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Updated on Tuesday, March 3 at 09:19 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Cape Verde Shearwaters,©BirdQuest

3 Mar 18 Photos: Two Canada Geese Mating at Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Jim Leonard ]
3 Mar Listing Results proof sheets have been sent ["Paul Sullivan" ]
3 Mar Listing Results proof sheets have been sent ["Paul Sullivan" ]
3 Mar Linn Co PINE GROSBEAKS and BB WOODPECKER ["deweysage AT frontier.com" ]
3 Mar Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Alan Contreras ]
3 Mar Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15 [Jim Leonard ]
3 Mar Updated photos from Wallowa Trip: Gyrfalcon, Pine Grosbeaks, and other fun birds [Khanh Tran ]
3 Mar Birders Night tonight [Owen Schmidt ]
3 Mar Re: Eurasia wigeon [Roy Lowe ]
3 Mar Re: Stopping OBOL messages [Russ Namitz ]
3 Mar Re: Eurasia wigeon [Tim Rodenkirk ]
3 Mar Re: Eurasia wigeon [Kris Gmail ]
03 Mar Eurasia wigeon [David Lantz ]
3 Mar Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. [Alan Contreras ]
3 Mar Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. ["Tom Crabtree" ]
3 Mar Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. [Luke Ferrenburg ]
3 Mar News from Vale ["Richard W. Musser" ]
3 Mar How do I stop the OBOL postings coming to my =?UTF-8?Q?email??Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 09:27:53 -0700 []
3 Mar Re: obol Digest V4 #65 [Paula Rich ]
2 Mar March 2 - Lane Co: Tundra Swans and Greater White-fronted Geese ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
2 Mar Fern Ridge/Royal Ave. Snowy Owl not seen Monday March 2, 2015 ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
02 Mar Pleasures of Unknown Hawk [Frank Kolwicz ]
2 Mar Sunday March 1 - Linn County Pine Grosbeaks ["Anne & Dan Heyerly" ]
2 Mar Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker [Jim Leonard ]
3 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species ["Richard W. Musser" ]
2 Mar Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Oregon ["Don" ]
02 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species [Mike Patterson ]
2 Mar White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island [George Neavoll ]
2 Mar Photos of unknown Hawk [Jim Leonard ]
2 Mar Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willamette River [Jeff Dillon ]
2 Mar reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge [Bonnie Comegys ]
02 Mar 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland [Michael Medina ]
2 Mar Re: dark 'tails ["Tom Crabtree" ]
2 Mar dark 'tails [Lars Per Norgren ]
2 Mar Pleasures of Unknown Hawk [Alan Contreras ]
2 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified ["Robert O'Brien" ]
2 Mar Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified ["Tom Crabtree" ]
2 Mar Talking Waters in Albany ["van der Horst" ]
02 Mar Willows [Mike Patterson ]
2 Mar Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified [Jim Leonard ]
1 Mar Lincoln County today [Christopher Hinkle ]
01 Mar Re: quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner.... [Susan Deagle ]
1 Mar quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner.... [Stephanie Hazen ]
1 Mar Tuesday, March 3rd, is Birders Night [Owen Schmidt ]
1 Mar ASHLAND DIPPER UPDATE [Harry Fuller ]
01 Mar Re: Curry CA Towhee et al. [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
1 Mar Curry CA Towhee et al. [Tim Rodenkirk ]
01 Mar rufous hummingbird Portland on NW Skyline [Mark H ]
1 Mar Re: Pale Red-tail in CO [Lyn Topinka ]
1 Mar Re: Pale Red-tail in CO ["Tom Crabtree" ]
1 Mar FOS Rufous Hummingbird -Silverton Area [John Thomas ]
1 Mar Yard Owling in Silverton hills [roger freeman ]
1 Mar Re: Pale Red-tail in CO ["Richard W. Musser" ]
1 Mar Re: "Yellow"-shafted Flicker was an intergrade, not Yellow-sh. [Jamie Simmons ]
1 Mar Linn - Pine Grosbeaks & BB Woodpecker [Luke Ferrenburg ]
1 Mar Re: Pale Red-tail in CO [Craig Miller ]
1 Mar "Yellow"-shafted Flicker continues in west Corvallis [Lars Per Norgren ]
1 Mar Re: Pale Red-tail in CO ["Richard W. Musser" ]
1 Mar Oregon's metro Dippers--a beginning of a catalog [Harry Fuller ]
1 Mar OREGON GREAT GRAYS GET A LITTLE NATIONAL PRESS [Harry Fuller ]
1 Mar OBA February photo contest winner! [Stephanie Hazen ]
1 Mar Re: Metropolitan Dippers ["Paul Sullivan" ]
1 Mar Re: Metropolitan Dippers ["Paul Sullivan" ]
1 Mar [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
01 Mar Metropolitan Dippers [Joel Geier ]
28 Feb Re: Pale Red-tail in CO [Craig Miller ]
28 Feb Re: Fwd: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA ["Tom Crabtree" ]
1 Mar Re: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker trees gone from Milne Rd, Washington County [David Irons ]
28 Feb Re: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA [Steve Kornfeld ]
28 Feb Yellow-bellied Sapsucker trees gone from Milne Rd, Washington County ["Craig Tumer" ]
28 Feb Fwd: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA [George Neavoll ]
28 Feb ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA [Harry Fuller ]
28 Feb Re: Pale Red-tail in CO ["Tom Crabtree" ]
28 Feb The Happiest Season of All [Diane Cavaness ]
28 Feb Re: Pale Red-tail in CO ["Tom Crabtree" ]
28 Feb Pale Red-tail in CO [Charles Gates ]

Subject: 18 Photos: Two Canada Geese Mating at Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:48:06 -0800
I was at the narrows along Covelle Rd. at Baskett Slough yesterday
morning.  I was watching and photographing two Canada Geese.  One started
dipping it's head & neck into the water and throwing water onto it's body.
Then both geese were doing the dipping together.  I have never seen or
photographed Canada Geese mating.  The male got on the back of the female
and held onto her neck with it's bill.  After mating they both dipped in
the water several times and flapped their wings.  It was very interesting
to see and photograph.  It must be that time of the year.  In the last
month I have photographed Northern Shovelers, Mallards and Northern
Pintails mating.  Click on link below for 18 photos of the action.  Happy
Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/CanadaGeeseMatingBaskettNWR030215?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLXIw7eEqOGxuwE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Listing Results proof sheets have been sent
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:45:13 -0800
Folks,

 

Today I sent out proof sheets to everyone who submitted 20114 Oregon Listing
Results.  Please let me know if you find errors, so I can correct them
before the results are published on the OBA website.

 

If you sent in (or thought you sent in)  Listing Results and you do not get
a proof sheet, let me know.

 

Last minute folks, I'll still take your numbers if you get them in ASAP!!

 

 

Paul T. Sullivan

paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com  

503-472-5306 h

971-237-4864 c

 

 
Subject: Listing Results proof sheets have been sent
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:45:13 -0800
Folks,

 

Today I sent out proof sheets to everyone who submitted 20114 Oregon Listing
Results.  Please let me know if you find errors, so I can correct them
before the results are published on the OBA website.

 

If you sent in (or thought you sent in)  Listing Results and you do not get
a proof sheet, let me know.

 

Last minute folks, I'll still take your numbers if you get them in ASAP!!

 

 

Paul T. Sullivan

paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com  

503-472-5306 h

971-237-4864 c

 

 
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Subject: Linn Co PINE GROSBEAKS and BB WOODPECKER
From: "deweysage AT frontier.com" <deweysage@frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:38:07 -0800
Kathy and I venture to Santiam Pass this morning and headed north on the PCT. 
About a mile in we had the PINE GROSBEAKS and a male and female BLACK BACKED 
WOODPECKERS. 


Cheers

Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Subject: Re: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:28:58 -0800
We saw a lark on the road there on Saturday, maybe two miles south of 
Perrydale. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Mar 3, 2015, at 3:04 PM, Jim Leonard  wrote:
> 
> The last few times I have been out to Baskett Slough NWR I have been watching 
for Streaked Horned Larks to photograph. Yesterday morning I found one that 
didn't fly away and let me photograph it from my pickup window along Livermore 
Rd. North of Baskett Slough NWR. Click on link below Happy Birding, Jim 
Leonard. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/StreakedHornedLarkBaskettNWR030315?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCPzr37OTqszTwAE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Photos: Streaked Horned Lark Baskett Slough NWR 03-02-15
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 15:04:48 -0800
The last few times I have been out to Baskett Slough NWR I have been
watching for Streaked Horned Larks to photograph.  Yesterday morning I
found one that didn't fly away and let me photograph it from my pickup
window along Livermore Rd. North of Baskett Slough NWR. Click on link
below  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/StreakedHornedLarkBaskettNWR030315?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCPzr37OTqszTwAE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Updated photos from Wallowa Trip: Gyrfalcon, Pine Grosbeaks, and other fun birds
From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 22:55:47 +0000
 
Hi Obolers: 

Sorry for the delay but here are some updates photos of Gyrfalcon, Great Gray, 
Pine Grosbeaks and other goodies from recent Wallowas trips. 


I love winter birding and it's always a thrill to see these beautiful birds 
against a wintry setting. I also included other owls, grouse, and bird photos 
from recent trips to North central WA. Seeing Gyrfalcons and Snowy Owls on 
glacial erratics and small rocks is really cool and adds to their allure. 


Hope you enjoy the photos. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/23662496 AT N02/


Peace, love and good birding. 


Khanh Tran 


www.ktbirding.com              		 	   		  

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Subject: Birders Night tonight
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:51:03 -0800
…… Portland Audubon House, 5151 NW Cornell, 7:00 pm! 

oschmidt AT att.net
Tuesday, March 3, 2015




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Subject: Re: Eurasia wigeon
From: Roy Lowe <roy.loweiii AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:46:06 -0800
Same is true for Grand Prairie Park in Albany and often there are multiple 
Eurasian wigeon present including male and females. 


Roy

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 3, 2015, at 1:58 PM, Tim Rodenkirk  wrote:
> 
> Anyone interested in real close up photos of a male Eurasian Wigeon should 
visit Mingus Park in Coos Bay. There is one overwintering with the American 
Wigeon, and the birds often feed in the grass right next to the trail around 
the pond. You can basically walk right up to it. 

>  
> Go Ducks!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
> 
>> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:54 PM, Kris Gmail  
wrote: 

>> I regularly saw Eurasian widgeons at that same location in March and April 
of last year. 

>> 
>> So maybe they will be around for a few weeks again this year.
>> 
>> Regards, Kris 
>> 
>>> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:04 PM, David Lantz  wrote:
>>> 
>>> There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National 
Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end. 

>>> 
>>> David Lantz
>>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Stopping OBOL messages
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 14:31:05 -0800
I contacted Greg Baker, but in case anyone else would like help.
The address to manage your subscription is 
http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
At the bottom left, "Choose an action" will allow you to change how messages 
come to your Inbox. 

I always have mine set for "Vacation mode on" so that I don't receive any OBOL 
messages directly to my Inbox, but I can still post messages if I want. 

I, personally, tend to read the message via the ABA 
website.http://birding.aba.org/maillist/OR01 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Eurasia wigeon
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 13:58:26 -0800
Anyone interested in real close up photos of a male Eurasian Wigeon should
visit Mingus Park in Coos Bay.  There is one overwintering with the
American Wigeon, and the birds often feed in the grass right next to the
trail around the pond. You can basically walk right up to it.

Go Ducks!
Tim R
Coos Bay

On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:54 PM, Kris Gmail 
wrote:

> I regularly saw Eurasian widgeons at that same location in March and April
> of last year.
>
> So maybe they will be around for a few weeks again this year.
>
> Regards, Kris
>
> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:04 PM, David Lantz  wrote:
>
> There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National
> Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end.
>
> David Lantz
>
>
Subject: Re: Eurasia wigeon
From: Kris Gmail <kristeneisenman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:54:17 -0800
I regularly saw Eurasian widgeons at that same location in March and April of 
last year. 


So maybe they will be around for a few weeks again this year.

Regards, Kris 

> On Mar 3, 2015, at 12:04 PM, David Lantz  wrote:
> 
> There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National 
Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end. 

> 
> David Lantz
Subject: Eurasia wigeon
From: David Lantz <lantz503 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 20:04:48 +0000
There are two pairs of Eurasian Wigeons at the Tualatin River National
Wildlife Refuge. They are at the viewing platform at the end.

David Lantz
Subject: Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd.
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 12:01:55 -0800
Meadowview is off 99 north of the Eugene airport.

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Mar 3, 2015, at 11:46 AM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:
> 
> And Meadowview Road is where???
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Luke Ferrenburg
> Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:24 AM
> To: obol AT freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. 
> 
> I was checking out the huge swan flock on Meadowview rd. and saw a
> particular individual I initially thought looked good for a Trumpeter Swan.
> However, it put its head down to feed on the grass and I lost it in the sea
> of white. Just something to keep an eye out for if anyone checks out the
> flock.
> 
> -Luke Ferrenburg 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or
> unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 


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Subject: Re: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd.
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:46:15 -0800
And Meadowview Road is where???

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Luke Ferrenburg
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:24 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd. 

I was checking out the huge swan flock on Meadowview rd. and saw a
particular individual I initially thought looked good for a Trumpeter Swan.
However, it put its head down to feed on the grass and I lost it in the sea
of white. Just something to keep an eye out for if anyone checks out the
flock.

-Luke Ferrenburg 

Sent from my iPhone

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unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org




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Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
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Subject: Possible Trumpeter Swan on Meadowview rd.
From: Luke Ferrenburg <lukeferrenburg AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 10:23:41 -0800
I was checking out the huge swan flock on Meadowview rd. and saw a particular 
individual I initially thought looked good for a Trumpeter Swan. However, it 
put its head down to feed on the grass and I lost it in the sea of white. Just 
something to keep an eye out for if anyone checks out the flock. 


-Luke Ferrenburg 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: News from Vale
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 16:36:30 +0000 (UTC)
Hello,     Today I had 2 Harris's sparrows here---and they have been absent 
for 14 days. I first saw Harris's sparrows here (between 1 and 3) on Jan. 7th, 
and they continued daily until Feb 17. Also, yesterday, I saw a pair of Am. 
Crows in downtown Vale. Best regards, Dick Musser (4 mi. NW of Vale) 
Subject: How do I stop the OBOL postings coming to my =?UTF-8?Q?email??Date: Tue, 03 Mar 2015 09:27:53 -0700
From: <greg AT bigdecadebirder.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 11:28:00 -0500 (EST)




Subject: Re: obol Digest V4 #65
From: Paula Rich <richpaula AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 08:11:59 -0800

 


> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 01:06:48 -0500
> From: obol AT freelists.org
> To: ecartis AT freelists.org
> Subject: obol Digest V4 #65
> 
> obol Digest	Monday, March 02 2015	Volume: 04  Issue: 065
> 
> In This Issue:
> 	#1:	From: Christopher Hinkle 
> 		Subject: [obol] Lincoln County today
> 	#2:	From: Jim Leonard 
> 		Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 	#3:	From: Mike Patterson 
> 		Subject: [obol] Willows
> 	#4:	From: "van der Horst" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Talking Waters in Albany
> 	#5:	From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 	#6:	From: "Robert O'Brien" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 	#7:	From: Alan Contreras 
> 		Subject: [obol] Pleasures of Unknown Hawk 
> 	#8:	From: Lars Per Norgren 
> 		Subject: [obol] dark 'tails
> 	#9:	From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: dark 'tails
> 	#10:	From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
> 		Subject: [obol] 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
> 	#11:	From: Bonnie Comegys 
> 		Subject: [obol] reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge
> 	#12:	From: Jeff Dillon 
> 		Subject: [obol] Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willa
> 	#13:	From: Jim Leonard 
> 		Subject: [obol] Photos of unknown Hawk
> 	#14:	From: George Neavoll 
> 		Subject: [obol] White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island
> 	#15:	From: Mike Patterson 
> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 	#16:	From: Bob 
> 		Subject: [obol] Golden eagle and brant, Wahkiakum Co., WA
> 	#17:	From: "Don" 
> 		Subject: [obol] Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Orego
> #18: From: "Richard W. Musser"  (Redacted sender 
"mussermcevoy AT yahoo.com" for DMARC) 

> 		Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 	#19:	From: Jim Leonard 
> 		Subject: [obol] Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #1 in digest
> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:15:14 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Lincoln County today
> From: Christopher Hinkle 
> 
> Adrian, our parents and I headed to Newport this morning for a bright sunny
> day on the coast. Yaquina Head produced the Burrowing Owl perched in its
> usual spot, looking cute. Lots of Black Scoters, looking north from the
> lighthouse, and some porpoises offshore. At Ona Beach we were surprised to
> find an imm. Golden Eagle circling overhead before flying east. It must be
> a pretty good bird for the central coast. We had only a few minutes at
> Hatfield Marine Science Center and could not find the Palm Warblers or
> anything else of note.
> Good birding,
> 
> Christopher Hinkle
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #2 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 05:21:14 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> From: Jim Leonard 
> 
> I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
> input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
> online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
> Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
> were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
> Jim Leonard.
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #3 in digest
> Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 08:55:55 -0800
> From: Mike Patterson 
> Subject: [obol] Willows
> 
> I celebrate the early spring by celebrating one of my favorite
> riparian shrubs.
> 
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Problem? what problem?
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #4 in digest
> From: "van der Horst" 
> Subject: [obol] Talking Waters in Albany
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:16:10 -0800
> 
> My husband and I spent a delightful Sunday morning at Talking Waters Gardens 
in Albany, finding close to 29 species of birds, including GREEN HERON, 
VIRGINIA RAIL (heard 2X), BLACK PHOEBE (heard both song and call, saw two 
flycatching over the wetlands), CINNAMON TEAL (2 pairs) and my FOY VIOLET-GREEN 
SWALLOW. I followed this flying swallow until I was 90% sure it had large white 
saddle bags and a pale face. The MARSH WRENS were singing away in the wetlands, 
and we even spotted one gathering cattail fluff for a nest. A good place to 
spot elusive Marsh Wrens up close. Raptors included an AMERICAN KESTREL hunting 
from a bare tree, RED-TAILED HAWKS circling above. 

> This season is probably prime time to get high bird species counts. A trail 
from the same parking lot goes into Simpson Park and runs along the Willamette 
River. We didnt walk there, but the edge of the woods was birdy, including a 
singing BROWN CREEPER. There are directions to the place at the end of this 
article. Dogs are allowed on leash. 

> 
> 
http://www.oregonlive.com/travel/index.ssf/2014/08/tumbling_waters_at_albany_crea.html 

> 
> Kathy van der Horst
> Portland, OR
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #5 in digest
> From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:37:50 -0800
> 
> Jim,
> 
> Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk. It is not a Harlans Hawk. 
Dark-phase Harlans Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich 
rufous-brown. Harlans Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on the 
head, throat and usually on the belly as well. For a pair of excellent articles 
on Harlans Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine. 

> 
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf 
> 
> www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf 	
> 
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
> 
> ********************
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf 
Of Jim Leonard 

> Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
> To: obol
> Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> 
> I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me. I had lots of input 
from OBOL members that was helpful. I also looked at a lot of photos online. I 
have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk 
photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd. These photos were taken 
in February. Click on link below to see photos. Happy Birding, Jim Leonard. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #6 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:53:33 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> From: "Robert O'Brien" 
> 
> I agree with Tom, that it is not a Harlan's but an unusual, dark Red-tail.
> Nevertheless it would be very interesting to see Frank's photos, especially
> the top of the tail.
> Bob OBrien
> 
> 
> On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 9:37 AM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:
> 
> > Jim,
> >
> > Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk.  It is not a Harlans Hawk.
> > Dark-phase Harlans Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich
> > rufous-brown.  Harlans Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on
> > the head, throat and usually on the belly as well.  For a pair of excellent
> > articles on Harlans Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine.
> >
> > http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf
> >
> > www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf
> >
> > Tom Crabtree, Bend
> >
> > ********************
> > From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> > Behalf Of Jim Leonard
> > Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
> > To: obol
> > Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
> >
> > I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
> > input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
> > online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
> > Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
> > were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
> > Jim Leonard.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

> >
> >
> >
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> >
> >
> >
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #7 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras 
> Subject: [obol] Pleasures of Unknown Hawk 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:01:38 -0800
> 
> Any chance it will fly away soon?  Just asking.
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> > 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #8 in digest
> From: Lars Per Norgren 
> Subject: [obol] dark 'tails
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:32:04 -0800
> 
> I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These 
rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter, 
perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike 
Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic 
lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe they're 
all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in that 
illuminating posting of the past. Lars 

> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #9 in digest
> From: "Tom Crabtree" 
> Subject: [obol] Re: dark 'tails
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:19:34 -0800
> 
> Lars,
> 
> Harlan's tails are highly variable.  Some have red, some don't.  They can be
> black, brown, white, red and all combinations thereof.  Check out these from
> William Clark's article in the January 2009 issue of birding.
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p30.pdf and more here:
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p36w1.pdf 
> 
> Tom 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Lars Per Norgren
> Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 10:32 AM
> To: obol AT freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] dark 'tails
> 
>  I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These
> rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter,
> perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike
> Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic
> lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe
> they're all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in
> that illuminating posting of the past.  Lars
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or
> unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #10 in digest
> From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:26:03 +0000
> Subject: [obol] 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
> 
> Today around 11 am, while driving over the l-205 bridge, I saw 60-90 great
> blue herons in flight. Was driving in traffic, so count is inaccurate, but
> I can't say I've ever seen this.
> Michael Medina
> Portland, OR
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #11 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:38:10 -0800
> Subject: [obol] reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge
> From: Bonnie Comegys 
> 
> some years ago, in late Feb. or so, was driving over the I205 bridge and
> saw a large flock of very big birds, which as they passed over were to my
> amazement Great blue herons. emailed Harry Nehls about it, and he said was
> likely they were heading to a heron rookery, perhaps on Ross Island. never
> have seen such a sight again, great timing
> Bonnie Comegys
> NE PortlandParkrose, Portland Oregon
> blcomegys AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #12 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willamette 
Rive 

> From: Jeff Dillon 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:52 -0800
> 
> Goat Island is located just down river from the I-205 bridge (across from the 
mouth of the Clackamas River) and it contains a sizable great blue heron 
rookery. You can see the rookery from the Maddox Woods trail on the west side 
of the river (good now because the trees have not leafed out yet). It is 
interesting to watch these herons and note where they are going / coming from. 
A number of these birds head southeast toward the Beavercreek area and others 
seem to focus on the Clackamas River drainage while others head up the 
Willamette River. Sometimes it can remind you of airplanes coming into the 
Portland airport - they seem to stagger their out-going or incoming flights 
between individual birds. 

> 
> Jeff Dillon
> Gladstone, Oregon
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #13 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:02:19 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Photos of unknown Hawk
> From: Jim Leonard 
> 
> Earlier today I reposted unknown hawk photos I had previously posted.  I
> had many different opinions on what type of Hawk it was including a
> Harlan's.  I am now receiving emails that it's not a Harlan but a
> dark-morph red-tailed.  It's confusing when you post an unknown species and
> receive different opinions.  I have concluded that any hawk photos I post
> in the future I will just call them hawks and let the OBOL readers decide
> what they are.  I do appreciate everyone's input and thanks again, Jim
> Leonard.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #14 in digest
> From: George Neavoll 
> Subject: [obol] White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 17:41:43 -0800
> 
> WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (snappy white-striped form) seen by Sabin Belknap and 
me at former "Harris's Sparrow spot" on Rentenaar Road this afternoon (3/2/15). 
Another, less distinctly marked, also there, in large flock of mostly 
GOLDEN-CROWNED, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. Golden-crowned leucistic beauty doesn't 
show today. (It was there as recently as a week ago.) 

> 
> On mammal front, three COLUMBIAN WHITE-TAILED DEER at Ridgefield NWR this 
morning. 

> 
> George Neavoll
> S.W. Portland 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #15 in digest
> Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 18:11:39 -0800
> From: Mike Patterson 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 
> There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
> tenable.
> 
> Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
> it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
> a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
> opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
> change their opinions and follow the majority.
> 
> Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
> detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.
> 
> I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
> have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
> show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
> anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
> on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
> is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
> Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).
> 
> However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
> definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
> photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
> this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
> dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.
> 
> The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
> OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
> misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
> a messy biological landscape...
> 
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Problem? what problem?
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #16 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Golden eagle and brant, Wahkiakum Co., WA
> From: Bob 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 18:35:17 -0800
> 
> Bit of a late post on the eagle. This morning a adult golden eagle was seen 
sitting in a field with atleast a dozen Bald eagles and numerous ravens along 
the Grays Harbor River ( i think). It was mile marker 16 on Hwy 4. 

> 
> Also about an hour ago i had 21 black brant on the Columbia River about 4 
miles from the Cowlitz County line along Hwy 4. 

> 
> There are thousands of gulls all along the river in both Wahkiakum and 
Cowlitz Co's. I did not have the time to stop and check them out. 

> 
> Bob Flores
> Ridgefield, WA
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #17 in digest
> From: "Don" 
> Subject: [obol] Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Oregon 
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:38:50 -0800
> 
> Friends of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Complex is holding a Bird
> Photography Workshop.
>  
> 
> Award-winning Photographer Paul Bannick will be leading this workshop April
> 11 from 7am to noon.
> 
>  
> 
> Topics that will be covered include:
> 
> q  Getting the best bird photographs at lowest cost and 
> 
>                 with the least technical variables
> 
> q     Pros and cons of different shooting modes
> 
> q     Exposure compensation
> 
> q     Depth of field
> 
> q     Shutter speed and ISO
> 
> q  Flash (when to use)
> 
> q  Finding birds
> 
> q  Getting closer to birds
> 
> q  In the field assistance in image making
> 
> q  Ethics of Photographing
> 
>  
> 
> The site will be nearby to the Sherwood, Oregon, location of the Tualatin
> River NWR. 
> 
> Exact details will be sent to registered participants.
> 
> More details are available on the Friend's website at
> http://www.friendsoftualatinrefuge.org/photosociety
> 
> There is a small fee and attendance is limited.
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #18 in digest
> Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 04:39:15 +0000 (UTC)
> From: "Richard W. Musser"  (Redacted sender 
"mussermcevoy AT yahoo.com" for DMARC) 

> Subject: [obol] Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
> 
> Hi Mike, I agree with your fundamental assumption, and as far as I'm 
concerned, it's tenable. This is my view---IDing Red-tailed hawks, as to 
subspecies, is terribly difficult, and it's not worth it to me to put up much 
of an argument as to subspecies---because the itself species is so varied. We 
would not be having this discussion if the species were a N. Goshawk, a 
Harris's hawk, or a Ferruginous hawk. These three species are narrowly defined, 
within each, there isn't much variability. Have any of you observed adult 
Harris's hawks? I'll tell you---every one looks the same----and falconers 
sometimes refer to them as ,"clones." I view these clearly defined species as, 
"well settled." This is not the case with Buteo jamaicensis (Red-tailed 
hawks)---and the bird books reflect this with extra pages of subspecies 
description. As far as I'm concerned, our RTs are more settled in the east, and 
become more confused as we go west. Still, even in the east, there are some 
huge 

> size differences within RTs---but in coloration, the easterns look alike. 
It's difficult for me to accept a definition of a subspecies (Harlan's RTs) 
that is so broad----that it's possible that none of the individuals look alike! 
When I think of this likely hood, (which from the photos seems great)---I 
wonder, how can we have a subspecies, or even a species, where all the 
individuals look considerably different? Red-tails are a complex species, and 
are ripe for DNA illumination. After this is figured out, our Swainson's hawks 
and Roughlegged hawks, are just about as confused, and need similar untangling. 
In defense of the guys that discuss this subject intently, they are making an 
effort to explain generally accepted subspecies descriptions (Kriders vs 
Harlans) vs dark western RT)----but there is lots of overlap. And this is why I 
view your fundamental assumption, as tenable. I hope you're well. Best regards, 
Dick Musser (4mi. NW of Vale) 

>      
>  
> On Monday, March 2, 2015 7:11 PM, Mike Patterson  wrote: 

>    
> 
>  There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
> tenable.
> 
> Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
> it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
> a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
> opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
> change their opinions and follow the majority.
> 
> Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
> detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.
> 
> I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
> have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
> show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
> anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
> on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
> is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
> Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).
> 
> However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
> definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
> photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
> this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
> dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.
> 
> The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
> OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
> misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
> a messy biological landscape...
> 
> 
> -- 
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Problem? what problem?
> http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p&67
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
>    
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Msg: #19 in digest
> Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:12:23 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker
> From: Jim Leonard 
> 
> This Incredible Photo Of A Baby Weasel Riding A Woodpecker Is Straight Out
> Of A Children's Fantasy Book http://bzfd.it/1FPdHVu  Happy Birding, Jim
> Leonard.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of obol Digest V4 #65
> *************************
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: March 2 - Lane Co: Tundra Swans and Greater White-fronted Geese
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 23:18:51 -0800
Today around mid-day there were approximately 20 Greater White-fronted Geese
and between 300-600 Tundra Swans out in a grass seed field along the north
side of Meadowview Rd., and west of its intersection with Green Hill Rd.
This spot is just north and slightly east of the Eugene Airport and to the
west of Hwy. 99.

I've never seen such a large flock of swans in this part of the valley
before.

Good birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: Fern Ridge/Royal Ave. Snowy Owl not seen Monday March 2, 2015
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 23:07:46 -0800
I'll have the raptor route (Lane #1) numbers tomorrow, but I wanted to
relate this bit of news today. Typically we can see the Snowy Owl from at
least one of three vantage points when completing our raptor route.  The
water level at Fern Ridge is very high with very little mud and virtually no
stumps visible (the exception being a few at the SW corner and along the
western edge just north of the Fern Ridge Shores Marina on Jeans Rd.).  We
saw no shorebirds along the reservoir's edge. We did NOT see the Snowy Owl
today either. A birder from Sacramento, CA was visiting friends/relatives in
Eugene and was looking for it.  We left as she started the hike out to the
end of Royal Ave. We do not know if she saw the bird.  

Good Birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: Pleasures of Unknown Hawk
From: Frank Kolwicz <kolwicz AT minetfiber.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 23:02:57 -0800
Alan,

If it's the dark-morph Red-tail you're asking about, I haven't seen it 
in the last few days - at least a couple of days before seeing you at 
the narrows. I go up Livermore and back every day at various times 
visiting my bird feeding stations and looking for new little beasties to 
photograph and have been checking for it.

Frank
in Monmouth


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Sunday March 1 - Linn County Pine Grosbeaks
From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager AT nu-world.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 23:01:02 -0800
Obolinks,

Anne and I also drove to the PCT at the Santiam Pass on Sunday. We got there
a little after 12 noon and walked up the trail where we encountered one Paul
Sullivan. We then continued on for a few more minutes and found the flock in
a little "swale" off to the west of the trail (maybe 100 meters north of the
Mt. Jefferson Wilderness sign). We didn't count the flock, but guessed maybe
20 were in it. They were feeding on the Bear Grass seed heads that were
still standing vertical and full of seeds. There was approximately 6-8
inches of snow on the ground. Beautiful birds:  Raspberries and Apricots.
As is typical for searches sometimes, when we got back to the car we saw two
grosbeaks sitting in the top of a fire-killed tree about 100 meters away to
the north.  It was a distant but identifiable view with bins. We were
watching and listening for woodpeckers in that area as well as in the
Hoodoo/Big Lake parking lots on the south side of Hwy. 20, but we did not
see or hear any.

We drove up the road to Foley Seed Orchard (back in Lane County and
approximately opposite the road to Belknap Crater) to see what we could see.
It was pretty quiet, but there were two ("courtin"?) Ruffed Grouse staring
at us from the grassy area inside the orchard and between the trees.  A pair
of American Dippers were paired up on Blue River just above where it empties
into Blue River Reservoir itself. That reservoir is down further than I have
ever seen it. It's going to be a dry summer I predict.

Good Birding,

Dan Heyerly, Eugene
Subject: Baby Weasel Riding a Woodpecker
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 21:12:23 -0800
This Incredible Photo Of A Baby Weasel Riding A Woodpecker Is Straight Out
Of A Children's Fantasy Book http://bzfd.it/1FPdHVu  Happy Birding, Jim
Leonard.
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 04:39:15 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Mike,     I agree with your fundamental assumption, and as far as I'm 
concerned, it's tenable. This is my view---IDing Red-tailed hawks, as to 
subspecies, is terribly difficult, and it's not worth it to me to put up much 
of an argument as to subspecies---because the itself species is so varied. We 
would not be having this discussion if the species were a N. Goshawk, a 
Harris's hawk, or a Ferruginous hawk. These three species are narrowly defined, 
within each, there isn't much variability. Have any of you observed adult 
Harris's hawks? I'll tell you---every one looks the same----and falconers 
sometimes refer to them as ,"clones." I view these clearly defined species as, 
"well settled." This is not the case with Buteo jamaicensis (Red-tailed 
hawks)---and the bird books reflect this with extra pages of subspecies 
description. As far as I'm concerned, our RTs are more settled in the east, and 
become more confused as we go west. Still, even in the east, there are some 
huge size differences within RTs---but in coloration, the easterns look alike. 
It's difficult for me to accept a definition of a subspecies (Harlan's RTs) 
that is so broad----that it's possible that none of the individuals look alike! 
When I think of this likely hood, (which from the photos seems great)---I 
wonder, how can we have a subspecies, or even a species, where all the 
individuals look considerably different? Red-tails are a complex species, and 
are ripe for DNA illumination. After this is figured out, our Swainson's hawks 
and Roughlegged hawks, are just about as confused, and need similar untangling. 
In defense of the guys that discuss this subject intently, they are making an 
effort to explain generally accepted subspecies descriptions (Kriders vs 
Harlans) vs dark western RT)----but there is lots of overlap. And this is why I 
view your fundamental assumption, as tenable. I hope you're well. Best regards, 
Dick Musser (4mi. NW of Vale) 

     
 

 On Monday, March 2, 2015 7:11 PM, Mike Patterson  wrote: 

   

 There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
tenable.

Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
change their opinions and follow the majority.

Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.

I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).

However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.

The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
a messy biological landscape...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org




   
Subject: Bird Photography Workshop April 11 at Sherwood, Oregon
From: "Don" <ac7zg AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 19:38:50 -0800
Friends of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Complex is holding a Bird
Photography Workshop.

 

Award-winning Photographer Paul Bannick will be leading this workshop April
11 from 7am to noon.

 

Topics that will be covered include:

q  Getting the best bird photographs at lowest cost and 

                with the least technical variables

q     Pros and cons of different shooting modes

q     Exposure compensation

q     Depth of field

q     Shutter speed and ISO

q  Flash (when to use)

q  Finding birds

q  Getting closer to birds

q  In the field assistance in image making

q  Ethics of Photographing

 

The site will be nearby to the Sherwood, Oregon, location of the Tualatin
River NWR. 

Exact details will be sent to registered participants.

More details are available on the Friend's website at
http://www.friendsoftualatinrefuge.org/photosociety

There is a small fee and attendance is limited.

 
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Species
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 18:11:39 -0800
There is a fundamental assumption at work here which is probably not
tenable.

Just because the majority opinion favors a certain ID doesn't mean
it's the right ID.  Just because a well respected individual favors
a certain ID doesn't make the ID correct.  And just because the trend in
opinion favors one ID, those who disagree are under no obligation to
change their opinions and follow the majority.

Your photo, while aesthetically well executed, does not provide enough
detail to satisfy everybody sufficiently for a unanimous opinion.

I, for example, am still not wholly convinced that the bird doesn't
have feathered tarsi.  On the other hand, the tail clearly does not
show the appropriate marks for a Rough-legged Hawk nor can I find
anything that would convince me that this is a Ferruginous Hawk.  Based
on what I can see (and assuming the apparent featheriness of the tarsi
is an artifact of the way the bird is sitting), I also lean toward
Dark-phase Western Red-tailed Hawk (not Harlan's).

However, I do not believe that any of us has any business being
definitive about this bird based on the information available in the
photos.  We simply cannot, in my opinion, resolve the identity of
this bird to a degree that justified any label other than probable
dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk of unknown type.

The notion that the collective (and undoubtedly brilliant) minds of
OBOL will always have an answer that is definitive and unequivocal is
misguided and doomed to disappoint those looking for absolutes in
a messy biological landscape...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: White-throated Sparrow (2) at Sauvie Island
From: George Neavoll <gneavoll AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 17:41:43 -0800
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (snappy white-striped form) seen by Sabin Belknap and me 
at former "Harris's Sparrow spot" on Rentenaar Road this afternoon (3/2/15). 
Another, less distinctly marked, also there, in large flock of mostly 
GOLDEN-CROWNED, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. Golden-crowned leucistic beauty doesn't 
show today. (It was there as recently as a week ago.) 


On mammal front, three COLUMBIAN WHITE-TAILED DEER at Ridgefield NWR this 
morning. 


George Neavoll
S.W. Portland 

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Subject: Photos of unknown Hawk
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:02:19 -0800
Earlier today I reposted unknown hawk photos I had previously posted.  I
had many different opinions on what type of Hawk it was including a
Harlan's.  I am now receiving emails that it's not a Harlan but a
dark-morph red-tailed.  It's confusing when you post an unknown species and
receive different opinions.  I have concluded that any hawk photos I post
in the future I will just call them hawks and let the OBOL readers decide
what they are.  I do appreciate everyone's input and thanks again, Jim
Leonard.
Subject: Great blue herons and the I-205 bridge over the Willamette River
From: Jeff Dillon <hirundorustica AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:41:52 -0800
Goat Island is located just down river from the I-205 bridge (across from the 
mouth of the Clackamas River) and it contains a sizable great blue heron 
rookery. You can see the rookery from the Maddox Woods trail on the west side 
of the river (good now because the trees have not leafed out yet). It is 
interesting to watch these herons and note where they are going / coming from. 
A number of these birds head southeast toward the Beavercreek area and others 
seem to focus on the Clackamas River drainage while others head up the 
Willamette River. Sometimes it can remind you of airplanes coming into the 
Portland airport - they seem to stagger their out-going or incoming flights 
between individual birds. 


Jeff Dillon
Gladstone, Oregon

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Subject: reL Great blue heron flight 205 bridge
From: Bonnie Comegys <blcomegys AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:38:10 -0800
some years ago, in late Feb. or so, was driving over the I205 bridge and
saw a large flock of very big birds, which as they passed over were to my
amazement Great blue herons. emailed Harry Nehls about it, and he said was
likely they were heading to a heron rookery, perhaps on Ross Island. never
have seen such a sight again, great timing

Bonnie Comegys
NE PortlandParkrose, Portland Oregon
blcomegys AT gmail.com
Subject: 60-90 Great Blue Herons in Flight - Portland
From: Michael Medina <802redwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:26:03 +0000
Today around 11 am, while driving over the l-205 bridge, I saw 60-90 great
blue herons in flight. Was driving in traffic, so count is inaccurate, but
I can't say I've ever seen this.

Michael Medina
Portland, OR
Subject: Re: dark 'tails
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 12:19:34 -0800
Lars,

Harlan's tails are highly variable.  Some have red, some don't.  They can be
black, brown, white, red and all combinations thereof.  Check out these from
William Clark's article in the January 2009 issue of birding.
http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p30.pdf and more here:
http://www.aba.org/birding/v41n1p36w1.pdf 

Tom 

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Lars Per Norgren
Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 10:32 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] dark 'tails

 I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These
rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter,
perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike
Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic
lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe
they're all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in
that illuminating posting of the past.  Lars

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Subject: dark 'tails
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:32:04 -0800
 I believe Harlan's Hawks have no red in the tail, white at the base? These 
rufous/brown/chestnut jobs are often common in Washington County in winter, 
perhaps less so in the bigger valley to the south of Tualatin. I recall Mike 
Denny reporting some years ago that they nest in ne BC, the sub-arctic 
lowlands. The ones I see seem a third smaller than pale 'tails. Maybe they're 
all males? But Mike Denny made some similar remark about size in that 
illuminating posting of the past. Lars 


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Subject: Pleasures of Unknown Hawk
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:01:38 -0800
Any chance it will fly away soon?  Just asking.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon


> 
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro AT pdx.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:53:33 -0800
I agree with Tom, that it is not a Harlan's but an unusual, dark Red-tail.
Nevertheless it would be very interesting to see Frank's photos, especially
the top of the tail.

Bob OBrien


On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 9:37 AM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:

> Jim,
>
> Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk.  It is not a Harlan’s Hawk.
> Dark-phase Harlan’s Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich
> rufous-brown.  Harlan’s Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on
> the head, throat and usually on the belly as well.  For a pair of excellent
> articles on Harlan’s Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine.
>
> http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf
>
> www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
> ********************
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> Behalf Of Jim Leonard
> Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
> To: obol
> Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
>
> I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
> input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
> online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
> Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
> were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
> Jim Leonard.
>
>
>
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 

>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:37:50 -0800
Jim,

Your hawk is a dark-phase Red-tailed Hawk. It is not a Harlan’s Hawk. 
Dark-phase Harlan’s Hawks are usually blackish in appearance, not a rich 
rufous-brown. Harlan’s Hawks have a variable amount of white streaking on the 
head, throat and usually on the belly as well. For a pair of excellent articles 
on Harlan’s Hawk ID check out the following from Birding magazine. 


http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf 

www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf 	

Tom Crabtree, Bend

********************
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Jim Leonard 

Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 5:21 AM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified

I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me. I had lots of input 
from OBOL members that was helpful. I also looked at a lot of photos online. I 
have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk 
photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd. These photos were taken 
in February. Click on link below to see photos. Happy Birding, Jim Leonard. 






https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 




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Subject: Talking Waters in Albany
From: "van der Horst" <kathyfrans AT opusnet.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 09:16:10 -0800
My husband and I spent a delightful Sunday morning at Talking Waters Gardens in 
Albany, finding close to 29 species of birds, including GREEN HERON, VIRGINIA 
RAIL (heard 2X), BLACK PHOEBE (heard both song and call, saw two flycatching 
over the wetlands), CINNAMON TEAL (2 pairs) and my FOY VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW. I 
followed this flying swallow until I was 90% sure it had large white saddle 
bags and a pale face. The MARSH WRENS were singing away in the wetlands, and we 
even spotted one gathering cattail fluff for a nest. A good place to spot 
elusive Marsh Wrens up close. Raptors included an AMERICAN KESTREL hunting from 
a bare tree, RED-TAILED HAWKS circling above. 


This season is probably prime time to get high bird species counts. A trail 
from the same parking lot goes into Simpson Park and runs along the Willamette 
River. We didn’t walk there, but the edge of the woods was birdy, including a 
singing BROWN CREEPER. There are directions to the place at the end of this 
article. Dogs are allowed on leash. 



http://www.oregonlive.com/travel/index.ssf/2014/08/tumbling_waters_at_albany_crea.html 


Kathy van der Horst
Portland, OR
Subject: Willows
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Mar 2015 08:55:55 -0800
I celebrate the early spring by celebrating one of my favorite
riparian shrubs.

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: Photos: Unknown Hawk Identified
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 05:21:14 -0800
I recently posted some photos of an unknown hawk to me.  I had lots of
input from OBOL members that was helpful.  I also looked at a lot of photos
online.  I have concluded that the hawk is a Harlan's dark-morph Red-tailed
Hawk photographed at Baskett Slough NWR along Livermore Rd.  These photos
were taken in February.  Click on link below to see photos.  Happy Birding,
Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/UnknownHawkBaskett22415?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJmygrjfl6y3yQE&feat=directlink 
Subject: Lincoln County today
From: Christopher Hinkle <christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:15:14 -0800
Adrian, our parents and I headed to Newport this morning for a bright sunny
day on the coast. Yaquina Head produced the Burrowing Owl perched in its
usual spot, looking cute. Lots of Black Scoters, looking north from the
lighthouse, and some porpoises offshore. At Ona Beach we were surprised to
find an imm. Golden Eagle circling overhead before flying east. It must be
a pretty good bird for the central coast. We had only a few minutes at
Hatfield Marine Science Center and could not find the Palm Warblers or
anything else of note.

Good birding,

Christopher Hinkle
Subject: Re: quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner....
From: Susan Deagle <sdeagle AT mac.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 21:34:26 -0800
One of my top five favorite birds!
This is a female…she’s got the pretty rusty red band that the male lacks. 
Isn’t she beautiful? 

She got my vote!
Susie Deagle



> On Mar 1, 2015, at 8:35 PM, Stephanie Hazen  
wrote: 

> 
> http://www.orbirds.org/index.html 
> 
> OK, photo fans, quiz for the day…what is the sex of bird in
> the winning photo in the February OBA photo contest?
> 
> Click on link above to see the great photo of a belted
> kingfisher submitted by Doug Beall.
> 
> I asked Doug to tell us more about how he got the shot,
> and here is what he wrote:
> 
>> "Kingfishers are a very wary bird that usually takes off quickly
>> when any human movement is occurring within 60 yards.
>> The unique colours, behaviors and feeding habits have always
>> fascinated me and I have spent many hours observing and attempting
>> to obtain a quality photograph. I finally found several birds that are
>> less wary and they fish near a highway at the coast and allowed me
>> to set up with proper lighting and distance which I obtain began
>> approaching verrrrrry slowwwwly [50']. The bird sporadically yammered
>> at me but allowed the tripod and the Canon 1D MK IV- 500mm+1.4 lens to 
remain. 

>> Photo taken Feb. 4pm slightly overcast.”
> 
> See Doug’s website at:
>> 
>> http://abirdsingsbecauseithasasong.com/recent-journeys 
 

> 
> 
> Cheers!
> 
> Stephanie
> 
Subject: quiz for the day and and interview with this month's OBA photo contest winner....
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 20:35:24 -0800
http://www.orbirds.org/index.html 

OK, photo fans, quiz for the day…what is the sex of bird in
the winning photo in the February OBA photo contest?

Click on link above to see the great photo of a belted
kingfisher submitted by Doug Beall.

I asked Doug to tell us more about how he got the shot,
and here is what he wrote:

> "Kingfishers are a very wary bird that usually takes off quickly
> when any human movement is occurring within 60 yards.
> The unique colours, behaviors and feeding habits have always
> fascinated me and I have spent many hours observing and attempting
> to obtain a quality photograph. I finally found several birds that are
> less wary and they fish near a highway at the coast and allowed me
> to set up with proper lighting and distance which I obtain began
> approaching verrrrrry slowwwwly [50']. The bird sporadically yammered
> at me but allowed the tripod and the Canon 1D MK IV- 500mm+1.4 lens to 
remain. 

> Photo taken Feb. 4pm slightly overcast.”

See Doug’s website at:
> 
> http://abirdsingsbecauseithasasong.com/recent-journeys 
 



Cheers!

Stephanie
Subject: Tuesday, March 3rd, is Birders Night
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 19:19:54 -0800
…….. 7:00 pm, Portland Audubon House, 5151 NW Cornell Road. Free! Bring 
your bird photos and videos, or come to see what others bring. Potpourri. Easy 
bird quiz ……… 


oschmidt AT att.net
Sunday, March 1, 2015




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Subject: ASHLAND DIPPER UPDATE
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:58:51 -0800
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/ashland-dipper-update/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Curry CA Towhee et al.
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 18:54:45 -0800
We are seeing both green and rufous backed male Selasphorus in our yard 
this past week, north of Bandon, Coos Co.

Saw a TURKEY VULTURE over our house for the first of spring, and one in 
Bandon today.

cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Bandon OR

On 3/1/2015 5:29 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>
>
> On the way home I stopped at Knute Andersson's place which is a few 
> miles SW of Langlois, Curry.  He had an all green-backed male 
> Selaphorus Hummer at his feeder that did an Allen's type display so I 
> would guess it was an ALLEN'S HUMMER!
>
> Merry migration indeed!!!!!!!!!
> Tim Rodenkirk
> back in Coos Bay



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Subject: Curry CA Towhee et al.
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:29:32 -0800
I will start with Saturday's Cape Arago Audubon trip around Coos Bay, there
were 10 of us and the weather was sunny and a bit cool:

No Harris's Sparrow in Eastside

The female BULLOCK'S ORIOLE was still at Bob Fields feeders in Coos Bay.
Also saw an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER coming to one of his suet feeders and
several BAND-TAILED PIGEONS. He has a very birdy yard and lots of feeders.

The adult male HOODED ORIOLE was an immediate show at Barb Griffin's in
North Bend.  Heard it was there again today.  No Tennesse anymore as
previously reported.

We ran out of time and it got real windy so we didn't go to Lakeside to
look for the Rusty Blackbird.

I then headed south. Stopped at New River and saw two male Selasphorus with
partially green backs. One did an Allen's type display.  I suspect both
were hybrids.

Later in the day in Ophir, Curry I saw 17 Greater White-fronted Geese.

Camped in an undisclosed location on the Siskiyou NF last night east of
Gold Beach.  Got down to 26F. This morning before dawn I heard a Western
Screech-owl and a Northern Spotted Owl.  Neither bird was solicited making
hearing them all the more cool.

I then drove to Harbor- near Brookings.  I arrived near the boat ramp
around 8AM and heard the metallic chink note of what sure sounded like a CA
TOWHEE almost immediately.  I forgot my iPod so i just pished and pished. I
heard several more call notes in about the first half hour but could NOT
see the bird. After a while it quit calling.  I came back around noon and
heard nada.  I think there is indeed a CA Towhee here. Ken Burton never
actually saw it either but he heard a full song as well as call notes, that
was on the 12th of Feb. Oh, neither Don Munson or Jim Rogers has seen this
species in Curry.  The checklist shows three previous records.  Don said
they are all from the '94 list and neither him nor Jim know any details on
these old records?

I took a jog along Oceanview Drive and found a SAY'S PHOEBE on the east
side of the road at the two houses just south of the red colored storage
building place.

On the way home I stopped at Knute Andersson's place which is a few miles
SW of Langlois, Curry.  He had an all green-backed male Selaphorus Hummer
at his feeder that did an Allen's type display so I would guess it was an
ALLEN'S HUMMER!

Merry migration indeed!!!!!!!!!
Tim Rodenkirk
back in Coos Bay
Subject: rufous hummingbird Portland on NW Skyline
From: Mark H <scuff02 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 16:31:56 -0800
Just an hour ago, our first male rufous landed and few for a while on NW
Skyline near Germantown (elev 1100)

Weve been feeding them for 15 years, and this is within just a few days of
past year first arrivals.

Mark Huffaker
Portland, OR



Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 16:12:40 -0800
Thanks Tom ... I too was wondering what the answer was to Craig's question as 
to why this wouldn't be considered a Krider's ... I've never seen a Krider's 
and really appreciate learning ... your points were all educational for me ... 
Thanks. 


Lyn




On Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:48:03 -0800
"Tom Crabtree"  wrote:

> Craig & Richard, 
> 
>  
> 
> Hopefully Brian will reply to this as he is one of the experts in the
> field.  I would say it isn’t Krider’s because of these factors:
> 
>  
> 
> 1.       Range, as mentioned by Richard, Krider’s don’t occur this
> far west (weakest of the arguments, to be sure); Liguori & Sullivan’s
> article in the March 2010 Birding says there are no documented
> records west of the Rockies.
> 
> 2.       The underparts are too white; Krider’s should show a lot of
> buffy coloration
> 
> 3.       The tail appears to be too red.  Krider’s are mostly white.  
> 
> 4.       Adult male Krider’s (as this appears to be in age) show a
> dark malar region.  This bird’s is white with a few dusky streaks
> 
> 5.       Krider’s should show a well-defined sub-terminal band on the
> tail.  
> 
>  
> 
> One other point is that Krider’s taxonomic status is unclear.  Some
> consider it a subspecies while others believe it is a pale extreme of
> the borealis subspecies.
> 
>  
> 
> Tom Crabtree
> 
>  
> 
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> Behalf Of Craig Miller Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 10:59 AM
> To: Richard W. Musser
> Cc: tom crabtree; Charles Gates; obol; Brian Sullivan
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
> 
>  
> 
> Hi Richard,
> 
>  
> 
> All your points are well-taken, and I pretty much agree with
> everything you say. However, the what I was wondering (and seems to
> be missed, or am I missing something?) is if we do take the edgy step
> of conjecturing, why doesn't this bird fit Krider's better than
> Harlan's? 
> 
>  
> 
> Craig
> 
> 
Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
www.NorthwestJourney.com
www.NorthwestBirding.com
www.ColumbiaRiverImages.com


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Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:48:03 -0800
Craig & Richard, 

 

Hopefully Brian will reply to this as he is one of the experts in the field. I 
would say it isn’t Krider’s because of these factors: 


 

1. Range, as mentioned by Richard, Krider’s don’t occur this far west 
(weakest of the arguments, to be sure); Liguori & Sullivan’s article in the 
March 2010 Birding says there are no documented records west of the Rockies. 


2. The underparts are too white; Krider’s should show a lot of buffy 
coloration 


3.       The tail appears to be too red.  Krider’s are mostly white.  

4. Adult male Krider’s (as this appears to be in age) show a dark malar 
region. This bird’s is white with a few dusky streaks 


5.       Krider’s should show a well-defined sub-terminal band on the tail.  

 

One other point is that Krider’s taxonomic status is unclear. Some consider 
it a subspecies while others believe it is a pale extreme of the borealis 
subspecies. 


 

Tom Crabtree

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Craig Miller 

Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2015 10:59 AM
To: Richard W. Musser
Cc: tom crabtree; Charles Gates; obol; Brian Sullivan
Subject: [obol] Re: Pale Red-tail in CO

 

Hi Richard,

 

All your points are well-taken, and I pretty much agree with everything you 
say. However, the what I was wondering (and seems to be missed, or am I missing 
something?) is if we do take the edgy step of conjecturing, why doesn't this 
bird fit Krider's better than Harlan's? 


 

Craig

 

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Richard W. Musser  
wrote: 


Hi Craig,

 I think we can call this a red-tailed hawk, but assigning a subspecies 
designation to migratory RTs, is simply a guess (we have no way to prove this 
one way or another). I know birders that are looking for photos of various odd 
appearing RTs with assigned subspecies---and then comparing the pictures. But 
my point is: There isn't a way (at present) to clearly define what a Harlans Rt 
really is. When we define a bird species (or subspecies), it seems to me that 
we are looking for aspects that are the same; but harlan's tails are all 
different, as is much of their other feathering. So exactly where do these 
harlans originate? When I think back to the article with all of the oddly 
appearing, "Harlans tails"----I realized that with all of my, "raptor looking" 
experience in Alaska for over 25 years, I was never able to locate a nesting 
pair of harlan's red-tails. Some of these raptor research scientists have 
documented these "odd tailed harlans" moving into Alaska on spring migration 
(and I too have seen this at the same location)----but as far as I know, the 
exact region of their nesting isn't completely known. 


 Many of our raptor species are much more narrowly defined---our Harris's hawk, 
prairie falcon, NA goshawk, and Ferruginous Hawk (for example) show little 
variation----but our red-tailed hawks, Swainson's hawks, and roughlegged hawks 
are buteos that are still very confused. It may be that Rts are composed of two 
or three different species that can interbreed----but have only been doing this 
for a relatively short time period. Humans have altered the landscape of North 
America from the time that seeds were brought here by Columbus, and later when 
we cut down much of the forest east of the Mississippi---and doing this may 
have opened pockets of isolated buteo species, or altered food supplies. 
Red-tailed hawks also show great variation in size and weight, and I clearly 
recall trapping a "butterball fat" adult male Rt that weighed only 28 oz., and 
later that week, at the same location, capturing a large female at 66 oz. Both 
of these individuals looked like "classic" adult red-tailed hawks----but with 
such a large disparity in size, it is very unlikely that they would pursue the 
same sort of quarry. So how alike are they? Do these little males breed with 
these huge females? 


 An avenue that is open to explore the Harlans Rt----is to obtain photos of 
adults with young---and then to moult a few of those youngsters---to see how 
they appear. It may be possible that these photos already exist from falconers 
taking this raptor within Alaska and Canada---but I have no firsthand knowledge 
of this, and only suggest it as a method. 


 I commend all of those that are trying to figure out this confusion, but it 
may take DNA analysis for scientists to untangle Bueto Jamaicensis. Best 
regards, Dick Musser (4 mi. NW of Vale) 


 

On Saturday, February 28, 2015 10:59 PM, Craig Miller  
wrote: 


 

Why isn't this a Krider's?

 

Craig Miller

 

On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 3:31 PM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:

Chuck,

It would be nice to have better shots of the tail, but it is either a light 
phase Harlan's Hawk or a leucistic Red-tail. It looks an awful lot like a 
white-headed, light-phase Harlan's in an article by Brian Sullivan (who I hope 
will comment on this) and Jerry Liguori in the March 2010 Birding. 
http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf This is whiter than the Harlan's I have 
seen but I think it still in in the range of that race. 


Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Charles Gates 

Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:19 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Pale Red-tail in CO

I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please feel 
free to comment. The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the location is just 
NW of Redmond, Oregon. The date was 2/23/15. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/124095129 AT N06/16673978732



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org



 

 

 
Subject: FOS Rufous Hummingbird -Silverton Area
From: John Thomas <johnpam AT mtangel.net>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:45:17 -0800
Male Rufous just showed at feeder on east side of kitchen. About two weeks 
early...though at least one has popped up in February in past years. 


John & Pam
5 mi NE of Silverton

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Subject: Yard Owling in Silverton hills
From: roger freeman <carrotguy55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:06:53 -0800
Currently, in mid afternoon (2-3pm) while I sit in my yard enjoying the
Chickadees and RB Nuthatches foraging on the suet feeder about ten feet
from me, a Northern Pygmy Owl is proudly tooting away some 100 yards away
in Doug Fir timber.
Along with the Great Horned Owl pair calling last night, the Western
Screech Owl softly calling Friday night and a Northern Saw-whet Owl calling
for a few nights a couple of weeks ago,  it has been an enjoyable
owl nesting season this far.

Roger Freeman
3 miles SW of Silverton
Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:29:56 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Craig,     Your question as to why this bird should be called a Krider's 
RT or a Harlans RT, pretty much makes my point. 

     As far as I can tell, Kirder's RTs never wander so far west, but both 
occur together during migration on our southern plains. It is my guess that 
when these two subspecies migrate during Spring migration, the harlans take a 
more westerly route, while the Kriders move north-----so their nesting grounds 
would be separate. I stress that this is a guess. Those guys that have studied 
these birds a lot more than I have, readily admit that attributing an 
individual to a certain RT subspecies----is sometimes not possible. I question 
the value of doing this on migration (which RT subspecies is it?), but other 
measurements (other than visual look-a-likes) are invasive, expensive, and time 
consuming. 

     I think it's okay for us to struggle with all bird science, and 
particularly subspecies questions, because it's birders with their cameras, out 
in the field, that are documenting the individuals that ultimately moves are 
science forward. All of you that take photos and post them, will, in the end, 
help clarify birds in general---we just don't know which of our contributions 
will be important. We really are, when taken as a whole, "citizen 
scientists."     I know I haven't answered your question very well, but 
have rather provided a partial explanation. Anyway, Best regards, Dick Musser 
(4 mi. NW of Vale) 

 

 On Sunday, March 1, 2015 11:59 AM, Craig Miller  wrote: 

   

 Hi Richard,
All your points are well-taken, and I pretty much agree with everything you 
say. However, the what I was wondering (and seems to be missed, or am I 
missing something?) is if we do take the edgy step of conjecturing, why 
doesn't this bird fit Krider's better than Harlan's? 

Craig
On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Richard W. Musser  
wrote: 


Hi Craig,     I think we can call this a red-tailed hawk, but assigning a 
subspecies designation to migratory RTs, is simply a guess (we have no way to 
prove this one way or another). I know birders that are looking for photos of 
various odd appearing RTs with assigned subspecies---and then comparing the 
pictures. But my point is: There isn't a way (at present) to clearly define 
what a Harlans Rt really is. When we define a bird species (or subspecies), it 
seems to me that we are looking for aspects that are the same; but harlan's 
tails are all different, as is much of their other feathering. So exactly where 
do these harlans originate? When I think back to the article with all of the 
oddly appearing, "Harlans tails"----I realized that with all of my, "raptor 
looking" experience in Alaska for over 25 years, I was never able to locate a 
nesting pair of harlan's red-tails. Some of these raptor research scientists 
have documented these "odd tailed harlans" moving into Alaska on spring 
migration (and I too have seen this at the same location)----but as far as I 
know, the exact region of their nesting isn't completely known. 

     Many of our raptor species are much more narrowly defined---our 
Harris's hawk, prairie falcon, NA goshawk, and Ferruginous Hawk (for example) 
show little variation----but our red-tailed hawks, Swainson's hawks, and 
roughlegged hawks are buteos that are still very confused. It may be that Rts 
are composed of two or three different species that can interbreed----but have 
only been doing this for a relatively short time period. Humans have altered 
the landscape of North America from the time that seeds were brought here by 
Columbus, and later when we cut down much of the forest east of the 
Mississippi---and doing this may have opened pockets of isolated buteo species, 
or altered food supplies. Red-tailed hawks also show great variation in size 
and weight, and I clearly recall trapping a "butterball fat" adult male Rt that 
weighed only 28 oz., and later that week, at the same location, capturing a 
large female at 66 oz. Both of these individuals looked like "classic" adult 
red-tailed hawks----but with such a large disparity in size, it is very 
unlikely that they would pursue the same sort of quarry. So how alike are they? 
Do these little males breed with these huge females?     An avenue that is 
open to explore the Harlans Rt----is to obtain photos of adults with 
young---and then to moult a few of those youngsters---to see how they appear. 
It may be possible that these photos already exist from falconers taking this 
raptor within Alaska and Canada---but I have no firsthand knowledge of this, 
and only suggest it as a method. 

     I commend all of those that are trying to figure out this confusion, 
but it may take DNA analysis for scientists to untangle Bueto Jamaicensis. Best 
regards, Dick Musser (4 mi. NW of Vale) 

 

 On Saturday, February 28, 2015 10:59 PM, Craig Miller  
wrote: 

   

 Why isn't this a Krider's?
Craig Miller
On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 3:31 PM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:

Chuck,

It would be nice to have better shots of the tail, but it is either a light 
phase Harlan's Hawk or a leucistic Red-tail.  It looks an awful lot like a 
white-headed, light-phase Harlan's in an article by Brian Sullivan (who I hope 
will comment on this) and Jerry Liguori in the March 2010 Birding.  
http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf  This is whiter than the Harlan's I 
have seen but I think it still in in the range of that race. 


Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Charles Gates 

Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:19 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Pale Red-tail in CO

I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please feel 
free to comment.  The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the location is just 
NW of Redmond, Oregon.  The date was 2/23/15. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/124095129 AT N06/16673978732



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Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org






    



   
Subject: Re: "Yellow"-shafted Flicker was an intergrade, not Yellow-sh.
From: Jamie Simmons <sapsuckers AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:57:03 -0800
Lars and all,

Lars, the Yellow-shafted Flicker you reported in December (12/8 on OBOL)
you described as having "all the marks of that subspecies but the
mustachial streak, which was red." That makes it not a Yellow-shafted, but
rather an intergrade Northern Flicker since it had characteristics of both
Red-shafted and Yellow-shafted forms.

Intergrade Northern Flickers are regularly found in Oregon, especially in
winter.
Apparent pure Yellow-shafted forms are seen too, but much less frequently.

Jamie Simmons
Corvallis

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 10:25 AM, Lars Per Norgren 
wrote:

> Last November I saw a flicker on the dead end part of VanBuren, west of
> 35th St in Corvallis. It had all the field marks of a Yellow-shafted
> Flicker but the black mustache. I saw it daily for a few weeks. A flicker
> just took off from the neighbor's fence and it had yellow under-wings. Of
> course I can't say for sure it's the same bird. The sapsucker I  saw last
> November never made a second appearance. I heard a Rufous Hummingbird here
> on Feb 27. Surely on the early side for Corvallis.  Lars
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Linn - Pine Grosbeaks & BB Woodpecker
From: Luke Ferrenburg <lukeferrenburg AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 12:56:38 -0800
Kelsey and I drove to the section of the PCT that the Pine Grosbeaks were seen, 
we found a large flock of 29 of them and as a bonus got a decent look at a 
black-backed woodpecker, one of the best days of birding I've had in awhile! 


-Luke Ferrenburg, Kelsey O'Sullivan

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: Craig Miller <gismiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:58:39 -0800
Hi Richard,

All your points are well-taken, and I pretty much agree with everything you
say. However, the what I was wondering (and seems to be missed, or am I
missing something?) is if we do take the edgy step of conjecturing, why
doesn't this bird fit Krider's better than Harlan's?

Craig

On Sun, Mar 1, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Richard W. Musser 
wrote:

> Hi Craig,
>      I think we can call this a red-tailed hawk, but assigning a
> subspecies designation to migratory RTs, is simply a guess (we have no way
> to prove this one way or another). I know birders that are looking for
> photos of various odd appearing RTs with assigned subspecies---and then
> comparing the pictures. But my point is: There isn't a way (at present) to
> clearly define what a Harlans Rt really is. When we define a bird species
> (or subspecies), it seems to me that we are looking for aspects that are
> the same; but harlan's tails are all different, as is much of their other
> feathering. So exactly where do these harlans originate? When I think back
> to the article with all of the oddly appearing, "Harlans tails"----I
> realized that with all of my, "raptor looking" experience in Alaska for
> over 25 years, I was never able to locate a nesting pair of harlan's
> red-tails. Some of these raptor research scientists have documented these
> "odd tailed harlans" moving into Alaska on spring migration (and I too have
> seen this at the same location)----but as far as I know, the exact region
> of their nesting isn't completely known.
>      Many of our raptor species are much more narrowly defined---our
> Harris's hawk, prairie falcon, NA goshawk, and Ferruginous Hawk (for
> example) show little variation----but our red-tailed hawks, Swainson's
> hawks, and roughlegged hawks are buteos that are still very confused. It
> may be that Rts are composed of two or three different species that can
> interbreed----but have only been doing this for a relatively short time
> period. Humans have altered the landscape of North America from the time
> that seeds were brought here by Columbus, and later when we cut down much
> of the forest east of the Mississippi---and doing this may have opened
> pockets of isolated buteo species, or altered food supplies. Red-tailed
> hawks also show great variation in size and weight, and I clearly recall
> trapping a "butterball fat" adult male Rt that weighed only 28 oz., and
> later that week, at the same location, capturing a large female at 66 oz.
> Both of these individuals looked like "classic" adult red-tailed
> hawks----but with such a large disparity in size, it is very unlikely that
> they would pursue the same sort of quarry. So how alike are they? Do these
> little males breed with these huge females?
>      An avenue that is open to explore the Harlans Rt----is to obtain
> photos of adults with young---and then to moult a few of those
> youngsters---to see how they appear. It may be possible that these photos
> already exist from falconers taking this raptor within Alaska and
> Canada---but I have no firsthand knowledge of this, and only suggest it as
> a method.
>      I commend all of those that are trying to figure out this confusion,
> but it may take DNA analysis for scientists to untangle Bueto Jamaicensis.
> Best regards, Dick Musser (4 mi. NW of Vale)
>
>
>   On Saturday, February 28, 2015 10:59 PM, Craig Miller <
> gismiller AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> Why isn't this a Krider's?
>
> Craig Miller
>
> On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 3:31 PM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:
>
> Chuck,
>
> It would be nice to have better shots of the tail, but it is either a
> light phase Harlan's Hawk or a leucistic Red-tail.  It looks an awful lot
> like a white-headed, light-phase Harlan's in an article by Brian Sullivan
> (who I hope will comment on this) and Jerry Liguori in the March 2010
> Birding.  http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf  This is whiter than
> the Harlan's I have seen but I think it still in in the range of that race.
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> Behalf Of Charles Gates
> Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:19 PM
> To: obol
> Subject: [obol] Pale Red-tail in CO
>
> I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please
> feel free to comment.  The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the location
> is just NW of Redmond, Oregon.  The date was 2/23/15.
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/124095129 AT N06/16673978732
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: "Yellow"-shafted Flicker continues in west Corvallis
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:25:03 -0800
Last November I saw a flicker on the dead end part of VanBuren, west of 35th St 
in Corvallis. It had all the field marks of a Yellow-shafted Flicker but the 
black mustache. I saw it daily for a few weeks. A flicker just took off from 
the neighbor's fence and it had yellow under-wings. Of course I can't say for 
sure it's the same bird. The sapsucker I saw last November never made a second 
appearance. I heard a Rufous Hummingbird here on Feb 27. Surely on the early 
side for Corvallis. Lars 


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Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:39:29 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Craig,     I think we can call this a red-tailed hawk, but assigning a 
subspecies designation to migratory RTs, is simply a guess (we have no way to 
prove this one way or another). I know birders that are looking for photos of 
various odd appearing RTs with assigned subspecies---and then comparing the 
pictures. But my point is: There isn't a way (at present) to clearly define 
what a Harlans Rt really is. When we define a bird species (or subspecies), it 
seems to me that we are looking for aspects that are the same; but harlan's 
tails are all different, as is much of their other feathering. So exactly where 
do these harlans originate? When I think back to the article with all of the 
oddly appearing, "Harlans tails"----I realized that with all of my, "raptor 
looking" experience in Alaska for over 25 years, I was never able to locate a 
nesting pair of harlan's red-tails. Some of these raptor research scientists 
have documented these "odd tailed harlans" moving into Alaska on spring 
migration (and I too have seen this at the same location)----but as far as I 
know, the exact region of their nesting isn't completely known. 

     Many of our raptor species are much more narrowly defined---our 
Harris's hawk, prairie falcon, NA goshawk, and Ferruginous Hawk (for example) 
show little variation----but our red-tailed hawks, Swainson's hawks, and 
roughlegged hawks are buteos that are still very confused. It may be that Rts 
are composed of two or three different species that can interbreed----but have 
only been doing this for a relatively short time period. Humans have altered 
the landscape of North America from the time that seeds were brought here by 
Columbus, and later when we cut down much of the forest east of the 
Mississippi---and doing this may have opened pockets of isolated buteo species, 
or altered food supplies. Red-tailed hawks also show great variation in size 
and weight, and I clearly recall trapping a "butterball fat" adult male Rt that 
weighed only 28 oz., and later that week, at the same location, capturing a 
large female at 66 oz. Both of these individuals looked like "classic" adult 
red-tailed hawks----but with such a large disparity in size, it is very 
unlikely that they would pursue the same sort of quarry. So how alike are they? 
Do these little males breed with these huge females?     An avenue that is 
open to explore the Harlans Rt----is to obtain photos of adults with 
young---and then to moult a few of those youngsters---to see how they appear. 
It may be possible that these photos already exist from falconers taking this 
raptor within Alaska and Canada---but I have no firsthand knowledge of this, 
and only suggest it as a method. 

     I commend all of those that are trying to figure out this confusion, 
but it may take DNA analysis for scientists to untangle Bueto Jamaicensis. Best 
regards, Dick Musser (4 mi. NW of Vale) 

 

 On Saturday, February 28, 2015 10:59 PM, Craig Miller  
wrote: 

   

 Why isn't this a Krider's?
Craig Miller
On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 3:31 PM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:

Chuck,

It would be nice to have better shots of the tail, but it is either a light 
phase Harlan's Hawk or a leucistic Red-tail.  It looks an awful lot like a 
white-headed, light-phase Harlan's in an article by Brian Sullivan (who I hope 
will comment on this) and Jerry Liguori in the March 2010 Birding.  
http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf  This is whiter than the Harlan's I 
have seen but I think it still in in the range of that race. 


Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Charles Gates 

Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:19 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Pale Red-tail in CO

I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please feel 
free to comment.  The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the location is just 
NW of Redmond, Oregon.  The date was 2/23/15. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/124095129 AT N06/16673978732



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org






   
Subject: Oregon's metro Dippers--a beginning of a catalog
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 09:00:29 -0800
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/metro-dippers/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: OREGON GREAT GRAYS GET A LITTLE NATIONAL PRESS
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 08:17:27 -0800
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/great-grays-get-a-little-national-press/ 


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: OBA February photo contest winner!
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:49:57 -0800
Hi, Obolites!

Click on the OBA website link to see the winning photo for 
last month’s photo contest!

http://www.orbirds.org 

You all have from now until March 14 to submit your entries
for this month’s contest.

One entry, taken of a wild bird in Oregon, any time from 
January 1 to March 14 2015.

You do not have to be an OBA member to submit.

Voting takes place through the same link from March 15 through 
March 31.

Cheers!

Stephanie Hazen
Subject: Re: Metropolitan Dippers
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:13:50 -0800
Folks,

I suspect we have not plumbed the depths of this question.

What about in the towns of Joseph, Enterprise, La Grande, Baker City, Elgin,
Oakridge, Idana, and others?

I've seen dippers at the bridge by the Grant County courthouse in Canyon
City -- and in metropolitan Marion Forks, too.  ;-)

Paul Sullivan

---------------------------
Another one is the town of Mitchell, along Bridge Creek in southern Wheeler
County. At least in the late 1990s & early 2000s.

Joel Geier

____________
Yes, they nest in the city limits of Bend and also Prineville.  Tom
Crabtree, Bend
-----------------
Dippers regularly breed under the walking bridge crossing the Deschutes
(below my house) here in Bend. I hear them every morning. Beats an alarm
clock.

 Steve Kornfeld 
------------------

Timber, on the Nehalem. - George Neavoll, S.W. Portland

------------------

From: Harry Fuller 
Subject: [obol] ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
Date: February 28, 2015 4:16:17 PM PST
To: OBOL 
Reply-To: atowhee AT gmail.com

https://atowhee.wordpress.com/...

Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting within
the city limits?  Bend?  Sisters?  Oakridge?

Harry Fuller




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Subject: Re: Metropolitan Dippers
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:13:50 -0800
Folks,

I suspect we have not plumbed the depths of this question.

What about in the towns of Joseph, Enterprise, La Grande, Baker City, Elgin,
Oakridge, Idana, and others?

I've seen dippers at the bridge by the Grant County courthouse in Canyon
City -- and in metropolitan Marion Forks, too.  ;-)

Paul Sullivan

---------------------------
Another one is the town of Mitchell, along Bridge Creek in southern Wheeler
County. At least in the late 1990s & early 2000s.

Joel Geier

____________
Yes, they nest in the city limits of Bend and also Prineville.  Tom
Crabtree, Bend
-----------------
Dippers regularly breed under the walking bridge crossing the Deschutes
(below my house) here in Bend. I hear them every morning. Beats an alarm
clock.

 Steve Kornfeld 
------------------

Timber, on the Nehalem. - George Neavoll, S.W. Portland

------------------

From: Harry Fuller 
Subject: [obol] ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
Date: February 28, 2015 4:16:17 PM PST
To: OBOL 
Reply-To: atowhee AT gmail.com

https://atowhee.wordpress.com/...

Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting within
the city limits?  Bend?  Sisters?  Oakridge?

Harry Fuller


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Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 06:31:13 -0800
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: March 1, 2015 6:11:08 AM PST

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Bean-Goose (2 Tillamook)
Ross's Goose (1 Benton)
Mallard (Northern) (1 Lincoln)
Blue-winged Teal (1 Clackamas)
Chukar (2 Klamath)
Western Sandpiper (1 Washington)
Short-eared Owl (2 Washington)
Say's Phoebe (1 Multnomah)
Tree Swallow (1 Umatilla)
Orange-crowned Warbler (1 Umatilla)
Pine Grosbeak (1 Linn)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Metropolitan Dippers
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 05:52:45 -0800
Another one is the town of Mitchell, along Bridge Creek in southern
Wheeler County. At least in the late 1990s & early 2000s.

Harry Fuller asked:
> Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting
> within the city limits?  Bend?  Sisters?  Oakridge?

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: Craig Miller <gismiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 21:59:30 -0800
Why isn't this a Krider's?

Craig Miller

On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 3:31 PM, Tom Crabtree  wrote:

> Chuck,
>
> It would be nice to have better shots of the tail, but it is either a
> light phase Harlan's Hawk or a leucistic Red-tail.  It looks an awful lot
> like a white-headed, light-phase Harlan's in an article by Brian Sullivan
> (who I hope will comment on this) and Jerry Liguori in the March 2010
> Birding.  http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf  This is whiter than
> the Harlan's I have seen but I think it still in in the range of that race.
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On
> Behalf Of Charles Gates
> Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:19 PM
> To: obol
> Subject: [obol] Pale Red-tail in CO
>
> I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please
> feel free to comment.  The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the location
> is just NW of Redmond, Oregon.  The date was 2/23/15.
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/124095129 AT N06/16673978732
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:21:38 -0800
Yes, they nest in the city limits of Bend and also Prineville.

 

Tom Crabtree, Bend

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of George Neavoll
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 5:09 PM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] Fwd: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA

 

Timber, on the Nehalem. - George Neavoll, S.W. Portland

 

Begin forwarded message:





From: Harry Fuller 

Subject: [obol] ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA

Date: February 28, 2015 4:16:17 PM PST

To: OBOL 

Reply-To: atowhee AT gmail.com

 

https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/02/28/hunting-dippers/

Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting within
the city limits?  Bend?  Sisters?  Oakridge?



-- 

Harry Fuller

author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: freewaybirding.com
 
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net  
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com  

 
Subject: Re: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker trees gone from Milne Rd, Washington County
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 03:13:42 +0000
Craig's description of the the Milne Rd. (at Vadis Rd.) Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker site is a bit understated. The lot has been absolutely scraped bare 
of vegetation and structures. There is nothing about the site in its current 
state that would give 

even the most optimistic birder reason to think about hitting the brakes
 and stopping to have a look. It is all GONE! I imagine driving by this site in 
future years, pointing at it and telling some new birder who isn't active now 
that a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker wintered "there" for two years running. That 
person will look at me as though I'm one taco short of a combination plate. 
Aside from the modest pile of debris that is currently burning and a bulldozer 
(Shawneen and I were there less than an hour ago), there is nothing to suggest 
that this property recently held a house, tall hedges, an old orchard and 
numerous large trees. 


On a brighter note, we enjoyed five Short-eared Owls at dusk tonight. They were 
widely scattered on both sides of Milne about one-third of mile south of Vadis 
Rd. Two birds stayed around the little nursery of saplings on the west side of 
the road. We arrived at about 5:45 and a couple of owls were already flying. We 
had them in almost constant view up until we left at about 6:15 or so. By then 
the light was pretty poor. 


We spent the day birding around Yamhill and Washington counties. The best 
birding was around Fernhill Wetlands, where we had a Snow Goose, at least 15 
Trumpeter Swans, a presumed Tundra Swan X Trumpeter Swan (I need to look at my 
photos) and a host of other waterfowl. I have been a bit skeptical about the 
major renovation at the wetlands, but after our visit today I'm a bit more 
optimistic. Shorebirding this spring ought to be pretty good so long as they 
keep the water levels somewhere close to where they are now. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR    

From: craig AT greatskua.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Yellow-bellied Sapsucker trees gone from Milne Rd, Washington 
County 

Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 18:09:55 -0700

This may be old news...
The trees around the abandoned house on Milne Road where the Washington County 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (YBSA) has been for the past two winters are gone. I 
visited Milne Road this afternoon on my way home from Hagg Lake in hopes of 
ticking YBSA for my year list only to find that the site has been cleared and 
the trees have been removed and burned (the debris piles were still smoldering 
mid-afternoon today). I didn't look for the sapsucker in the large trees around 
the house across the street. 

Hagg Lake was pretty quiet, with nothing unusual to report.
Craig TumerPortland



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Subject: Re: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
From: Steve Kornfeld <sbkornfeld AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:34:54 -0800
Dippers regularly breed under the walking bridge crossing the Deschutes (below 
my house) here in Bend. I hear them every morning. Beats an alarm clock. 

 
Steve Kornfeld
Bend
 
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:16:17 -0800
Subject: [obol] ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org

https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/02/28/hunting-dippers/

Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting within the 
city limits? Bend? Sisters? Oakridge? 

-- 
Harry Fullerauthor of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: freewaybirding.com
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com

 		 	   		  
Subject: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker trees gone from Milne Rd, Washington County
From: "Craig Tumer" <craig AT greatskua.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 18:09:55 -0700




Subject: Fwd: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
From: George Neavoll <gneavoll AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:08:35 -0800
Timber, on the Nehalem. - George Neavoll, S.W. Portland

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Harry Fuller 
> Subject: [obol] ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
> Date: February 28, 2015 4:16:17 PM PST
> To: OBOL 
> Reply-To: atowhee AT gmail.com
> 
> https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/02/28/hunting-dippers/
> 
> Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting within 
the city limits? Bend? Sisters? Oakridge? 

> 
> -- 
> Harry Fuller
> author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: freewaybirding.com
> Atowhee AT gmail
> http://www.towhee.net
> my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: ASHLAND; DIPPER NEST-BUILDING ON CAMERA
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:16:17 -0800
*https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/02/28/hunting-dippers/
*

*Obolers: anybody know of any other town or city with Dippers nesting
within the city limits?  Bend?  Sisters?  Oakridge?*

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:03:26 -0800
The Harlan's Hawk I was referencing in my prior email was featured in the web 
extra, not the main article. It is figure 2 in this link: 
http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p5w1harlans.pdf 


Tom Crabtree



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Subject: The Happiest Season of All
From: Diane Cavaness <scrapbird AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:03:39 -0800
Important signs that spring is coming to the south coast:

1. Lots of Turkey Vultures are back. I counted 23 today from Pistol River
to Gold Beach.

2. A few Tree Swallows were seen over the wet meadows in the Pistol River
valley.

3. The willows are leafing out and the daffodils are blooming.

4. The frog chorus is getting loud!

5. Song Sparrows are singing.

6. Tim Rodenkirk is signing his emails with "Merry Migration!"

Enjoy,
Diane Cavaness
Subject: Re: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:31:09 -0800
Chuck,

It would be nice to have better shots of the tail, but it is either a light 
phase Harlan's Hawk or a leucistic Red-tail. It looks an awful lot like a 
white-headed, light-phase Harlan's in an article by Brian Sullivan (who I hope 
will comment on this) and Jerry Liguori in the March 2010 Birding. 
http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n2p30.pdf This is whiter than the Harlan's I have 
seen but I think it still in in the range of that race. 


Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Charles Gates 

Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 12:19 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Pale Red-tail in CO

I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please feel 
free to comment. The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the location is just 
NW of Redmond, Oregon. The date was 2/23/15. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/124095129 AT N06/16673978732



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Subject: Pale Red-tail in CO
From: Charles Gates <cgates326 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:19:19 -0800
I'm going to post some links to some Red-tail photos I received. Please 
feel free to comment.  The photographer was Debbie Goodman and the 
location is just NW of Redmond, Oregon.  The date was 2/23/15.


Debbie's Hawk-4-1-1

Debbie's Hawk-1-3-2-2


-- 
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for 
sure that just ain't so. 

Mark Twain

Chuck Gates
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon
Oregon Birding Site Guide
www.birdingoregon.info



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