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Updated on Sunday, March 8 at 01:21 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Zapata Wren,©Barry Kent Mackay

7 Mar Re: [COBOL] Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades? ["Tom Crabtree" ]
7 Mar Re: Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades? ["Tom Crabtree" ]
07 Mar Columbia Estuary Report - 3/8/2015 [Mike Patterson ]
7 Mar Re: Clackamas County, Saturday, 3/7 [Bob Archer ]
7 Mar Critters while trekking east on I-84 ["L Markoff" ]
7 Mar Re: today's quiz [Stephanie Hazen ]
7 Mar Clackamas County, Saturday, 3/7 [Tim Shelmerdine ]
7 Mar Birding central Oregon [Max Smith ]
7 Mar Re: Benton - Prairie Falcon [Lars Per Norgren ]
7 Mar Lane County Pine Grosbeaks ["Linda Gilbert" ]
07 Mar Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades? [Joel Geier ]
07 Mar Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades? [Joel Geier ]
8 Mar Re: jackson county sharpie ["Richard W. Musser" ]
7 Mar Pine Grosbeaks @ Gold Lake, Lane Co. ["Tom & Allison Mickel" ]
7 Mar [COBOL] PCT grosbeaks, Linn county ["judy" ]
7 Mar jackson county sharpie [Harry Fuller ]
7 Mar Re: Osprey washington County [Marlowe Kissinger ]
07 Mar Re: Osprey washington County [Pamela Johnston ]
7 Mar Osprey washington County [Marlowe Kissinger ]
07 Mar [Fwd: Larks south of Corvallis on Saturday morning] [Joel Geier ]
7 Mar 3 pine grosbeak [Jack Williamson ]
7 Mar Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds ["Paul Sullivan" ]
7 Mar Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds [Gerard Lillie ]
7 Mar Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds ["Pamela Johnston" ]
7 Mar Re: Streaked Horned Lark locations ["R. Adney Jr." ]
7 Mar [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
6 Mar Re: Benton - Prairie Falcon [Jamie Simmons ]
6 Mar Pine Grosbeak in w. Oregon - just barely [Jack Williamson ]
6 Mar FOY in Yamhill County ["Paul Sullivan" ]
6 Mar No Pine Grosbeaks on PCT []
06 Mar Re: today's quiz [Mike Patterson ]
6 Mar Photos: Ankeny NWR 03-05-15 Turkey Vulture Ruddy Duck [Jim Leonard ]
06 Mar Streaked Horned Lark locations [Joel Geier ]
6 Mar today's quiz [Stephanie Hazen ]
6 Mar Steigerwald Lake NWR (Clark County, Washington) - Sagebrush Sparrow Photos [Philip Kline ]
6 Mar Photos: Virginia Rail - Marsh Wren Talking Water Gardens Albany [Jim Leonard ]
6 Mar Benton - Prairie Falcon [Luke Ferrenburg ]
6 Mar Re: Help request- Finley nwr [Lars Per Norgren ]
6 Mar No Pine Grosbeaks on PCT [Max Smith ]
06 Mar Fwd: Increased Access to Auk and Condor journals [Joel Geier ]
06 Mar Fwd: Albany/Tangent/Lebanon area open-country birds (incl. Streaked Horned Larks) [Joel Geier ]
6 Mar Help request- Finley nwr [Dave Kollen ]
6 Mar Re: Steigerwald Sage Sparrow [Kris Gmail ]
6 Mar Steigerwald Sage Sparrow [Philip Kline ]
6 Mar Eugene Birder's Night (SWOC) meets March 9th with Anne and Dan Heyerly's BIRDS OF PERU [Ellen Cantor ]
6 Mar Tree Swallow on HMSC Trail - Correction [John Thomas ]
6 Mar [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
6 Mar Coos Palm Warbler & early nighthawk 3/5/2015 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
6 Mar Field cameras catch deer eating birds ["L Markoff" ]
5 Mar Turkey Vultures, Columbia County [Darrel Whipple ]
5 Mar ECAS Fort Rock Raptor Survey ["Kim Boddie" ]
5 Mar ECAS Fort Rock Raptor Survey ["Kim Boddie" ]
5 Mar Bald Eagles over E.E. Wilson et cetera [Jamie Boulton ]
5 Mar Help requested - Coos Bay and North Bend Orioles [David Kollen ]
5 Mar ECAS Christmas Valley Raptor Survey ["Kim Boddie" ]
5 Mar ECAS Christmas Valley Raptor Survey ["Kim Boddie" ]
05 Mar A speedy quartet [sheila chambers ]
5 Mar Re: Bald Eagles [Barbara Millikan ]
5 Mar Florence birds [Alan Contreras ]
5 Mar the Bean Goose, other stuff [Roy Gerig ]
5 Mar BEAN GOOSE Yesterday -Still Here [John Thomas ]
5 Mar Re: Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Bob ]
5 Mar Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Bob ]
5 Mar Re: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Lyn Topinka ]
5 Mar Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Lyn Topinka ]
5 Mar Linn County PINE GROSBEAKS - revisited [Hendrik Herlyn ]
5 Mar Bald Eagles [Marlowe Kissinger ]
5 Mar photography workshop [Stephanie Hazen ]
5 Mar Gulls at riverside park in grants pass [Zia Fukuda ]
5 Mar pics of Pine Grosbeaks on Pacific Crest Trail yesterday ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
5 Mar Re: Ridgefield deer sighting [Bobbett Pierce ]
5 Mar Fw: Management of Hayfields for Grassland Birds [Lillian ]
5 Mar Re: Flock? Of Great Blue Herons [Lillian ]
5 Mar yesterdays quiz the answer below [Stephanie Hazen ]
5 Mar Flock? Of Great Blue Herons ["R. Adney Jr." ]
5 Mar [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]

Subject: Re: [COBOL] Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades?
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:47:30 -0800
Joel,

We have talked about going up there, but haven't so far.  The forest service
road can be a bit dicey even without snow on it. 

There actually are a number of folks who have heard the full song of the
Boreal Owl.  Craig Miller and I had a pair duetting at the Green Lakes
Trailhead on September 14, 1994.  They kept up this vocal serenade for well
over half an hour.  Three years earlier (April 22, 1991) Craig, Karen
Theodore, Chris Carey and I went up to the same area on snowmobiles and we
heard a total of three birds singing their main song.  If I were a betting
person I would bet that there are others who have heard it as well.

Tom

-----Original Message-----
From: cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu
[mailto:cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu] On Behalf Of Joel Geier
Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 5:54 PM
To: MidValley Birds; Oregon Birders OnLine; Central Oregon Birders
Subject: [COBOL] Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades?

Hi all,

Just a thought here ...

The unprecedented snowless conditions in Santiam Pass and elsewhere seem to
present an equally unprecedented opportunity for owling at elevations where
Boreal Owls could be nesting, either in the Cascades or Ochocos.
This time of year, you could well hear their full song (I think I'm still
one of only a handful of people who've ever heard this in Oregon, not sure
who else outside of Mike Denny can claim that experience).

Has anyone tried?

All the reports of Pine Grosbeaks up in Santiam Pass have been very cool,
but it would be even cooler if someone could stick around after dark and try
calling a bit for owls.

Sure wish I could try myself, since these are amazingly rare conditions, but
I'm hobbled by vehicle issues. This snowless winter is one in a hundred, in
terms of opportunities for high-elevation owling (unless this is the new
normal, as some have suggested).

We'll surely rue these conditions later in summer as water supplies dwindle,
but might as well take advantage of the situation now.

Happy owling,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


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Subject: Re: Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades?
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 21:47:30 -0800
Joel,

We have talked about going up there, but haven't so far.  The forest service
road can be a bit dicey even without snow on it. 

There actually are a number of folks who have heard the full song of the
Boreal Owl.  Craig Miller and I had a pair duetting at the Green Lakes
Trailhead on September 14, 1994.  They kept up this vocal serenade for well
over half an hour.  Three years earlier (April 22, 1991) Craig, Karen
Theodore, Chris Carey and I went up to the same area on snowmobiles and we
heard a total of three birds singing their main song.  If I were a betting
person I would bet that there are others who have heard it as well.

Tom

-----Original Message-----
From: cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu
[mailto:cobol-bounces AT lists.oregonstate.edu] On Behalf Of Joel Geier
Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 5:54 PM
To: MidValley Birds; Oregon Birders OnLine; Central Oregon Birders
Subject: [COBOL] Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades?

Hi all,

Just a thought here ...

The unprecedented snowless conditions in Santiam Pass and elsewhere seem to
present an equally unprecedented opportunity for owling at elevations where
Boreal Owls could be nesting, either in the Cascades or Ochocos.
This time of year, you could well hear their full song (I think I'm still
one of only a handful of people who've ever heard this in Oregon, not sure
who else outside of Mike Denny can claim that experience).

Has anyone tried?

All the reports of Pine Grosbeaks up in Santiam Pass have been very cool,
but it would be even cooler if someone could stick around after dark and try
calling a bit for owls.

Sure wish I could try myself, since these are amazingly rare conditions, but
I'm hobbled by vehicle issues. This snowless winter is one in a hundred, in
terms of opportunities for high-elevation owling (unless this is the new
normal, as some have suggested).

We'll surely rue these conditions later in summer as water supplies dwindle,
but might as well take advantage of the situation now.

Happy owling,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


_______________________________________________
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http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

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COBOL-request AT lists.oregonstate.edu
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Subject: Columbia Estuary Report - 3/8/2015
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 21:44:04 -0800
Columbia Estuary Report - 3/8/2015

A WHITE-TAILED KITE was reported from Ft Stevens early last week by
Dane Osis.  I photographed a kite at the historical area Friday which
(presumably) was the same bird.  There is also a NORTHERN SHRIKE at
the historical area.

A SORA has been heard on multiple visit to the wetland near the Barendse
Rd Bridge at Brownsmead along with up to 7 VIRGINIA RAILS.  Six AMERICAN
WHITE PELICANS are hanging out with TUNDRA SWANS at Bughole.  Up to 60
GREATER YELLOWLEGS have be seen at Svensen Island (we counted 39 today).

I've been seeing TREE SWALLOWS in pretty good numbers for at least two
weeks now.  Small numbers of VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS have been noted at
several locations and 4 very scruffy looking BARN SWALLOWS were along
Jackson Rd, Brownsmead on Thursday.

Multiple RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD reports from several folks this week.

MOURNING CLOAKS have been reproted from multiple locations this week
and a LORQUIN'S ADMIRAL was spotted at Ft Stevens Friday.


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: Re: Clackamas County, Saturday, 3/7
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:18:15 -0800
Hi all:

Just to add to the info about Clackamas and Wasco County in case folks want to 
get out: 


I did not post anything except my ebird findings but last weekend I did hit 
some of the trails Tim and Russ drove by. I parked on 42 and hiked 6 miles 
south and back along the PCT into the Warm Springs Res, no great finds. But I 
did post the first ebird reports for Warm Springs not along a major road, as 
far as I can tell. 


Tomorrow I might try for the PCT from Frog Lake up to Devil's Half Acre. That 
part of trail is more similar to the elevation and flora that all these Pine 
Grosbeak reports are coming from. 


You'll be the first to know..

Bob Archer



> On Mar 7, 2015, at 7:47 PM, Tim Shelmerdine  
wrote: 

> 
> Hello, all. 
> Russ Namitz and I spent a good part of today birding Clackamas County. We 
started in the mountains hoping that the Pine Grosbeak invasion had reached 
Clackamas County. We tried a couple of likely spots, with no luck. Perhaps our 
luck would have been different if we had been able to spend some more time 
hiking trails. There was no snow at all on Skyline Road (FS Rd 42) between Hwy 
26 and Timothy Lake and quite a few people were taking advantage of the clear 
roads. We did find a couple of decent county birds in our wanderings. We 
finally had a male WILLIAMSON'S SAPSUCKER (after seeing and hearing several 
RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKERS) on FS Rd 58. We had one HORNED GREBE and two COMMON 
GOLDENEYE on Timothy Lake, one GRAY JAY and two CLARK'S NUTCRACKERS among the 
hoards of people at Timberline Lodge. A MERLIN was plucking something along a 
small tree along the Canby-Marquam Rd, In my opinion, our best bird was a 
singing BLACK PHOEBE under the bridge over the Molalla River on S. Iv 

 y just south of Canby. While we worked hard for our birds, it was a great day 
to be out. 

> Cheers, 
> Tim Shelmerdine


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Subject: Critters while trekking east on I-84
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:59:24 -0800
After dropping my daughter off in Beaverton today I went east on I-84, on a
quest for a special bird.  I didn't have time to stop because I wanted to
make Pendleton before dark, but I picked up a few treats as I trekked along.


 

Near milepost 85 in The Dalles a male Cooper's Hawk flew across the road in
front of me, so close it caused me to slow down.  His adult plumage was
especially vivid in the sunshine...a knockout!

 

Near milepost 115 a bit east of Rufus I got the best critter of the day, a
ram Bighorn Sheep!  He was standing about 20' from the road gazing slightly
ahead of me, looking very noble.  I said to him, "Stay, stay.  Stay right
there looking noble, DO NOT try and cross the road, please!"

 

Near milepost 156 somewhere between Arlington and Boardman I spotted my
first Black-billed Magpies of the trip when 7 of them flew across the road,
but thankfully not so close that I feared I would hit them.  Magpies are
always a day brightener for me, love them!

 

Near milepost 164 getting close to Boardman there was a pair of Red-tailed
Hawks sitting on the rim of a nest, having a chat I guess...ah love.

 

Still thinking about that Bighorn Sheep!

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene most of the time, currently on the road

 
Subject: Re: today's quiz
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:59:07 -0800
OK, lurking obolites….I only had one reply. Lillian said her husband thought 
it 

was a displaying male Anna’s hummingbird, and he is correct!

I will keep trying to video the actual bird.  So far, I have only gotten 2 more
videos with the sound, but no bird.  This particular bird is swooping over 
our hummingbird feeder.  I think he is advertising that he owns some
particularly good real estate, or perhaps he is a barfly, hoping for 
a cool chick to come through the doors!

Click on link below to read a complete discussion of the noises various
hummingbirds make with their tail feathers, coming out of a swoop…
part of their display.


http://news.sciencemag.org/2011/09/dive-bombing-hummingbirds-let-their-feathers-do-talking 



To me the sound the hummingbird makes with its tail sounds like the short
chirp red-winged blackbirds make sometimes, or my sneaker being stubbed
down a vinyl floor, or a smoke alarm that needs a new battery!


Anyway, another way to bird by ear! If you hear a chirp in the woods, it 
probably 

is not a dying smoke alarm. 

Stephanie

> On Mar 6, 2015, at 7:56 PM, Stephanie Hazen  
wrote: 

> 
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/e3rn30d9w8wm7pf/P1250755.mov?dl=0 
 

> 
> click on the link above to see and hear 58 second video I filmed today 
> in our back yard.
> 
> In it are 3 loud chirps.
> 
> What made those 3 loud chirps?
> 
> Stephanie
Subject: Clackamas County, Saturday, 3/7
From: Tim Shelmerdine <tim.spanish.guide AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:47:35 -0800
Hello, all.
Russ Namitz and I spent a good part of today birding Clackamas County. We
started in the mountains hoping that the Pine Grosbeak invasion had reached
Clackamas County. We tried a couple of likely spots, with no luck. Perhaps
our luck would have been different if we had been able to spend some more
time hiking trails.  There was no snow at all on Skyline Road (FS Rd 42)
between Hwy 26 and Timothy Lake and quite a few people were taking
advantage of the clear roads. We did find a couple of decent county birds
in our wanderings. We finally had a male WILLIAMSON'S SAPSUCKER (after
seeing and hearing several RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKERS) on FS Rd 58. We had one
HORNED GREBE and two COMMON GOLDENEYE on Timothy Lake, one GRAY JAY and two
CLARK'S NUTCRACKERS among the hoards of people at Timberline Lodge. A
MERLIN was plucking something along a small tree along the Canby-Marquam
Rd, In my opinion, our best bird was a singing BLACK PHOEBE under the
bridge over the Molalla River on S. Ivy just south of Canby. While we
worked hard for our birds, it was a great day to be out.
Cheers,
Tim Shelmerdine
Subject: Birding central Oregon
From: Max Smith <oregonmax AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:41:02 -0800
This morning Sarah and I decided that, instead of trying again for Pine
Grosbeaks on the PCT, we'd bird our way from Bend to The Dalles.

Shevlin Park in Bend was pretty quiet apart from chatty HAIRY WOODPECKERS
and some EVENING GROSBEAKS flying over.  We spotted a FERRUGINOUS HAWK, two
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS, and a GOLDEN EAGLE from Highway 197. At the the Oak
Springs Fish Hatchery near Tygh Valley, we found several LEWIS'S
WOODPECKERS and another GOLDEN EAGLE.

In addition to these birds, there were Cascade peaks and MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRDS
visible at nearly every stop and WESTERN MEADOWLARKS were singing their
hearts out. Though we missed out on Pine Grosbeaks once again, we feel we
chose wisely.

Happy spring birding!

Max Smith,
Portland
Subject: Re: Benton - Prairie Falcon
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 18:13:22 -0800
I second the motion, Linn County. That's (Seward Drive) where I saw a Prairie 
Falcon catch and eat some kind of small bird on this year's Corvallis CBC. It's 
a total hotspot. I spent most of the daylight hours w/in a mile of there on 
this year's count. The famous Bald Eagle roost is there, etc. etc. Lars 

On Mar 6, 2015, at 9:47 PM, Jamie Simmons wrote:

> Luke, for your records, that's Linn county, not Benton.
> 
> Jamie Simmons
> Corvallis
> 
> On Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:17 PM, Luke Ferrenburg  
wrote: 

> While looking for Short-Eared Owls off Seward dr. Near Tangent Kelsey and I 
spotted a cooperative Prairie Falcon on one of the telephone poles. Also there 
was a single Short-Eared Owl flying around the fields. 

> 
> -Luke Ferrenburg
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Lane County Pine Grosbeaks
From: "Linda Gilbert" <oregonjunco AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 18:13:15 -0800
On 1/27/15 I found 1 calling PINE GROSBEAK in a treetop on the ridge above the 
seed orchard on Foley Ridge Rd. This road is a right turn from highway 126 just 
past the McKenzie Bridge ranger station when travelling east. It was a russet 
colored adult with reddish head and gray breast. On 3/4/15 I drove the 5824 
road up from the north shore of Lookout Pt. Reservoir. At the edge of a 
clearcut near Clover Patch Butte I saw 2 large finches in a treetop. By 
silhouette and behavior they looked like PINE GROSBEAKS but I am not certain on 
those. 

Linda Gilbert
Eugene
Subject: Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades?
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 17:53:36 -0800
Hi all,

Just a thought here ...

The unprecedented snowless conditions in Santiam Pass and elsewhere seem
to present an equally unprecedented opportunity for owling at elevations
where Boreal Owls could be nesting, either in the Cascades or Ochocos.
This time of year, you could well hear their full song (I think I'm
still one of only a handful of people who've ever heard this in Oregon,
not sure who else outside of Mike Denny can claim that experience).

Has anyone tried?

All the reports of Pine Grosbeaks up in Santiam Pass have been very
cool, but it would be even cooler if someone could stick around after
dark and try calling a bit for owls.

Sure wish I could try myself, since these are amazingly rare conditions,
but I'm hobbled by vehicle issues. This snowless winter is one in a
hundred, in terms of opportunities for high-elevation owling (unless
this is the new normal, as some have suggested).

We'll surely rue these conditions later in summer as water supplies
dwindle, but might as well take advantage of the situation now.

Happy owling,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Boreal Owls in snowless Cascades?
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 17:53:36 -0800
Hi all,

Just a thought here ...

The unprecedented snowless conditions in Santiam Pass and elsewhere seem
to present an equally unprecedented opportunity for owling at elevations
where Boreal Owls could be nesting, either in the Cascades or Ochocos.
This time of year, you could well hear their full song (I think I'm
still one of only a handful of people who've ever heard this in Oregon,
not sure who else outside of Mike Denny can claim that experience).

Has anyone tried?

All the reports of Pine Grosbeaks up in Santiam Pass have been very
cool, but it would be even cooler if someone could stick around after
dark and try calling a bit for owls.

Sure wish I could try myself, since these are amazingly rare conditions,
but I'm hobbled by vehicle issues. This snowless winter is one in a
hundred, in terms of opportunities for high-elevation owling (unless
this is the new normal, as some have suggested).

We'll surely rue these conditions later in summer as water supplies
dwindle, but might as well take advantage of the situation now.

Happy owling,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


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Subject: Re: jackson county sharpie
From: "Richard W. Musser" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mussermcevoy@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2015 01:44:52 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Harry,     Thanks for sharing these----they clearly show a sharpie's, 
"match stick legs." Best regards, Dick Musser (4mi. NW of Vale) 

 

 On Saturday, March 7, 2015 3:21 PM, Harry Fuller  wrote: 

   

 nothing unusual here except the great quality photos a friend took:
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/03/07/sharp-images-of-sharpie/

near the bird feeders, of course

-- 
Harry Fullerauthor of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: freewaybirding.com
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com


   
Subject: Pine Grosbeaks @ Gold Lake, Lane Co.
From: "Tom & Allison Mickel" <tamickel AT riousa.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 17:09:48 -0800
OBOL,

Allison and I were up at Gold Lake, etc today (7 March) looking for Pine
Grosbeak, given that they have been found in all the counties around Lane
Co.  We heard birds calling/singing on the Waldo Lake road side of Gold
Lake, but never did see them.  If you drive up the Waldo Lake road to the
Fuji Mtn. trail, it's only 1/4 mile down the hill to Gold Lake and that's
the area where we heard them.
Other interesting birds were American Crow, calling Sooty Grouse, and
Western Bluebirds.  Quite a few birds up there given the few bird species
seen at Santiam Pass on Thursdays.

Tom Mickel
Eugene




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Subject: [COBOL] PCT grosbeaks, Linn county
From: "judy" <jmeredit AT bendnet.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 14:50:27 -0800
It just gets easier apparently! Forwarding from COBOL, Judy

-----Original Message----- 
From: Denise Fainberg
Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 2:36 PM
To: cobol AT lists.oregonstate.edu
Subject: Re: [COBOL] PCT grosbeaks

Marion and I observed a small flock (8-12) of Pine Grosbeaks about 10 AM 
this morning at the PCT parking lot on the Santiam Pass.  Spectacular males 
and females feeding in the taller green (spruces?) and smaller pine 
saplings, with some possible courting behavior.  Also two Mountain 
Bluebirds.  Denise




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Subject: jackson county sharpie
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 14:20:59 -0800
nothing unusual here except the great quality photos a friend took:
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/2015/03/07/sharp-images-of-sharpie/

near the bird feeders, of course

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Osprey washington County
From: Marlowe Kissinger <rosebudgurl AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:02:07 -0800
Thank you all. I was pretty sure but just wanted confirmation. 
Not the best photo but he was pretty high up
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 1:00 PM, Pamela Johnston  wrote:
> 
> For sure! Notice that there is lots of solid white on the breast and belly, 
extending out into the wings, and a dark stripe above the eye. Osprey have a 
nice simple coloring - white and dark brown with large areas of each. 

> 
> Happy spring,
> 
> Pamela Johnston
> 
> On Mar 7, 2015 12:40 PM, Marlowe Kissinger  wrote:
> Can someone confirm this as an Osprey. 
> Taken an hour ago at Beal wetlands
> 
>       Thanks  Marlowe
> 
> 
http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/osprey201_zpsq77wzdxs.jpg?t=1425674255 

> 
8¶«r¯zÌ0ÁúÞzX¬¶Ê+ƒö«r¯{ú¢S¨Ê‹«iÇ(º{h®éì¹»®&Þ†Ûiÿü0ÁúÞzX¬¶Ê+ƒùb²ßèn‰B¢{ZrÙ¨uêÚ¶Šì¡º%š‡^­«h®Çëyéb²Û(® 
Subject: Re: Osprey washington County
From: Pamela Johnston <pamelaj AT spiritone.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 12:59:51 -0800




Subject: Osprey washington County
From: Marlowe Kissinger <rosebudgurl AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:40:02 -0800
Can someone confirm this as an Osprey. 
Taken an hour ago at Beal wetlands

      Thanks  Marlowe


http://i751.photobucket.com/albums/xx156/rosebudgurl/osprey201_zpsq77wzdxs.jpg?t=1425674255 

 		 	   		  
Subject: [Fwd: Larks south of Corvallis on Saturday morning]
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 12:03:09 -0800
A bit more for folks who are interested in Streaked Horned Larks -- joel

-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: Joel Geier 
Reply-to: joel.geier AT peak.org
To: MidValley Birds 
Subject: Larks south of Corvallis on Saturday morning
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 11:55:07 -0800

Hi all,

On my way to haul a few more boxes of Willamette Valley Birding Trail
guides to Finley NWR this morning, I took a bit of a slalom route to
check fields that seemed likely to have Horned Larks. Here's a summary
of what I found:

Llewellyn Rd: 3 HORNED LARKS singing at widely spaced locations along
the south side of the road. The one that was close enough to see through
the thin/patchy fog was a male "Streaked" Horned Lark (ssp. strigata),
not banded. Heard a few PIPITS.

Decker Rd. (easternmost half mile): WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW singing right
across the road from Muddy Creek Charter School. Two male WESTERN
MEADOWLARKS singing along with Red-winged Blackbirds from the cattails
along the swale that runs diagonally across the corner of this field. At
least half a dozen more meadowlarks feeding in fields on both sides of
road, along with 200+ American Robins.

Buchanan Rd: Two WESTERN MEADOWLARKS singing from down in grass (already
half a foot high) on east side of road, couple of others sneaking
around. Also one ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK perched to west, a TREE SWALLOW
perched near a nest box, and a pair of kestrels.

Greenberry Rd: No larks detected. 

Eureka Rd (east of Bruce Rd): Two pairs of HORNED LARKS (at least one
and probably both pairs of "Streaked" subspecies), males singing,
squabbling a bit over territory, and sticking close to females. None
were banded. I think Sally Hill reported some larks here a few weeks
ago. When I tracked down one pair with my scope after they flew together
and landed about 80 m away, the female was doing some feather
fluffing/adjustment similar to what they often do after copulation, but
I can't be positive that she wasn't just preening (would be awfully
early for copulation/nesting). Also a dozen or more PIPITS and a few
SAVANNAH SPARROWS.

Bruce Rd through Finley NWR: Lots of birders and photographers checking the 
wetlands! I 

figured they were covering those pretty well, so I tried to focus on the
fields. No larks detected though about 20 PIPITS were mixed in with
ROBINS in the grass field directly south of the Mitigation Pond
(a.k.a. "the scrape").

Finley NWR headquarters area: Pair of WESTERN BLUEBIRDS trying to fend
off five or six Tree Swallows on small prairie between HQ and Woodpecker
Loop. But help is on the way! A small army of young carpenters were
hammering together nest boxes as one of several bird-related activities
for a youth event. Looks like they had a great turnout, I've never seen
so many people on the refuge.

Finley Rd: At least three WESTERN MEADOWLARKS singing (two out on
prairie south of the overlook, one to the north). No Horned Larks
detected on the conservation wetland or other fields to the N and E of
the wildlife refuge boundary. Again, I'll leave it to others to comment
on the waterfowl -- though one fun thing was watching 20 AMERICAN COOTS
traipse across the driveway of the conservation wetland.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis





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Subject: 3 pine grosbeak
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:25:30 -0800
at PCT and Summit trail junction



-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:20:55 -0800
Several years ago I reported an event that I saw on the road between Rufus
and the John Day dam.  I saw a Belding's ground squirrel dragging another
squirrel, a road-kill, off the road.  I thought it was a case of compassion
for a fallen comrade.  However, I later saw the live animal eating the
victim.

Nature's tough. 

Paul Sullivan
-----------------------------
Subject: Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds
Date: Sat Mar 7 2015 11:06 am
From: gerardlillie AT outlook.com
A couple of weeks ago I stepped outside to find a squirrel with a Junco in
it's mouth. I don't know if it captured a live bird, found a dead bird or an
injured bird. It was on the ground and then went a short way up a tree. It
sat in one place and was acting like it didn't quite know what to do- could
have been my perception, of course. I had to leave for work so I don't know
what it eventually did with the bird. That was the first time I have seen a
squirrel with anything other than standard squirrel fare.



Gerard Lillie

Portland, OR





- See more at: http://birding.aba.org/maillistdigest/OR01#875617



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Subject: Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds
From: Gerard Lillie <gerardlillie AT outlook.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:05:24 -0800
A couple of weeks ago I stepped outside to find a squirrel with a Junco in it's 
mouth. I don't know if it captured a live bird, found a dead bird or an injured 
bird. It was on the ground and then went a short way up a tree. It sat in one 
place and was acting like it didn't quite know what to do- could have been my 
perception, of course. I had to leave for work so I don't know what it 
eventually did with the bird. That was the first time I have seen a squirrel 
with anything other than standard squirrel fare. 


Gerard Lillie
Portland, OR

 
From: pamelaj AT SpiritOne.com
To: obol AT freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 08:33:59 -0800









Deer have also been observed eating dead frogs. Id say our notions of what 
animals will eat are often a bit narrow. 
 
Pamela Johnston




From: L Markoff 
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 4:18 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org 
Subject: [obol] Field cameras catch deer eating 
birds
 


Hello Obol.  This is a 
new one on me.  Although thinking about it, it makes 
sense.
 
 

http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870 

utm_source=recirculation&utm_medium=recirculation&utm_campaign=wednesdayPM
 
 
Lori 
Markoff
Eugene
 
  		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Field cameras catch deer eating birds
From: "Pamela Johnston" <pamelaj AT SpiritOne.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 08:33:59 -0800
Deer have also been observed eating dead frogs. I’d say our notions of what 
animals will eat are often a bit narrow. 


Pamela Johnston
From: L Markoff 
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 4:18 AM
To: obol AT freelists.org 
Subject: [obol] Field cameras catch deer eating birds

Hello Obol. This is a new one on me. Although thinking about it, it makes 
sense. 


 

 


http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870 


utm_source=recirculation&utm_medium=recirculation&utm_campaign=wednesdayPM

 

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene

 

 
Subject: Re: Streaked Horned Lark locations
From: "R. Adney Jr." <rfadney AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 08:30:00 -0800
Tub Run rd. in Linn County was also where we saw and photographed Streaked 
Horned Larks last year. If you google map the road, there is a "Z" in the road. 
That is where we found them. 


Rich Adney

http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
http://www.oregonimages.net


> Subject: [obol] Streaked Horned Lark locations
> From: joel.geier AT peak.org
> To: obol AT freelists.org
> Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 20:07:17 -0800
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> I noticed Lars's posting. One thing to keep in mind, for any seekers of
> Streaked Horned Larks, is that we're in between seasons right now.
> Wintering flocks seem to be breaking up but we're not really into
> nesting season yet.
> 
> Livermore Rd. north of Baskett Slough NWR (it bears mentioning that this
> is almost all private land, outside of the federal refuge system) is
> certainly one of the most important nesting areas, though not protected
> under the 2013 USFWS listing decision. As I mentioned in a few days ago,
> I found about 50 larks while walking this 8-mile stretch for an ODFW
> survey in 2008, accounting for about 5% of the range-wide population.
> However, reports this winter have only been sporadic.
> 
> Coville Rd. (note there is no "l" between the "o" and the "v," unlike
> the place in NE Washington) as I also mentioned is good for nesting
> season, but has had only intermittent reports this winter.
> 
> Glaser Rd. over in Linn Co. as I mentioned has at least a couple of
> pairs of Streaked Horned Larks right now, and has had consistent reports
> all winter. So that's where I would go if I really wanted to see
> Streaked Horned Larks.
> 
> There is also Corvallis Airport, but most of the population there is in
> areas not accessible to the general public.
> 
> Good birding,
> Joel
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 06:14:26 -0800
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: March 7, 2015 6:10:34 AM PST

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Bean-Goose (2 Tillamook)
Ross's Goose (1 Benton)
Cackling Goose (minima) (1 Klamath)
Tundra Swan (Bewick's) (1 Benton)
Blue-winged Teal (2 Clackamas)
Horned Grebe (2 Wallowa)
White-tailed Kite (1 Clatsop)
Virginia Rail (1 Klamath)
Common Nighthawk (1 Deschutes)
Williamson's Sapsucker (1 Hood River)
Black-capped Chickadee (1 Deschutes)
Pine Grosbeak (1 Linn)
White-winged Crossbill (1 Wallowa)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Re: Benton - Prairie Falcon
From: Jamie Simmons <sapsuckers AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:47:52 -0800
Luke, for your records, that's Linn county, not Benton.

Jamie Simmons
Corvallis

On Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:17 PM, Luke Ferrenburg 
wrote:

> While looking for Short-Eared Owls off Seward dr. Near Tangent Kelsey and
> I spotted a cooperative Prairie Falcon on one of the telephone poles.  Also
> there was a single Short-Eared Owl flying around the fields.
>
> -Luke Ferrenburg
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
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> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Pine Grosbeak in w. Oregon - just barely
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:32:27 -0800
Six female Pine Grosbeak flying high over the Pacific Crest Trail about 3/4
of a mile n. of the trail's intersection with Hwy 20 today was a
tantalizing occurrence that kept me scouring the area (unsuccessfully) for
several hours this morning with the hope of finding a large flock foraging
at eye-level on the bear grass which many others have recently enjoyed. To
add insult to injury - several woodpeckers were drumming in the area, but I
was unable to visually locate a single one of them. I was off trail for
about a third of the walk today chasing distant call notes to no avail. The
most interesting find, besides the grosbeak and lack of snow at the 5,200
ft elevation level, was a pair of Mountain Bluebird actively working a nest
cavity.

http://www.jack-n-jill.net/blog/2015/3/pine-grosbeak-in-w-oregon---just-barely

-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: FOY in Yamhill County
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:24:09 -0800
We had a couple first-of-the-year sightings in Yamhill County today.  

 

We saw an OSPREY at the nest 2+ miles west of Amity along the Amity-Bellevue
Highway.

We found a CINNAMON TEAL at Sheldon's marsh on Briedwell Rd, NW of Amity.

We saw our first FEMALE RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD at our feeder in McMinnville.

 

We also had a lone female EVENING GROSBEAK visit our feeders today.

 

The Purple Finches, Robins, and White-crowned Sparrows are singing in the
neighborhood in the mornings.

 

Good birding,

 

Paul Sullivan
Subject: No Pine Grosbeaks on PCT
From: <pat2ly AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 20:41:39 -0800
Five of us hiked about mile on the PCT from the Santiam Pass Trailhead around 
3:00 p.m. today (Friday) and saw no Pine Grosbeaks, nor any other bird for that 
matter! 

We met two other women walking back toward the parking lot, who told us that 
they had seen three unidentified birds as silhouette's flying away from them at 
a distance into the sun. 

What little snow that remained on the trail was rapidly melting, making mud. 
While missing out on the Grosbeaks, the beauty of the snow covered mountains 
glistening in the sun was 

a highlight. If Max Smith and Sarah go again tomorrow, I hope they find the 
birds and let us know where they are. Regardless, it was a great day to be 
birding! 


Pat Tilley
Salem, OR.
Subject: Re: today's quiz
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 20:29:10 -0800
I wonder if these can truly be called "chirps" given how they
are produced?

Maybe it's just semantics...


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
Problem? what problem?
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2667



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Subject: Photos: Ankeny NWR 03-05-15 Turkey Vulture Ruddy Duck
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 20:27:27 -0800
Yesterday afternoon at Ankeny NWR I photographed a Turkey Vulture flying
over head and a male Ruddy Duck starting to change into it's mating plumage
with a blue bill and starting to change to a ruddy color.  Click on link
below for photos.  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/AnkenyNWR030515?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCIvD46uv_f2SeA&feat=directlink 
Subject: Streaked Horned Lark locations
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 20:07:17 -0800
Hi all,

I noticed Lars's posting. One thing to keep in mind, for any seekers of
Streaked Horned Larks, is that we're in between seasons right now.
Wintering flocks seem to be breaking up but we're not really into
nesting season yet.

Livermore Rd. north of Baskett Slough NWR (it bears mentioning that this
is almost all private land, outside of the federal refuge system) is
certainly one of the most important nesting areas, though not protected
under the 2013 USFWS listing decision. As I mentioned in a few days ago,
I found about 50 larks while walking this 8-mile stretch for an ODFW
survey in 2008, accounting for about 5% of the range-wide population.
However, reports this winter have only been sporadic.

Coville Rd. (note there is no "l" between the "o" and the "v," unlike
the place in NE Washington) as I also mentioned is good for nesting
season, but has had only intermittent reports this winter.

Glaser Rd. over in Linn Co. as I mentioned has at least a couple of
pairs of Streaked Horned Larks right now, and has had consistent reports
all winter. So that's where I would go if I really wanted to see
Streaked Horned Larks.

There is also Corvallis Airport, but most of the population there is in
areas not accessible to the general public.

Good birding,
Joel




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Subject: today's quiz
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:56:15 -0800
https://www.dropbox.com/s/e3rn30d9w8wm7pf/P1250755.mov?dl=0 
 


click on the link above to see and hear 58 second video I filmed today 
in our back yard.

In it are 3 loud chirps.

What made those 3 loud chirps?

Stephanie
Subject: Steigerwald Lake NWR (Clark County, Washington) - Sagebrush Sparrow Photos
From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:51:32 -0800
I linked some photos I took of the bird I was surprised as hell to find
today in the ebird checklist below.  The bird hung around in the bare areas
around the metal sided barn that is visible to the right if you follow the
main trail to the Columbia River.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22197485

It was a gorgeous day to be out there.  Also saw my FOS Turkey Vulture and
Violet-green Swallows.

I am not on Tweeters if anyone who is thinks it's worth posting there.

Good birding:

Philip Kline
Subject: Photos: Virginia Rail - Marsh Wren Talking Water Gardens Albany
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:48:13 -0800
Yesterday morning I went to Talking Water Gardens in Albany and enjoyed
photographing a Virginia Rail, Yellow-rumped Warbler and a Marsh Wren.
Click on link below for photos.  Loving this great spring weather, Jim
Leonard.





https://picasaweb.google.com/108302360004365615395/TalkingWaterGardens030515?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLCNsM7U2bG5KA&feat=directlink 
Subject: Benton - Prairie Falcon
From: Luke Ferrenburg <lukeferrenburg AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:17:12 -0800
While looking for Short-Eared Owls off Seward dr. Near Tangent Kelsey and I 
spotted a cooperative Prairie Falcon on one of the telephone poles. Also there 
was a single Short-Eared Owl flying around the fields. 


-Luke Ferrenburg 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Help request- Finley nwr
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:14:56 -0800
While I have detected Horned Larks at Finley, it's never a slam dunk. I think 
the best place on Earth for Streaked Horned Larks is Basket Slough NWR. 
Colville Road from Hwy 99W to the Basket Butte Trailhead is good. Livermore 
Road, north of the refuge, is better. I mean the north half, from Perrydale 
south to the narrows, or gap. I've seldom dipped there in the course of a 
decade. On my first trip ever to Baskett Slough, April '74, I found the nest of 
a Horned Lark. Lars 

On Mar 6, 2015, at 1:41 PM, Dave Kollen wrote:

> I find myself with some extra time and would like to try for a streaked 
horned-lark. Any suggestions on the best way to do that? Thanks in advance for 
any help. 

> Dave Kollen
> Brookings 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 



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Subject: No Pine Grosbeaks on PCT
From: Max Smith <oregonmax AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 18:26:27 -0800
Sarah and I hiked beyond the coordinates posted by Doug on the Pacific Crest 
Trail in search of the Pine Grosbeak flock. The birds we found were a Mountain 
Bluebird and a White-breasted Nuthatch. We're staying in Bend tonight and 
thinking about trying again tomorrow. Did anyone out there find them today? 


Max Smith


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fwd: Increased Access to Auk and Condor journals
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 15:39:46 -0800
Hi all,

I haven't seen mention of this yet on OBOL yet, so forwarding this info
from the Nevada birding list, courtesy of Jen Ballard at the Great Basin
Bird Observatory. 

The direct link if you want to skip the fluff on the ABA blog site is:
http://aoucospubs.org/


Date:    Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:56:38 -0800
From:    Jennifer Ballard 
Subject: Increased Access to Auk and Condor journals

Hi all, I just wanted to let you know that I've heard that Auk and Condor,
two of the premier ornithology journals in North America, will be making
available their articles through 2013.  If you're wanting to learn more
about some aspects of ornithology and species, this is a great opportunity
to trawl through their archives (the older articles from most North American
ornithological journals are available free on SORA).  Here's a link talking
about it:

http://blog.aba.org/2015/02/the-auk-and-the-condor-expanding-access.html

Happy reading,
Jen

********************************************
Jennifer Ballard, 
Monitoring Coordinator
Great Basin Bird Observatory
********************************************

------------------------------

End of NVBIRDS Digest - 27 Feb 2015 to 28 Feb 2015 (#2015-50)
*************************************************************






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Subject: Fwd: Albany/Tangent/Lebanon area open-country birds (incl. Streaked Horned Larks)
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 14:43:00 -0800
Hi all,

I just saw Dave Kollen's request for information about Streaked Horned
Larks at Finley NWR. Unfortunately e-mail addresses don't display in the
OBOL archives, so I'd have to wait until the daily archives come through
tomorrow to respond directly to Dave's RFI -- but here is another
reliable place to see Streaked Horned Larks (see report below).

Glaser Drive (and adjoining fields) is one of the most regular nesting
sites for Streaked Horned Larks, and can be found as follows, starting
from the Hwy 34 / I-5 interchange east of Tangent:

Go east on Hwy 34 about 0.6 mile and turn south onto Seven Mile Lane. Go
two miles and turn left onto a small gravel road (Glaser Dr.). Please
drive slowly as the larks will often be right in the road, or along the
shoulders.

At Finley NWR, Horned Larks are most often reported along Bruce Rd., or
along Finley Rd. Directions are written up in the Willamette Valley
Birding Trail guide (www.willamettebirding.org/wvtrailguide.htm). The
best area along Bruce Rd. is usually west of McFadden Marsh, in fields
along the south side of the road. The best spot along Finley Rd. is
actually just outside the refuge boundary, on a private conservation
easement along the south side of the road.

One other reliable place to see Streaked Horned Larks during nesting
season is east of Baskett Slough NWR, along Coville Rd. within 1/4 to
1/2 mile of Hwy 99W (north of Hwy 22 and Rickreall). Again, the birds
are often right out in the road so please drive slowly.

Good birding,
Joel

-------- Forwarded Message --------
From: Joel Geier 
Reply-to: joel.geier AT peak.org
To: MidValley Birds 
Subject: Albany/Tangent/Lebanon area open-country birds
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 14:02:49 -0800

Hi all,

Bob Altman and I spent the morning cruising around western Linn County,
mostly focused on potential as well as traditional grassland bird spots,
basically wandering around in the area east and south of Albany, west of
Lebanon, north of Shedd, and east of Hwy 99E (you should be fully turned
around now, if you tried to follow that).

We found WESTERN MEADOWLARKS and heard one or two HORNED LARKS singing
very far out in a field at the north end of Blatchford Rd.

Along the gravel stretch of Glaser Rd., we saw two pairs of STREAKED
HORNED LARKS and heard another male singing far off toward the south.
Both pairs were sticking very close to each other, with the males
singing frequently, though we didn't see any indication of nesting
activity (this would be extraordinarily early).

We also heard a couple of meadowlarks singing off to the north of
Glaser, and in a few other places. We heard 2-3 other Horned Larks
singing elsewhere, at widely dispersed locations. We didn't find any
flocks.

AMERICAN PIPITS likewise seemed to be rather dispersed. We heard a few
at numerous stops, but never saw more than half a dozen in one place.
The landscape looks dry for this time of year, with very little standing
water in the fields, except in ditches.

The only concentration of shorebirds that we ran across was at what
looked like a new wetland restoration project along the south side of
Gerig Rd. About 10 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and about 25 DUNLIN were using a
shallow pond far back from the road. This is where we saw about six
PIPITS (and heard a few more flying over).

A sheep farm along Goltra Rd. had four BALD EAGLES and a few RAVENS on
the ground feeding on a sheep carcass. There were numerous lambs in the
field. A few of them were lying down and resting within 25 ft or so of
eagles, seemingly unconcerned.

We saw a total of five TURKEY VULTURES, lots of RED-TAILED HAWKS and
several NORTHERN HARRIERS, but only one ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK (just a bit
WNW of Ward Butte). 

We though we might see some shrikes, bluebirds or phoebes, but no such
luck. Pretty much everything out there is singing, except the vultures.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis





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Subject: Help request- Finley nwr
From: Dave Kollen <davekollen AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 13:41:05 -0800
I find myself with some extra time and would like to try for a streaked 
horned-lark. Any suggestions on the best way to do that? Thanks in advance for 
any help. 

Dave Kollen
Brookings 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Steigerwald Sage Sparrow
From: Kris Gmail <kristeneisenman AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 13:02:35 -0800
I saw two of them in that area. I couldn't figure out what they were since I 
had never seen a sage sparrow before and didn't know they would be in that 
area. I kept looking for someone to confirm it. Thanks, Kris 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 6, 2015, at 12:38 PM, Philip Kline  wrote:
> 
> Just found a Sage Sparrow (sagebrush I think) by the old barn if you turn 
right when you reach the river. Have pretty decent photos. Will post later. 

> 
> Philip Kline
Subject: Steigerwald Sage Sparrow
From: Philip Kline <pgeorgekline AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:38:22 -0800
Just found a Sage Sparrow (sagebrush I think) by the old barn if you turn
right when you reach the river.  Have pretty decent photos.  Will post
later.

Philip Kline
Subject: Eugene Birder's Night (SWOC) meets March 9th with Anne and Dan Heyerly's BIRDS OF PERU
From: Ellen Cantor <ellencantor AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 10:06:05 -0800
The next Eugene Birders Night (SWOC) meeting will be held Monday March 9th,
2015 at 7 pm at the McNail-Riley house, 601 W 13th Ave, Eugene. The
McNail-Riley House is the restored historic house at the NW corner of W.
13th Ave. and Jefferson St. The parking area, located immediately west of
the McNail-Riley House, can be accessed from Jefferson St. via the driveway
located immediately north of the M-R House.

After initial introductions, we’ll share recent sightings and discuss
birding connected topics.  Then Anne and Dan Heyerly will share tales and
present photos taken on their often off-the beaten-path birding trip to
Peru.

No entrance fees! All are welcome!
Contact ellencantor AT gmail.com for further information
Subject: Tree Swallow on HMSC Trail - Correction
From: John Thomas <johnpam AT mtangel.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 07:22:48 -0800
We had a TREE SWALLOW hanging from a nest box at Hatfield Marine Science Center 
Trail yesterday and not a "Tree Sparrow." Must have been tired after the drive 
home...There were at least 15-20 swallows. The trail area is receiving major 
modifications to stop the erosion. 


John Thomas

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Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 06:25:19 -0800
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: March 6, 2015 6:10:19 AM PST

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Bean-Goose (3 Tillamook)
Ross's Goose (1 Benton)
Blue-winged Teal (4 Clackamas)
Chukar (1 Multnomah)
Clark's Grebe (1 Linn)
Pine Grosbeak (10 Linn)
White-winged Crossbill (1 Wallowa)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 


NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Coos Palm Warbler & early nighthawk 3/5/2015
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 06:00:08 -0800
There was a single PALM WARBLER in the parking lot at the BLM office in
North Bend yesterday morning as I loaded up my truck to go to the field. I
had seen two earlier in the winter over at the airport (across the street)
so I suspect that is the best spot to view them.

In the PM while walking Teak, we heard what sounded like a perfect C.
Nighthawk call.  Of course it was a starling but I wanted to beat the rush
on reporting the first one this year : )

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Field cameras catch deer eating birds
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 04:18:18 -0800
Hello Obol.  This is a new one on me.  Although thinking about it, it makes
sense.

 

 

http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-168944
0870
 

utm_source=recirculation
 &utm_medium=recirculation&utm_campaign=wednesdayPM

 

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene

 

 
Subject: Turkey Vultures, Columbia County
From: Darrel Whipple <dwhipple AT opusnet.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 23:31:11 -0800
Two Turkey Vultures circling over my place at Alston, between Rainier and 
Clatskanie. This was March 3. (Sorry for late post.) 


Darrel Whipple
Rainier

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Subject: ECAS Fort Rock Raptor Survey
From: "Kim Boddie" <kcboddie AT bendbroadband.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:45:09 -0800
Tom Lowler and I joined Lowell Franks on the ECAS Fort Rock Raptor Survey 
today, 3/5, under clear skies except for the jet con trails, calm to light 
winds , and temps between 21 and 65 degrees F. We spent almost 7 hours covering 
the 59 mile route which included lunch in the Silver Lake Cafe. Like yesterday, 
many of the raptors were soaring high and it was tough getting an ID on some of 
them. We counted 128 raptors which is route record for March which included 60 
Red-tails which is one over the route record for 11 years of counting. 


We also saw 15 Sage Grouse, some were leaving the lek when we got there at 
9:00, 70 Pronghorns, lots of Horned Larks, and a few Mtn. Bluebirds and W. 
Meadowlarks. 


Raptors seen:
Red-tailed hawk 60 American Kestrel 2 

Northern Harrier 2 Bald Eagle 5 A 2 S 

Golden Eagle 14 Rough-legged Hawk 14 

Ferruginous Hawk 9 unident. Buteo 9 

Prairie Falcon 4 Cooper's Hawk 1 

Great Horne Owl 3 (2 on nest) Turkey Vulture 3 


Kim Boddie
Bend
 
Subject: ECAS Fort Rock Raptor Survey
From: "Kim Boddie" <kcboddie AT bendbroadband.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:45:09 -0800
Tom Lowler and I joined Lowell Franks on the ECAS Fort Rock Raptor Survey 
today, 3/5, under clear skies except for the jet con trails, calm to light 
winds , and temps between 21 and 65 degrees F. We spent almost 7 hours covering 
the 59 mile route which included lunch in the Silver Lake Cafe. Like yesterday, 
many of the raptors were soaring high and it was tough getting an ID on some of 
them. We counted 128 raptors which is route record for March which included 60 
Red-tails which is one over the route record for 11 years of counting. 


We also saw 15 Sage Grouse, some were leaving the lek when we got there at 
9:00, 70 Pronghorns, lots of Horned Larks, and a few Mtn. Bluebirds and W. 
Meadowlarks. 


Raptors seen:
Red-tailed hawk 60 American Kestrel 2 

Northern Harrier 2 Bald Eagle 5 A 2 S 

Golden Eagle 14 Rough-legged Hawk 14 

Ferruginous Hawk 9 unident. Buteo 9 

Prairie Falcon 4 Cooper's Hawk 1 

Great Horne Owl 3 (2 on nest) Turkey Vulture 3 


Kim Boddie
Bend
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Subject: Bald Eagles over E.E. Wilson et cetera
From: Jamie Boulton <bluespark59 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:43:54 -0800
Today I took my bicycle up to the E.E. Wilson Wildlife area and did some
exploring. Lots of RED-TAILED HAWKS were around and way up high I saw a
pair of BALD EAGLES soaring in lazy circles.  I stopped at the wetland
restoration area adjacent to the fishing pond and saw plenty of waterfowl.
Among them were about 10 CORMORANTS harvesting fish rather more efficiently
than the anglers (humans) on the pond.  Only 2 CANADA GEESE, but lots of
ducks; including AMERICAN WIGEON, SCAUP, RING-NECKED DUCK, and MALLARD. A
GREAT BLUE HERON, and AMERICAN COOTs were there too. On the edge near the
observation deck a BLACK PHOEBE stopped by and a WRENTIT sang his bouncing
ping-pong ball song. He then dove into the brush and I saw he had a
companion.

It was a beautiful day for tooling around in the sunshine and the target
range was completely silent. I explored one of the grassy paths and stopped
for a moment to listen to a small commotion in the blackberry bushes when a
RING-NECKED PHEASANT flushed about 20 feet away. A bit of a shock, but in a
good way! SPOTTED TOWHEES were singing and occasionally one would fly
straight up out of the bushes and quickly dip straight down and back in.
AMERICAN ROBINS are still hanging together in loose flocks and a male
NORTHERN HARRIER was soaring on a thermal.

Jamie Boulton
Subject: Help requested - Coos Bay and North Bend Orioles
From: David Kollen <davekollen AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:30:35 -0800
Hello,
I will be traveling through Coos Bay on Sunday afternoon and would like to
attempt viewing the Orioles. Are they viewable from publicly accessible
areas? Thanks in advance for any help.

Dave Kollen
Brookings
Subject: ECAS Christmas Valley Raptor Survey
From: "Kim Boddie" <kcboddie AT bendbroadband.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:17:16 -0800
Clay Crofton joined me on Wed Mar. 4th on the Christmas Valley ECAS Raptor 
Survey. We drove 88 miles under clear skies, calm to light winds and temps 
between 30 and 52 degrees F.we counted 138 raptors which is a March record for 
the route. A lot of the birds were soaring with many quite far out making for 
some hard identifications, you had to stick with them. The Roughies are still 
with us and we are starting to see TVs. 


We saw 16 Sage Grouse on the lek, all males, but only one was doing a little 
strutting. This is way down from the 150 I saw on the lek several years ago. In 
recent years we have been seeing close to 60 but it may be a little early in 
the year and we haven't been to the site until around 9:00 AM. 


Horned Larks were everywhere along the route in the hayfields. we also saw 1 N. 
Shrike, 2 Coyotes, 6 Pronghorns, and a scattering of Mt. Bluebirds plus a few 
W. Meadowlarks. 


Raptors Counted:
Red-tailed Hawk 58 American Kestrel 1 

Northern Harrier 3 Bald Eagle 9 A, 4 S 

Golden Eagle 10 Rough-legged Hawk 24 

Ferruginous Hawk 14 Prairie Falcon 1 

Cooper's Hawk 2 Unident. Buteo 2 

Turkey Vulture                                 2


Kim Boddie
Bend
Subject: ECAS Christmas Valley Raptor Survey
From: "Kim Boddie" <kcboddie AT bendbroadband.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:17:16 -0800
Clay Crofton joined me on Wed Mar. 4th on the Christmas Valley ECAS Raptor 
Survey. We drove 88 miles under clear skies, calm to light winds and temps 
between 30 and 52 degrees F.we counted 138 raptors which is a March record for 
the route. A lot of the birds were soaring with many quite far out making for 
some hard identifications, you had to stick with them. The Roughies are still 
with us and we are starting to see TVs. 


We saw 16 Sage Grouse on the lek, all males, but only one was doing a little 
strutting. This is way down from the 150 I saw on the lek several years ago. In 
recent years we have been seeing close to 60 but it may be a little early in 
the year and we haven't been to the site until around 9:00 AM. 


Horned Larks were everywhere along the route in the hayfields. we also saw 1 N. 
Shrike, 2 Coyotes, 6 Pronghorns, and a scattering of Mt. Bluebirds plus a few 
W. Meadowlarks. 


Raptors Counted:
Red-tailed Hawk 58 American Kestrel 1 

Northern Harrier 3 Bald Eagle 9 A, 4 S 

Golden Eagle 10 Rough-legged Hawk 24 

Ferruginous Hawk 14 Prairie Falcon 1 

Cooper's Hawk 2 Unident. Buteo 2 

Turkey Vulture                                 2


Kim Boddie
Bend_______________________________________________
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Subject: A speedy quartet
From: sheila chambers <sheilach2 AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 19:01:51 -0800
Another sunny, warm, dry day on the southern Oregon coast & as I was 
putting out the morning feed for "my" outside birds who were lurking in 
the nearby bushes, I heard a great commotion in the sky above.
The Tree's were back! & their early.

Their were 4 of them & chattering as they went as they swirled about 
their nest boxes then swooped upwards again to chase each other 
someplace else.
It's a wise strategy for them to check out their nest site before their 
breeding season. What if their nest site was gone? They would have time 
to find another before the season to breed arrived.

As soon as I had turned my back on the now filled feeders, they charged 
in, White-crowns, Gold-crowns, Fox & Song sparrows, House Finches, 
Spotted towhee. Scrub Jay's, Black-capped chickadee, Brewers blackbird, 
Anna's hummingbird, Starlings & a Robin.
Pine siskins & one lone Goldfinch were at the niger feeder.

I don't expect to see much of the Trees until their breeding season & I 
wonder if I'll ever see Violet-green swallows here again?

Sheila in Brookings, Oregon 97416


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Subject: Re: Bald Eagles
From: Barbara Millikan <barbara.millikan AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:59:55 -0800
Out of area, but cool. Bald eagles on nest in snow storm in Pennsylvania.


http://wtop.com/watercooler/2015/03/eagle-covered-with-snow-up-to-her-beak-as-she-protects-eggs-in-storm/slide/12/ 


On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 1:20 PM, Marlowe Kissinger 
wrote:

>
> Just saw 4 Bald Eagles sw of the PDX airport
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
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>
>
>
Subject: Florence birds
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:54:03 -0800
Not exactly Florence birds. I am doing a regular survey of birds using the 
Waite Ranch marshlands just east of Cushman. This property is now owned by 
McKenzie Trust and will be reverted to natural salt marsh over the next few 
years, so regular counts are being done. 


Nothing too strange on today's survey. The wintering Swamp Sparrow is still 
there. Lots of Lincoln's. Singing Marsh Wrens in pretty much every possible 
place. I did see one meadowlark, which might end up breeding there. 


Plenty of Tree Swallows and a small flock of vultures. A pair of Wood Ducks and 
small numbers of other quackers. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 




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Subject: the Bean Goose, other stuff
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:13:16 -0800
.First, after suggestions by Alan C (GC with cotton mouth) and Greg Gillson who 
suggested White-throated Sparrow which I had forgotten about, not having seen 
one around here all winter, I think it had to be a sparrow. Considering how 
sedentary CA Towhee is, and I doubt one has ever been seen anywhere near Salem. 
That was a dead ringer for a CA towhee call note in my backyard yesterday. 

I hope I don't ramble too much in this post but I might.
Jack Presley Evans and I went to Pacific City today for the Bean Goose, and 
Jack wanted me to try a Fire on the Mountain or Stella Blue omelette at 
Grateful Bread in Pacific City. Now, I do not care one bit about geese, to me 
they are like farm animals. They have nearly all overpopulated themselves (this 
statement coming from a human, right?) thanks to modern farming practices, and 
we manage them to boot. I don't dislike them either. I just don't care much 
about them. As far as I'm concerned, there should be open season on most goose 
species, except on refuges because the word refuge means something. I am sorry 
if you like geese a lot, I have no argument with you, I just do not care. I 
don't even think they are very good to eat. 

We did see the Tundra Bean Goose, and it did not look quite like I thought it 
would. Last fall, just a few days before it was first reported at Nestucca I 
saw a few White-fronts at Ankeny, and one looked different - likely a young 
bird - but when the Bean Goose was reported I thought to myself maybe I saw 
that bird at Ankeny. I thought what a moron, not taking a closer look, maybe 
that bird was here first. After seeing it today I no longer have that sinking 
feeling of having maybe seen a rarity but being too uninformed to report it. 

The Stella Blue omelette was delicious. And it did not make me shed a tear like 
Stella Blue did when the Grateful Dead first got together as The Other Ones (in 
2002?) after Jerry Garcia died in 1995. It was a magical concert where they 
played the most soulful version ever of Stella Blue, in Oakland, without any 
lyrics, just Jimmy Herring and Bobby Weir channeling Jerry, as a tribute to 
Jerry himself. Excuse me please, for that diversion but it was on my mind 
today. Nearby we saw 8 COMMON GOLDENEYES which may have been noteworthy, I 
don't know since I almost never bird on the coast. I can't remember having seen 
many COGOs at the coast before. 

If I kept a life list, I added one today, and if I kept a state list I added 
one today - I might reconstruct both lists sometime. While were having 
delicious omelettes Jack gave the Grateful Bread cafe a nice photo that he had 
taken of the Bean Goose. You might see it on their wall unless the wait person 
took it home with her. His portrait of Jerry Garcia always hung stage left at 
the old Sweetwater in Mill Valley, it is something Jack likes to do. It was a 
good and beautiful spring day in NW Oregon. 

Roy Gerig, Salem OR


  		 	   		  
Subject: BEAN GOOSE Yesterday -Still Here
From: John Thomas <johnpam AT mtangel.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:30:42 -0800
Pam and I saw the BEAN GOOSE at 3 PM yesterday, March 4th, so it was still 
present and easily seen. It was north of the bridge as you come into the 
wildlife refuge on Christiansen Road (sp?) and very close. We drove by and 
spent time up at the first kiosk until we realized the main goose flocks were 
back down by the entrance road. It seems to have found some friendly geese and 
settled right in with them after eating grass. 


Some of the other birds on our one day-overnight outing to north and central 
coast were 10 BLACK TURNSTONES at Bay City Pacific Ocean Farm south of 
Garibaldi, 3 BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS at Depoe Bay, PEREGRINE FALCON and BURROWING 
OWL at Yaquina Head , thousands of COMMON MURRES -along with SURF SCOTERS and 
others-milling under the rocks by the Yaquina Head Lighthouse. A friendly 
volunteer said the Murres have even been up on the rocks a few times but are 
mostly out in the ocean during this bonding period. Finally, we had 10 
HARLEQUIN DUCKS at the South Jetty and a TREE SPARROW hanging onto a box on the 
Hatfield Marine Science Center trail to remind us how fast this spring is 
coming on us. 


Good Birding,
John Thomas
(Silverton-Mt Angel Area)

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Subject: Re: Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:26:37 -0800
Hum,
I was there till almost noon. Did you head to Marina Park? There were more 
gulls there this morning. 


Smelt are everywhere just check the shoreline.

Bob

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Lyn Topinka  wrote:

got to the I5 bridge at 1:30

no gulls
no smelt
no Bob

Lyn



Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.com



On Mar 5, 2015, at 10:37 AM, Bob  wrote:

I am here at the I5 bridge and gulls are numerous and there are smelt.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Bob  wrote:

Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:26:37 -0800
Hum,
I was there till almost noon. Did you head to Marina Park? There were more 
gulls there this morning. 


Smelt are everywhere just check the shoreline.

Bob

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Lyn Topinka  wrote:

got to the I5 bridge at 1:30

no gulls
no smelt
no Bob

Lyn



Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.com



On Mar 5, 2015, at 10:37 AM, Bob  wrote:

I am here at the I5 bridge and gulls are numerous and there are smelt.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Bob  wrote:

Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Re: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:10:08 -0800
got to the I5 bridge at 1:30

no gulls 
no smelt 
no Bob

Lyn



Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.com



On Mar 5, 2015, at 10:37 AM, Bob  wrote:

I am here at the I5 bridge and gulls are numerous and there are smelt.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Bob  wrote:

Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:10:08 -0800
got to the I5 bridge at 1:30

no gulls 
no smelt 
no Bob

Lyn



Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.com



On Mar 5, 2015, at 10:37 AM, Bob  wrote:

I am here at the I5 bridge and gulls are numerous and there are smelt.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Bob  wrote:

Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Linn County PINE GROSBEAKS - revisited
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 13:22:31 -0800
Well, second time's a charm! This morning around 9:15, the flock of PINE
GROSBEAKS made an appearance in the "usual" spot, ca. .8 miles north from
the Pacific Crest trailhead. There were at least 55 birds, all high up in
the trees.

At 8:45, a lone male was singing less than 1/4 mile from the parking lot,
and on the hike back I encountered a small flock of ca. 5 birds.

Also present were 3 WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, 4 MOUNTAIN CHICKADEES, 2
HAIRY WOODPECKERS, 2 BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS and 1 COMMON RAVEN.

A few pictures may be viewed here:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsk8r3VWu

Good birding!

Hendrik

-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Bald Eagles
From: Marlowe Kissinger <rosebudgurl AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 13:20:42 -0800
Just saw 4 Bald Eagles sw of the PDX airport
Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: photography workshop
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 12:12:17 -0800
Click on link to see how to attend a bird photography workshop
at Tualatin Refuge April 11.  Speaker Paul Bannick.  Should be good!

Stephanie Hazen


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Subject: Gulls at riverside park in grants pass
From: Zia Fukuda <zialeefukuda AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 11:42:56 -0800
At least half a dozen have been hanging out here recently. Haven't had my
binos so unsure of species...ring-billed probably? They sure are vocal!
Cheers,
Zia
Subject: pics of Pine Grosbeaks on Pacific Crest Trail yesterday
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 11:17:50 -0800
I've input my counts from yesterday and added some pics of the grosbeaks. They 
are here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22183117 


Good birding!
Doug




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Subject: Re: Ridgefield deer sighting
From: Bobbett Pierce <ensatina3 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 13:10:39 -0500
Off topic: While birding north of Portland, take a close look at any deer you 
see. Some transplanted Columbian white-tailed deer wamdered from Ridgefield 
Wildlife Refuge and even swam the Columbia River to the Oregon side. The adults 
have large yellow ear tags. You can report sightings online to the refuge 
managers. 

Lona Pierce 		 	   		  
Subject: Fw: Management of Hayfields for Grassland Birds
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:42:26 -0800
Hi Joel,

Thank you for such a thoughtful response! You mentioned "There will be more 
opportunities for that in the coming season; let me know if you're interested." 
What types of opportunities are there for folks wanting to help? 


Good Birding!
Lillian

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Joel Geier 
To: obol
Cc: Lillian
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2015 12:17 AM
Subject: Re:Management of Hayfields for Grassland Birds
 


Hi Lillian and All,

The recommendations from Massachusetts Audubon are generally good ones. In fact 
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) has a very good publication that 
recommends many of these same practices, in their "Landowner Guide to Grassland 
Bird Conservation" which you can find via a link on this page. 


http://www.dfw.state.or.us/conservationstrategy/grassland_birds.asp

However Willamette Valley agriculture -- and the grass seed industry 
specifically -- has some unique aspects that make some of these practices 
unlikely to be implemented on a voluntary basis by farmers, without incentives. 


A big issue for grass-seed farmers is "shattering" (having the seeds fall out 
during harvest). Unlike most cereal grains which have been selectively bred for 
millennia for traits that make them easy to harvest, the main varieties of 
grass grown for seed are somewhat fragile. The swathers that are used to cut 
the standing grass are often fitted with custom, double cutting blades in order 
to minimize shaking of the grass as it's being cut, and special pickup-up heads 
to convey the grass as gently as possible toward the back of the machine to 
form the windrow. 


You can imagine why it would be difficult to convince farmers to fit their 
machines with "flushing bars," as these would result in lost income by 
basically flailing the grass before it even goes into a windrow. Swathing and 
combining are also often done at night when the humidity is higher, as this 
helps to reduce seed losses. And the harvest takes place in a fairly narrow 
window of time when conditions are suitable -- usually in the last week or two 
of June. Sometimes unusual weather can push the harvest into the second week of 
July (as is recommended to reduce impacts on grassland birds), but the same 
weather conditions (unseasonably cool, wet weather) also tend to be bad for 
nestling survival. 


As bad as this sounds, the grass-seed industry is more favorable to Streaked 
Horned Larks than most of the other major crops. Wheat and most row crops are 
unsuitable. Larks may nest in Christmas tree farms, hazelnut orchards, and 
vineyards in the very early stages of establishment if the landscape is 
sufficiently open, but once these are established they become unsuitable -- and 
may even make adjacent fields unsuitable by fragmenting the open landscape. The 
same goes for commercial nurseries. So grass-seed farms, even if not ideal, are 
important as habitat. Some of the more minor crops in the valley (for example, 
clover seed production which can be seen along Livermore Rd. in the area of 
recent OBOL reports) could also be important. 


The October 2014 USFWS listing decision that designated the Streaked Horned 
Lark as a federally Threatened species recognized that Willamette Valley grass 
seed fields are currently functioning as THE main habitat for this species. 
Even at sites that are nominally protected (the valley NWRs and certain 
airports) and host significant nesting populations, it's likely that 
substantial numbers of larks are nesting in the surrounding grass fields. 
Unfortunately, the same decision provided neither carrot nor stick to encourage 
lark-friendly practices on those lands. 


Having lived for 10 years on a Willamette Valley grass-seed farm, after 
spending most of my first 18 years in farming, I can see the farmers' point of 
view. I've talked to several who are sympathetic to larks, and could be 
interested in participating in programs that would provide better nesting 
habitat (for example, planting patterns that would leave bare patches in fields 
for larks to use), but they're not going to do that without some incentives to 
compensate for what would be a loss of income. I've heard some rumors that some 
positive incentive programs (carrots) *might* be in the works, but let's just 
say I'll believe it when I see it. 


There won't be any negative incentives (sticks), since the way that the listing 
was formulated gives a blanket exemption to anything that might be regarded as 
"normal agricultural practice" -- even if that includes effectively permanent 
conversion of Streaked Horned Lark nesting habitat to vineyards. Regrading and 
drainage to eliminate wet spots in fields (which formerly provided nesting 
sanctuaries -- also good because grass-seed swather operators generally "lift 
up" their cutting heads in these areas to avoid weed seeds) mean that over 
time, even grass-seed fields that used to host Horned Larks will become less 
suitable. 


There is nothing in the listing decision to discourage these modifications. 
It's called a "section (d) exemption" in the lingo of the Endangered Species 
Act. 


I currently don't see any way for the situation to improve, unless and until 
there is documentation of the ways in which the realities of Willamette Valley 
agriculture are diverging from the assumptions that the USFWS made in their 
listing decision. Basically they assumed that the grass-seed industry will 
continue to apply basically the same practices on the same acreage, for the 
foreseeable future. Never mind that the grass-seed industry is a 30-year flash 
in the pan. 


Side story: 10 years ago while doing the Antone CBC in eastern Oregon, I wound 
up talking to a ranch hand by the name of Ken Rasch who initially came out to 
confront us, but once we got to talking, it turned out that we both knew some 
of the same people in the Willamette Valley. But the same people whom I knew as 
grass-seed farmers, he knew as the wheat farmers that he used to work for. 
Anyway the encounter ended well, helped in larger part by a Northern Pygmy-Owl 
that flew in while we were talking. I'd been tooting just before Ken pulled up 
in his 2-ton flatbed truck. When he asked me what sort of birds we were 
finding, I mentioned a Northern Pygmy-Owl that I'd seen half a mile up the 
road. Ken responded, "Don't think I've ever seen one of those," and just at 
that moment I saw the owl sitting on a fencepost about 20 feet behind him, so I 
said, "It looked pretty much like that one right behind you." Well he was 
impressed and from that time on, we were 

 welcome as birders along that road. Even if Ken wasn't around, all I had to do 
was mention his name, and we were in the door. 


The moral of the story for the present topic is that Ken wasn't that old (maybe 
in his late 30s or early 40s, about the same age or a bit younger than me at 
the time), but his memory of the Willamette Valley was as a wheat-farming 
region, before grass seed took over. That's how short-term the current paradigm 
is. Things will change again, which is normal for agriculture in this country. 
Already wheat is making a comeback as grass-seed prices have slumped, and there 
is a clear shift to vineyards, hazelnut orchards, and nursery operations. 
Unfortunately the dynamics of the ag industry aren't taken into account in the 
Streaked Horned Lark listing decision. So it's up to us birders to document 
what's happening, and push for stronger protections or -- much better yet -- 
positive incentives for farmers to help preserve these birds. 


I don't know any farmers who feel good about mowing over bird nests, and most 
will go out of their way if you can tell them where one is. I've seen them 
leave grass standing around Wild Turkey nests when they manage to spot them 
from the swather. But the reality is that they can't avoid every Savannah 
Sparrow nest out there, and it's VERY tough to locate Horned Lark nests. If 
there were some positive financial incentives for farmers, I think a lot of 
them would be interested in protecting Streaked Horned Larks. 


This is why I see it as important to document the realities of agricultural 
landscapes as habitat for these threatened/endangered grassland species. There 
will be more opportunities for that in the coming season; let me know if you're 
interested. 


Good birding,
Joel

P.S. About that field on the north side of Coville Rd., the good news is that 
all of that field is now in a NRCS conservation easement. USFWS is aware that 
larks are nesting out there, and that should be part of the management plan. 


On Thu, 2015-03-05 at 01:06 -0500, obol AT freelists.org wrote:

Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 23:12:42 -0800
>From: Lillian 
>Subject: [obol] Management of Hayfields for Grassland Birds 
>
>Hello Birders,
>After my previous email I did a little searching to see what I could learn 
about farming practices and ground nesting birds... Below are some good 
recommendations from the Massachusetts Audubon. I don't know if anything like 
it exists for Oregon farmers, but maybe it should... 

>
>
>
Subject: Re: Flock? Of Great Blue Herons
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:34:58 -0800
Good Morning Birders,

That question got me thinking too (it had to happen sometime)... Any way I 
found a list on the USGS website - 
https://us-mg205.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.partner=sbc&.rand=22njhhejei45d#mail 


According to their list it is a sedge, a siege of herons...

http://lyberty.com/encyc/articles/murder.html says a siege of herons...


http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/31/overview/Great_Blue_Heron.aspx says:

 * A group of herons has many collective nouns, including a "battery", "hedge", 
"pose", "rookery", and "scattering" of herons. 


http://www.birdnature.com/groupnames.html also says a siege of herons 

So, a siege of herons seems to be the favorite, but not the only choice. This 
would have made a great Quiz of the Day! 


 Good Birding All!
Lillian
Subject: yesterdays quiz the answer below
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:22:19 -0800

https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/WhatBirdIsThis?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCMKAzfC0pIiNSA&feat=directlink 
 



The above link shows yesterday’s quiz, “What bird is this?”

Often I make bird identifications not by single birds but by the company they 
keep. 


If you saw the bird in the above link with its flock, as I did, you would have 
no problem identifying the bird. 


This was the mystery bird’s companion, see link below:


https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/BrewerSBlackbird?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLLPs8GqlafXGw&feat=directlink 
 


The bird was a female Brewer’s blackbird.

The brown-headed cowbird female is the other possibility for a drab brown bird.
For a link to photos of brown headed cowbirds click below:

https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/AnswerToWhatBirdIsThis?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCMW-z-XH2YjphAE&feat=directlink 
 



To me, the iridescence of the female Brewer’s blackbird, the slender pointy 
shape of the beak, the slenderness of the body, and the shape and length 

of the tail separate it from the duller, thick beaked, chubby, short and 
forked-tailed female brown-headed cowbird. 


And, of course, the company the birds keep, those handsome male birds. 

Are we just looking at birds or are we seeing?

Keep seeing birds!

Stephanie

Subject: Flock? Of Great Blue Herons
From: "R. Adney Jr." <rfadney AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 06:44:43 -0800
Kettle, Flock, Murder?? Yesterday in the Florence area, near the golf course 
(not sandpines) I saw a group of approximately 50 Great Blue Herons circling 
like TV's as they progressed in a southerly direction. I've never seen this 
before and I have traveled the 101 from Florence to Bandon weekly for work for 
20 years. As I watched I couldn't remember ever hearing what one called a large 
group of GBH's. 

Also, I am also seeing large numbers of Turkey Vultures during my work travels 
through Coos And Douglas counties. One kettle was near Dillard where I watched 
them as they headed south last fall. 

Happy spring birding!

Rich Adney

http://avianpics.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/adneyvisualarts/
http://www.oregonimages.net
 		 	   		  
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 06:41:28 -0800

From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: March 5, 2015 6:09:38 AM PST

*** Species Summary:

Blue-winged Teal (1 Clackamas)
American White Pelican (1 Clatsop)
Barn Swallow (1 Clatsop)
Black-and-white Warbler (1 Clackamas)
MacGillivray's Warbler (1 Lane)
Pine Grosbeak (1 Linn)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. 

View this alert on the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated