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Updated on Wednesday, August 20 at 12:08 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Aquatic Warbler,©Jan Wilczur

20 Aug Re: Migrating White-fronted Geese ["5hats AT peak.org" ]
19 Aug PHOTOS: Newport Old-tailed Duck, Lesser Yellowlegs, etc. [Mike Patterson ]
20 Aug Jackson Bottom shorebirds (Washington Co) [Stefan Schlick ]
19 Aug Photos: Baskett Slough NWR American Bittern, Killdeer, Least Sandpiper [Jim Leonard ]
19 Aug Migrating White-fronted Geese [Linda Gilbert ]
19 Aug Coos Birds 8/18-8/19/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
19 Aug FW: [RV Birds] Pine grossbeaks in Sky Lakes Wilderness [Russ Namitz ]
19 Aug Mary's Peak 8/19 Grouse/Yes [Lars Per Norgren ]
19 Aug Smart Jay [Kevin Smith ]
19 Aug Netarts pelicans [Stacy Strickland ]
18 Aug Rockaway Beach Shorebirds [Rhett Wilkins ]
18 Aug Long-tailed Duck at HMSC today []
18 Aug Re: Gray Fox stories [Roy Lowe ]
18 Aug Re: Mt. Hood - Glacier Shorebirding? [Alan Contreras ]
18 Aug Mt. Hood - Glacier Shorebirding? [Philip Kline ]
18 Aug Gray Fox stories ["Dennis Vroman" ]
18 Aug Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. ["L Markoff" ]
18 Aug Re: Saturday's BLACK STORM-PETREL off Newport [Russ Namitz ]
18 Aug Re: Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [Noah Strycker ]
18 Aug Saturday's BLACK STORM-PETREL off Newport [Shawneen Finnegan ]
18 Aug Re: Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
18 Aug Coos shorebirds [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
18 Aug Deschutes county -Red-necked Grebe at Lava Lake & Chestnut-backed Chickadee along the trail to Lucky Lake []
18 Aug Lane Coast Sightings 17-18 Aug 2014 ["Diane Pettey" ]
18 Aug OBA Annual Meeting ["Cathy Nowak" ]
18 Aug Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [George Neavoll ]
18 Aug Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [Karen Saxton ]
18 Aug Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [Wayne Hoffman ]
18 Aug Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [Keith Saylor ]
18 Aug Re: More on dark Storm-Petrel seen off Newport [David Irons ]
18 Aug More on dark Storm-Petrel seen off Newport [Bob Archer ]
18 Aug Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
18 Aug Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
17 Aug Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co. [Jeff Gilligan ]
17 Aug Jackson Co: Agate Lake & Kirtland Ponds [Russ Namitz ]
17 Aug Ooops correction to report [Bob Archer ]
17 Aug Re: More pelagic pics ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
17 Aug More pelagic pics [Bob Archer ]
17 Aug [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
17 Aug Newport Pelagic and Wilson's Storm-Petrel (and yet another Ashy) [Bob Archer ]
16 Aug Newport STORM-PETREL extravaganza [Shawneen ]
16 Aug Photos: Baskett Slough NWR Semipalmated Plovers, American White Pelicans [Jim Leonard ]
16 Aug Vanport Semipalmated Plovers [Andy Frank ]
16 Aug 1 Gray Catbird Further South in South Beach [Range Bayer ]
16 Aug Siltcoos Snowy Plover & Lost Sibley first edition [Jack Williamson ]
16 Aug Jackson County grouse correction [Harry Fuller ]
16 Aug third try for OBA August photo contest ["Pamela Johnston" ]
16 Aug Oregon Birds recruiting for 2015 editor [Alan Contreras ]
16 Aug Re: OBA August photo contest is open for voting [Pamela K Johnston ]
16 Aug OBA August photo contest is open for voting [Pamela K Johnston ]
16 Aug thrushes on the move [Darrel Faxon ]
15 Aug Re: Philomath Sewage Ponds - shorebirds, etc. [Russ Namitz ]
15 Aug SOUTHERN CASCADES [Harry Fuller ]
15 Aug South Jetty, Columbia River Report [Jeff Gilligan ]
15 Aug raptor handling seminar in Salem Sept 6 and 7 [Stephanie Hazen ]
15 Aug beak deformity--possible explanation [Harry Fuller ]
15 Aug 47 Elegant Terns this morning [Mike Patterson ]
15 Aug Bandon State Natural Area Shorebirds [Keith Saylor ]
14 Aug JACKSON COUNTY: trying to track GREAT GRAY OWLET [Harry Fuller ]
14 Aug Philomath Sewage Ponds - shorebirds, etc. [Hendrik Herlyn ]
14 Aug Jackson County: freak beak on RB NUthatch [Harry Fuller ]
14 Aug barn owl photos [Stephanie Hazen ]
14 Aug Photos: Semipalmated Plover Baskett Slough NWR 08-14-14 [Jim Leonard ]
14 Aug Coos N' Elegant Curry 8/13-14/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
14 Aug Fern Ridge Black-Necked Stilt - sitting on nest? [Priscilla Nam Hari Kaur ]
14 Aug Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands this afternoon [Steve Engel ]
14 Aug MY FIRST AUGUST WARBLER EVER [Harry Fuller ]
14 Aug A NOT-SO-BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: PICS [Harry Fuller ]
14 Aug Elegant Terns at Hammond Boat Basin [Mike Patterson ]
14 Aug bird sound apps for Android [Alan Contreras ]
14 Aug Elegant terns Hammond [Justin Cook ]
14 Aug New "Birds of Jackson County" [Jeffrey Tufts ]
14 Aug Jackson Co shorebirds [Russ Namitz ]
14 Aug Ft Steven's Gull and Tern Help [Justin Cook ]
13 Aug RBA: Portland, OR 8-14-14 [Harry Nehls ]
13 Aug Banded Canada Geese at Walterville Pond - update []

Subject: Re: Migrating White-fronted Geese
From: "5hats AT peak.org" <5hats@peak.org>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 04:41:14 +0000
Quite early, I would say, at least compared to my records. White-fronts don’t 
usually move over the inland Coast Range in Lincoln County until well into 
September. But I know there are many different routes they take. Maybe earlier 
birds take a different one. 


 

 

Darrel


Sent from Windows Mail


From: Linda Gilbert
Sent: ‎August‎ ‎19‎, ‎2014 ‎8‎:‎26‎ ‎PM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] Migrating White-fronted Geese



I was up near Groundhog Mt. , southeast of Oakridge, at 5000+ feet elevation 
this afternoon. I saw and heard a flock of GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE go over, 
headed roughly southeast, going to the Klamath I presume. I saw them another 
year from The Twins near Waldo Lake. 
Subject: PHOTOS: Newport Old-tailed Duck, Lesser Yellowlegs, etc.
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 21:35:51 -0700
I have posted my photos of stuff from the Nature Trail at the
Hatfield MSC.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/archives/date-posted/2014/08/19/?view=md

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Jackson Bottom shorebirds (Washington Co)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 00:33:03 -0400
This is just an alert for those who are not using Portland Area Birds that the 
shorebird habitat at Jackson Bottom in Hillsboro is excellent. Will be for the 
next 2 weeks for sure. See here for more details: 

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/portland-area-birds/CuEb5uUcroM
Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Photos: Baskett Slough NWR American Bittern, Killdeer, Least Sandpiper
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 21:16:27 -0700
I went back to Baskett Slough NWR yesterday morning.  Nice calm morning for
a few reflection photos.  An American Bittern came right out into the open
along the pond and posed for photos. Click on link below for photos.  Happy
Birding, Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6049492175467042353?authkey=CMr4xK3on9jcLg 
Subject: Migrating White-fronted Geese
From: Linda Gilbert <oregonjunco AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 20:26:23 -0700
I was up near Groundhog Mt. , southeast of Oakridge, at 5000+ feet elevation 
this afternoon. I saw and heard a flock of GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE go over, 
headed roughly southeast, going to the Klamath I presume. I saw them another 
year from The Twins near Waldo Lake. 
Subject: Coos Birds 8/18-8/19/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:11:35 -0700
On the 18th, late afternoon while walking out near White's Point (eastside
of Coos Bay north of where the Painted Bunting was last winter) I saw a
single ELEGANT TERN, never seen one so far up the bay!

Today I was in the very eastern end of Coos County near the Douglas County
line.  I was headed up to the Signal Tree Communication Site and just below
there, in a private clearcut at about 2700 feet, there was a calling ROCK
WREN, my 3rd of the year in Coos!  I only saw one bird- it could be a
migrant or a late breeder, not sure which?  This is the same clearcut where
PURPLE MARTINS nested earlier in the season (several nice snags), no sign
of any birds now, hopefully the young fledged successfully?

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: FW: [RV Birds] Pine grossbeaks in Sky Lakes Wilderness
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:29:14 -0700
In a private message, Bill noted the white wing bars and gray breasts of the 
adult males. A nice sighting for Klamath County. 

42.572525, -122.202744

Good birding,Russ Namitz

Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 11:24:07 -0700
From: varble.bill AT gmail.com
To: rv-birds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [RV Birds] Pine grossbeaks in Sky Lakes Wilderness

My hiking partner, Meg Landers, and I were on the west shore of Isherwood Lake 
in the Sky Lakes Wilderness late the morning of Saturday, Aug. 16, when we came 
upon a bunch of Pine Grosbeaks. Or rather they came upon us. We'd stopped for a 
drink of water when Meg saw several birds pecking avidly at a pile of dried 
horse droppings not 10 feet from us. They were soon joined by others. We 
counted 11, with individuals in all three plumages -- yellow, orange or russet, 
and red. We watched the feast for several minutes, during which they were 
indifferent to us. 





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Subject: Mary's Peak 8/19 Grouse/Yes
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 10:55:57 -0700
 Just downhill from the "3000 ft elev" sign a grey phase RUFFED GROUSE crossed 
the road. The right color for a Sooty, but half the size of an adult Sooty. I 
recall someone posting a picture of a grey phase Ruffed from Winter Rim earlier 
this summer. Then just uphill (7am) from the same 3000' road sign was a young 
of the year SOOTY GROUSE. It walked along the road, sat on the shoulder while 
my wife drove right up to it, no binocular needed. It was the same size as an 
adult Ruffed Grouse. These developing chickens pose extra ID problems for a few 
weeks each summer. I flushed three barely fledged Sooty juveniles near Timber 
on July 4 a few years back. If I hadn't seen their mother too I would have 
mistaken them for Mtn Quail. 

 Up at the false summit (grassy knoll between parking lot and true summit) 
there were seven WESTERN BLUEBIRDS flitting between treetops. They came down to 
the parking lot as we returned, and fed all over it for half an hour. No Mtn 
Quail at the campground . Lars 


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Subject: Smart Jay
From: Kevin Smith <kevinsmithnaturephotos AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:17:56 -0700
Just watched a new demonstration of smart Scrub Jays.  A large family of 
California Quail was foraging on the hill above our house and there was 
one odd ball in the flock.  That turned out to be a Scrub Jay and it was 
intent on watching the quail finding bugs.  It would then pounce on the 
bird with the food (or at least scare it into dropping its find).  The 
jay would find a high perch so as to be able to keep an eye on the quail 
flock until one would find food and again would swoop down and steal the 
food.

Very interesting.
Kevin Smith
Subject: Netarts pelicans
From: Stacy Strickland <sas70 AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:12:12 -0700
Brown pelicans have returned to Netarts Bay this summer. Yesterday was the 
first day Ive seen them in the bay. 

-Stacy

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Subject: Rockaway Beach Shorebirds
From: Rhett Wilkins <rhettwilkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:31:29 -0700
Hi OBOL,

For anyone near Rockaway Beach, last night there was a flock of 60 to 70
peeps hanging out just behind Sand Dollar Restaurant.  They included 60 or
so Westerns, a single Baird's, and at least 5 Semipalmated Plovers.  Go see
them if you're in the area!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/boundtobird/

Good birding,

Rhett
Subject: Long-tailed Duck at HMSC today
From: celata AT pacifier.com
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:13:06 -0700 (PDT)
I saw a LONG-TAILED DUCK in the lagoon in front of the Hatfield
Marine Science Center this afternoon.  It was a male molting
out of summer plumage.

Also, lots of RED-NECKED PHALAROPES seen from the South Jetty of
Yaqina.

---
Mike Patterson
Newport Library



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Subject: Re: Gray Fox stories
From: Roy Lowe <roy.loweiii AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 18:42:01 -0700
I don't have a fox story, but I do have a bobcat story marginally connected to 
birds. In 2007 we had a bird feed in our back yard about 25' from the kitchen 
window. The feeder was mounted on a thin pole that had a squirrel baffle over 
it. The baffle was essentially a 4" tube capped on top but open on the bottle. 
Squirrels feeding on the ground below the feeder would run up the pole inside 
the baffle when a perceived threat occurred. One day I saw the birds panic from 
the feeder and a red squirrel run up into the baffle and then I saw a bobcat 
bound out of the woods and run over to the feeder. I grabbed my camera and 
started photographing. The bobcat just sat there and occasionally walked around 
the feeder, sniffing now and then and gently swatting the baffle with its paw. 
This went on for nearly 20 minutes and I wasn't sure if the bobcat really knew 
there was a squirrel up in the baffle. After 20 minutes the bobcat got excited 
sniffing and peering up into the baffle. It stood up on its hind legs and tried 
to see if it could get the squirrel out of the top. Then it started reaching up 
into the baffle from below when suddenly it jammed its head and both front legs 
into the baffle up to its shoulders and pulled out the squirrel. It casually 
walked away with its prize and I thought to myself, hey, I may have the only 
bobcat feeder in Oregon. 


Roy
 
Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 18, 2014, at 4:22 PM, "Dennis Vroman"  wrote:
> 
> This is a kind of bird related story about a Gray Fox encountered while 
banding birds in the Grayback Creek area near Cave Junction. 

>  
> The setting: Forest road along Grayback Creek, with steep banks on each side 
of the riparian area. Heard what sounded like a Bear trashing down slope 
through the dry leaves. The vegetation was solid out to the road and you could 
not see much except the road. Expecting a Bear, I went to the back of my truck 
and waited by the tailgate and watched above the canopy. In an instant, a Gray 
Fox bounded off the slope and landed in the road. Before you could blink an 
eye, a Bobcat landed just behind the Fox. The Bobcat was about 2 foot from the 
Foxes' tail. They both were running in my direction full speed. The Gray Fox 
passed on the road within a few feet of me and kept going down the road. Then, 
the Bobcat stop the chase in the road directly opposite me; it was really 
close. It apparently didn't realize I was standing there...I could hear the 
labored breathing of the Bobcat. Then, I uttered "here kitty, kitty, kitty" and 
without even looking my way, in a flash the Bobcat leaped into the brush and 
out of site up the slope. 

>  
> Something you don't see everyday and I felt honored I got to witness it.
>  
> Dennis
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Karen Saxton
> To: whoffman AT peak.org
> Cc: Keith Saylor ; David Lauten ; OBOL Oregon Birders Online
> Sent: Monday, August 18, 2014 9:07 AM
> Subject: [obol] Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
> 
> I was out riding my horse several years ago and a grey fox ran right up to 
us. Then he ran a few steps, ran back, stood on his hind legs and ran a few 
more steps. I suspect he had a den nearby. It seemed as if he was playing 
"Lassie" I regret not having a camera that day, although I rarely carried one 
while riding. 
Subject: Re: Mt. Hood - Glacier Shorebirding?
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 19:20:46 -0600
Baird's does that, they are known for using high elevation snowfields in fall 
migration. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Aug 18, 2014, at 6:47 PM, Philip Kline  wrote:
> 
> I hiked the Cooper Spur trail on the east side of Mt. Hood today. I hiked as 
far as you can go up the Cooper Spur ridge without venturing out on to the 
glaciers and snow fields, and stopped for lunch. I saw a small group of birds 
at the edge of a snow field below me. I excitedly thought they might be 
rosy-finches, but no, they were 4 Baird's Sandpipers! What? They weren't that 
close, but I got good looks at the main field marks--buffy chest with moderate 
streaking, buffy face with blank expression, shortish, apparently straight 
bill, super-long primary projection, and scaly - looking upperparts. Legs 
looked black, but difficult to tell for sure, bill looked solid black. Not sure 
how often shorebirds venture up there, but perhaps it's not that unusual. Think 
sewage plants are still a better bet though. 

> 
> About 10 minutes later I had a flyby flock of 10-15 rosy-finches. Good day to 
be up there. 

> 
> Philip Kline
Subject: Mt. Hood - Glacier Shorebirding?
From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 17:47:52 -0700
I hiked the Cooper Spur trail on the east side of Mt. Hood today.  I hiked
as far as you can go up the Cooper Spur ridge without venturing out on to
the glaciers and snow fields, and stopped for lunch.  I saw a small group
of birds at the edge of a snow field below me.  I excitedly thought they
might be rosy-finches, but no, they were 4 Baird's Sandpipers!  What?  They
weren't that close, but I got good looks at the main field marks--buffy
chest with moderate streaking, buffy face with blank expression, shortish,
apparently straight bill, super-long primary projection, and scaly -
looking upperparts.  Legs looked black, but difficult to tell for sure,
bill looked solid black.  Not sure how often shorebirds venture up there,
but perhaps it's not that unusual.  Think sewage plants are still a better
bet though.

About 10 minutes later I had a flyby flock of 10-15 rosy-finches.  Good day
to be up there.

Philip Kline
Subject: Gray Fox stories
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:22:37 -0700
This is a kind of bird related story about a Gray Fox encountered while banding 
birds in the Grayback Creek area near Cave Junction. 


The setting: Forest road along Grayback Creek, with steep banks on each side of 
the riparian area. Heard what sounded like a Bear trashing down slope through 
the dry leaves. The vegetation was solid out to the road and you could not see 
much except the road. Expecting a Bear, I went to the back of my truck and 
waited by the tailgate and watched above the canopy. In an instant, a Gray Fox 
bounded off the slope and landed in the road. Before you could blink an eye, a 
Bobcat landed just behind the Fox. The Bobcat was about 2 foot from the Foxes' 
tail. They both were running in my direction full speed. The Gray Fox passed on 
the road within a few feet of me and kept going down the road. Then, the Bobcat 
stop the chase in the road directly opposite me; it was really close. It 
apparently didn't realize I was standing there...I could hear the labored 
breathing of the Bobcat. Then, I uttered "here kitty, kitty, kitty" and without 
even looking my way, in a flash the Bobcat leaped into the brush and out of 
site up the slope. 


Something you don't see everyday and I felt honored I got to witness it.

Dennis
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Karen Saxton 
  To: whoffman AT peak.org 
  Cc: Keith Saylor ; David Lauten ; OBOL Oregon Birders Online 
  Sent: Monday, August 18, 2014 9:07 AM
  Subject: [obol] Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.


 I was out riding my horse several years ago and a grey fox ran right up to us. 
Then he ran a few steps, ran back, stood on his hind legs and ran a few more 
steps. I suspect he had a den nearby. It seemed as if he was playing "Lassie" I 
regret not having a camera that day, although I rarely carried one while 
riding. 
Subject: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:52:35 -0700
Regarding Gray Fox climbing and not be overly shy...that has been my
experience.  They denned in my yard in Austin, TX.  As long as I moved
slowly, they did not run from me.  They would eat the peanuts and BOSS
(black oil sunflower seed), and drink the water that I put out for the birds
and squirrels.  Sometimes they would climb the trees, and on occasion, sleep
on the roof of our shed.  

For some photos go to: https://www.flickr.com/gp/canyoneagle/FXpF4B/


The photos were taken from our sunroom window, the Foxes being between
10-20' away.

Lori Markoff 
Eugene

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf
Of DJ Lauten and KACastelein
Sent: Monday, August 18, 2014 1:49 PM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Re: Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.

A couple of comments.

One, Gray Fox can climb trees.   They are one of the few canines to be 
able to do this task.   I believe that they even have retractable claws 
like a cat.   This is very unique.

Two, they are not overly shy, at least according to folks I know who do 
a lot of hunting or predator management.    They are well known to come 
into distress calls to investigate, and are well known to walk right up 
to the source, even if it is a hunter with a call box.   So the story 
Karen told of being on a horse makes a little more sense if you 
understand they aren't as shy as one might think.   They are fairly 
nocturnal which explains why we don't see them much.

Cheers
Dave Lauten






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Subject: Re: Saturday's BLACK STORM-PETREL off Newport
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:25:08 -0700
It should be noted that this bird was not viewed under the best of conditions. 
I initially called out "Leach's Storm-Petrel" and then tried to get passengers 
on the bird. It was not close as the boat was drifting away from our chum. We 
were looking mostly into the sun and the bird only allowed us about a 60 second 
look before disappearing, never to be seen again. Kudos to Wink Gross as he 
suggested that it was too big for a Leach's to me while we were observing the 
bird. 

I think all 3 guides had our doubts about the bird being a Leach's Storm-Petrel 
with the larger size and feet pattering behavior and perhaps the flight style 
of the bird, but I don't think any one of us would have been comfortable 
calling it a definitive Black Storm-Petrel based on our brief, marginal looks. 
The credit really goes to Bob Lockett and his quick action photos that captured 
the bird, allowing for after-the-fact discussion, consultation and finally, a 
solid identification. 

It was a fun day.
Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: Noah Strycker <noah.strycker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:15:43 -0700
I have Gray Foxes in my yard (southeast of Eugene) but didn't realize it
until I put out remote camera traps a couple of years ago. (Turns out
there's a lot of things in my yard that I virtually never see!)

A couple of fox photos are near the end of this photo album - between the
coyote and the skunks ;)


https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105633769220487043413/albums/5926597790606946065 


Good birding,

Noah Strycker




On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 1:49 PM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <
deweysage AT frontier.com> wrote:

> A couple of comments.
>
> One, Gray Fox can climb trees.   They are one of the few canines to be
> able to do this task.   I believe that they even have retractable claws
> like a cat.   This is very unique.
>
> Two, they are not overly shy, at least according to folks I know who do a
> lot of hunting or predator management.    They are well known to come into
> distress calls to investigate, and are well known to walk right up to the
> source, even if it is a hunter with a call box.   So the story Karen told
> of being on a horse makes a little more sense if you understand they aren't
> as shy as one might think.   They are fairly nocturnal which explains why
> we don't see them much.
>
> Cheers
> Dave Lauten
>
>
>
> On 8/18/2014 9:08 AM, George Neavoll wrote:
>
>> I saw them quite frequently on the farm where I grew up east of Lebanon,
>> in Linn County - once in a tree! (This was more than 50 years ago.)
>>
>> George Neavoll
>> S.W. Portland
>>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>>
>
>
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>
>
>
Subject: Saturday's BLACK STORM-PETREL off Newport
From: Shawneen Finnegan <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:55:27 -0700
Bob Lockett captured a series of photos of the "black" storm-petrel which
indeed was a BLACK STORM-PETREL. This is the fourth record for Oregon. I
sent Bob's photos to six top seabird folks in California (Steve Howell,
Alvaro Jaramillo, Debi Shearwater, Sophie Webb, Todd McGrath, and Paul
Lehman) and all said it looked like a BLACK.

The photos, while not tack sharp, are good enough to show the definitive
features including the very long legs and big feet that are diagnostic of
the genus of *Halocyptena* (Black and Least), plus a big bill, the wing
shape, size, etc.  A behavioral feature of Black that we witnessed was its
pattering its feet on the water.

Thanks to all who joined us on the trip for this extraordinary storm-petrel
filled day.

The water is very, very warm offshore (65 deg when we were 50+ miles
offshore). Per Alvaro "since the end of July off Half Moon Bay Black Storm
Petrel has been the most common species of Stormie. They have vacated the
south and gone way north looking for some decent water temperatures and
food. Also associated with “mexican murrelets” moving north, Vellela
outbreak, Mola molas at 10x the usual number we see here etc."

I will post my photos from the weekend now that I am home, caught up on a
bit of sleep, and have downloaded the pics.

Shawneen Finnegan
Portland, Oregon
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:49:01 -0700
A couple of comments.

One, Gray Fox can climb trees.   They are one of the few canines to be 
able to do this task.   I believe that they even have retractable claws 
like a cat.   This is very unique.

Two, they are not overly shy, at least according to folks I know who do 
a lot of hunting or predator management.    They are well known to come 
into distress calls to investigate, and are well known to walk right up 
to the source, even if it is a hunter with a call box.   So the story 
Karen told of being on a horse makes a little more sense if you 
understand they aren't as shy as one might think.   They are fairly 
nocturnal which explains why we don't see them much.

Cheers
Dave Lauten


On 8/18/2014 9:08 AM, George Neavoll wrote:
> I saw them quite frequently on the farm where I grew up east of 
> Lebanon, in Linn County - once in a tree! (This was more than 50 years 
> ago.)
>
> George Neavoll
> S.W. Portland
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>



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Subject: Coos shorebirds
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 13:36:38 -0700
We had a WANDERING TATTLER on the beach at New River today and on Aug 14 
we had a PACIFIC GOLDEN PLOVER at New River, Coos Cty.

Cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
Bandon OR


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Subject: Deschutes county -Red-necked Grebe at Lava Lake & Chestnut-backed Chickadee along the trail to Lucky Lake
From: jmeredit AT bendnet.com
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 12:40:35 -0700
 

Good for Deschutes county, especially the CB Chickadee. 

Howard Horvath and Mary Oppenheimer hiked the trail to Lucky Lake and
had the CB Chickadees and lots of birds in general. Later, they stopped
in at the west end of Lava Lake, where they saw a Red-necked Grebe at
the west edge of the lake. Good birding, judy, jmeredit AT bendnet.com 

COBOL mailing list 

COBOL AT lists.oregonstate.edu
http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol [1]

 

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Subject: Lane Coast Sightings 17-18 Aug 2014
From: "Diane Pettey" <surfbird AT q.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:53:29 -0700
Last evening, I observed a single ELEGANT TERN flying over the Siuslaw River
off the N. Jetty.

This morning, a BLACK TURNSTONE was working the N. Jetty rocks.

At home, a BEWICK'S WREN was bugging the needle-filled house gutters.

good birding.
Diane Pettey
Heceta Beach, OR
surfbird AT q.com



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Subject: OBA Annual Meeting
From: "Cathy Nowak" <cathy.nowak AT state.or.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:55:55 +0000
OBOLites:
The Oregon Birding Association (OBA) annual membership meeting, September 26 - 
28, is coming up fast so now is the time to make your plans. This year's 
meeting is in Bandon on the south Oregon coast. The location and timing have 
allowed OBA to add an optional pelagic trip for Friday (Sept 26). Here is some 
of what they hope to find on that trip: 


"We should have Sooty, Pink-footed and Buller's Shearwaters in good numbers- 
there is always the possibility of a Manx, Short-tailed or Flesh-footed too, 
but they are much rarer. Of course we can hope for other shearwater species 
too! We should have lots of Black-footed Albatross. Great time for Jaegers and 
South Polar Skua, although Long-tailed Jaeger could be missed as it is the end 
of their window, as seen most years. It should be good for alcids, with a lot 
of luck we could find a Scripps's. We should see Arctic Terns and possible 
Commons closer to shore. Storm-petrels are often in good numbers this time of 
year, with luck we could see a Leach's. The allure of pelagic birding is the 
unknown, and going out the end of September is like going to Malheur over 
Memorial Day weekend- who knows what could show up?" 


The area often hosts vagrant passerines and other land birds at that time of 
year as well. There should be some cool surprises. I am hoping for a Crested 
Caracara which would be a life bird for me. Last time we had one in Oregon, I 
was in Arizona (couldn't find one there) and missed it. It is a great 
opportunity to go birding with folks who know the area, see some birds you may 
not have seen before and maybe see some interesting vagrants. 


Get all the details at:  http://www.orbirds.org/2014annualmeeting.html

I hope to see you there!
Cathy Nowak
Board Member, Oregon Birding Association
Subject: Fwd: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: George Neavoll <gneavoll AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 09:08:39 -0700
I saw them quite frequently on the farm where I grew up east of Lebanon, in 
Linn County - once in a tree! (This was more than 50 years ago.) 


George Neavoll
S.W. Portland

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Wayne Hoffman 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
> Date: August 18, 2014 8:59:45 AM PDT
> To: kfsaylor AT gmail.com
> Cc: David Lauten , OBOL Oregon Birders Online 
 

> Reply-To: whoffman AT peak.org
> 
> Cool picture!
> 
> I have seen them several times in Oregon, but never got a camera on one. 
Mostly I see them crossing roads in front of the car, generally early AM or 
near dusk. My sightings have been in Corvallis, and in the Umpqua, Rogue, and 
Illinois valleys. 

>   
> Wayne
> 
> 
> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 8:52 AM, Keith Saylor  wrote:
> Hello Jeff,
> 
> Here is a link to a Gray Fox image I was able to capture (Aug. 13th, 2014) 
along the east side of New River in Bandon State Natural Area. The image is 
fuzzy as I had no time to focus through the grasses. 

> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/CiDOXsHkYEcZJ4rF6EdEVtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

> 
> Keith F. Saylor
> 
> 
> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 7:46 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein 
 wrote: 

> Oh I should add they are rather common right up to the beach. They will hunt 
on the edge of the beach but they generally do not like wondering out into the 
open, unlike Red Fox. They really are a woods/shrubby habitat animal which is 
why they are hard to see. We see their tracks all the time. 

> 
> Cheers
> Dave
> 
> 
> 
> On 8/18/2014 7:19 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
> Hello Jeff
> 
> We see Gray Fox or their evidence all the time here in Coos Co. They are 
rather common, just not the easiest to see. If anyone doubts me, I can find a 
whole bunch of people I work with who would confirm this. 

> 
> 
> Cheers
> Dave Lauten
> 
> 
> 
> On 8/17/2014 9:11 PM, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
> Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of us just 
before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to the bunker 
observatory at Trestle Bay). I have seen Gray Foxes in Arizona a number of 
times, but this was my first sighting for Oregon. A range map shows them right 
to the southern shore of the Columbia River, but not across, and even to the 
coast. If there is a more northerly Gray Fox, and the map is accurate, it 
couldn't be further north than by a few hundred feet. 

> 
> http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_fox_r_map.jpg
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Keith F. Saylor
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: Karen Saxton <kcsaxton AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 09:07:43 -0700
I was out riding my horse several years ago and a grey fox ran right up to
us. Then he ran a few steps, ran back, stood on his hind legs and ran a few
more steps. I suspect he had a den nearby. It seemed as if he was playing
"Lassie" I regret not having a camera that day, although I rarely carried
one while riding.


On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 8:59 AM, Wayne Hoffman  wrote:

> Cool picture!
>
> I have seen them several times in Oregon, but never got a camera on one.
>  Mostly I see them crossing roads in front of the car, generally early AM
> or near dusk.  My sightings have been in Corvallis, and in the Umpqua,
> Rogue, and Illinois valleys.
>
> Wayne
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 8:52 AM, Keith Saylor  wrote:
>
>> Hello Jeff,
>>
>> Here is a link to a Gray Fox image I was able to capture (Aug. 13th,
>> 2014) along the east side of New River in Bandon State Natural Area. The
>> image is fuzzy as I had no time to focus through the grasses.
>>
>>
>> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/CiDOXsHkYEcZJ4rF6EdEVtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

>>
>> Keith F. Saylor
>>
>>
>> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 7:46 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <
>> deweysage AT frontier.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Oh I should add they are rather common right up to the beach.   They
>>> will hunt on the edge of the beach but they generally do not like wondering
>>> out into the open, unlike Red Fox.   They really are a woods/shrubby
>>> habitat animal which is why they are hard to see.   We see their tracks all
>>> the time.
>>>
>>> Cheers
>>> Dave
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 8/18/2014 7:19 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hello Jeff
>>>>
>>>> We see Gray Fox or their evidence all the time here in Coos Co. They
>>>> are rather common, just not the easiest to see.   If anyone doubts me, I
>>>> can find a whole bunch of people I work with who would confirm this.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Cheers
>>>> Dave Lauten
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 8/17/2014 9:11 PM, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of
>>>>> us just before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to the
>>>>> bunker observatory at Trestle Bay).  I have seen Gray Foxes in Arizona a
>>>>> number of times, but this was my first sighting for Oregon.  A range map
>>>>> shows them right to  the southern shore of the Columbia River, but not
>>>>> across, and even to the coast. If there is a more northerly Gray Fox, and 

>>>>> the map is accurate, it couldn't be further north than by a few hundred
>>>>> feet.
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_
>>>>> fox_r_map.jpg
>>>>>
>>>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Keith F. Saylor
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:59:45 -0700
Cool picture!

I have seen them several times in Oregon, but never got a camera on one.
 Mostly I see them crossing roads in front of the car, generally early AM
or near dusk.  My sightings have been in Corvallis, and in the Umpqua,
Rogue, and Illinois valleys.

Wayne


On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 8:52 AM, Keith Saylor  wrote:

> Hello Jeff,
>
> Here is a link to a Gray Fox image I was able to capture (Aug. 13th, 2014)
> along the east side of New River in Bandon State Natural Area. The image is
> fuzzy as I had no time to focus through the grasses.
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/CiDOXsHkYEcZJ4rF6EdEVtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

>
> Keith F. Saylor
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 7:46 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <
> deweysage AT frontier.com> wrote:
>
>> Oh I should add they are rather common right up to the beach.   They will
>> hunt on the edge of the beach but they generally do not like wondering out
>> into the open, unlike Red Fox.   They really are a woods/shrubby habitat
>> animal which is why they are hard to see.   We see their tracks all the
>> time.
>>
>> Cheers
>> Dave
>>
>>
>>
>> On 8/18/2014 7:19 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
>>
>>> Hello Jeff
>>>
>>> We see Gray Fox or their evidence all the time here in Coos Co. They are
>>> rather common, just not the easiest to see.   If anyone doubts me, I can
>>> find a whole bunch of people I work with who would confirm this.
>>>
>>>
>>> Cheers
>>> Dave Lauten
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 8/17/2014 9:11 PM, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>>>
>>>> Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of us
>>>> just before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to the
>>>> bunker observatory at Trestle Bay).  I have seen Gray Foxes in Arizona a
>>>> number of times, but this was my first sighting for Oregon.  A range map
>>>> shows them right to  the southern shore of the Columbia River, but not
>>>> across, and even to the coast.  If there is a more northerly Gray Fox, and
>>>> the map is accurate, it couldn't be further north than by a few hundred
>>>> feet.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_fox_r_map.jpg
>>>>
>>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Keith F. Saylor
>
>
Subject: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: Keith Saylor <kfsaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:52:31 -0700
Hello Jeff,

Here is a link to a Gray Fox image I was able to capture (Aug. 13th, 2014)
along the east side of New River in Bandon State Natural Area. The image is
fuzzy as I had no time to focus through the grasses.


https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/CiDOXsHkYEcZJ4rF6EdEVtMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 


Keith F. Saylor


On Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 7:46 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <
deweysage AT frontier.com> wrote:

> Oh I should add they are rather common right up to the beach.   They will
> hunt on the edge of the beach but they generally do not like wondering out
> into the open, unlike Red Fox.   They really are a woods/shrubby habitat
> animal which is why they are hard to see.   We see their tracks all the
> time.
>
> Cheers
> Dave
>
>
>
> On 8/18/2014 7:19 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
>
>> Hello Jeff
>>
>> We see Gray Fox or their evidence all the time here in Coos Co. They are
>> rather common, just not the easiest to see.   If anyone doubts me, I can
>> find a whole bunch of people I work with who would confirm this.
>>
>>
>> Cheers
>> Dave Lauten
>>
>>
>>
>> On 8/17/2014 9:11 PM, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>>
>>> Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of us
>>> just before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to the
>>> bunker observatory at Trestle Bay).  I have seen Gray Foxes in Arizona a
>>> number of times, but this was my first sighting for Oregon.  A range map
>>> shows them right to  the southern shore of the Columbia River, but not
>>> across, and even to the coast.  If there is a more northerly Gray Fox, and
>>> the map is accurate, it couldn't be further north than by a few hundred
>>> feet.
>>>
>>> http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_fox_r_map.jpg
>>>
>>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
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>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
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>
>
>


-- 
Keith F. Saylor
Subject: Re: More on dark Storm-Petrel seen off Newport
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:46:41 -0700
When photographing low-flying birds over water at a flat (horizontal) angle one 
trick is to focus on the water below the bird. If you try to focus on birds, 
particularly species that fly like storm-petrels or swallows, the auto-focus 
will lock onto the water in the background rather than the bird. 


Even if you do this getting good photos of storm-petrels remains a challenge.

Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 18, 2014, at 8:34 AM, "Bob Archer"  wrote:

> Bob Lockett has allowed me to post his pictures of the bird on the end of my 
Birdfellow report. I need a photo lesson on Storm-Petrels, considering how 
difficult it is to get pictures of these birds, great job! So here they are, 
scroll past my dribble to the bottom: 

> 
> 
http://www.birdfellow.com/members/BobArcher/field_reports/882-newport-pelagic-8-16-2014 

> 
> 
> Bob Archer
> PDX
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: More on dark Storm-Petrel seen off Newport
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 08:33:50 -0700
Bob Lockett has allowed me to post his pictures of the bird on the end of
my Birdfellow report.  I need a photo lesson on Storm-Petrels, considering
how difficult it is to get pictures of these birds, great job!  So here
they are, scroll past my dribble to the bottom:


http://www.birdfellow.com/members/BobArcher/field_reports/882-newport-pelagic-8-16-2014 



Bob Archer
PDX
Subject: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 07:46:23 -0700
Oh I should add they are rather common right up to the beach.   They 
will hunt on the edge of the beach but they generally do not like 
wondering out into the open, unlike Red Fox.   They really are a 
woods/shrubby habitat animal which is why they are hard to see.   We see 
their tracks all the time.

Cheers
Dave


On 8/18/2014 7:19 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
> Hello Jeff
>
> We see Gray Fox or their evidence all the time here in Coos Co. They 
> are rather common, just not the easiest to see.   If anyone doubts me, 
> I can find a whole bunch of people I work with who would confirm this.
>
>
> Cheers
> Dave Lauten
>
>
>
> On 8/17/2014 9:11 PM, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>> Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of 
>> us just before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to 
>> the bunker observatory at Trestle Bay).  I have seen Gray Foxes in 
>> Arizona a number of times, but this was my first sighting for 
>> Oregon.  A range map shows them right to  the southern shore of the 
>> Columbia River, but not across, and even to the coast.  If there is a 
>> more northerly Gray Fox, and the map is accurate, it couldn't be 
>> further north than by a few hundred feet.
>>
>> http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_fox_r_map.jpg
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
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> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>



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Subject: Re: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 07:19:06 -0700
Hello Jeff

We see Gray Fox or their evidence all the time here in Coos Co. They are 
rather common, just not the easiest to see.   If anyone doubts me, I can 
find a whole bunch of people I work with who would confirm this.


Cheers
Dave Lauten



On 8/17/2014 9:11 PM, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
> Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of us just 
before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to the bunker 
observatory at Trestle Bay). I have seen Gray Foxes in Arizona a number of 
times, but this was my first sighting for Oregon. A range map shows them right 
to the southern shore of the Columbia River, but not across, and even to the 
coast. If there is a more northerly Gray Fox, and the map is accurate, it 
couldn't be further north than by a few hundred feet. 

>
> http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_fox_r_map.jpg
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>



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Subject: Off topic - Gray Fox - Clatsop Co.
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 21:11:39 -0700
Owen Schmidt and I saw a Gray Fox as it crossed the road in front of us just 
before the last parking lots (the one with the raised walk to the bunker 
observatory at Trestle Bay). I have seen Gray Foxes in Arizona a number of 
times, but this was my first sighting for Oregon. A range map shows them right 
to the southern shore of the Columbia River, but not across, and even to the 
coast. If there is a more northerly Gray Fox, and the map is accurate, it 
couldn't be further north than by a few hundred feet. 


http://www.scetv.org/web/web_of_water/images/uploads/gray_fox_r_map.jpg

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Subject: Jackson Co: Agate Lake & Kirtland Ponds
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:51:17 -0700
Over 35 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS still remain on Agate Lake. Among the 
shorebirds at the south end of the lake, there were 2 BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS, one 
of which had a reddish tinge to the plumage similar to, but not as intensive as 
a breeding Sanderling. The other bird was a standard golden-tan color. There 
was also a SOLITARY SANDPIPER as well. 

At Kirtland Ponds, the number of CINNAMON TEAL is increasing and there were 8 
NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRDS along the west edge of the ponds. There is still a 
lingering RED-NECKED PHALAROPE as well. 

Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford, OR

 		 	   		  
Subject: Ooops correction to report
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 11:01:09 -0700
I deleted my picture of the Ashy from my report, last night I thought that
was an Ashy but it was a brownish Fork-tailed.  Thanks Russ, I looked at
all my photos and the Ashy is just a blob on the ocean so I'll leave that
photo out.

Bob Archer
Subject: Re: More pelagic pics
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 10:40:58 -0700
Hi – 

 

I agree that the light was challenging. It often is at sea. If overcast, photos 
tend to be gray on gray. If sunny, water can look unnaturally blue. If sunny 
and windy, the contrast between white-caps and blue water can be excessive. My 
experience is that with overcast skies, photos do particular injustice to 
Sabine’s 

Gull and to kittiwakes.

 

I worked at getting good estimates on some of the birds:  

 

Pink-footed Shearwaters: 12,000 – 15,000 within 2 miles of the 
processor/trawler (Kodiak Enterprise). There were probably at least 1000 more 
elsewhere. 


Sooty Shearwaters: At most, a few hundred. Most of them must be up in the 
Columbia River plume. 


Buller’s Shearwaters:   maybe 20?

 

Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: As we left the Shearwater Flock behind the Kodiak 
Enterprise I began counting the rafts of Fork-tails and got 6,000. In addition, 
we had probably a 100+ as we approached the trawlers, and a scattering as we 
continued west. I suspect when we chummed on the way back in we could have been 
getting repeats. 


 

Wayne

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Bob Archer 

Sent: Sunday, August 17, 2014 9:08 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] More pelagic pics

 

I took 190 pictures yesterday, I deleted about 80 of them and have these left. 
The first part of day was gray, both ocean and sky the same color. Made the 
pictures tough. You should be able to zoom in on all the Wilson pictures to see 
the bird. It is towards the end of the album, where the ocean is blue not gray. 
I would guess 8,000 or so Pink-footed and 5,000 or so Fork-tailed, could have 
been much more. 


 


https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/117998954337911599230/albums/6048549965440025649/6048549971632014706?pid=6048549971632014706 
 
&oid=117998954337911599230 


 

 

Bob Archer

PDX

 

 
Subject: More pelagic pics
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 09:07:55 -0700
I took 190 pictures yesterday, I deleted about 80 of them and have these
left.  The first part of day was gray, both ocean and sky the same color.
 Made the pictures tough.  You should be able to zoom in on all the Wilson
pictures to see the bird. It is towards the end of the album, where the
ocean is blue not gray.  I would guess 8,000 or so Pink-footed and 5,000 or
so Fork-tailed, could have been much more.


https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/117998954337911599230/albums/6048549965440025649/6048549971632014706?pid=6048549971632014706&oid=117998954337911599230 



Bob Archer
PDX
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 06:10:59 -0700
*** Species Summary:

Long-tailed Duck (1 Lincoln)
Eared Grebe (1 Jackson)
American Avocet (1 Lane)
Forster's Tern (1 Lane)
Elegant Tern (2 Clatsop)
Rock Pigeon (1 Benton)
Calliope Hummingbird (1 Union)
Bank Swallow (1 Lane)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1)
- Reported Aug 16, 2014 10:05 by Jeff Harding
- Mark Hatfield Marine Science Center, Lincoln, Oregon
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.6231604,-124.0434766&ll=44.6231604,-124.0434766 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19491025
- Comments: "Long-tailed Duck" 




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Subject: Newport Pelagic and Wilson's Storm-Petrel (and yet another Ashy)
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 00:23:45 -0700
Here is a link to a few pictures from today's trip, I enjoyed trying out my
500 mm lens, but I still need a little work, but much better?!  Thanks Tim
, Shawneen, and eagle eye Russ .



http://www.birdfellow.com/members/BobArcher/field_reports/882-newport-pelagic-8-16-2014 



Bob Archer
PDX
Subject: Newport STORM-PETREL extravaganza
From: Shawneen <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 22:48:45 -0700
THE BIRD GUIDE had a very successful deep water trip today. We made it over 50 
miles offshore. The conditions were spectacular with easy seas and calm winds 
which picked up as the day wore on. 


The highlight of the trip were multiple species of storm-petrels all in one 
flock. 


ASHY, WILSON'S, plus what appears to be a BLACK STORM-PETREL were seen almost 
one right after another. The ASHY and WILSON'S flew side by side for a while. 
Photos were taken by several people of the large all dark storm petrel which 
was noticeably larger than the FORK-TAILEDS. It was observed pattering its feet 
in the water's surface which is apparently something Black's do. 


Several distant LEACH'S were seen by one guide.

We also had a staggering number of PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 5 LAYSAN 
ALBATROSS behind a trawler. 


Shawneen Finnegan
Bird Guide Leader

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Photos: Baskett Slough NWR Semipalmated Plovers, American White Pelicans
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 21:04:07 -0700
I went to Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge this morning from about
7:00am- 10:00am.  I set up at the narrows looking north and photographed
for 3 hours at the same location.  Click on link for photos.  Happy
Birding, Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6048376194494664177?authkey=CIDit8PZjsLr7AE 
Subject: Vanport Semipalmated Plovers
From: Andy Frank <andydfrank AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:19:30 -0700
Today at Vanport Wetlands in North Portland there were 3 SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS with 2 adult and 1 juvenile.  Water levels are now very low.  The
only other shorebirds I saw were 2 distant peeps that I think were Westerns
and Killdeer.

Andy Frank
Subject: 1 Gray Catbird Further South in South Beach
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 15:46:42 -0700
This morning (8/16), Eric Horvath heard (meowing), and then saw,
(clearly, out in the open, black cap, otherwise gray, rusty under
tail) a Gray Catbird along 35th Street in South Beach.  This is about
0.5 mile south of where catbirds have been seen along the HMSC Nature
Trail, so at least one appears to be doing a little post-breeding
wandering.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


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Subject: Siltcoos Snowy Plover & Lost Sibley first edition
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:40:28 -0700
I lost our first edition Sibley guide somewhere between West Linn and
Florence last week - its hard to describe how naked I felt without it.
 Thankfully, Jill surprised me by locating a brand new replacement copy at
the Backyard Bird Shop near Bridgeport Village!  The thing is, it's going
to take a few years for this new copy to develop that comfortable lived-in
feel.  Oh well - at least I am not stuck with the strangely colored second
edition.

The plover and lifer Whimbrel more than made up for the lost guide.

We enjoyed two fabulous hours watching the Snowy Plover from the edge of
their protected nesting habitat along the north spit of the Siltcoos River,
south of Florence, Oregon. All twenty-one of the plover we observed were
found, at low tide, along the wrack line.  Jill and I had the place to
ourselves which was great because we're able to sit and photograph the
birds without drawing the attention of beach combers or otherwise
interfering with the plover's activities.


http://www.jack-n-jill.net/blog/2014/8/siltcoos-estuary-snowy-plover-august-2014 


-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Jackson County grouse correction
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:10:39 -0700
Sooty in the road, not Ruffed...yellow eyebrows and a pale bar at end of
the tail
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/15/cascade-evening/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: third try for OBA August photo contest
From: "Pamela Johnston" <pamelaj AT SpiritOne.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:50:52 -0700
Sometimes a smart phone can make the user look pretty stupid. 

I hope that won’t stop you from voting for your favorite photo at:
www.orbirds.org/photocontest.html.

Pamela Johnston
Subject: Oregon Birds recruiting for 2015 editor
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:33:47 -0700
Owing to the shifting sands of birding and life, OBA needs a new editor for 
Oregon Birds starting in January 2015. Anyone who might be interested should 
contact me for information about how it works. The editor is responsible for 
two issues a year, the spring issue that contains mostly the previous year's 
regional highlights and photos and the fall issue that contains articles about 
Oregon's birds, birders and birding places. There is a very modest stipend. 


The new photo editor will be Diana Byrne, taking over from the capable Brandon 
Green (thanks, Brandon). 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Re: OBA August photo contest is open for voting
From: Pamela K Johnston <pamelaj AT spiritone.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:25:16 -0700




Subject: OBA August photo contest is open for voting
From: Pamela K Johnston <pamelaj AT spiritone.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:18:15 -0700
Ladies and gentlemen, birds and birders, please navigate to 
www.orbirds.org/photocontest.HTML. to take part. 


Pamela 
Johnstonڭb0yb(ڭbnLjv{*.rzmyb(% 

if׫j+jz祊l
Subject: thrushes on the move
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 09:26:35 -0700
I find it somewhat surprising not to have yet seen any comment about
Swainson's Thrush migration this fall.  Here at Thornton Creek they have
been moving through each night for at least three weeks.  Numbers are
beginning to pick up now.  Best times to listen for them are right before
dawn  and right after dusk.

Darrel
Subject: Re: Philomath Sewage Ponds - shorebirds, etc.
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 23:25:20 -0700
I briefly visited the Philomath Sewage Ponds this evening on my way to Newport 
and saw only about a third of the shorebirds that Hendrik reported yesterday. 
There were only 4 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and 1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS left. WESTERN 
SANDPIPERS were still at 4, but LEAST SANDPIPER were more like 20. I saw no 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, but Howard from Covallis though he might have a photo 
of a Baird's Sandpiper. 

The 2 BONAPARTE'S GULLS were hanging out with 7 young CALIFORNIA GULLS and I 
saw a YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD fly across the road on the way out. 

Good birding,
Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: SOUTHERN CASCADES
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 22:56:16 -0700
Ruffed Grouse, Common Nighthawk, Vesper Sparrow, California Towhee above
3000', tanagers in flocks

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: South Jetty, Columbia River Report
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 21:24:47 -0700
Owen Schmidt and I birded this afternoon under Elysian circumstances at the 
warm and only slightly breezy South Jetty and nearby areas . 




Hammond Boat Basin:  at least 50 Elegant Terns
					  1 Wandering Tattler
					  4 Whimbrels
					  3 Marbled Godwits

Trestle Bay::       2 Black-bellied Plovers
			     1 Ruddy Turnstone
			     1 Black Turnstone
			     12 Short-billed Dowitchers
			     6 Semipalmated Plovers
                            4 Greater Yellowlegs
			    Least and Western Sandpipers (a few dozen)

South Jetty tidal ponds;

			   220 Western Sandpipers (only 1 adult)
			  40 Least sandpipers
			  2  Baird's Sandpiper
			 28 Short-billed Dowitchers
			 4 Semipalmated Plovers
			3 Ruddy Turnstones
			3 Sanderlings


Jeff Gilligan


   					   

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Subject: raptor handling seminar in Salem Sept 6 and 7
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 17:49:02 -0700
There will be a seminar in Salem Sept 6 and 7 involving training people to 
handle captive birds 

of prey in educational settings.

For more information click on link below

http://www.turtleridgewildlifecenter.org/WP/events-2/

Stephanie Hazen

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Subject: beak deformity--possible explanation
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 15:18:50 -0700
not a happy ending:
updated blog at;    http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/14/freak-beak/


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: 47 Elegant Terns this morning
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 13:38:55 -0700
The numbers appear to be building at the Hammond ELEGANT TERN
flock.  I counted 47 today.

We are in the middle of  BOUY 10 fishing right now.  Be advised the it
is crazy at the boat basin right now, with lots of crowding and the
heddy mix of cigarette smoke, diesel and testosterone.  Adjust your ch'i
accordingly.


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Bandon State Natural Area Shorebirds
From: Keith Saylor <kfsaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 05:42:55 -0700
BSNA shorebird activity is budding in pockets but the bloom is coming between 
the Four Mile Creek and China Creek SP parking lot. 


The best viewing is along New River between the mouths of Four Mile and Two 
Mile creeks. Walking the bluffs on the east side of new river overlooking New 
River, the foredunes, and the ocean shore is wonderful. 


There is a colony of Band-tailed Pigeons more interior almost midway between 
Four Mile Creek and Two Mile Creek. 


The rocky flats on Two Mile Creek near the mouth where it flows into New River 
hosts shorebirds regularly now. This is where I had the American Avocet a 
couple weeks ago. The rocky and mud flats at New River are are teeming in fits 
and starts. 


The wetlands along the west edge of BSNA are dry. In the spring these wetlands 
host migratory shorebirds. However now the rocky and mud flats at New River and 
Two Mile Creek are the focus; along with the ocean shoreline. 


Shorebirds yesterday:

Sanderling
Semipalmated Plovers
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Snowy Plover
Black-bellied Plover

Also:
Great Egret
Great Blue Heron 
Peregrine Falcon
Merlin
Northern Harrier

And various other species.

Keith Saylor

ڭb0yb(ڭbnLjv{*.rzmyb(%
if׫j+jz祊l
Subject: JACKSON COUNTY: trying to track GREAT GRAY OWLET
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 23:00:10 -0700
Plenty of pics of the adult male...no sign of owlet

http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/14/where-baby/


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Philomath Sewage Ponds - shorebirds, etc.
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:56:23 -0700
Shorebird numbers are slowly increasing. This evening's visit yielded the
following:

Spotted Sandpiper - 2
Greater Yellowlegs - 14
Lesser Yellowlegs - 3
Least Sandpiper - 41
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER - 1 juv.
Western Sandpiper - 4

The 2 adult BONAPARTE'S GULLS (first seen yesterday) were still around, and
2 YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS hung out with BREWER'S BLACKBIRDS and 2
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS.

A few snapshots can be viewed here: https://flic.kr/s/aHsk1S2RXZ

Happy migration

Hendrik

__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Jackson County: freak beak on RB NUthatch
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:45:16 -0700
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/14/freak-beak/
-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: barn owl photos
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:51:23 -0700
https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/BarnOwl?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCIir9o-wkcOTygE&feat=directlink 


stephanie hazen
salem

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Subject: Photos: Semipalmated Plover Baskett Slough NWR 08-14-14
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 20:30:13 -0700
I went to Baskett Slough NWR this morning and photographed and saw my first
Semipalmated Plover.  What a cute little bird!!  There were two of them
along Coville Rd. on the north side of the narrows at the east end of the
pond.  They were mixed in with some Western & Least Sandpipers and
they came in close to the road.  It's always nice to photograph and see a
new bird that I haven't seen before.  Click on link below for some photos.
Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6047624776354419281?authkey=CICo2Z6ByPSH_wE 
Subject: Coos N' Elegant Curry 8/13-14/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 18:17:25 -0700
On the 13th Teak and I were out on the beach on the north spit of Coos Bay.
 Seems like this is where the shorebird action has been the last few weeks.
 I saw the following:

2500- WESTERN SANDPIPERS
160- BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS (150 in one huge flock)
only 20 SANDERLINGS
5- Dowitcher sp. (it was very foggy and I didn't have a scope)
1- BAIRD'S SANDPIPER
1- SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER
no Leasties or Semipalm Plovers

Today in Gold Beach there were 150+ ELEGANT TERNS in the dock area and
another 150+ near the mouth.  Out on the ocean there were tens of them all
the way up to Ophir and Euchre Creek so I guesstimate around 400 total.
 Nothing like seeing (and hearing) these large flocks wheel around the
area, one of my favorite fall bird spectacles in OR. Last year we had big
numbers through September, which should be fun come the OBA meeting in
Bandon late September.

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Fern Ridge Black-Necked Stilt - sitting on nest?
From: Priscilla Nam Hari Kaur <priscillanhk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 16:17:48 -0700
Bird-Lovers;
Campbell Center Birds of Oregon and General Science (BOGS)
went out to Fern Ridge this morning along Royal.
Best shorebird action was along the dike SOUTH of the observation platform.
Ponds immediately south on EAST side were in good shape
with shorebirds up close to the dike trail. The partial cloud cover this
morning actually made for good seeing of colors and field marks.

Most interesting perhaps was a Black-Necked Stilt which appeared
to be sitting on a nest maybe 20-30 feet east of the dike trail. Seems
pretty late in the season for nesting. There have been reports of two
successful B-N-Stilt families this Summer. Perhaps one of them is going for
a 2nd brood?  I didn't think of getting gps coords at the time. I would
estimate it was 200 to 300 feet south of the platform. There was a large
bush/tree on the east side of the trail and a mud-bar about 20 feet long
parallel to trail and 10 - 20 feet out from the shore. At the south end of
the mud bar but a foot or two further out, was a SMALL clump of short
grass. The Stilt was perched down on/in that clump.  We viewed it from
about the north end of the mud-bar, because the large bush would block the
view of it otherwise.

Shorebirds were pretty vocal - which was nice when they are so close too.
Greater Yellowlegs and Black-Necked Stilt did the most calling and flying.
We had one good look at a this-year bird juvenile Black-Tern, flying close
to us.

We did not go more than 1/8 mile south of the platform and saw a lot in
just that distance. We didn't get to the south corner or as far east as the
Barn Pond, so who knows what is out in those areas.

Didn't see any of the more "exotic" sandpipers; ie no Bairds, nor Solitary,
nor Spotted, nor Pectoral.  We were close enough to sort out Least from
Western Sandpipers, which is a first for me; and we had several
Semi-Palmated Plovers.  Some of the Yellowlegs were juveniles I'm told.

Large Crayfish were fending off Gulls with their large claws raised.

Looked for but did not see Clay-Colored Sparrows or Brewer's Sparrows at
the beginning of the trail, though there were lots of Savannah and Song
Sparrows as usual.

Otherwise, all the "usual suspects"; ie Osprey, Bitterns, Blue Herons,
White Pelicans, juvenile Yellowthroats and Marsh Wrens, Pied-Billed and
Western Grebes, Hooded Mergansers, various Swallows, Purple Martins, a Bald
Eagle ... 34 species in all ....

Priscilla
Subject: Re: Jackson Bottom Wetlands this afternoon
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:46:55 -0700
A quick look at South end of Wapato Marsh and Pintail Pond between 230 and 330 
this afternoon: Sub-adult Bald Eagle perched on telephone pole in wapato marsh: 
Head, back and belly mottled white and brown; viewed from behind, two or three 
worn tail feathers protruding well-beyond primary feather tips on left side but 
right side tail feathers were short, dark, barely visible. 

  
American Kestrel - 1 female
Turkey Vulute - 2
Osprey - 1
Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Canada Goose - 27
Mallard - 20
Great Blue Heron - 16 
Great Egret - 16 
California Gull - 1 juv, 3 adult
Least Sandpiper - 12
Western Sandpiper - 2
Semi-palmated Plover - 1
Killdeer - 5
Greater Yellowlegs - 2
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Belted Kingfisher - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 2
Barn Swallow - 10

Pintail pond has dropped several inches this week exposing more shoreline mud 
and weedy mud islands further out. All the shorebirds listed were found there. 


Steve Engel, Nature Program Supervisor
Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve | Parks and Recreation Department 
2600 SW Hillsboro Hwy., Hillsboro, OR 97123
Phone: 503-681-6283 |fax 503-681-6277
email: steve.engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov
web: www.jacksonbottom.org




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Subject: MY FIRST AUGUST WARBLER EVER
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:23:31 -0700
in my garden in Ashland, a Wilson's Warbler.

http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/14/birding-the-neighborhood/
-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: A NOT-SO-BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: PICS
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 13:41:27 -0700
a little bit of leucism adds a touch of individualism
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/08/14/birding-the-neighborhood/
-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Elegant Terns at Hammond Boat Basin
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 13:19:41 -0700
In Justin's original query regarding terns he did not mention the
photos he took of ELEGANT TERNS on the Hammond Boat Basin Jetty.
Well, I noticed them and went out this morning to check into them.

I found 28 Elegant Terns along with several hundred HEERMANN'S GULLS
on the jetty at around 08:30.  On a second visit around 11:00
there were no terns.

I failed to find any small terns on the Columbia River Beach at the
South Jetty (Justin's were COMMON TERNS).  I did manage to spot a
hatch-year MARBLED MURRELET on a short seawatch, however.

Shorebird numbers are picking up.  About 1200 on the Necanicum Estuary,
yesterday, 1500 on Trestle Bay and about 3000 at Tansy Point from the
overlook on 13th St in Warrenton.

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: bird sound apps for Android
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 12:56:15 -0700
Ralph Browning is interested in getting a good bird sound app for use on his 
Android phone. Please send any ideas directly to Ralph at: 


rlabn69 AT hotmail.com



.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Elegant terns Hammond
From: Justin Cook <jrc7219 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 12:14:41 -0700
There were 5 ELEGANT TERNS at Hammond OR yesterday as well. One of those things 
where you start erasing photos and you realize how did I freaking miss those... 

They were near the mouth where the boats were passing thru.

Crying on the inside,
Justin

Sent from my iPod

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Subject: New "Birds of Jackson County"
From: Jeffrey Tufts <jctufts33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 11:14:27 -0700
*BIRDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, Fourth Edition, is now available for sale ($5.00)
at local stores or by ordering directly from the Rogue Valley Audubon
Society (P. O. Box 8597, Medford, OR 97501).*


 *It will also be sold at RVAS chapter meetings beginning September 23.  *



*This popular reference source features monthly abundance charts and
distribution characteristics of all species seen in the last 25 years as
well as pre-1989 historical records.*



*Also in this booklet, updated since it was last published in 2009, is a
county map with reference marks to detailed descriptions of forty-five
Jackson County birding and hiking locations in the Rogue Valley, the
Siskiyous and the Cascades.*



*Introductory notes written by Jackson County Checklist Committee chair
Stewart Janes include discussion of changes in this fourth edition,
a general description of Jackson County and its birdlife, and extensive
comments on changes in local bird populations that have occurred in the
last four decades.*
Subject: Jackson Co shorebirds
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 08:28:25 -0700
I saw my first juvenile dowitcher of the season yesterday, a SHORT-BILLED 
DOWITCHER, at Kirtland Ponds. 



********************************************************************************8/13 
Tim Shelmerdine (PDX) and I went out in the rain looking for shorebirds. We 
birded Agate Lake and Kirtland Ponds and found a similar mix for both places. 

Present is decent numbers areKilldeerSemipalmated Plover (Agate)Wilson's 
PhalaropeRed-necked PhalaropeWestern/Least SandpiperSpotted 
SandpiperLong-billed DowitcherThere was a juvenal-plumaged Short-billed 
Dowitcher on the back pond of Kirtland this evening. Most shorebirds are in the 
"dirt" fields over the fence  AT  Kirtland....don't forget to look  AT  these.Good 
birding,Russ Namitz Medford, OR 
Subject: Ft Steven's Gull and Tern Help
From: Justin Cook <jrc7219 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 06:35:44 -0700
Hello,
So I believe I had a FRANKLIN'S GULL in Area D and COMMON TERNS in Area C
yesterday morning the 13th.

The Franklin's Gull (sorry about the quality):
Small gull with eye ring, dark legs, white spots on primary extensions.
Seems more "beefy" relatively than a Laughing.
https://flic.kr/p/ornsNG
https://flic.kr/p/ornyiP
https://flic.kr/p/ornyiP

Common Tern:
Bill color was comparable to Caspian's nearby with dark tip, gray under
parts but not as extensive as an Artic.
https://flic.kr/p/oHAC32
https://flic.kr/p/orobdc
https://flic.kr/p/ornFNZ

Criticism welcome!!  And thanks in advance for the corrections/help.


Highlights of my North Coast run:
MARBLED GODWITS in Hammond near Ft. Stevens.

HEERMAN'S GULL were in most places I stopped but plentiful in Area C of Ft.
Stevens.

SEMIPALMATED PALMATED PLOVERS, RED-THROATED LOON, SURF and BLACK SCOTERS in
Seaside.  A Peregrine was eating up the peeps so lots of excitement, the
peeps seemed to fly around me as a distraction/deterrent to the falcon?  A
few even landed about 20 feet away from me.

Thanks Again,

Justin Cook
Portland
Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 8-14-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 23:47:01 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* August 14, 2014
* ORPO1408.14

- birds mentioned

Sooty Shearwater
American White Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Red-shouldered Hawk
Black-bellied Plover
Pomarine Jaeger
Elegant Tern
Gray Catbird

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-2976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday August 14. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls at
503-233-3976.

Hot weather slowed birding during the week, but the fall migration is
increasing noticeable.

CATBIRDS continue to be reported along the nature trail at the Marine
Science Center on Yaquina Bay. On August 12 a flock of 16 ELEGANT TERNS were
at the South Jetty there. On August 8 a POMARINE JAEGER was off Boiler Bay.
Streams of SOOTY SHEARWATERS continue off northern Oregon beaches.

On August 7 about 24 WHITE PELICANS were at the north section of Sturgeon
Lake on Sauvie Island. A large number of GREAT EGRETS and GREAT BLUE HERONS
have gathered recently on Racetrack Lake on the island. On August 13 a
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was with them. A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was reported
August 13 at Steigerwald NWR.

Thats it for this week.

End transcript
Subject: Banded Canada Geese at Walterville Pond - update
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 23:15:31 -0700
The results are in on the banded geese I found earlier this week.

Both were banded on June 18, 2009 near the Columbia River SE of Wenatchee, 
Washington in the Rock Island area. 


One is male and one is female.  Their assumed hatch year is 2008 or earlier.

Sent from my iPad

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