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Updated on Friday, October 31 at 04:18 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Common Yellowthroat,©Barry Kent Mackay

31 Oct Possible Rusty Blackbird (heard only), E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area [Joel Geier ]
31 Oct Eugene siskin [Alan Contreras ]
31 Oct Union County : PINE GROSBEAK(S) ["" ]
31 Oct Re: Brown Booby - Yes! [Range Bayer ]
31 Oct Re: Bandon Alcid [Alan Contreras ]
31 Oct Bandon Alcid [Neil Bjorklund ]
31 Oct Re: ride to Newport - Albany [Joel Geier ]
31 Oct Brown Booby - Yes! ["John Sullivan" ]
31 Oct ride to Booby - Albany [Alan Contreras ]
31 Oct Comments on the Newport Brown Booby [Wayne Hoffman ]
31 Oct Re: *Fwd: Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes [Range Bayer ]
31 Oct brown booby again [Darrel Faxon ]
31 Oct Brown Booby, YES [Darrel Faxon ]
31 Oct [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
30 Oct FW: Rare warbler at The Dalles' Riverfront Park [Harry Nehls ]
30 Oct Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes ["Hemstrom, William" ]
30 Oct Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes ["Hemstrom, William" ]
30 Oct 87 snipe, 1200 Shovelers ["Paul Sullivan" ]
30 Oct photo request [Linda Fink ]
30 Oct Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay [Joel Geier ]
30 Oct Re: Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay [Joel Geier ]
30 Oct Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay ["Tom Crabtree" ]
30 Oct Re: Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay ["Tom Crabtree" ]
30 Oct Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes [Range Bayer ]
30 Oct Re: Barred Owl in the city (inner NE Portland), crows crows crows [Jeff Gilligan ]
30 Oct Brown Booby [Harry Nehls ]
30 Oct Safety warning - Siltcoos River [Alan Contreras ]
30 Oct Barred Owl in the city (inner NE Portland), crows crows crows [Bonnie Comegys ]
30 Oct White-throated Sparrow, Yamhill Co [Pamela K Johnston ]
30 Oct Bayocean Spit Hearing [Marg ]
30 Oct Early morning visitor [Mike Patterson ]
29 Oct RBA: Portland, OR 10-30-14 [Harry Nehls ]
29 Oct Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 10/29/2014 [Wink Gross ]
29 Oct Photos: Bald Eagle Baskett Slough NWR How Old?? [Jim Leonard ]
29 Oct Curry Birds [Tim Rodenkirk ]
29 Oct Lower Tualatin River Basin BAEA Nest Tree Lost [Jack Williamson ]
29 Oct Lane coast birds [Alan Contreras ]
29 Oct Deschutes County Wednesday Birders to Millican Valley ["judy" ]
29 Oct Re: hilarious bird photo [Joel Geier ]
29 Oct hilarious bird photo [Joel Geier ]
29 Oct Re: This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14 [Russ Namitz ]
29 Oct s cranes ["ron and Polly Maertz" ]
29 Oct Re: hilarious bird photo [Wayne Hoffman ]
29 Oct FOS Rock Sandpiper [Wayne Hoffman ]
29 Oct Osprey eating fish (Bass?) + Black Phoebe: Delta Ponds [Priscilla Nam Hari Kaur ]
29 Oct Surf Scoters at Foster ["Jeff Harding" ]
29 Oct 8 Tundra Swans on Water at Yaquina Bay [Range Bayer ]
29 Oct Wed morning, Eugene [Lawrence McQueen ]
29 Oct Re: Salem Red-throated Loon - From: Roy Gerig [Lillian ]
29 Oct This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14 [Lillian ]
29 Oct Salem Surf Scoter, 10/29/2014 [Roy Gerig ]
29 Oct Re: hilarious bird photo ["Tom Crabtree" ]
29 Oct Foster Reservoir- WW Scoters [Russ Namitz ]
29 Oct hilarious bird photo [Darrel Faxon ]
29 Oct Broughton Beach 10-27 Updates- Clark's Grebe, White-winged Scoter, Red-necked Grebe [Jen Sanford ]
29 Oct Re: [birding] Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County [Mark Nikas ]
28 Oct WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish [Russ Namitz ]
28 Oct Lincoln county coast, Tuesday ["Paul Sullivan" ]
28 Oct Commonwealth Lake, Beaverton [Michael Gold ]
28 Oct Re: [birding] Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley [Joel Geier ]
28 Oct Got Lewis's? Now performing in Jackson County. [Harry Fuller ]
28 Oct Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley [Joel Geier ]
28 Oct The rest of my day list... [Mike Patterson ]
28 Oct Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
28 Oct Re: A close encounter []
28 Oct A close encounter [Mike Patterson ]
28 Oct Salem Red-throated Loon [Roy Gerig ]
28 Oct Re: Possible Long-toed Stint foot detail ["Robert O'Brien" ]
28 Oct that Boiler Bay alcid [Darrel Faxon ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Bob Archer ]
28 Oct Aleutian cackling geese wintering near Tillamook ["WLRisser" ]
28 Oct Storm Birds again ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) ["Wayne Hoffman" ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Bob Archer ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Stefan Schlick ]
28 Oct Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed) [Shawneen Finnegan ]

Subject: Possible Rusty Blackbird (heard only), E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 13:50:05 -0700
Hi all,

This morning, on a quick walk at E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area just as the
sun was coming out, I heard a song that at first had me thinking of a
Sooty Fox Sparrow in terms of pitch (there have been quite a few singing
this month), but the cadence was strange and it seemed to be coming from
up in a stand of Oregon ash and cottonwoods -- higher up than I'd expect
to hear a Fox Sparrow.

My second thought was a Starling imitating a Fox Sparrow, since that
grove of trees often gets starlings that are better-than-average mimics
(of Sora and the like). But the song was repeated numerous times, each
time identical, without any starling-like phrases or improvisations
thrown in. Also it was moving along through the trees at intervals. 

The main phrase that I kept hearing was "ee-o-weee!" falling on the
second note, then rising emphatically, on the third, and with the hint
of a fourth short note dropping at the end. I heard it 10, maybe 12
times altogether, with perhaps 10-15 seconds between each repetition.

The third thought that came to mind for such a high-pitched song was
warbler -- and there were a ton of Yellow-rumps moving around so it
would have been easy for a warbler to be moving with them -- but it was
certainly not any warbler that I recognized. 

There were a *lot* of birds in the area, all very active so it was hard
to keep track of everything. Whatever it was finally moved off to
another clump of trees to the south, and after singing a few more times
from , then stopped singing.

Thinking how to describe the song, the first thing that came to mind was
the "ee-o-LAY" phrase of Eastern Meadowlark. But it didn't sound quite
like that either.

After I got home I ran through a bunch of warbler songs before I hit on
RUSTY BLACKBIRD -- bingo! The habitat seems reasonable -- wet woods. But
without a visual, I think it seems best to leave this as a "possible"
unless someone else can relocate the bird.

The location was in the SW part of E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area, along the
road that runs south from the skeet range (off of Camp Adair Rd.). Where
I first heard the bird was about 1/3 mile south of Camp Adair Rd, in the
trees alongside the powerline. Where I last heard it was about 300 yards
to the south of the initial location. If it kept moving, it would be in
Adair Village by now.

Happy birding,
Joel
--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Eugene siskin
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 13:40:03 -0700
I would not normally post a siskin, but the one at my feeder today is the first 
I have seen in flatland parts of Eugene since sometime in mid-2013. It arrived 
with three Lesser G. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Union County : PINE GROSBEAK(S)
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "AVITOURS@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 16:20:42 -0400
Birders -
This morning (10/31, 7:30 A.M.),  near Frazier Mountain,  above the 
Catherine Creek drainage, I finally got a  glimpse of the  PINE GROSBEAKS I 
had been 
hearing over the past several days. A cruddy,  but diagnostic digiscoped 
photo through my binos can be viewed here:   
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20393742
Good  birding,
-  Trent
The Bobolink - Linking Birders & Birds
1707  5th Street
La  Grande, OR  97850
(541) 963 -  2888
avitours AT aol.com  
Subject: Re: Brown Booby - Yes!
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:36:06 -0700
Hi,

Bob Olson reports that at about 10 AM this morning, the Brown Booby
was flying around and diving in the channel by the breakwater near
where it had been previously perched.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


On Fri, Oct 31, 2014 at 9:44 AM, John Sullivan
 wrote:
> Perched on platform, out from Undersea Gardens Dock now!
>
> John Sullivan
> Springfield, OR
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>


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Subject: Re: Bandon Alcid
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:09:25 -0700
Yo, birder. Could be a rhino but there have been thousands of southbound 
Cassin's Auklets in the past week. We saw three in the Siuslaw River last 
Sunday. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Oct 31, 2014, at 11:03 AM, Neil Bjorklund wrote:

> Havent posted here in years, but starting to get out birding more of late. 
Hello everyone! 

> 
> Yesterday, standing on the north jetty of the Coquille River at Bandon, I saw 
at close range (about 50 meters) a small, plump-bodied sea bird that was 
basically all black with a white belly, with shortish wings and head. The head 
was clearly all black or dark gray, and the body looked distinctively plump and 
rounded. The wind was blowing fiercely from the south and as the bird flew 
south towards me on the jetty, it hit the wind coming over the jetty and got 
blown back around to the north. I tentatively IDed this as a Rhinoceros 
Auklet, but Ive had relatively little experience with sea birds. Is there some 
other species I should also consider? 

> 
> I also saw about 25 Sabines gulls flying over the jetty at close rangequite 
a lovely sight. On the beach, an exhausted and confused looking Marbled Godwit 
seemed to be looking for a place to get out of the wind (or maybe just to hide 
from me). As I walked up the beach, many gulls were headed south, flying only a 
few inches above the sand. It looked like a hard go for the south-bounders. 

> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Neil Bjorklund
> Eugene, OR
Subject: Bandon Alcid
From: Neil Bjorklund <nbjorklund AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:03:47 -0700
Havent posted here in years, but starting to get out birding more of late.
Hello everyone!

Yesterday, standing on the north jetty of the Coquille River at Bandon, I
saw at close range (about 50 meters) a small, plump-bodied sea bird that was
basically all black with a white belly, with shortish wings and head.  The
head was clearly all black or dark gray, and the body looked distinctively
plump and rounded.  The wind was blowing fiercely from the south and as the
bird flew south towards me on the jetty, it hit the wind coming over the
jetty and got blown back around to the north.  I tentatively IDed this as a
Rhinoceros Auklet, but Ive had relatively little experience with sea birds.
Is there some other species I should also consider?

I also saw about 25 Sabines gulls flying over the jetty at close
rangequite a lovely sight.  On the beach, an exhausted and confused looking
Marbled Godwit seemed to be looking for a place to get out of the wind (or
maybe just to hide from me).  As I walked up the beach, many gulls were
headed south, flying only a few inches above the sand.  It looked like a
hard go for the south-bounders.

Thanks,

Neil Bjorklund
Eugene, OR

Subject: Re: ride to Newport - Albany
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:23:03 -0700
Hi all,

This a perfect situation to make use of public transportation, since the
bus:

http://www.co.benton.or.us/pw/stf/coast.php

is nearly as fast as you can get there in a car, and parking in downtown
Newport is always difficult.

I tried to put the info out on the Midvalley list but there seems to be
a problem with the name of the bird.

Unfortunately it's too late to catch either of the two morning buses
from the Amtrak station in Albany or downtown Corvallis

The 3:25 PM bus will get you there by 5:05 PM but you would either need
to overnight in Newport, or hitch a ride home (unless you can somehow
see the bird in 10 minutes before the last bus leaves at 5:15 PM). But
for anyone planning a trip tomorrow, the timetable is much more
favorable.

Happy car-free birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Brown Booby - Yes!
From: "John Sullivan" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "Oropendolas@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 09:44:07 -0700
Perched on platform, out from Undersea Gardens Dock now!

John Sullivan
Springfield, OR

Sent from my iPad


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Subject: ride to Booby - Albany
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:44:05 -0700
Tristen Hynes from Albany is looking for a ride to see the Newport booby today. 
If you can help, call or text him at (541) 990-7230. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 




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Subject: Comments on the Newport Brown Booby
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:41:47 -0700
Hi -

I studied the booby at length yesterday afternoon, and took quite a few
photos.  Based on my notes and photos, I have a few comments.

First, I compared its plumage to the criteria in Peter Pyle's
"Identification Guide to North American Birds Part II."  Pyle has a drawing
of underparts pattern on Brown Boobies, and based on it, this bird would be
between 24 and 36 months old, or third cycle. Basically. the underparts,
below the dark chocolate upper breast are white with a light mottling of
brown.  Behind the feet the lower belly is fully white. If the bird
survives, it would presumably achieve full adult plumage within the next
year.

Second, the bird has facial features indicating it is a female, although I
am not completely sure these are reliable on subadults.  First is a dark
area extending a little out the bill from the eye.  This is a female
character in adults.  Secondly, the pale of the bill (more on color later)
extends way back onto the bare skin on the lower mandible.  Again this is a
feature of adult females:  this skin is dark on adult males.

My recollection of the accounts of Brown Boobies on the Pacific Coast north
of southern California is that most that have been sexed are females, so it
may be that females have a greater propensity to wander north.  Females
average larger than males in these and other boobies.

Third:  Soft Parts colors.  This bird has yellow feet, but a duller yellow
than I have seen in adults in the tropics.  The bill is pale, but in my
photos shows a distinctly pinkish tint.  This is strongest in the middle.
The tip is fairly dark, and at the base the pink fades toward white.
Juvenile Brown Boobies have grayish bills and adults have yellow.
Lighting conditions yesterday afternoon were challenging, so I would really
like to see it again in better light.  Hopefully it will stay with us a
while.

I will send photos to OBRC.

Wayne
Subject: Re: *Fwd: Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:26:50 -0700
Hi,

This morning (Oct. 31) at 8:19 AM, Deb Holland telephoned that she is
watching the Brown Booby in the same area and maybe the same spot as
yesterday.  She is on the pier at Port Dock 1 where the sea lions are,
and the Brown Booby is perched to the south on a wooden structure with
crossbars.

Last night at 4:25 PM, Janet Lamberson reported to eBird that she saw
it; "On channel marker off sea wall, seen from public pier adjacent to
Undersea Gardens; dark upperparts, neck and head, light belly, pale
bill..."

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon

On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 6:10 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Hemstrom, William 
> Date: Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 5:42 PM
> Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes
> To: range.bayer AT gmail.com
> Cc: Harry Nehls , OBOL ,
> "Lincoln Co. Birding & Nature Observing" 
>
>
> Hey folks,
>
> The Brown Booby is still in newport as of 5:41, just where it was last 
reported. 

>
> Best,
> Will Hemstrom
>
> On Oct 30, 2014 4:04 PM, "Range Bayer"  wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Wayne Hoffman telephoned at 3:55 PM to report that he is watching the
>> Brown Booby at the Newport Bayfront.  He is standing on Port Dock 1 on
>> the pier where people go out to watch sea lions
>> (http://www.newportsealiondocks.com/).  The Brown Booby is perched on
>> the railing on top of the Range Marker across from Undersea Gardens
>> (250 SW Bay Blvd).
>>
>> Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 1:56 PM, Harry Nehls  wrote:
>> > OBOLers,
>> >
>> > John Gutherie  just called to report that a Brown Booby is now sitting on
>> > buoy just off the Newport Waterfront on Yaquina Bay.
>> >
>> > Harry
>> > Harry Nehls
>> > Portland, Oregon
>> >
>>
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>


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Subject: brown booby again
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:25:46 -0700
8:23 a.m.  Chuck Philo just called to tell me the Brown Booby is back on
the navigational structure.

Darrel
Subject: Brown Booby, YES
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:20:40 -0700
Following a hunch that the booby would perch all night where it was seen at
5:40 on Thursday, I arrived at the sight this morning before daylight. By
7:25 I was able to discern the booby perched on the navigational marker
south of the Undersea Gardens in Yaquina Bay.  At 7:30, before it was fully
daylight, it left the perch and flew west. I soon lost sight of it against
the backdrop of the breakwater on the opposite side of the bay.

Darrel
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 06:26:27 -0700

From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 31, 2014 6:09:21 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Surf Scoter (3 Marion)
Red-breasted Merganser (1 Klamath)
Brown Booby (2 Lincoln)
Great Egret (1 Wasco)
Turkey Vulture (2 Tillamook)
Spotted Sandpiper (1 Klamath)
Western Sandpiper (1 Lane)
Red-necked Phalarope (1 Clatsop)
Williamson's Sapsucker (1 Grant)
Western Scrub-Jay (2 Grant)
Northern Waterthrush (1 Wasco)
American Tree Sparrow (1 Columbia)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: FW: Rare warbler at The Dalles' Riverfront Park
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:11:08 -0700
Harry Nehls
Portland, Oregon


------ Forwarded Message
From: Stuart Johnston 
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:41:07 -0700
To: Steve Bradley , John Price
, Dan Sager , Jane Camero
, Linda Steider , Robert Hansen
, Diane and Roger Gadway , Janet
and Paul Essley and Moyer , Jake Jakabosky
, "bakerrogerd AT hotmail.com"
, Cathy Flick , David Irons
, Sally Gilchrist , Harry
Nehls , Theo Anderson 
Subject: Rare warbler at The Dalles' Riverfront Park

 Friends...
This afternoon while surveying the waterfowl off The Dalles Riverfront Park,
"out of the corner of my ear" I heard an unfamiliar call, every so often,
from false indigo around the little pond back of the beach and below the
restroom. As I made my way around the pond's s. side, moving westward, I
heard the call closeby again (not a soft call) and began psh-ing. Noted some
movement in the f. indigo just ahead of me and got binoculars on it. Small
brown-above bird with wagging brown tail, half hidden back in there by
branches and spase leaves. Figured it must be either Palm or N. Waterthrush.
It flew across a small opening in the riparian and I decided to go round to
the opposite side of the pond and try to scope it in under the overhanging
f. indigo branches. And I lucked out...got to study it in scope (30x Bausch
and Lomb) for 11 minutes, 1711-1720...then had to rush off in order to get
to work on time. It was a Northern Waterthrush. It walked about in the
sparse forbs on the muddy shore in under the false indigo bushes, coming
towards me as it walked and foraged, pumping tail up and down all the while.
Brown upperparts (cap, from forehead to hindneck, back, wings, tail); no
wingbars. Dark line through the eye with conspicuous white eyebrow and also
a white strip in malar area, between the dusky auriculars and a dark stripe
on the side of the white throat. Underparts white with lots of dark
streaking across breast, extending down onto belly and flanks. Vent,
undertail coverts white. Dark eyeline congealed into a blob at the rear of
the auriculars. Legs looked pinkish-grey and bill appeared to be dark, but
the lighting was not great in under the brush. Heavy overcast skies, calm.
Temp. was 60 degrees F at 1603 on a bank sign in The Dalles.
 
Harry or David, you might want to put something on OBOL (and Tweeters?); I'm
not able to post it.
 
All the best....
Stuart Johnston
       


------ End of Forwarded Message
Subject: Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes
From: "Hemstrom, William" <hemstrow AT onid.oregonstate.edu>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:42:30 -0700
Hey folks,

The Brown Booby is still in newport as of 5:41, just where it was last
reported.

Best,
Will Hemstrom
On Oct 30, 2014 4:04 PM, "Range Bayer"  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Wayne Hoffman telephoned at 3:55 PM to report that he is watching the
> Brown Booby at the Newport Bayfront.  He is standing on Port Dock 1 on
> the pier where people go out to watch sea lions
> (http://www.newportsealiondocks.com/).  The Brown Booby is perched on
> the railing on top of the Range Marker across from Undersea Gardens
> (250 SW Bay Blvd).
>
> Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon
>
>
>
> On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 1:56 PM, Harry Nehls  wrote:
> > OBOLers,
> >
> > John Gutherie  just called to report that a Brown Booby is now sitting on
> > buoy just off the Newport Waterfront on Yaquina Bay.
> >
> > Harry
> > Harry Nehls
> > Portland, Oregon
> >
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes
From: "Hemstrom, William" <hemstrow AT onid.oregonstate.edu>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:41:13 -0700
Hey folks,

The Brown Booby is still VoicE
On Oct 30, 2014 4:04 PM, "Range Bayer"  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Wayne Hoffman telephoned at 3:55 PM to report that he is watching the
> Brown Booby at the Newport Bayfront.  He is standing on Port Dock 1 on
> the pier where people go out to watch sea lions
> (http://www.newportsealiondocks.com/).  The Brown Booby is perched on
> the railing on top of the Range Marker across from Undersea Gardens
> (250 SW Bay Blvd).
>
> Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon
>
>
>
> On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 1:56 PM, Harry Nehls  wrote:
> > OBOLers,
> >
> > John Gutherie  just called to report that a Brown Booby is now sitting on
> > buoy just off the Newport Waterfront on Yaquina Bay.
> >
> > Harry
> > Harry Nehls
> > Portland, Oregon
> >
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: 87 snipe, 1200 Shovelers
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:30:09 -0700
We birded Sheridan Sewage Ponds and other spots in Yamhill County today.  We
saw:

 

4             Eared Grebe

1             Great Blue Heron

20           Canada Goose

140        Cackling Geese

5             American Wigeon

150        Mallard

1200      Northern Shoveler

12           Northern Pintail

1             Green-winged Teal

5             Ring-necked Duck

1             Greater Scaup

20           Lesser Scaup

100        Bufflehead

6             Hooded Merganser

175        Ruddy Duck  

2             Red-tailed Hawk

500        American Coot

6             Killdeer

35           Dunlin

10           Wilson's Snipe

2             California Gull

2             Herring Gull

1             Eurasian Collared Dove

1             Belted Kingfisher

2             Western Scrub-Jay

2             American Robin

6             European Starling

3             Song Sparrow

4             White-crowned Sparrow

1             Western Meadowlark

12           Brewer's Blackbird

 

Brigittine Monastery SW of Amity

 

2             Pied-billed Grebe

300        American Wigeon

500        Mallard

50           Northern Shoveler

400        Northern Pintail

600        Green-winged Teal

50           Ring-necked Duck

50           Ruddy Duck  

3             Bald Eagle

 

McKee Rd pond, S of Amity

 

6             Mallard

1             Greater Yellowlegs

87           WILSON'S SNIPE - Has anyone else seen such a gathering of this
species?

 

Good birding, everyone,

 

Paul Sulllivan & Carol Karlen

McMinnville
Subject: photo request
From: Linda Fink <linda AT fink.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:22:43 -0700
The photo list of birds seen on our farm that I've been working on now 
has all the photos I can find that I took here. I am missing quite a few 
species, of course. Might anyone who saw the Sage Sparrow in 2004 have a 
photo I might use (that they can find)? I will give credit to the 
photographer, of course. Or any other species seen and photographed here 
that I do not have. Here is my blog post so far:

http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/fink-family-farm-bird-list.html

Thanks!

Linda
-- 
http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/


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Subject: Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:18:28 -0700
Thanks Tom! 

That was just a wild guess from my end (the old "with two dots you can
always fit a line" theory) but it starts to make more sense with your
research into the NW Idaho & Eastern Washington lists. 

I wanted to add a note of caution to what I sent earlier, just to avoid
unfortunate incidents: 

If you hear raucous calls that don't sound like the usual corvids coming
from your neighbors' backyard, it's good to keep in mind that it could
just be your neighbors out partying in their hot tub (or whatever ...
folks who live in meth country can fill in the blanks). But after that,
it's good to think about True-Blue Jays.

Happy birding,
Joel

On Thu, 2014-10-30 at 16:54 -0800, Tom Crabtree wrote:
> Joel is definitely onto something with regard to a Blue Jay Invasion.  A
> look at the NW Idaho/Eastern Washington listserv shows that in the last
> month there have been no fewer than 11 Blue Jays reported at 8 separate
> locations in that region.  Most of that area does not normally get any jays
> at all.  Keep your eyes and ears open, they are likely to show up in a
> woodlot near you (relatively speaking).
> 
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu
> [mailto:cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu] On Behalf Of Joel Geier
> Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 1:11 PM
> To: Central Oregon Birders
> Subject: Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay
> 
> Hi COBOLers,
> 
> A Blue Jay also turned west of the Cascades this week. It was seen a few
> miles north of Albany (Linn County) on Tuesday. The observer was hearing
> similar calls for much of the week before she and her husband saw the jay,
> so it's probably been around since Oct 20 or so. 
> 
> There might be a bit of a Blue Jay irruption going on, so if you hear some
> raucous calls that don't sound like the usual corvids ... might be worth
> checking it out.
> 
> Happy birding,
> Joel
> 
> 





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Subject: Re: Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:18:28 -0700
Thanks Tom! 

That was just a wild guess from my end (the old "with two dots you can
always fit a line" theory) but it starts to make more sense with your
research into the NW Idaho & Eastern Washington lists. 

I wanted to add a note of caution to what I sent earlier, just to avoid
unfortunate incidents: 

If you hear raucous calls that don't sound like the usual corvids coming
from your neighbors' backyard, it's good to keep in mind that it could
just be your neighbors out partying in their hot tub (or whatever ...
folks who live in meth country can fill in the blanks). But after that,
it's good to think about True-Blue Jays.

Happy birding,
Joel

On Thu, 2014-10-30 at 16:54 -0800, Tom Crabtree wrote:
> Joel is definitely onto something with regard to a Blue Jay Invasion.  A
> look at the NW Idaho/Eastern Washington listserv shows that in the last
> month there have been no fewer than 11 Blue Jays reported at 8 separate
> locations in that region.  Most of that area does not normally get any jays
> at all.  Keep your eyes and ears open, they are likely to show up in a
> woodlot near you (relatively speaking).
> 
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu
> [mailto:cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu] On Behalf Of Joel Geier
> Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 1:11 PM
> To: Central Oregon Birders
> Subject: Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay
> 
> Hi COBOLers,
> 
> A Blue Jay also turned west of the Cascades this week. It was seen a few
> miles north of Albany (Linn County) on Tuesday. The observer was hearing
> similar calls for much of the week before she and her husband saw the jay,
> so it's probably been around since Oct 20 or so. 
> 
> There might be a bit of a Blue Jay irruption going on, so if you hear some
> raucous calls that don't sound like the usual corvids ... might be worth
> checking it out.
> 
> Happy birding,
> Joel
> 
> 



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Subject: Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:54:20 -0800
Joel is definitely onto something with regard to a Blue Jay Invasion.  A
look at the NW Idaho/Eastern Washington listserv shows that in the last
month there have been no fewer than 11 Blue Jays reported at 8 separate
locations in that region.  Most of that area does not normally get any jays
at all.  Keep your eyes and ears open, they are likely to show up in a
woodlot near you (relatively speaking).

Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu
[mailto:cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu] On Behalf Of Joel Geier
Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 1:11 PM
To: Central Oregon Birders
Subject: Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay

Hi COBOLers,

A Blue Jay also turned west of the Cascades this week. It was seen a few
miles north of Albany (Linn County) on Tuesday. The observer was hearing
similar calls for much of the week before she and her husband saw the jay,
so it's probably been around since Oct 20 or so. 

There might be a bit of a Blue Jay irruption going on, so if you hear some
raucous calls that don't sound like the usual corvids ... might be worth
checking it out.

Happy birding,
Joel




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Subject: Re: Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:54:20 -0800
Joel is definitely onto something with regard to a Blue Jay Invasion.  A
look at the NW Idaho/Eastern Washington listserv shows that in the last
month there have been no fewer than 11 Blue Jays reported at 8 separate
locations in that region.  Most of that area does not normally get any jays
at all.  Keep your eyes and ears open, they are likely to show up in a
woodlot near you (relatively speaking).

Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu
[mailto:cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu] On Behalf Of Joel Geier
Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 1:11 PM
To: Central Oregon Birders
Subject: Re: [COBOL] Deschutes River Woods Blue Jay

Hi COBOLers,

A Blue Jay also turned west of the Cascades this week. It was seen a few
miles north of Albany (Linn County) on Tuesday. The observer was hearing
similar calls for much of the week before she and her husband saw the jay,
so it's probably been around since Oct 20 or so. 

There might be a bit of a Blue Jay irruption going on, so if you hear some
raucous calls that don't sound like the usual corvids ... might be worth
checking it out.

Happy birding,
Joel


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http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

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Subject: Re: Brown Booby at Newport Bayfront--Yes
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:03:34 -0700
Hi,

Wayne Hoffman telephoned at 3:55 PM to report that he is watching the
Brown Booby at the Newport Bayfront.  He is standing on Port Dock 1 on
the pier where people go out to watch sea lions
(http://www.newportsealiondocks.com/).  The Brown Booby is perched on
the railing on top of the Range Marker across from Undersea Gardens
(250 SW Bay Blvd).

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon



On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 1:56 PM, Harry Nehls  wrote:
> OBOLers,
>
> John Gutherie  just called to report that a Brown Booby is now sitting on
> buoy just off the Newport Waterfront on Yaquina Bay.
>
> Harry
> Harry Nehls
> Portland, Oregon
>


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Subject: Re: Barred Owl in the city (inner NE Portland), crows crows crows
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:05:28 -0700
I saw crows mobbing the corpse of a fresh road-kill Barred Owl near the grocery 
store on Highway 101 in Lincoln Beach on Monday. I tossed the corpse into the 
median strip. 






On Oct 30, 2014, at 1:19 PM, Bonnie Comegys  wrote:

> Yesterday early afternoon investigated what was upsetting the crows near 
where I work, three crows very vocal in trees on NE 3rd ave. near Wasco 
(Convention center nearby). 

> Found was a Barred Owl being harrassed, sometimes he flew from branch to 
branch, crows very vocal. Later, approaching 5pm, there were a whole lot of 
crows mobbing the owl, more than could be counted, who had moved to trees 
across Wasco, large mob who perhaps were gathering for roost later, highly 
agitated. First time saw an owl this location, is usually Red tailed Hawk that 
gets there attention. 

>  
> Bonnie Comegys
> blcomegys at gmail.com
Subject: Brown Booby
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:56:34 -0700
OBOLers,

John Gutherie  just called to report that a Brown Booby is now sitting on
buoy just off the Newport Waterfront on Yaquina Bay.

Harry
Harry Nehls
Portland, Oregon

Subject: Safety warning - Siltcoos River
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:28:10 -0700
Anyone birding the Siltcoos River mouth for Snowy plover or other delights (it 
has had other delights, e.g. Smith's Longspur, Curlew Sandpiper, Blackpoll 
etc.) should note the following about local conditions. 


I strongly advise not taking the Waxmyrtle Trail along the south bank of the 
Siltcoos to the beach. There is a stretch of maybe 30 yards, 3/4 of the way 
out, that is now too close to the river's edge and has a few soft spots. It 
needs to be closed until it can be rebuilt because there is no way to work 
around that section through the brush - it is too heavy. Stephan and I got 
through it, but it was not fun. I'd be astonished if that stretch survives the 
winter. 


The workaround is to take the perfectly safe wide trail out from the 
campground, which is longer but in good shape. You can then cross back over to 
the ponds across the dune. 


The recent storm has also jammed a lot of debris into the "north slough" access 
point on the north side of the river. This, however, has only occluded the 
short access trail in one spot and is passable with care. If we get some high 
tides under calm conditions I suspect some of that wood and garboleum will 
drift out. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Barred Owl in the city (inner NE Portland), crows crows crows
From: Bonnie Comegys <blcomegys AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:19:55 -0700
Yesterday early afternoon investigated what was upsetting the crows near
where I work, three crows very vocal in trees on NE 3rd ave. near Wasco
(Convention center nearby).
Found was a Barred Owl being harrassed, sometimes he flew from branch
to branch, crows very vocal. Later, approaching 5pm, there were a whole lot
of crows mobbing the owl, more than could be counted, who had moved to
trees across Wasco, large mob who perhaps were gathering for roost later,
highly agitated.  First time saw an owl this location, is usually Red
tailed Hawk that gets there attention.

Bonnie Comegys
blcomegys at gmail.com
Subject: White-throated Sparrow, Yamhill Co
From: Pamela K Johnston <pamelaj AT spiritone.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:52:19 -0700
Just now a tan-striped White-throated Sparrow popped up on the deck of my 
house. This is a first, and very unexpected. 


Pamela Johnston
outside 
McMinnvilleڭb0yb(ڭbnLjv{*.rzmyb(% 

if׫j+jz祊l
Subject: Bayocean Spit Hearing
From: Marg <mtweel AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 11:48:59 -0700
The Bayocean Spit Hearing is November 13 ,7PM  second floor of the 
Tillamook County Courthouse- Attendance is encouraged even
for those not planning to testify
Request is for a recreational campground,marina, cycling,equestrian 
staging area,gardens, and research station.
Applicant is Bay Ocean LLC  which has 163 page document now.
You can write a letter to:    Sarah Absher Senior Planner
                                               Tillamook County 
Department of Community Development
                                                1510-B Third Street
                                                 Tillamook, OR 97141
I have a couple pages of information which I will forward to anyone 
wishing it.   Cape Meares Community is fighting this with an
organized group but needs the help from everyone.  Please come.
Marg Tweelinckx   mtweel AT charter.net


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Subject: Early morning visitor
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:11:56 -0700
Teresa noted something sitting on the telephone wire this
morning...

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 10-30-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 23:41:46 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* October 30, 2014
* ORPO1410.30

- birds mentioned

Surf scoter
White-winged Scoter
BROWN BOOBY
Brown Pelican
Rough-legged Hawk
Sandhill Crane
Sanderling
Rock Sandpiper
Red Phalarope
Sabines Gull
Franklins Gull
Heermanns Gull
vega Herring Gull
Tropical Kingbird
BLUE JAY
BROWN THRASHER
Grasshopper Sparrow
Pine Grosbeak

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday October 30. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls
at 503-233-3976.

A major storm pushed ashore and inland during the week bringing offshore
migrants close to the beaches. Birders along the coast recorded amazingly
high numbers for many species. Few rare birds were recorded but on October
23 a BROWN BOOBY was off Boiler Bay. On October 25 one was north of Pacific
City off Tierra del Mar. A probable VEGA HERRING GULL was at Yaquina Bay
October 27.

Inland reports of wind blown birds included a BROWN PELICAN, two HEERMANNS
GULLS, and a SABINES GULL at the Philomath Sewage Ponds; two RED PHALAROPES
at Fern Ridge Reservoir and two at Foster Reservoir near Sweet Home. Four
WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were seen at Foster Reservoir and up to four along the
Columbia River in the Portland-Ridgefield area. SURF SCOTERS were reported
from Lake Selmac, the Copeland Ponds in Grants Pass, in Salem, at the
Philomath Sewage Ponds, and 10 on Foster Reservoir. Many reports along the
Columbia River in the Portland area included up to 13 off Hayden Island.

On October 26 a FRANKLINS GULL was off Boiler Bay. The next day a
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen at the South Jetty of Yaquina Bay. A ROCK
SANDPIPER was there October 29. On October 26 three TROPICAL KINGBIRDS were
in Astoria. A southward movement of CRANES was reported October 27 in
southwest Portland and in Canby. A ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was at Jackson Bottom
in Hillsboro October 26. A BLUE JAY was reported October 28 in Albany.

On October 24 a male PINE GROSBEAK was seen near Boardman. A BROWN THRASHER
was in Mt. Vernon October 28. A SANDERLING was at the Redmond Sewage Ponds
October 26.

Thats it for this week.

- end transcript












Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 10/29/2014
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 22:25:16 -0700
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 10/23/14 to 10/29/14. Species neither seen nor 
heard the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 4 days this week.

Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

Cackling Goose              1  (30+, 10/24)
CANADA GOOSE                1  (15, 10/24)
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK          1  (1, 10/23)
Coopers Hawk               2  (1, 10/24 & 28)
Red-tailed Hawk             1  (1, 10/28)
Band-tailed Pigeon          1  (1, 10/24)
Anna's Hummingbird          4  (4)
Red-breasted Sapsucker      1  (1, 10/29)
Downy Woodpecker            1  (1, 10/28)
Northern Flicker            4  (5)
PILEATED WOODPECKER         1  (1, 10/28)
HUTTONS VIREO              1  (1, 10/29)
Steller's Jay               4  (6)
American Crow               4  (12, 10/24)
Black-capped Chickadee      4  (12)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   3  (2)	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       4  (4)
Pacific Wren                2  (1, 10/28 & 29)
Bewicks Wren               1  (3, 10/29)
Golden-crowned Kinglet      2  (3, 10/28)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet        3  (1)
Hermit Thrush               1  (1, 10/29)
American Robin              3  (6, 10/29)
Varied Thrush               4  (7)
European Starling           3  (6, 10/24)
Spotted Towhee              4  (7)
FOX SPARROW                 1  (3, 10/29)
Song Sparrow                4  (7)
Dark-eyed Junco             4  (24, 10/23)
House Finch                 1  (1, 10/28)
Lesser Goldfinch            1  (2, 10/23)
American Goldfinch          1  (1, 10/29)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: BALD EAGLE, SANDHILL CRANE, 
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, PEREGRINE FALCON, WESTERN SCRUB-JAY, GOLDEN-CROWNED 
SPARROW 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Photos: Bald Eagle Baskett Slough NWR How Old??
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:04:43 -0700
I went to Baskett Slough NWR this afternoon.  A Bald Eagle was perched on
top of a power pole at the narrows parking area on Coville Rd.  It was very
tolerate of me taking photos out my pickup window and never did fly away.
It had some blood and feathers on it's beak.  Must of had a recent kill.  I
am guessing it was about 3 years old.  I have heard they get the full white
head at around 4 years old.  What do you think the age is?  Click on link
for photos.  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6075837258074255489?authkey=CKWsw5i74ICCfw 
Subject: Curry Birds
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:59:03 -0700
Terry Wahl reports one TROPICAL KINGBIRD at the family ranch near Cape
Blanco on Monday and a SNOW GOOSE today.

That's all for now,
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Lower Tualatin River Basin BAEA Nest Tree Lost
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:06:35 -0700
When I forwarded a high-wind warning to this group the other day I wasn't
sure if my cautionary tone was appropriate - especially since (we) birders
love severe weather events.

Having said that - the last thing I expected was the message I received
today from the Jeans about the loss of their Bald Eagle Nest Tree in the
wind storm. It was a 100+ year-old ponderosa pine, over 150' tall, which a
pairs of eagles called home for the past seven years.

The nest splintered into tiny fragments on impact and except for an
unscathed mole-trap, little-else of notable interest was discovered within
the remains of the nest.

On a fun non-birding note I learned (1800 pound) scottish long haired
cattle are docile and very approachable - especially if you're bearing the
gift of apples. Information I will incorporate into all plans to visit to
this wonderful farm in the future.

http://www.jack-n-jill.net/eagle_nest_tree_lost

-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Lane coast birds
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:37:47 -0700
I birded the morning on both sides of the Siltcoos estuary and the early 
afternoon along South Jetty Road at Florence, both with Stephan Nance. Diane 
Pettey joined us for the north side of Siltcoos. 


Highlights at Siltcoos: Northern Shrike (adult), flushed flock of about 20 
Snowy Plovers out of the dunes, good looks at one (no bands at all) on the 
beach. 2 Semi Plovers in the area, likewise one adult and one subadult Bald 
Eagle. Also had in-yo-face looks at Wrentit, always fun. One imm. 
Red-shouldered Hawk was along the river. An odd shorebird flushed out of the 
marshy pond by the beach, Pectoral sized but making a quiet "purp" call and 
seemed rather dull for Pectoral. It had a fairly short bill. It got away, 
flying out southbound and at least briefly joining a flock of Starlings, quite 
odd. Department of Wild Speculation: a late adult Sharp-tail? 


By the way, we saw southbound flocks of Starlings all day over the inner 
beaches. I didn't realize that they had such a movement. 


A note of caution to anyone birding Siltcoos. The Waxmyrtle Trail is in poor 
condition halfway along, almost collapsed into the river, and the central 
segment alongside the river is quite dangerous. 


South Jetty Road was not very flashy, though it had several harriers. The 
channel was good, with all three loons and a surprising 13 Red-necked Grebes. 


Stephan can add anything I forgot.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Deschutes County Wednesday Birders to Millican Valley
From: "judy" <jmeredit AT bendnet.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:22:29 -0700
If you are going to get a flat tire, have Clay Crofton, Tom Lawler and
Howard Horvath along to do the deed. When the spare needed some air, and
none was at the "station" in Brothers, Clay knew to try the ODOT shop and
get air from them.  They were great. So we kept birding. Thanks guys.  The
morning was slow to get started. Eventually we started seeing thrushes and
meadowlarks. We saw a dozen Red tails before any other raptor species
appeared. The bluebirds were brilliant today, both Westerns and Mountain.
Raptors around Harman Road were all busy hunting on the ground. A male
Northern Harrier sat feasting while we drove by close to it. Sadly, a
Rough=legged Hawk had met it's demise recently, dead along the fenceline and
already predated.  Hundreds of Pronghorn Antelope today, nearly every place
we stopped. The coyotes must have new winter coats because they were just so
beautiful, busy hunting the same fields as the raptors.  Nice morning with
the expected species for this time of year.  We were seeing Belding's Ground
squirrels and Chipmunks scurrying around in many places.  So plenty of easy
pickings for those raptors.

List below, some birds with explanation. This report was mailed for Judy
Meredith by http://birdnotes.net

East of Bend, first stop along Moffit Road, then Brothers, Camp Creek, and
lastly Harman Road.
Bald Eagle = 3 or more Harman Rd
Northern Harrier = 4 or more
Sharp-shinned Hawk  = 1 hunting low on sage off Harman Rd
Cooper's Hawk = 2, one at WBU carpooling area, took a Cedar Waxwing
Red-tailed Hawk
Ferruginous Hawk = 4 or more Harman Rd
Rough-legged Hawk = 4 or more Harman Rd
Golden Eagle = 3
American Kestrel
Rock Dove
Mourning Dove
Northern Shrike = one for sure, a juvie, brownish. Other bird was chasing
Solitaires, Shrike species. So 2 shrikes, one unidentified.

Steller's Jay
Western Scrub-Jay
Black-billed Magpie
Common Raven
Horned Lark = big flock Harman  Rd but too distant to scrutinize, 200 or so
birds total

Canyon Wren  = Dry River Canyon overlook
Western Bluebird  = flock along Moffit
Mountain Bluebird  = lots around Harman
Townsend's Solitaire = off Harman
American Robin
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing = WBU  while  shuffling out of cars
Spotted Towhee = Brothers "oasis"
Savannah Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Western Meadowlark
American Goldfinch = Brothers "oasis"
House Sparrow

Total number of species seen: 32
birders today: Clay Crofton, Steve Day, Marion Davidson, Tom Lawler, Jan
Rising, Tim
Smith and Nancy Abrams, Howard Horvath, Ted and Susan Groszkiewicz, Diane
Burgess, Sherrie Pierce, Tom Penpraze, Judy Meredith. Good birding, judy,
jmeredit AT bendnet.com 



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Subject: Re: hilarious bird photo
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:33:07 -0700
P.P.P.S. To be fair to this outfit, at least they got the keywords
right.
Subject: hilarious bird photo
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:17:54 -0700
Hi Darrel, Tom & All,

The way I read this, only one of the birds in the photo is a Crested
Auklet. Can you tell which one it is?

www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html

This seems to be one of the really tough and underappreciated ID
problems, even more difficult than Least vs. Long-toed Sandpiper. 

Who knew that auklets and dunlin could be so similar in flight? It must
be another example of convergent evolution, like starlings and
meadowlarks.

Happy birding,
Joel

P.S. Looking at my Sibley guide, I'd say that, despite his obvious
skills in portraying most other bird species, Mr. Sibley really screwed
up on his paintings of Crested Auklet. The internet is always right,
right?

P.P.S. This reminds me of a Statesman Journal editorial about 10 years
back, where they came down on the right side of the Snowy Plover issue
-- but ran the wrong photo, of Sanderlings.




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Subject: Re: This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:10:56 -0700
Lillian~
There is no need to apologize at all for not being able to identify all the 
species of birds that you saw today. The fact that you shared your sightings to 
OBOL, something that you are under no obligation to do, is much appreciated. 
The fact that you saw a swan is very cool. If people want to go out and try and 
identify it to species, you have provided some helpful information as to 
presence and location. 

Sincerely,Russ NamitzMedford 		 	   		  
Subject: s cranes
From: "ron and Polly Maertz" <hadada AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:58:19 -0700
Howdy
We had about 50 SANDHILL CRANES floating over Douglas County yesterday. 
Seems like they never have a leader.
Maertz
Glide 



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Subject: Re: hilarious bird photo
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:48:51 -0700
Are you sure Tom?  They only count if you see the black belly patch!

Wayne

On Wed, Oct 29, 2014 at 7:30 AM, Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org> wrote:

> This is too funny not to pass on.  Check out the photo for crested auklet
> flying at www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html
>
Subject: FOS Rock Sandpiper
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:46:54 -0700
Found This afternoon at Yaquina Bay South Jetty, near the base of the
finger at the west end of the "Gull Spot."  Appeared to be a juv./first
fall bird.

Briefly perched next to a Dunlin, giving a nice comparison.  I was
surprised at how much bigger the Rock was compared to the Dunlin.

Wayne
Subject: Osprey eating fish (Bass?) + Black Phoebe: Delta Ponds
From: Priscilla Nam Hari Kaur <priscillanhk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:16:06 -0700
Dear OBOL readers;

Most Ospreys are supposed by be gone by the end of the first week of
October, according to eBird bar graphs, but one I saw yesterday at Delta
Ponds along the river bike path was happily picking away at a pretty nice
sized fish which I think was a Bass.  Meanwhile I was happily snapping
photographs. You can see one at the link below, or below that photo click
on a link to a 15-photo slideshow. Warning, things begin to get closer up
and more red by the ending.

We at BOGS have continued to see the occasional Black Phoebe at the central
Delta Ponds area east of Goodpasture Island Rd. We saw one there on Aug 28,
and another on October 23. Others have reported them at this location this
Summer as well.  I got a decent photograph of this last one. Scroll down
below the Osprey picture + link to see the Phoebe.

Scroll down further if you want to see better photographs of the Acorn
Woodpecker we saw on the hill behind Lane Community College main campus
back on Sept 25. Since anyone last took a look at those, I have replaced my
poorly exposed ones with two much better photographs taken by Don Laufer on
that day.  Don goes with our BOGS groups on our bird walks,  and he has
been contributing the Lion's share of very fine photos for us for most of a
year now. Especially this past Summer when I was more involved with helping
to ID the birds we were seeing.

http://priscillanhk.com/birds-of-interest.html

Enjoy!

Priscilla Sokolowski
Subject: Surf Scoters at Foster
From: "Jeff Harding" <jeffharding AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:36:29 -0700
This morning, at 10:00 am, there were 10 Surf Scoters near the Dam on Foster
Lake.  Around 10:15 they flew off toward the east end, and I did not see
them again. I counted them in flight, and they showed no white in the wings,
so I'm confident they were not the WW Scoters that Russ saw this morning,
which I did not find. As Russ mentioned, there were two Horned Grebes, and
the Bonaparte's Gull was with a group of larger gulls lounging by the boat
ramp on the north side of the lake.

 

At Lewis Creek Park, there was a Western Flycatcher (presumed Pacific-slope,
but I did not hear it call, so I can't rule out Cordilleran). 

 

There were a fair number of Common Loons, a good number of Western Grebes,
but I could not find any Clark's Grebes or more unusual Loons.

 

I was there from about 9:30 to 2:00, Circling the lake, and missed Russ as
well as his WW Scoters. Foster Lake is big, and it would be easy to miss
something on the other side. 

 

Good birding,

Jeff
Subject: 8 Tundra Swans on Water at Yaquina Bay
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:03:30 -0700
Hi,

At 2:55 PM today (Oct. 29), Roy Lowe & Dawn Harris saw 8 Tundra Swans
in a flock on the water near the south edge corner of Idaho Flats by
the 35th Street condos.  They are swimming towards Oregon Coast
Aquarium.  Idaho Flats is the intertidal embayment just east of the
Hatfield Marine Science Center.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


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Subject: Wed morning, Eugene
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:38:35 -0700
Armitage County Park, McKenzie River near the confluence with Willamette River. 
Rather quiet; not helped either, by the traffic noise off I-5 and Coburg 
bridges. Except for Song, sparrows, towhees, and finches essentially absent. A 
ground-feeding group of 7 Varied Thrushes was a nice surprise. 


    Double-crested Cormorant - 3
Bald Eagle - 2 adult
White-tailed Kite - 1 possible; seen flying as silhouette. Without detail, the 
pointed wings, long tail, and gull-like flight indicated this bird; an unusual 
sight along coburg hills and following the river. 

American Kestrel - 1
Rock Pigeon - 35
Mourning Dove - 2
Annas Hummingbird - 1 heard
Belted Kingfisher - 1
Hairy Woodpecker - 1
Northern Flicker - 2
Red-breasted Sapsucker - 3
Northern Raven - 2
American Crow - 20
Steller's Jay - 9
Western Scrub Jay - 2 
Brown Creeper - 2
Black-capped Chickadee - 3
Chestnut-backed Chickadee - 2
Bushtit - 20
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2
Pacific Wren - 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 15
American Robin - 12
Varied Thrush - 7
European Starling - 8
American Pipit - 1 overhead
Cedar Waxwing - 30
Townsends Warbler - 2 or 3
Song Sparrow - 10
Golden-crowned Sparrow - 1
Dark-eyed Junco - 1
Red-winged Blackbird - 1

Randy Sinnott, Don Schrouder, Dave Brown, Dan Gusset, Sim Prendergast, Ellen 
Cantor, and Larry McQueen 

Subject: Re: Salem Red-throated Loon - From: Roy Gerig
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:23:01 -0700
Roy Gerig wrote:

"whenever it tries to fly it goes straight up about 5 feet then abruptly dives 
straight back into the water." 


There were a couple Canada Geese at Eagle Marsh the morning that seem to be 
having the same trouble. 
Subject: This morning at Ankeny NWR - 10/29/14
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:08:06 -0700
Hello Birders!

Lots of activity at Ankeny this morning... 

Before I begin my list I want to apologize to all of you who are able to 
identify all the local birds with so much accuracy. I am very impressed with 
your knowledge! I am afraid my list may be frustrating for you because I won't 
list something unless I am VERY sure what it is and sometimes I'm not sure... 
For example I am able to ID a Canada Goose, but I can't say for sure what 
species of Canada Goose. ~ I am very sorry for the "general" ID on some of 
these birds, but that's the best I can do. I actually saw quite a few birds 
that I couldn't even get into a general category. 


That being said... here is my list for 10/29/14 at Ankeny NWR

Killdeer
Canada Goose (multiple species)
Greater White-fronted Goose
Pintail Duck
Mallard Duck
Green-winged Teal
Gulls 
American Coot

Pied-billed Grebe
Scrub Jay
Several varieties of tiny shorebirds 
Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Great Egret

all dark eagle (Golden Eagle or juvenile Bald Eagle) 
Belted Kingfisher
Bufflehead
Brewer's Blackbird

"stinking" Starlings
Ruddy Duck
Northern Harrier

Ring-necked Duck
Mature Bald Eagle
Gadwall
Morning Dove
Dove (not a Morning Dove)
Robin
Swan - FOS - single native swan at Eagle Marsh

I apologize again for not being able to give better IDs on a few of these 
sightings, especially the swan! 


Good Birding One and All!
Lillian
Subject: Salem Surf Scoter, 10/29/2014
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:52:48 -0700
After observers in Linn, Benton and other inland counties have been seeing good 
seabird county birds, they may be showing up here in Marion as well, a day or 
two later. The small numbers of scoters, etc that show up inland during and 
after fall storms, this kind of sighting does not seem biologically 
significant, but it is a fun part of the game we play as birders. 

There was a female SURF SCOTER on the pond in front of Lowe's Home Improvement 
by the Salem Airport at 10 this morning. She was moving around the pond a lot. 
I cannot recall right now if I've ever seen the species in Marion County. Also 
3 WESTERN GREBES, 2 HORNED GREBES. 

I looked for the Red-throated Loon that I saw yesterday across the freeway from 
there, behind Kelly's, and did not see it. There were at least 4 WESTERN 
GREBES. 

Roy Gerig, Salem OR




 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: hilarious bird photo
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:10:03 -0800
Come to think of it, I had 20 Crested Auklets at the Redmond Sewage Ponds last 
weekend. Thanks to the ABA Listing Committee for allowing us to count any birds 
we see that match an identified photo on the internet. 


 

Tom Crabtree, Bend

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Darrel Faxon 

Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 6:31 AM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] hilarious bird photo

 

This is too funny not to pass on. Check out the photo for crested auklet flying 
at www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html 

Subject: Foster Reservoir- WW Scoters
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:30:47 -0700
There were 4 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS near the dam on Foster Reservoir (near Sweet 
Home). I think I misidentified these birds as Surf Scoters on Monday in the 
fading light. They were in the same vicinity. 


There is still 1 BONAPARTE'S GULL in with California, Ring-billed & Herring. 
There are a lot fewer gulls, grebes & loons there today...no Clark's and only 2 
Horned. 


As you were,
Russ Namitz
Medford
 		 	   		  
Subject: hilarious bird photo
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 07:30:45 -0700
This is too funny not to pass on.  Check out the photo for crested auklet
flying at www.diomedia.com/public/en/5302457/imageDetails.html
Subject: Broughton Beach 10-27 Updates- Clark's Grebe, White-winged Scoter, Red-necked Grebe
From: Jen Sanford <jjsanford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 06:27:12 -0700
Hi all,

I posted my finds from Broughton Beach on Monday but have since been able
to verify some of the birds I was not sure about.

In the river beyond Multnomah County (closer to Wintler Park, Clark County)
I had five scoters, one of which has been verified as WHITE-WINGED SCOTER.
The scoters were drifting west while I watched and lost sight of them as
they began to pass Marine Park.  I also had one RED-NECKED GREBE cruise
by.

In the group of 13 grebes by the beach where the gulls roost I found one
possible Clark's, possible Clark's x Western hybrid.  All input I have
received on this bird is that it is indeed a CLARK'S GREBE with its bright
orangey yellow bill, white around the eye, and lighter flanks.  I imagine
it is still around, those grebes seem to have set up shop there.

I have photos of all the birds mentioned (take note I did not say I had
"good photos") on my Flickr photostream:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoptellingmeitsokay/

Feel free to voice concern or add comments.  Good birding (and most
excellent motorless birding!),

Jen Sanford
Portland
Subject: Re: [birding] Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County
From: Mark Nikas <elepaio AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 00:13:08 -0700
A female type SURF SCOTER was also on the middle pond about the same time.

Mark Nikas

On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 3:22 PM, W. Douglas Robinson <
w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com> wrote:

> 1 in middle pond. I think first detected in Benton County since 2003.
>
> Doug
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
>
Subject: WA: Eurasian Hobby - Go Fish
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 23:03:30 -0700
Tim Shelmerdine and I waited from 10am to 330pm for the bird to make an 
appearance, but were disappointed. We kept ourselves busy meeting WA birders 
and seeing some of the other local rarities like ORCHARD ORIOLE, TROPICAL 
KINGBIRD & COMMON TERN. 


There was a reported sighting before we arrived, but I believe the verdict was 
still out pending review of photos. 


Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford, OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Lincoln county coast, Tuesday
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 21:26:03 -0700
OBOL:

 

We birded the Lincoln county coast today 9 AM - 3:30 PM.  Boiler Bay, Depoe
Bay, Otter Crest loop, Moolak Beach, NW 68th St., S Jetty of Yaquina Bay,
parking lot behind NOAA building, 12th St., then back to Boiler Bay.  Lots
of rain - sideways.

 

We didn't find nearly as many birds as were reported on the weekend.  NO
tubenoses, few loons, no Tropical Kingbird.

 

1             Red-throated Loon

2             Pacific Loon

9             Common Loon

2             Horned Grebe

1             Red-necked Grebe

35           Western Grebe

111        Brown Pelican

4             Brandt's Cormorant

1             Double-crested Cormorant

30           Pelagic Cormorant

1             Great Egret

5             Cackling Geese

1             Harlequin Duck

200        Surf Scoter

150        Black Scoter

2             Red-tailed Hawk

2             Peregrine Falcon

8             Black Oystercatcher

2             Black Turnstone

12           RED PHALAROPE

60           Bonaparte's Gull

48           Heermann's Gull

2             Mew Gull

4             Ring-billed Gull

625        California Gull

190        Western Gull

3             Glaucous-winged Gull

6             Elegant Tern  - S jetty, Newport

2             Common Murre

2             Pigeon Guillemot

6             Rock Pigeon

1             BLACK PHOEBE - down on rocks, end of Ellingson St, Depoe Bay

2             Steller's Jay

6             American Crow

75           European Starling

4             Dark-eyed Junco

1             Brewer's Blackbird

6             House Sparrow

 

Good birding, everyone,

 

Paul Sulllivan & Carol Karlen

McMinnville
Subject: Commonwealth Lake, Beaverton
From: Michael Gold <mhgold AT nwlink.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:29:47 -0700
This morning at Commonwealth Lake there were eight female mergansers and on the 
grass adjacent to the lake there were more than 300 

Cackling Geese (minima).

Mike Gold

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Subject: Re: [birding] Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:45:39 -0700
P.S. The number of deep-water grebe reports from the mid-Willamette
Valley might be higher, if not for the unfortunate transfer of
Stahlbusch Island to Linn County, 10 or so years ago.

Trent Bray will no doubt remember finding Benton County's first recorded
Clark's Grebe on the gravel-pit ponds there, a few years before the land
swap.

Linn County birders don't seem to appreciate this spot, no doubt since
they have plenty of other deep-water spots to choose from. For Benton
County birders, even though it's the closest deep water to Corvallis, no
one goes there anymore.

Well, to be fair, it was always a hard place to bird due to the
restrictions by Morse Bros., and nowadays the Knife River gravel
company. In addition to all of the "no trespassing signs" and
fast-moving gravel trucks, the trees that they planted to block views of
the pond have been growing higher.

So without the incentive of county listing, I guess it's hard to gin up
motivation to check. I think Marcia Cutler still manages to work out
access for the Corvallis Christmas Bird Count, so that's basically the
only time that anyone checks. It might still be a good spot for
motorless birders based in Corvallis, as a relatively short bicycle
ride.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Got Lewis's? Now performing in Jackson County.
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:24:36 -0700
Just as the Oregon Shakespeare Festival prepares to close its season, the
Lewis's Woodpeckers are back and their show is free to all.  Today they
were doing their best imitation of Purple Martins, something I'd never seen
before.
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/28/lewis-lollapalooza/


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Past Red-necked Grebes sightings in mid-Willamette Valley
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:17:36 -0700
Hi all,

Doug is correct that the last confirmed sighting of a Red-necked Grebe
in deep-water-challenged Benton County was in 2003. Here is an excerpt
from my Audubon field notes for that period:

        A Red-necked Grebe that showed up at the Knoll Terrace s.p. 14
        Oct was a rare bird for Benton Co. (Randy Moore). It appeared to
        be a juvenile in transition plumage, and stayed at least through
        19 Oct (J Simmons; P Vanderheul). On 27 Oct one was at Big Lake
        and two were at Foster Res. (R Campbell); the two at Foster Res.
        were still there 28 Oct (J Fleischer & M Nikas). 

As I recall, the observers were not able to conclusively rule out
Holböl's Grebe.

There was also a possible sighting at the same sewage ponds in late
August of 2006. Here is the description by Paula Vanderheul:

        I viewed 2 grebes for a long time watching a dark one with
        varied colored facial mask like. It was exercising its wings and
        moving around most of the time.  At first I thought it to be a
        pied-billed grebe.  The other was floating near it not moving
        much. Its face was more grayish with a bit of white at throat
        and longer dark neck. The bill was large, and the head was
        large. They were out in the middle and I only had my 8 X 42
        ranger eagle optics.  I suspect they both were RED-NECKED GREBE.
        Being an adult and juvenile.
        
There have been considerably more frequent sightings from Linn County,
in the August-November window and especially in late October.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: The rest of my day list...
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:14:14 -0700
It would have been a pretty fair day even without getting to
commune with a POMARINE JAEGER...

I also saw a PARASITIC JAEGER and plenty of phalaropes at the
South Jetty.

There are still at least 6 ELEGANT TERNS at the Hammond Boat Basin.
I also saw at least 2 COMMON TERNS.  A noisy PALM WARBLER and a very
gray-headed ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER were in the shrubbery at the base of
the boat basin jetty.

Today's photo-documents are at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/archives/date-posted/2014/10/28/?view=md

I should also note that the WILLET along with 3 MARBLED GODWITS
continue to be seen at Necanicum Estuary.  A single EARED GREBE,
and one (possibly 2) CLARK'S GREBE are also present.

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Red-necked Grebe, Philomath poo ponds , Benton County
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:22:20 -0700
1 in middle pond. I think first detected in Benton County since 2003.

Doug





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Subject: Re: A close encounter
From: SJJag AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:13:20 +0000 (UTC)

----- Original Message -----
From: "Patterson, Mike" 
To: obol AT freelists.org, "swalalahos" , "Neal Maine" 
 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 2:38:20 PM
Subject: [obol] A close encounter

I recount a marvelous close encounter out on the South Jetty

Wow!! Mike, just wow!

Oboloids, click open the link if you haven't already!

Steve Jaggers



salt marsh...

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/



-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: A close encounter
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:38:20 -0700
I recount a marvelous close encounter out on the South Jetty
salt marsh...

http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/



-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Salem Red-throated Loon
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:13:32 -0700
I've been checking the deep water ponds around Salem, they are mostly in SE 
Salem, the past few days while stormy weather has seen others in the 
mid-Willamette Valley finding Brown Pelicans, Clark's Grebes, Sabines and 
Heermanns Gulls, Pacific Loons, Scoters and I don't know what all, but here in 
Salem there has been nothing besides WESTERN GREBES and HORNED GREBES in 
addition to the usual CORMORANTS, DUCKS, GEESE, etc. 

This morning, around 10, I saw a RED-THROATED LOON while peeking through the 
gate behind Kelly's looking at the large pond that you can see from I-5 near 
the exit to Detroit and Salem for Highway 22. It was in the neighborhood of the 
3 WESTERN GREBES that have been there for a few days. Not much else on this 
large gravel pond. Some COOTS, RUDDIES, CORMORANTS, PB GREBES. I drove to the 
entrance off Lancaster and walked in to get a better look and it was in close 
there and I got good looks. East of there, the Aumsville Sewage Ponds had 
little beside a lot of SHOVELERS, a few WOOD DUCKS, and 200 DUNLIN. There has 
been a (lead poisoned?) SHOVELER that holds its bill straight up at an 
impossible angle while on the water, and whenever it tries to fly it goes 
straight up about 5 feet then abruptly dives straight back into the water. Over 
and over again. 

Summer's gone, my oh my.
Roy Gerig, Salem OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Possible Long-toed Stint foot detail
From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro AT pdx.edu>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:21:17 -0700
I had the good fortune to be on Attu in Spring, 1998 where there were a lot
of Long-toed Stints (LTST) and
no Least Sandpipers (LESA).  They were  in breeding plumage, of course.  I
believe the pale base to the lower mandible
is overrated in LTST.  I also agree this is a very difficult identification
in Oregon.

I also have seen (eventual) Least Sandpipers 'standing tall in fall' in
Oregon.
This often happens when they are by themselves, in vegetation rather than
mudflats, and are therefore
more than a little nervous.  They appear to stretch to get a better look
around.
It is a very distinctive pose that certainly attracts a birder's attention..
I've experienced what Ed describes quite a few times on the Oregon coast in
Fall and ended up
thinking that the bird was probably a LESA but never knowing for sure.

That said, this could well be a Long-toed.

A structural field mark (of uncertain applicability to my knowledge) is the
relative length of the
central toe (after all, it is a LONG-toed Stint) relative to the length of
the bill; longer than the bill
in LTST and shorter than LESA.

I've compared Ed's bird to one I photographed on Attu.  Neither photo is
crystal clear as to the lengths,
but, at least qualitatively, they appear similar.  Note that the based of
the lower mandible in the Attu
LTST is completely dark.

http://www2.rdrop.com/users/green/LTST/LTST.jpg

Bob OBrien
Carver OR




On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 9:39 AM, ed mcv  wrote:

> I've posted a couple more photos.  One is a decent look at the toe.  I
> lightened and increased saturation to make the toe a little more visible.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/10665268 AT N04/sets/72157648591145497
>
> Ed McVicker
>
Subject: that Boiler Bay alcid
From: Darrel Faxon <5hats AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:13:03 -0700
which I saw there at 4:20 Sunday afternoon had the right characteristics
for Crested Auklet.  I had a good, if somewhat brief look at it as it flew
by at nearly eye level, about sixty yards away.  It was a mid-sized, chunky
bodied alcid, larger than a Cassin's (of which I saw many that day), and
smaller than a Rhinoceros Auklet.  It was dark blackish gray throughout,
including wing linings and underparts, had a thick-necked, big headed
appearance, and flew with the fast, fluttery wingbeats typical of
auklets. Bill color appeared dark, or at least not discerned to be
differently colored than the plumage.  In addition to the size difference
between it and Cassin's and Rhinoceros Auklets, it was darker than either
of those species, tending toward blackish, lacked any white on the
underparts, and had a different neck and head profile.  It was
distinguishable from Whiskered Auklet by much larger size; from breeding
plumaged Marbled or Long-billed Murrelet (which would not likely be in
breeding plumage at this time of year anyway) by blacker color, wider-based
wings, and head and neck profile; from winter plumaged Tufted Puffin by
size and flight style; from all other similarly sized alcids by entirely
dark underparts.
      The sighting would not be unprecedented.  The species has been
recorded in California and as far south as Baja.  It has been sighted at
least once from a cruise ship off the Oregon coast (Jeff Gilligan, pers.
comm.).
Darrel
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:10:48 -0700
If that is a middle toe in Ed's new pictures then it is a Least.  I do
remember Shawneen emphasizing the "J" and bi-colored bill last year, I even
have written  those notes in my guide.  But the middle toe on a Long-toed
is longer than the bill and the tarsus and this bird does not appear to
have that feature.  So those three points are strikes against a Long-toed.

Bob Archer

On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 10:56 AM, Wayne Hoffman  wrote:

> Hi –
>
>
>
> One of the difficult lessons here is that when we really examine them
> carefully, Least Sandpipers are incredibly variable.  They vary in posture,
> head pattern, leg and toe proportions, bill size and shape – you name it.
> I bet if we look long enough we’ll find some birds with pale bill bases
> that otherwise look more like Leasts then Long-toes.
>
>
>
> I have no personal experience with conclusively identified Long-toed
> Stints, but from examination of photos, I suspect the same is true for them
> – highly variable as well.
>
>
>
> I often imagine the difficulty a birder in Thailand, say might have poring
> over flocks of peeps trying to pick out a vagrant Least Sandpiper, and
> periodically finding birds that look “different” from Long-toes, but not
> able to nail down any as definite Leasts.
>
>
>
> Wayne
>
>
>
> *From:* obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] *On
> Behalf Of *Shawneen Finnegan
> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 28, 2014 9:40 AM
> *To:* obol AT freelists.org OBOL
> *Subject:* [obol] Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
>
>
>
> All:
>
>
>
> I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID
> that has stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can
> stretch up regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob
> Archer brings up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern
> and lower bill base color, which is the first thing I look for.
>
>
>
> Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern
> that differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the
> bill and connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium
> doesn't reach the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less
> pronounced in basic plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base
> of the bill. This bird shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at
> the base of the bill at the forward part of the supercilium.
>
>
>
> The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale
> base to the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts.
> There is mud at the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on
> the left which shows the bill to be very black.
>
>
>
> Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to
> crouch. Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question,
> seeing how long the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see.
>
>
>
> The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for
> photos of both species.
>
>
>
> Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at:
> http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/
>
>
>
> Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County,
> CA, which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith
> Hansen who took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted
> as I believe it was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows
> just how hard these can be.
>
>
>
>
> 
http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 

>
>
>
> Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.
>
>
>
> Shawneen Finnegan
>
> Portland, OR
>
Subject: Aleutian cackling geese wintering near Tillamook
From: "WLRisser" <wlrisser AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:10:33 -0700
Scott Carpenter told us about the flock of Aleutian cackling geese that
winters near Pacific City half an hour south of Tillamook.  We saw them
easily yesterday.  I did some research subsequently and learned that it is
well known that these geese winter where we saw them.  Jan and I are
relatively new to Oregon and weren't aware of this.  If anyone else doesn't
know about them and wants directions, contact me privately and I will send
you Scott's excellent instructions.
Subject: Storm Birds again
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:04:11 -0700
We are having another storm today on the coast, although much less powerful
than Saturday's.  I spent about 90 minutes at the Yaquina Bay South Jetty
this morning - 8 AM - 9:30 AM.

 

There were several hundred California Gulls, both at the gull spot and
clustered on the base of the first finger.  Among them were at least 20
adult Herring Gulls, all with clear yellow irises, a few imm. Herring Gulls,
and 35 or so Heermann's Gulls, and of course the usual Westerns,
Glaucous-wings, and Olympics, none of the latter in unusual numbers.  I
could not pick out a Thayer's.

 

At least 7 ELEGANT TERNS were flying around over the channel, and 1 roosted
a while on the first finger.

 

1 ad. Black-legged Kittiwake flew across the channe, then west along the
south jetty, then on south.

 

One group of 8+  Bonaparte's Gulls, same route.

 

At least 3 Red-throated Loons in the channel.

 

No sign of Long-tailed Duck, and few scoters present.

 

Wayne
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:56:15 -0700
Hi –

 

One of the difficult lessons here is that when we really examine them 
carefully, Least Sandpipers are incredibly variable. They vary in posture, head 
pattern, leg and toe proportions, bill size and shape – you name it. I bet if 
we look long enough we’ll find some birds with pale bill bases that otherwise 
look more like Leasts then Long-toes. 


 

I have no personal experience with conclusively identified Long-toed Stints, 
but from examination of photos, I suspect the same is true for them – highly 
variable as well. 


 

I often imagine the difficulty a birder in Thailand, say might have poring over 
flocks of peeps trying to pick out a vagrant Least Sandpiper, and periodically 
finding birds that look “different” from Long-toes, but not able to nail 
down any as definite Leasts. 


 

Wayne

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Shawneen Finnegan 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 9:40 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org OBOL
Subject: [obol] Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)

 

All:

 

I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that has 
stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up 
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer brings 
up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and lower bill 
base color, which is the first thing I look for. 


 

Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern that 
differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the bill and 
connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium doesn't reach 
the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less pronounced in basic 
plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base of the bill. This bird 
shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at the base of the bill at the 
forward part of the supercilium. 


 

The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale base to 
the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts. There is mud at 
the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on the left which shows 
the bill to be very black. 


 

Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to crouch. 
Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question, seeing how long 
the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see. 


 

The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos of 
both species. 


 

Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at: 
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/ 


 

Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County, CA, 
which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith Hansen who 
took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted as I believe it 
was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows just how hard these 
can be. 


 


http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 


 

Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.

 

Shawneen Finnegan

Portland, OR
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:17:53 -0700
Of course I think the best thing to do, as mentioned last time this went around 
OBOL, is get a picture of the toes :) 


Bob Archer



> On Oct 28, 2014, at 9:39 AM, Shawneen Finnegan  
wrote: 

> 
> All:
> 
> I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that 
has stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up 
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer brings 
up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and lower bill 
base color, which is the first thing I look for. 

> 
> Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern that 
differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the bill and 
connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium doesn't reach 
the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less pronounced in basic 
plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base of the bill. This bird 
shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at the base of the bill at the 
forward part of the supercilium. 

> 
> The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale base 
to the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts. There is mud 
at the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on the left which 
shows the bill to be very black. 

> 
> Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to crouch. 
Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question, seeing how long 
the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see. 

> 
> The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos 
of both species. 

> 
> Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at: 
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/ 

> 
> Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County, CA, 
which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith Hansen who 
took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted as I believe it 
was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows just how hard these 
can be. 

> 
> 
http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 

> 
> Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.
> 
> Shawneen Finnegan
> Portland, OR
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 13:15:41 -0400


The following photo shows the feature that Shawneen was describing below pretty 
well: http://www.birdskorea.org/Images/images2007/08/Long-toed-Stint_RN.jpg. 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR

Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:39:51 -0700
Subject: [obol] Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com
To: obol AT freelists.org

All:
I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that has 
stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up 
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer brings 
up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and lower bill 
base color, which is the first thing I look for. 

Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern that 
differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the bill and 
connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium doesn't reach 
the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less pronounced in basic 
plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base of the bill. This bird 
shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at the base of the bill at the 
forward part of the supercilium. 

The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale base to 
the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts. There is mud at 
the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on the left which shows 
the bill to be very black. 

Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to crouch. 
Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question, seeing how long 
the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see. 

The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos of 
both species. 

Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at: 
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/ 

Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County, CA, 
which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith Hansen who 
took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted as I believe it 
was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows just how hard these 
can be. 


http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 

Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.
Shawneen FinneganPortland, OR
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Calidris ID help (Least vs. Long-toed)
From: Shawneen Finnegan <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:39:51 -0700
All:

I would say this is a Least Sandpiper, but this is a very difficult ID that
has stumped the best, particularly in basic plumage. Leasts can stretch up
regularly and look tall and upright which throws people off. Bob Archer
brings up some interesting points, but doesn't mention face pattern and
lower bill base color, which is the first thing I look for.

Long-toed Stints, particularly juveniles, have a different face pattern
that differs from Least in that the dark crown extends to the base of the
bill and connects with the dark eyeline, such that the white supercilium
doesn't reach the base of the bill. It creates a "J". This is less
pronounced in basic plumage. The supercilium on Least extends to the base
of the bill. This bird shows a faint facial pattern with some duskiness at
the base of the bill at the forward part of the supercilium.

The other thing is that Long-toeds usually, but not always, have a pale
base to the bill, which this bird does not and vice versa with Leasts.
There is mud at the base of this bird's bill on its right side, but not on
the left which shows the bill to be very black.

Leg length can be hard to determine because of Least's propensity to
crouch. Unless they stand up and look alert like the bird in question,
seeing how long the upper half of their legs are can be difficult to see.

The first thing I always do is hit the books and internet search for photos
of both species.

Monte Taylor has a number of photos of LTST on his website at:
http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/

Years ago Rich Stallcup thought he had found a Long-toed in Marin County,
CA, which was finally deemed a Least Sandpiper. See video/blog by Keith
Hansen who took lots of video of it below. The record was never submitted
as I believe it was finally deemed to be a Least Sandpiper. But it shows
just how hard these can be.


http://thebloggerhead.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/interesting-sandpiper-has-birders-talking-learning-considering/ 


Off to work. No more time to contemplate this.

Shawneen Finnegan
Portland, OR