that arrives and spends 2 to 3 days here. --John Shewey, 
www.birdingoregon.com 



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Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:46:45 -0700
Dave's comment is certainly true for spring shorebirding.  My impression is
that it is extremely coastal, for one thing, with big movements right along
the beaches and nothing up the rivers.  Fall is quite different and even
Yaquina Bay gets a bird now and then !  And of course a lot of the good fall
shorebirding is inland at Fern Ridge, Summer Lake and so on.

-- 
Alan Contreras

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




From:  Dave Irons 
Reply-To:  Dave Irons 
Date:  Tuesday, April 22, 2014 4:42 PM
To:  Dave Lauten 
Cc:  OBOL , "deborah.holland AT star-thrower.com"

Subject:  [obol] Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?


>      
>>> Greetings all,

Dave Lauten is spot on in this case. By the date of the report in question
(19 April), we are at the front end of the prime window for not only
Semipalmated Plover, but all of the Arctic and sub-Arctic breeding
shorebirds that pass through Oregon as northbound migrants. I had a few Semi
Plovers in Clatsop Co. last Friday and was surprised to not find more than I
did.

Surely some will disagree with this opinion, but if your phenology for
migrant shorebirds is calibrated based on what you see inside Yaquina Bay,
it's not going to be very good. For all of its outward attractiveness for
shorebirds (good-looking mudflats), the shorebirding there is pathetic. I
have no explanation for why this is the case, but in recent years this
estuary is often devoid of waders even right in the middle of spring or fall
migration.

If I'm looking for shorebirds along the northern Oregon coast, I will drive
Clatsop Beach, go to Youngs Bay or Tillamook Bay. Even the tiny little
Necanicum estuary is better than Yaquina Bay most of the time. Sadly, if you
compare the 'best' Oregon estuaries to Humboldt Bay to the south or Willapa
and Grays Harbor in Washington, you will discover that these out of state
estuaries offer far better shorebirding and present a better picture of the
phenologies for migrant waders.


I am currently watching a Virginia Rail while taking a work break next to a
little wetland in NW. McMinnville.

Dave Irons
Portland, OR


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Subject: Re: On Semiplover numbers
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:43:52 -0700
They are not annual on Coquille Valley CBC.  Usually absent at Florence.

My impression is that they like very large estuaries in winter. Maybe Matt
Hunter could enlighten us about the medium-sized Umpqua estuary.

-- 
Alan Contreras

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon








On 4/22/14 4:34 PM, "Mike Patterson"  wrote:

>CBC for 2013-14
>	
>WAEV 	Everett            3
>WAGH 	Grays Harbor     162
>WALP 	Leadbetter Point   8
>ORTB 	Tillamook Bay      7
>ORCE 	Columbia Estuary   3
>ORCB 	Coos Bay          36
>ORCV 	Coquille Valley    3
>
>-- 
>Mike Patterson
>Astoria, OR
>Some assembly required
>http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=1888
>
>
>
>OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>




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Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19 -- Semi Plover early?
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:42:48 -0700
>> Greetings all,

Dave Lauten is spot on in this case. By the date of the report in question (19 
April), we are at the front end of the prime window for not only Semipalmated 
Plover, but all of the Arctic and sub-Arctic breeding shorebirds that pass 
through Oregon as northbound migrants. I had a few Semi Plovers in Clatsop Co. 
last Friday and was surprised to not find more than I did. 


Surely some will disagree with this opinion, but if your phenology for migrant 
shorebirds is calibrated based on what you see inside Yaquina Bay, it's not 
going to be very good. For all of its outward attractiveness for shorebirds 
(good-looking mudflats), the shorebirding there is pathetic. I have no 
explanation for why this is the case, but in recent years this estuary is often 
devoid of waders even right in the middle of spring or fall migration. 


If I'm looking for shorebirds along the northern Oregon coast, I will drive 
Clatsop Beach, go to Youngs Bay or Tillamook Bay. Even the tiny little 
Necanicum estuary is better than Yaquina Bay most of the time. Sadly, if you 
compare the 'best' Oregon estuaries to Humboldt Bay to the south or Willapa and 
Grays Harbor in Washington, you will discover that these out of state estuaries 
offer far better shorebirding and present a better picture of the phenologies 
for migrant waders. 



I am currently watching a Virginia Rail while taking a work break next to a 
little wetland in NW. McMinnville. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR


>> 
>> 
>>>  
>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: On Semiplover numbers
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:34:42 -0700
CBC for 2013-14
	
WAEV 	Everett            3
WAGH 	Grays Harbor     162
WALP 	Leadbetter Point   8
ORTB 	Tillamook Bay      7
ORCE 	Columbia Estuary   3
ORCB 	Coos Bay          36
ORCV 	Coquille Valley    3

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Some assembly required
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=1888



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Subject: Jo Co Yellow Warblers
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:14:34 -0700
Three YELLOW WARBLERS today (04-22-14) in the willow/cottonwood stand at 
Whitehorse Park singing away. 


51 species for the area this morning

Dennis (north of Grants Pass)
Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 15:55:51 -0700
Jamie and All,

I'm not intending to argue either. :-)

Ok, let's look at some facts.

You wrote:
Our sighting of a single Semipalmated Plover was the first reported 
anywhere in Lincoln County since September, 2013.
Data sources were 3 robust sources: OBOL, Lincoln County field notes 
from The Sandpiper, and eBird.
(I know some of us eBird users--and other birders--report EVERYTHING we 
see.)

First, just because a bird has not been reported does not mean it is not 
there or has not been seen or has not passed thru.  It means it hasn't 
been reported.

Second, on 29 March 2014 in Pacific WA Semi Plover was reported (by Dave 
Irons).   One might think that because no Semp P's were reported in 
Lincoln Co since Sept 2013 that might mean that there are none north of 
there, or even none within that area.

Three, how can a bird that is reported quite a distance north of Lincoln 
Co be "early" in Lincoln Co nearly a month after the date in WA?

We can certainly have a debate as to the definition of "early". Are 
these birds "early"?   Well, maybe, but actually maybe they are right on 
time.   And importantly I am not suggesting or saying it is not a worthy 
bird to report (all birds are worthy of reporting, especially 
shorebirds! ;-) ).

Another fact, we have watched flocks of shorebirds migrating north 
within the past couple of weeks.  Included in those flocks are Semi 
P's.   Some one else asked:  "have you been working on Lincoln County 
beaches"  - No, I have not, but if you are suggesting that the flocks of 
shorebirds  we see that are migrating north are somehow dropping all 
their Semi P's off before they get to Lincoln Co.....well, somehow I 
doubt that.   While I have not been to Lincoln Co, I am willing to bet 
that some Semi P's have passed thru Lincoln Co over the past 3 weeks if 
not before that.  If no observers witnessed it does not mean that it did 
not happen.

I don't have the Coos Bay CBC data in front of me, but as I recall Semi 
P is not an unusual bird on that CBC (Tim???).   Yes, I grant you maybe 
in Lincoln Co it is a rare winter bird, or even absent.   I submit that 
is because of either a lack of habitat that they prefer, or a lack of 
observers looking in the places they like.   I do not know whether they 
winter in Pacific Co WA, but it wouldn't surprise me if they did (there 
is good habitat, but whether anyone is looking is another story).

And yes, I agree Lincoln Co is not Coos Co - and thus that might be the 
issue - we have better habitat for them.  However, we are 2 hours away 
from Lincoln Co, and Lincoln is what - 4, 6 hours from Pacific Co WA, so 
I think Coos Co beaches are a bit more comparable to Lincoln Co 
beaches.  Both Coos and Pacific Co have reported Semi P before the 
Lincoln Co report.   Hence my statement that it is not really "early" 
for Semi P's, it is rather right on time.

I would also suggest that if you walked a beach with good habitat for 
them on a daily basis in April in Lincoln Co (and maybe some months 
before that), you'd find some Semi P's.   What I am fairly sure of, is 
few people walk the kind of beaches and the length of beaches we do on a 
daily basis starting in April thru Sept.   When you hit a beach for a 
couple of hours one day a week (or even less than that), you are likely 
to miss a lot of what goes on out there.

Again, I agree Coos Co is not Lincoln Co, but there is no doubt in my 
mind that the daily observations we have of Semi P's (and believe me, it 
is daily as they are rather a common bird) are not all individuals who 
either wintered in Coos or stopped in Coos and didn't keep going 
north.   They are migrants and we see them come and go all the time.   
They are quite normal in April.

PS - As a side note, there are actually breeding records of Semi P for 
Coos Bay!   Not sure how many people are aware of that.

Cheers
Dave Lauten








On 4/22/2014 10:47 AM, Jamie Simmons wrote:
> Dave and all,
>
> Not intending to argue, but rather to present facts:
> Our sighting of a single Semipalmated Plover was the first reported 
> anywhere in Lincoln County since September, 2013.
> Data sources were 3 robust sources: OBOL, Lincoln County field notes 
> from The Sandpiper, and eBird.
> (I know some of us eBird users--and other birders--report EVERYTHING 
> we see.)
>
> Thus it seemed worthy of posting, albeit with a question mark.
> (Your beach ain't Lincoln County beaches...)
>
> Jamie Simmons
> Corvallis
>
>
> On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 5:53 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein 
> > wrote:
>
>     On 4/21/2014 10:27 PM, Jamie S. (REDACTED: yahoo.com
>      uses DMARC) wrote:
>>
>>
>>     HMSC trail:
>>     Semipalmated Plover - 1 (early?)
>>
>>
>>     Jamie Simmons
>>     Corvallis
>>
>
>     Semipalmated Plover is not "early" at this time of year.   They
>     are rather common on the beach and have been all month.   I
>     suppose if you work on the beach like we do you get used to what
>     is around and don't even really realize what you folks who don't
>     work on the beach every day don't see.   Just a little
>     clarification (to tell you the truth, Semi P is a bird you could
>     seen just about any time, albeit they are a lot less common in
>     winter).
>
>     Cheers
>     Dave Lauten
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 11:20:24 -0700
The species has been recorded on the Eugene CBC. I don't know how often. 
Perhaps a late fall detection? Clearly Lane Co represents the northern fringe 
of winter occurence. Similarly, Yellowlegs are routine at Fern Ridge Res all 
winter, but highly sporadic in Washington County after October. Lars 

On Apr 22, 2014, at 10:53 AM, Alan Contreras wrote:

> Semis are much more common (numbers) and regular (frequency) in winter from 
about Coos Bay southward, as are Western Sandpipers. 

> 
> -- 
> Alan Contreras
> 
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> 
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: Jamie Simmons 
> Reply-To: 
> Date: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 10:47 AM
> To: Dave Lauten , OBOL 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
> 
> Dave and all,
> 
> Not intending to argue, but rather to present facts:
> Our sighting of a single Semipalmated Plover was the first reported anywhere 
in Lincoln County since September, 2013. 

> Data sources were 3 robust sources: OBOL, Lincoln County field notes from The 
Sandpiper, and eBird. 

> (I know some of us eBird users--and other birders--report EVERYTHING we see.)
> 
> Thus it seemed worthy of posting, albeit with a question mark.
> (Your beach ain't Lincoln County beaches...)
> 
> Jamie Simmons
> Corvallis
> 
> 
> On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 5:53 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein 
 wrote: 

>> On 4/21/2014 10:27 PM, Jamie S. (REDACTED: yahoo.com uses DMARC) wrote:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> HMSC trail:
>>> Semipalmated Plover - 1 (early?)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Jamie Simmons
>>> Corvallis
>>> 
>> 
>> Semipalmated Plover is not "early" at this time of year. They are rather 
common on the beach and have been all month. I suppose if you work on the beach 
like we do you get used to what is around and don't even really realize what 
you folks who don't work on the beach every day don't see. Just a little 
clarification (to tell you the truth, Semi P is a bird you could seen just 
about any time, albeit they are a lot less common in winter). 

>> 
>> Cheers
>> Dave Lauten
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>>  
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 10:53:04 -0700
Semis are much more common (numbers) and regular (frequency) in winter from
about Coos Bay southward, as are Western Sandpipers.

-- 
Alan Contreras

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




From:  Jamie Simmons 
Reply-To:  
Date:  Tuesday, April 22, 2014 10:47 AM
To:  Dave Lauten , OBOL 
Subject:  [obol] Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19

Dave and all,

Not intending to argue, but rather to present facts:
Our sighting of a single Semipalmated Plover was the first reported anywhere
in Lincoln County since September, 2013.
Data sources were 3 robust sources: OBOL, Lincoln County field notes from
The Sandpiper, and eBird.
(I know some of us eBird users--and other birders--report EVERYTHING we
see.)

Thus it seemed worthy of posting, albeit with a question mark.
(Your beach ain't Lincoln County beaches...)

Jamie Simmons
Corvallis


On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 5:53 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein
 wrote:
>     
>  
> On 4/21/2014 10:27 PM, Jamie S. (REDACTED: yahoo.com   uses
> DMARC) wrote:
>  
>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>> 
>>  
>>  HMSC trail:
>>  Semipalmated Plover - 1 (early?)
>>  
>>  
>>  Jamie Simmons
>>  Corvallis
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>  
>  Semipalmated Plover is not "early" at this time of year.   They are rather
> common on the beach and have been all month.   I suppose if you work on the
> beach like we do you get used to what is around and don't even really realize
> what you folks who don't work on the beach every day don't see.   Just a
> little clarification (to tell you the truth, Semi P is a bird you could seen
> just about any time, albeit they are a lot less common in winter).
>  
>  Cheers
>  Dave Lauten
>  
>  
>  
>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>  
>  


Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
From: Jamie Simmons <sapsuckers AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 10:47:29 -0700
Dave and all,

Not intending to argue, but rather to present facts:
Our sighting of a single Semipalmated Plover was the first reported
anywhere in Lincoln County since September, 2013.
Data sources were 3 robust sources: OBOL, Lincoln County field notes from
The Sandpiper, and eBird.
(I know some of us eBird users--and other birders--report EVERYTHING we
see.)

Thus it seemed worthy of posting, albeit with a question mark.
(Your beach ain't Lincoln County beaches...)

Jamie Simmons
Corvallis


On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 5:53 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <
deweysage AT frontier.com> wrote:

>  On 4/21/2014 10:27 PM, Jamie S. (REDACTED: yahoo.com uses DMARC) wrote:
>
>
>
> HMSC trail:
> Semipalmated Plover - 1 (early?)
>
>
> Jamie Simmons
> Corvallis
>
>
> Semipalmated Plover is not "early" at this time of year.   They are rather
> common on the beach and have been all month.   I suppose if you work on the
> beach like we do you get used to what is around and don't even really
> realize what you folks who don't work on the beach every day don't see.
> Just a little clarification (to tell you the truth, Semi P is a bird you
> could seen just about any time, albeit they are a lot less common in
> winter).
>
> Cheers
> Dave Lauten
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Boiler Bay
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 10:28:30 -0700
6:45-8:00 AM (4/22):
partly clear, wind W 5-15 swells 6-8

200 Red-throated Loon
4500 Pacific Loon (clumpy 30-200/min)
25 Common Loon
19 Red-necked Grebe (all N with loons)
6 Western Grebe
24 Brown Pelican
285 Brant
3 Northern Shoveler
6 scaup sp.
3 Black Scoter
40 White-winged Scoter
2500 Surf Scoter
8 Red-breasted Merganser
3 Black-bellied Plover
9 Whimbrel
20+ Dunlin
600+ Western/Least
1 Ring-billed Gull
8 California Gull
150 Western Gull
15 Glaucous-winged Gull
1 Heermann's Gull (alternate adult S)
200 Caspian Tern
6000+ Common Murre (roughly 2/3 S)
30 Pigeon Guillemot
2 Marbled Murrelet
150+ Rhinoceros Auklet (roughly 2/3 S)
2 Cassin's Auklet
1 Tufted Puffin
1 Eurasian Collared Dove (N)

Phil
philliplc AT charter.net



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Subject: FW: Please post to Obol Digest this week
From: "Hawes, Susan" <Susan.Hawes AT portlandoregon.gov>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 10:10:47 -0700
Hi there,

If you have room, would you post the following announcement (listed below under 
my signature) in this week's Digests, please? The training is this Friday. 


I greatly appreciate it. Thanks so much!
Susan


Susan Hawes
Stewardship Coordinator | City Nature East
Portland Parks & Recreation
8931 SE Flavel
Portland, OR 97266
503-823-6131 (office)
503-823-5937 (mobile)
Susan.Hawes AT PortlandOregon.gov

From: Hawes, Susan
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 3:22 PM
To: 'obol AT freelists.org'
Subject: Please post to Obol Digest

Hello,

Please post the following announcement to this week's Obol Digests. I'm not 
sure if you're able to include attachments, so if not, feel free to delete the 
language below that refers to an attachment. 


Thanks so much!
Susan


Susan Hawes
Stewardship Coordinator | City Nature East
Portland Parks & Recreation
8931 SE Flavel
Portland, OR 97266
503-823-6131 (office)
503-823-5937 (mobile)
Susan.Hawes AT PortlandOregon.gov
www.PortlandParks.org



[cid:image001.jpg AT 01CF5BE3.11120090] 



 [cid:image002.jpg AT 01CF5BE3.11120090]  
[cid:image003.jpg AT 01CF5BE3.11120090]  
[cid:image004.jpg AT 01CF5BE3.11120090] 
 


Powell Butte Volunteer Bird Survey Training
Powell Butte Nature Park
Friday, April 25, 7:30-9:00 AM
Calling all Birders to assist with our breeding bird survey! The goals of the 
Survey are to: 


 *   update the Powell Butte Nature Park bird list
 *   associate fauna with vegetation communities
 * observe the change in avian communities on the Butte before and after 
reservoir construction and restoration efforts 

Volunteer Bird Surveyors should have at least an intermediate level of bird 
identification by sight and/or sound. This training focuses on the survey 
techniques and does not include PNW bird identification. See attached document 
for the Volunteer Position Description. 

For more information or to RSVP (RSVP is strongly encouraged! Meeting location 
is the SE 148th and Center St. entrance.), contact Stewardship Coordinator 
Susan Hawes at: 
susan.hawes AT portlandoregon.gov or (503) 
823-6131. Day of event, text/call Susan at 
503.823.5937. 

Subject: Crook County's first Snowy Plover
From: Charles Gates <cgates326 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 07:25:47 -0700
I found a Snowy Plover at Houston Lake in western Crook County just 
north of the community of Powell Butte 
(http://birdingoregon.info/Home/CrookCounty/tabid/167/Default.aspx#houston). 
This is a county first for this species.  It was observed by myself, Kim 
Owen and Lew Rems.  Near dusk, I tried to re-find the bird with my wife 
and Cindy Zalunardo but with no luck.  Will check again today.

-- 
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for 
sure that just ain't so. 

Mark Twain

Chuck Gates
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon
Oregon Birding Site Guide
www.birdingoregon.info



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Subject: Marbled Godwit, Douglas co
From: Daniel Farrar <jdanielfarrar AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 07:19:55 -0700
Obol,
   There was a MARBLED GODWIT on the beach with 2 WHIMBREL at Tahkenitch
Creek mouth yesterday morning (4-21).



-- 
Daniel Farrar
Dunes City, Oregon
jdanielfarrar AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: [birding] Benton Co. Burrowing Owl, etc.
From: Pam Otley <pamo1954 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 06:59:10 -0700
Oscar and all,

Wow, good on you for the burrowing owl! I predict traffic will increase on
Llewellyn Rd for awhile.....

Pam O  :-)


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:49 PM, Oscar Harper  wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> Yesterday evening, Hendrik and I birded with Jamie Simmons, Adrian and
> Christopher Hinkle at Finley NWR. Things were rather slow overall, but
> there were still 5 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS at the Conservation Wetland, along
> with a few GREATER YELLOWLEGS, LEAST SANDPIPERS and DUNLIN. We also heard 2
> SORAS.
>
> Along Bruce Rd., we found 2 YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS at the scrape, and
> McFadden Marsh hosted a small flock of GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE.
>
> On the way back to Corvallis, we drove down Llewellin Road to check for
> Short-eared Owls south of the airport. We didn't find any, but driving back
> to Hwy 99, we flushed a BURROWING OWL off the south side of the road. It
> was well seen by 3 of us. Unfortunately, Adrian and I missed it (although
> Adrian tried hard to relocate it by jogging alongside the car in hopes of
> finding the bird again as we made a second pass along that stretch of
> road).
>
> This is the first Burrowing Owl report from Benton County in several years.
> An exciting find, and a great way to end the day.
>
> Good birding
>
> Oscar
> _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
>
Subject: Re: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 05:53:10 -0700
On 4/21/2014 10:27 PM, Jamie S. (REDACTED: yahoo.com uses DMARC) wrote:
>
>
> HMSC trail:
> Semipalmated Plover - 1 (early?)
>
>
> Jamie Simmons
> Corvallis
>

Semipalmated Plover is not "early" at this time of year.   They are 
rather common on the beach and have been all month.   I suppose if you 
work on the beach like we do you get used to what is around and don't 
even really realize what you folks who don't work on the beach every day 
don't see.   Just a little clarification (to tell you the truth, Semi P 
is a bird you could seen just about any time, albeit they are a lot less 
common in winter).

Cheers
Dave Lauten



Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 05:38:28 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: April 22, 2014 5:14:24 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Ross's Goose (1 Washington)
Surf Scoter (1 Benton)
Black-necked Stilt (Black-necked) (1 Umatilla)
Black-bellied Plover (1 Jackson)
Short-billed Dowitcher (1 Harney)
Burrowing Owl (5 Benton)
Calliope Hummingbird (1 Benton)
Dusky Flycatcher (4 Multnomah)
Warbling Vireo (1 Multnomah)
Swainson's Thrush (1 Multnomah)
Yellow Warbler (1 Benton)
Hermit Warbler (1 Benton, 1 Clatsop, 1 Jackson)
White-throated Sparrow (2 Deschutes)
Black-headed Grosbeak (1 Lane)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (1 Klamath)

---------------------------------------------
 View this alert on the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Re: Benton Burrowing Owl and some Eugene yard birds
From: Mark Nikas <elepaio AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 23:39:51 -0700
Oscar's report of a Burrowing Owl in Benton County is 2 weeks later than
any previous record for wintering birds in the valley and about 5 weeks
later than typical late dates.  Nice find.



The bird that wintered this year near Halsey departed sometime between
March 4th and 17th. Most years wintering birds disappear in February. East
side birds often return to nesting territories in March.



I've had 50 species of birds from my yard in west Eugene the past 2 days
with 42 the count for each day. There's been a lot of turnover.  Every
spring I hope to hit the magic 50 in one day but 49 has been the limit so
far. After almost 20 years here new yard birds are scarce but there's still
a few I expect sooner or later. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was not on that
expected list but as I stepped out the door last evening I had 1 croaking
directly overhead as it flew westbound towards Fern Ridge Res. a mile away.



A male CALLIOPE HUMMER has visited apple blossoms briefly the past 2 days
but has ignored my feeders. The wintering WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continues
and is quite late for here.



BAND-TAILED PIGEONS made an impressive showing today. They nest in the
neighborhood and first showed up last month in small numbers. Today I had
flocks of 12, 14 and 44 fly over. The group of 12 flew to a nearby butte
but the other 2 flocks continued northward. The group of 44 was quite high
- aprox. 1000' up. I'm guessing these were late migrants.



HOUSE WREN showed up today.  So did House Sparrows.  They nest in
neighboring barns and attempt to use my nest boxes each year but then
disappear later in summer rarely to be seen again until the following
spring. I used to think of them as a more sedentary species.



Mark Nikas

Eugene
Subject: Mt. Tabor yesterday
From: Christopher Hinkle <christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 22:50:24 -0700
Had a busy day yesterday and never got around to posting. I was in Portland
for the weekend so my mom and I birded Mt. Tabor yesterday morning (4/20)
from 8:30 to noonish. (We were also up there in the afternoon of 4/19 and
had a slightly early WESTERN TANAGER.) Migrants on 4/20:

Northern Harrier  1
Hammond's Flycatcher  4-5
Dusky Flycatcher  1
Pacific-slope Flycatcher  2
Cassin's Vireo  4-5
Warbling Vireo  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  8
Hermit Thrush  7
Orange-crowned Warbler  8
Nashville Warbler  5-6
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  10
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's)  20+
Black-throated Gray Warbler  15+
Townsend's Warbler  12+
Wilson's Warbler  1
Lincoln's Sparrow  1

The Dusky Flycatcher and Warbling Vireo were slightly early. A quick note
on Dusky Flycatchers: From 2011 - 2013, between late April and late May, I
recorded Duskys on 68% of morning birding trips to Tabor. Low count 0 (32%
of trips), median count 1 (42% of trips), high count 8 (twice), average
count about 1.3/trip. Recognizing their call note is by far the best way to
detect and identify them.

Cheers,

Christopher Hinkle
Subject: Monday, April 21, 2014
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 22:49:46 -0700
Birded the North Coast today with Jack Kiley and John Elizalde, all in Clatsop 
County. 


At Silver Point several bunches of Brown Pelicans, quite a few Red-throated 
Loons, several small tight flocks of shorebirds .... all flying north. 


At Necanicum Estuary 19 Black-bellied Plovers, scattering of Dunlin in mostly 
alternate plumage. At Stanley Lake 6 Greater Yellowlegs. 


Along Sunset Beach very few Sanderlings in mostly basic plumage, small number 
of Western Sandpipers in complete or nearly complete alternate plumage. Along 
Wireless Road a quite satisfying flock of 120+ Whimbrel with 4 Marbled Godwits. 


All along the usual Savannah Sparrows (some are migrants with a lot of yellow 
in the face), Yellow-rumped Warblers, Orange-crowned Warblers, the 
White-crowned Sparrows are singing, a few leftover Golden-crowned Sparrows, 
Barn Swallows in good numbers, Bald Eagles everywhere. 


oschmidt AT att.net
Monday, April 21, 2014

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Subject: Lincoln Co birding 4/19
From: "Jamie S." <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (REDACTED: yahoo.com uses DMARC)
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 22:27:22 -0700 (PDT)
My apologies for the late report.
Hendrik Herlyn, Oscar Harper, and Adrian Hinkle & I birded Saturday (4/19) in 
Lincoln County. 

Highlights:

Fall Creek Rd:
Hermit, Wilson's, Black-thr Gray, Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped Warblers
American Dipper - 2

Grass Mountain (nw side; rain & wind off and on): 
Mountain Quail - 3
Varied Thrush - 1

Eckman Lake:
Cinnamon Teal  - 1 sleeping male

Eckman Slough:
Greater White-fronted Goose

Seal
 Rock pullouts 
Whimbrel - 4 on the beach

HMSC trail:
Semipalmated Plover - 1 (early?)
Whimbrel - 26
Merlin - 1 dark "Pacific" form
Western Scrub-Jay with a short tail (2 inches?) 

Complete results are on eBird.

Jamie Simmons
Corvallis
Subject: Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:58:31 -0700
Definitely a species has long been expected to show up in Oregon.

Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 21, 2014, at 9:13 PM, "Jeff Gilligan"  wrote:

> It would be a first Oregon record. The species has also been north of us in 
British Columbia. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 21, 2014, at 9:08 PM, Brandon Green  wrote:
> 
>> Would that be a first for Oregon? There have been at least a few sightings 
in Humboldt County, CA over the past 20 or so years. That's also not a 
difficult ID. 

>> 
>> -Brandon
>> 
>> -----
>> Subject: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
>> Date: Mon Apr 21 2014 22:22 pm
>> From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com 
>> A possible Black Vulture was seen in northern Curry County (not on Terry 
Wahl's ranch) by an observer who is likely to be right. The observer was the 
first to have seen and identified the Crested Caracara in that area a few years 
ago. Terry looked for the Black Vulture without success. He said that there 
were a lot of Turkey Vultures and ravens in the area feeding on dead lambs and 
after birth. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Today Terry saw a light phase Swainson's Hawk on his Cape Blanco Ranch, and 
still had two Palm Warblers earlier in the month there. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> 
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:57:17 -0700
This is a species that has been 

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 21, 2014, at 9:13 PM, "Jeff Gilligan"  wrote:

> It would be a first Oregon record. The species has also been north of us in 
British Columbia. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 21, 2014, at 9:08 PM, Brandon Green  wrote:
> 
>> Would that be a first for Oregon? There have been at least a few sightings 
in Humboldt County, CA over the past 20 or so years. That's also not a 
difficult ID. 

>> 
>> -Brandon
>> 
>> -----
>> Subject: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
>> Date: Mon Apr 21 2014 22:22 pm
>> From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com 
>> A possible Black Vulture was seen in northern Curry County (not on Terry 
Wahl's ranch) by an observer who is likely to be right. The observer was the 
first to have seen and identified the Crested Caracara in that area a few years 
ago. Terry looked for the Black Vulture without success. He said that there 
were a lot of Turkey Vultures and ravens in the area feeding on dead lambs and 
after birth. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Today Terry saw a light phase Swainson's Hawk on his Cape Blanco Ranch, and 
still had two Palm Warblers earlier in the month there. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> 
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>> 
> 
Subject: Benton Co. Burrowing Owl, etc.
From: Oscar Harper <oeharper3 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:49:23 -0700
Hello all,

Yesterday evening, Hendrik and I birded with Jamie Simmons, Adrian and
Christopher Hinkle at Finley NWR. Things were rather slow overall, but
there were still 5 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS at the Conservation Wetland, along
with a few GREATER YELLOWLEGS, LEAST SANDPIPERS and DUNLIN. We also heard 2
SORAS.

Along Bruce Rd., we found 2 YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS at the scrape, and
McFadden Marsh hosted a small flock of GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE.

On the way back to Corvallis, we drove down Llewellin Road to check for
Short-eared Owls south of the airport. We didn't find any, but driving back
to Hwy 99, we flushed a BURROWING OWL off the south side of the road. It
was well seen by 3 of us. Unfortunately, Adrian and I missed it (although
Adrian tried hard to relocate it by jogging alongside the car in hopes of
finding the bird again as we made a second pass along that stretch of road).

This is the first Burrowing Owl report from Benton County in several years.
An exciting find, and a great way to end the day.

Good birding

Oscar
Subject: March Lincoln Co. Bird Notes Received During 2/26-3/23
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:40:19 -0700
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
BIRD FIELD NOTES from the March 2014 Sandpiper 35(3)
for Observations Received During 2/26-3/23 by Range Bayer

The Sandpiper is a publication of Yaquina Birders and Naturalists, a
Lincoln County (Oregon) natural history group.

Comments in this column about abundance or seasonality refer to
LINCOLN COUNTY only.

There is room here for only some of the many Lincoln County sightings
posted to Oregon Birders On-Line (OBOL), eBird.org, Lincoln Co.
Birding & Nature Observing (LCBNO), and BirdNotes.net; or emailed,
telephoned, or mailed to me.

If you have any Lincoln County field notes, please share them with
Range (range.bayer AT gmail.com; P.O. Box 1467, Newport, OR 97365;
541-265-2965) by the 20th of the month.  Bird field notes columns in
the Sandpiper since 1992 are at
http://yaquina.info/ybn/bird/bird.htm#recent

Abbreviations, terms, and some Lincoln Co. site locations (numbers
refer to site numbers in the Oregon Coast Birding Trail Guide
http://www.oregoncoastbirding.com/):  BEAVER CREEK (#78, in part):
creek flowing through Ona Beach State Park that includes Beaver Creek
State Natural Area (SNA)
(http://www.oregonstateparks.org/park_261.php), BOILER BAY STATE
WAYSIDE (#59): about 0.5 mi north of Depoe Bay, ECKMAN LAKE (#84):
lake 2 mi east of Waldport along HWY 34, HMSC (#75): OSU Hatfield
Marine Science Center, IDAHO FLATS: large embayment just east of the
HMSC, LNG TANK: large green Liquefied Natural Gas tank on the north
side of Yaquina Bay about 1.5 miles east of Yaquina Bay Bridge, ONA
BEACH (renamed as Brian Booth State Park in 2013) (#77): State Park
about 6.6 mi south of Yaquina Bay bridge along HWY 101 at Beaver
Creek, SALLY'S BEND (#66): large Yaquina Bay embayment east of the LNG
tank, SALMON RIVER ESTUARY (#44 and 45): estuary at north end of
Lincoln Co.; the mouth is in Tillamook Co., YBSJ (#71): Yaquina Bay
South Jetty, YAQUINA HEAD OUTSTANDING NATURAL AREA (#65): headland
north of Newport (requires recreation pass or vehicle entrance fee).


WATERFOWL

Since late Nov., 10-16 GR. WHITE-FRONTED GEESE have found a protected
place from people and dogs on the lawn inside the chain link fence
around the large green LNG tank in Newport, west of Sally's Bend,
where they can graze and rest.  15-17 were still there on 3/14 & 23
(RB; PT & SM).

The high counts of BRANT during the 2/26-3/23 reporting period were
200 near the HMSC on 3/1 (JH) and 197 at Idaho Flats on 3/14 (RB).  It
is unusual to have Brant far upstream at Yaquina Bay, but 185 Brant
were feeding on native eelgrass (Zostera marina) on the south side of
the Bay across from Sawyer's Landing (JL & CP); this is approximately
at Road Milepost 4.2 along north Yaquina Bay Road.  Starting in 2007,
YB&N is a project partner of the International Brant Monitoring
Project (IBMP) (http://www.padillabay.gov/brant/agencies.html); see
their Observations Log for reports along the Pacific Coast
(http://www.padillabay.gov/brant/observationlogs/log1314.asp ).
Historical Yaquina Estuary records for Brant are accessible by
clicking "View/Open" at
http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/handle/1957/8081

WW found our first REDHEAD of the year, an adult male, at Sally's Bend on 3/12.

WH noticed a herring spawn at YBSJ on 3/11 that resulted in scoters
aggregating.  On 3/14, RL saw a variety of birds taking advantage of
the recent herring spawn, with 12 HARLEQUIN DUCKS (11 males) hanging
out at the 2nd finger jetty with a lot of squawking directed toward
the lone female, photos at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/24707703 AT N06/sets/72157642411797915/
E&RG had the high Harlequin count with 22 at the YBSJ on 3/17.   For
12 photos and comments that well show and describe the bird behavior
and aggregations as well as photos of 3 Long-tailed Ducks at this
herring spawn, see JSa's blog for her 3/20 observation date (posted on
3/21) at http://www.iusedtohatebirds.com/2014/03/newport.html

A report of Harlequin records through 1992 that includes some records
for other Oregon coastal counties and Alex Walker's unpublished
nesting report in Tillamook County is at

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/8061/vol.%203%20pg.%20243-260.pdf 


The female, rare KING EIDER found off 68th Street in north Newport
during the Jan. 5 Yaquina Bay CBC was often noted with the latest
report at the end of the reporting period on 3/23 (eBird).  The
Lincoln Co. King Eider residency record is for a female that KM found
at the YBSJ on 12/8/1996 that was reported last on 3/24/1997 -- will
the 68th Street eider remain later?  The 68th Street eider was along
with 400 BLACK SCOTERS and 320 SURF SCOTERS on 3/8 (A&CH, HH, JSi &
OH); this area may be the best Lincoln County site for Black Scoters.

There were many reports of 1-3 BARROW'S GOLDENEYES at Yaquina Bay and
also reports of 1 at north Siletz Bay during 3/8 & 12 (MR; WW).  1-4
LONG-TAILED DUCKS were also regularly viewed at Yaquina Bay during the
report period ending on 3/23 (m.ob.)

[Image Not Included: One of 11 male and 1 female Harlequin Ducks at
the Yaquina Bay South Jetty on 3/14.  Photo © by Roy Lowe from one of
6 Harlequin photos at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/24707703 AT N06/sets/72157642411797915/]


QUAIL-RAPTORS (including falcons)

M&SN found a MOUNTAIN QUAIL on 3/19 at Fox Creek (1 mile south of Seal
Rocks) (fide BB).

Single CLARK'S GREBES were noted at Yaquina Bay during the reporting
period (m.ob.), and 1 LAYSAN ALBATROSS and 3 NORTHERN FULMARS washed
ashore in Feb. along 4.6 miles of beach north of Ona Beach (B&SLo,
L&VO); in 2013, 2 beached Laysans were found there, so beached Laysans
are uncommon to rare.

So far this year through 3/23, BROWN PELICANS have been absent with
the exception of an uncertain report at Seal Rocks on 3/15.  This is a
big change from the past 2 years when we had records each month during
Jan.-March, and there were records each month of the year in 2008,
2010, & 2012 (FN).

We had a scattering of reports of single GREAT EGRETS at Yaquina,
Siletz, & Alsea Bays, Beaver Cr., Salmon River, and Eckman Lake, along
with a report of 2 at Eckman Lake on 3/10 (m.ob.).

Oregon Winter Raptor Surveys are a good relative index to the
abundance of wintering raptors and are coordinated by the East
Cascades Birds Observatory (www.ecbcbirds.org/Default.aspx?tabid=73).
JL & CP finished the Raptor Run season with one last run on 3/7 along
the Inland or Yaquina River-Siletz Raptor Route that was 66 miles long
and took 4.3 hours.  JL reports that:

"the weather was warm and partly sunny after a series of stormy days,
and fields and pastures were partly flooded.  Since March count
numbers are usually low, we were surprised to find more than our
average number of RED-TAILED HAWKS (20), many of them flying, but no
kites, harriers, peregrine or accipiters.  We were also pleased to see
one RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, a lone AMERICAN KESTREL, and five BALD EAGLES
(all adults)."

Another Red-shouldered Hawk was at the HMSC during 3/7-8 (eBird), but
we had no reports of White-tailed Kites.

1 or 2 OSPREY were intermittently reported during winter until 2/9,
but the apparent first migrant was detected at Yachats on 3/4 (BB).

On 2/25, PD saw 4 COMMON RAVENS and a PEREGRINE FALCON flying north of
Mo's Restaurant along the Newport Bayfront.  The Peregrine was
attacking by flying at one of the larger ravens, and the raven was
doing aerial acrobatics in twisting and turning while in flight.  PD
said she felt like she was watching a WWII movie of fighters attacking
bombers!  Ravens have become more common in lower Yaquina Bay, but 4
ravens there also seems an unusually high number.

Update to the Peregrine soap opera at Yaquina Head, WH notes that he
has seen 4 females there this winter, including the breeding female
and the interloping female banded as C5.  On 2/28, there was aerial
combat between C5 and apparently the breeding female at Yaquina Head
(DC).

No MERLINS were reported, and, other than during the Raptor Run,
single kestrels were also at Hudson Loop between Toledo and Siletz on
3/7 (JL) and at Beaver Creek on 3/11 (DHo).


SHOREBIRDS-WOODPECKERS

A WHIMBREL was at Seal Rocks on 3/8 (A&CH, HH, JSi & OH), and a
BONAPARTE'S GULL at Yaquina Bay on 3/9 (CC) is a few weeks early so
may be a vagrant rather than early migrant.

During a 1 hour morning seawatch on 3/10 at Boiler Bay, PP estimated
25,000+ COMMON MURRES in flocks streaming south.  2 MARBLED MURRELETS
were at Seal Rocks on 3/8 (A&CH, HH, JSi & OH), and another 2 were off
of 32nd Street in Lincoln City on 3/22 (MR).

An adult, rare PARAKEET AUKLET was less than 150 yards off Boiler Bay
on 3/10 (PP).

The first BAND-TAILED PIGEONS arrived at Eckman Lake on 2/28 (RL).

JL saw 1-2 BARRED OWLS at Hudson Loop between Toledo and Siletz during
5 days in March.

RL led the YBNFT on 3/22, and they observed female RUFOUS and ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRDS gathering furry cattail seeds to line their nests at
Eckman Lake.

1 RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER was at Hudson Loop between Toledo and Siletz
on 3/11 & 19 (JL).

On 3/19, CP saw a NORTHERN FLICKER with yellow-shafts at his home in
Toledo.  For records through 1992, flickers with yellow-shafts were
not reported here from 4/11 to 10/8 (SemiL).  Will they be later this
year?

[Image Not Included: Female Rufous Hummingbird harvesting fluffy
cattail seeds for use as nesting material at Eckman Lake on March 22.
Photo © by Roy Lowe from 1 of 7 photos of female Rufous and Anna's
Hummingbirds harvesting cattail seeds at Eckman Lake at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/24707703 AT N06/sets/72157642817867604/]


FLYCATCHERS-GOLDFINCH

BW found a SAY'S PHOEBE near the apartments at the HMSC on 3/15 & 16
that was resighted in that area through 3/18 (m.ob.); click on MS's
photo to see more photos at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17507536  Prior to 1993,
we only had 3 records (SemiL), but since 2000, they were reported
during Feb.-April in 2001 and 2006, there was 1 sighting each year
during 2009-2011, 2 sightings in 2012, but none in 2013 (FN).

1-2 WESTERN SCRUB-JAYS were in Newport during 4 days in March, and 1
was also at Otter Crest north of Otter Rock on 3/5 (MG).

Spring firsts include: TREE SWALLOW on 2/22 at Beaver Creek (DHo), 3/1
at Yachats (BB), and 3/2 in Toledo (DHa & RP); first singing BROWN
CREEPER on 3/12 in Toledo (DHa), and VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW on 3/13 in
the HMSC area (WW).

The only WESTERN BLUEBIRD record received during the reporting period
was at Yaquina Head on 2/9 (BLM).

AMERICAN PIPITS were at Yaquina Head on 2/8-9 (BLM) during the cold
snap as reported in last month's newsletter, but our only report after
2/15 was on 3/8 at the HMSC (A&CH, HH, JSi & OH).

A Slate-colored DARK-EYED JUNCO appeared at ME's feeder at Road's End,
north of Lincoln City, on 3/13-14, and a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW singing
in Newport on 3/23 suggests their spring arrival, although some
overwinter (RB).

A HOODED ORIOLE on private property about 2 miles south of Waldport on
2/14 (DR) was included in last month's newsletter.  With landowner
BC's gracious permission, one was appreciated and reported in the same
area on 3/8 (A&CH, HH, JSi & OH); see AH's photos at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17366097  It was
subsequently seen through 3/11 (m.ob.).

[Image Not Included: Male Hooded Oriole that had been coming to a
hummingbird feeder south of Waldport.  March 8 photo © by Jamie
Simmons.]

With Spring, there are departures as well as arrivals.  Our latest
WESTERN MEADOWLARK was at the HMSC on 3/18 (MS); click on MS's
meadowlark photo at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17507536 to see more.

An uncommon LESSER GOLDFINCH was at HMSC feeders on 3/8 (A&CH, HH, JSi
& OH).  Thanks to their prompt reporting, CP saw it at the USFWS
feeders at the south end of the OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center
campus on 3/9.

OBSERVERS/SOURCES: Betty Bahn, Range Bayer, Birding Oregon
(http://birdingoregon.info/), BirdNotes.net, Bureau of Land Management
staff and volunteers at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area (BLM),
Don Campbell, Bob Carr, Cheryl Chessick, Pat Dickey, eBird.org
(location and observer not accessible in "View and Explore Data" for
"All Observations" but available through "Bar Charts"), Mark Elliott,
fide ("as reported by" someone other than the observer), Eve & Rob
Gill, Michael Green, Jeff Harding, Oscar Harper, Dawn Harris (DHa),
Hendrik Herlyn, Adrian & Christopher Hinkle, Wayne Hoffman, Deb
Holland (DHo), Janet Lamberson, Lincoln Co. Birding & Nature Observing
(LCBNO) (https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/LCBNO/info), Bob Loeffel
(BLo) & Shirley Loeffel (SLo), Roy Lowe, Kathy Merrifield, Sandra
Morey, m.ob. (multiple observers), Michael & Sally Noack, Field Notes
(FN; Lincoln County records from the Sandpiper since 1992 are
searchable in search box at
http://yaquina.info/ybn/bird/bird.htm#recent), Oregon Birders On-Line
(OBOL; recent postings at http://birdnews.aba.org/maillist/OR01),
Laimons & Vicki Osis, Ram Papish, Chuck Philo, Phil Pickering, Mitch
Ratzlaff, Doug Robinson, Jen Sanford (JSa), SemiL (semimonthly Lincoln
Co. bird records through 1992 for each species at ScholarsArchive AT OSU
[http://hdl.handle.net/1957/8070]), Jamie Simmons (JSi), Molly
Sultany, Patti Truhn, Dawn Villaescusa, Wayne Weber, Ben Wishnek,
Yaquina Birders & Naturalists (http://yaquina.info/ybn/) Field Trip
(YBNFT) led by RL.


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Subject: Ridgefield NWR Closure - Update
From: Scott Carpenter <slcarpenter AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:39:57 -0700
CARTY AND RIVER 'S' UNITS CLOSED APRIL 25
Weather Related Change in Construction Schedule

The Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge will be closed on Friday, April
25th for road improvements. These repairs will impact both the River 'S'
and Carty Units. The closures will allow crews to extend asphalt at the
Refuge entrances and replace asphalt along the Observation Blind trail.

Please note: Construction closures were previously announced for April
24th, however, precipitation in the forecast has delayed the work to April
25th.

For more information check out these websites:

Refuge Complex -
     www.fws.gov/ridgefieldrefuges
Ridgefield Friends Website -
     www.ridgefieldfriends.org
Gorge Stewards Website -
     www.refugestewards.com


-- 
Scott Carpenter
Portland, Oregon
-------------------------
http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/
Subject: Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:12:58 -0700
It would be a first Oregon record. The species has also been north of us in 
British Columbia. 





On Apr 21, 2014, at 9:08 PM, Brandon Green  wrote:

> Would that be a first for Oregon? There have been at least a few sightings in 
Humboldt County, CA over the past 20 or so years. That's also not a difficult 
ID. 

> 
> -Brandon
> 
> -----
> Subject: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
> Date: Mon Apr 21 2014 22:22 pm
> From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com 
> A possible Black Vulture was seen in northern Curry County (not on Terry 
Wahl's ranch) by an observer who is likely to be right. The observer was the 
first to have seen and identified the Crested Caracara in that area a few years 
ago. Terry looked for the Black Vulture without success. He said that there 
were a lot of Turkey Vultures and ravens in the area feeding on dead lambs and 
after birth. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Today Terry saw a light phase Swainson's Hawk on his Cape Blanco Ranch, and 
still had two Palm Warblers earlier in the month there. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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Subject: Re: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
From: Brandon Green <brandon.green18 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:08:32 -0700
Would that be a first for Oregon?  There have been at least a few sightings
in Humboldt County, CA over the past 20 or so years.  That's also not a
difficult ID.

-Brandon

-----
*Subject: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County*
Date: Mon Apr 21 2014 22:22 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com

A possible Black Vulture was seen in northern Curry County (not on
Terry Wahl's ranch) by an observer who is likely to be right.   The
observer was the first to have seen and identified the Crested
Caracara in that area a few years ago.  Terry looked for the Black
Vulture without success.  He said that there were a lot of Turkey
Vultures and ravens in the area feeding on dead lambs and after birth.



Today Terry saw a light phase Swainson's Hawk on his Cape Blanco
Ranch, and still had two Palm Warblers earlier in the month there.




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Subject: possible Black Vulture reported Curry County
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:21:34 -0700
A possible Black Vulture was seen in northern Curry County (not on Terry Wahl's 
ranch) by an observer who is likely to be right. The observer was the first to 
have seen and identified the Crested Caracara in that area a few years ago. 
Terry looked for the Black Vulture without success. He said that there were a 
lot of Turkey Vultures and ravens in the area feeding on dead lambs and after 
birth. 


Today Terry saw a light phase Swainson's Hawk on his Cape Blanco Ranch, and 
still had two Palm Warblers earlier in the month there. 





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Subject: The warbler and the vulture
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:54:29 -0700
We ran out to Champoeg State Park over the lunch hour today to look for
Chipping Sparrow in the same area we found two of them last year - we're
hoping to locate a nesting-pair. We did not find the sparrow, but we did
find and enjoy two birds in particular, a Myrtle Warbler and two Turkey
Vultures. The later, I had read about the night before in Noah Strycker's
latest book, "The thing with feathers: the surprising lives of birds and
what they reveal about being human".  I will not give up the story line -
but I will say the account of his earliest efforts to study and photograph
the Turkey Vulture is both entertaining and enlightening. I am grateful to
have had the opportunity to observe this species in close-proximity so soon
after reading Noah's book.

Four Images:

http://www.jack-n-jill.net/blog/2014/4/the_warbler_and_the_vulture

-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Jackson County birds
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:32:04 -0700
I was working again in the woods along the far reaches of Kane Creek Rd off Old 
Stage Rd south of Gold Hill. There were 2 HOUSE WRENS singing in a clearcut and 
at least a dozen HERMIT WARBLERS singing in the forest. There was also a 
WILSON'S WARBLER singing along with the other warbler species that are already 
on territory. PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER was the only flycatcher of the day. 

I stopped by Kirtland Ponds this evening after work and saw 27 BONAPARTE'S 
GULLS and 4 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS. The SEMIPALMATED PLOVER was still around as 
was the single DUNLIN. Two LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS were feeding by themselves in 
the front pond. There were 6 pairs of GADWALL and 2 pairs of CINNAMON TEAL. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18023671
Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford 		 	   		  
Subject: Jo Co Mac Warbler/ more Lazulis
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 18:11:59 -0700
Mike Klem found 2 LAZULI BUNTINGS and a MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER at the frontage 
road east of the Manzanita I-5 R.S. today (04-21-14). 


Dennis (north of Grants Pass)
Subject: Arrivals in W. Yamhill Co.
From: Floyd Schrock <fschrock AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 18:11:58 -0700
This morning (4-21-14) my earliest ever "first of the season"
MacGillivray's Warbler was singing in the hills west of Willamina.  Also a
Black-throated Gray Warbler was singing, and White-fronted Geese were
headed northwest high overhead.

====================
Floyd Schrock
McMinnville, Oregon   USA
http://empids.blogspot.com
====================
Subject: [Fwd: Postdoc job opportunity: Climate Change and Species Interactions]
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:25:38 -0700
-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: Joel Geier 
Reply-to: joel.geier AT peak.org
To: MidValley Birds , Mid-Valley Nature

Subject: Postdoc job opportunity: Climate Change and Species
Interactions
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:24:07 -0700


Hi all,

This job listing came out on the OSU water list-serv, but seems like it
could be a great opportunity for any doctoral candidates or recent Ph.D.
graduates from the biological, ecological, or statistical departments on
campus.

I see hundreds of post-doc job listings every year but this one looks
like by far the most FUN!!!!

Heck, if I was still 26 or 27 years old and without a mountain of
obligations to deal with, I'd be looking into apartment prices in East
Lansing right now. I also hear (from a close friend who's a Spartan
alum) that they have football & basketball teams that are fun to watch,
and that East Lansing is not a bad town to live in. Also it's not too
far to drive if you want to look for Kirtland's Warblers.

Best of luck if you decide to apply for this!
Joel

--

Postdoctoral Associate – Climate Change and Species Interactions
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

We seek a highly motivated postdoctoral associate with experience in
spatio-temporal modeling, data management, and community ecology.

The research project focuses on predicting the effects of climate change
on ecological communities, and specific goals include: 1) developing
spatio-temporal models over recent history that account for interactions
among birds, insects, trees, disturbance regimes, LULCC, and climate
across forests of the continental United States, and 2) applying climate
change scenarios to project changes in community composition. 

The postdoctoral associate will be expected to manage and analyze large
spatial and temporal data sets and will work collaboratively with Drs.
Phoebe Zarnetske and Andrew Finley to develop the models, carry out
analyses, and write manuscripts and proposals. Expected start timeframe
is September 2014-January 2015. Applicants must hold a PhD in ecology,
geography, forestry, statistics, or related field by the start of the
position. Applicants must have a strong background in ecology, modeling,
R, GIS, and writing, and experience with Bayesian models and
collaborative research.

This position is based at Michigan State University (MSU) with
competitive salary and excellent health benefits. This is a full-time,
12-month, fixed-term position, with reappointment conditional on
satisfactory performance. Funding is available for 2 years. To apply,
email as a single PDF: 1) a cover letter (2-pg max) with your research
interests and qualifications for this position, 2) CV, 3) list of 3
references with contact information, and 4) 1 recent first-authored
publication, to: Dr. Phoebe Zarnetske, Department of Forestry, MSU: plz
[at] anr.msu.edu. Application review will begin May 2, 2014 and the
position will remain open until filled.

Phoebe Lehmann Zarnetske
Assistant Professor
Michigan State University
Department of Forestry
480 Wilson Road
East Lansing, MI 48824
phone: (517) 355-7671
plz AT msu.edu 
http://www.msu.edu/~plz



Subject: Nashvilles, etc., Mt. Tabor, Portland
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:08:27 -0700
I birded Mt. Tabor this morning from about 8:45 AM to 10:30 AM.

Nashville Warblers: 11 (5 in the big-leaf maple on the upper circle, as were 
all of the rest I saw - they were feeding on insects in the maple blossoms). 


MacGillivray's Warblers - 3

Black-throated Gray Warbler - 1

Townsend's Warblers - 12

many Yellow-rumped Warblers (and about 15 in my yard of both races)

Hammond's Flycatchers - 2

Jeff Gilligan






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Subject: Eugene Hammond's
From: Brandon Green <brandon.green18 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 16:49:26 -0700
Earlier today, a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER was hawking insects my neighbor's
overgrown shrubs.

-Brandon
Subject: Eugene/Skinner Butte this am...
From: "Diane Pettey" <surfbird AT q.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 16:24:22 -0700
Two flocks of EVENING GROSBEAKS totalling about 40.

regards,
Diane Pettey
Heceta Beach, OR


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Subject: Purple Martins and Am Goldfinches
From: Paul Buescher <paul AT furzwo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:50:25 -0700
Purple Martins returned to my nest boxes on the 17th and today the first Am 
Goldfinch arrived on the river. Osprey are on their usual nest sites (BNSF RR 
bridge and The shopping center parking lot) 


We have just returned from Panama ( Canopy Towers), if anyone is considering at 
trip south I'd be will willing to share thoughts and or experiences. 


Warm Regards,

Paul
When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
Jimi Hendrix