Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Oregon Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, July 25 at 12:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Red-shouldered Hawk,©John Schmitt

25 Jul Re: recommended bird apps [Brandon Wagner ]
25 Jul No More Turkey ["L Markoff" ]
25 Jul Re: birding apps [Bob Archer ]
25 Jul Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River ["Tom Crabtree" ]
25 Jul Re: birding apps ["Tom Crabtree" ]
25 Jul Re: Bend to Malheur [Jack Williamson ]
25 Jul Bend to Malheur [Colleen McDaniel ]
25 Jul Make that TWO catbirds at HMSC ["Harris, Dawn" ]
25 Jul Re: birding apps [Joel Geier ]
25 Jul Seabird in Columbia Gorge [Lars Per Norgren ]
25 Jul Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Alan Contreras ]
25 Jul Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River ["Susan T. Murphy" ]
24 Jul Recommended Apps [roger freeman ]
24 Jul Sauvie Island Yellow-headed Blackbirds [Max Smith ]
24 Jul *Re: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Range Bayer ]
24 Jul SAS Keizer Rapids Field Trip Summary [Mike Unger ]
24 Jul Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Nels Nelson ]
24 Jul Re: [PortlandAreaBirds] Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds [Tim Rodenkirk ]
24 Jul Nehalem Sewage Ponds Stint NO [James Billstine ]
24 Jul Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Range Bayer ]
24 Jul Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Shawneen ]
24 Jul [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
24 Jul RBA: Portland, OR 7-24-14 [Harry Nehls ]
23 Jul In memoriam: Jack Walters [Joel Geier ]
23 Jul Re: Request for help with grouse ID [Craig Miller ]
23 Jul Nehalem Lagoons [Lars Per Norgren ]
23 Jul Re: Request for help with grouse ID [Joel Geier ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds [Jeff Gilligan ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds [Jeff Gilligan ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds [David Bailey ]
23 Jul Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 7/23/2014 [Wink Gross ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Pond--a few more notes [David Bailey ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds [Jeff Gilligan ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds NO (details) [Jeff Gilligan ]
23 Jul Re: Request for help with grouse ID [Kevin Spencer ]
23 Jul Re: [PortlandAreaBirds] Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds [Jeff Gilligan ]
23 Jul Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds [Adrian Hinkle ]
23 Jul Black Swifts Nesting at Salt Creek Falls East of Eugene [Range Bayer ]
23 Jul Pole Creek Woodpeckers and Flycatchers [Stephen Shunk ]
23 Jul Pole Creek Woodpeckers and Flycatchers [Stephen Shunk ]
23 Jul Re: Winter Rim Grouse [Joel Geier ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds NO (details) [James Billstine ]
23 Jul Re: Possible Stilt at Tualatin NWR - Need id help for pics [David Bailey ]
23 Jul Possible Stilt at Tualatin NWR - Need id help for pics [Beverly Hallberg ]
23 Jul Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds [Bob ]
23 Jul Re: Winter Rim grouse [Wayne Hoffman ]
23 Jul Pectoral Sandpiper, Fern Ridge [Joni Dawning ]
23 Jul RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds [David Bailey ]
23 Jul Winter Rim grouse [Lars Per Norgren ]
23 Jul Request for help with grouse ID [Tim Johnson ]
23 Jul local RBA?: STILT S at Tual R NWR [Thomas Love ]
23 Jul local RBA?: STILT S at Tual R NWR [Thomas Love ]
23 Jul [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
23 Jul Re: Shorebirds, Tenmile Coos Cty [Tim Rodenkirk ]
23 Jul Shorebird survey today at TRNWR [StevenMauvais ]
22 Jul Baskett Slough Trip Summary [Mike Unger ]
22 Jul Hatfield Marine Science Center Catbird, Marbled Godwit, & Great Egrets [Range Bayer ]
22 Jul Shorebirds, Tenmile Coos Cty [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
22 Jul Pectoral Sandpipers at Nehalem S. Ponds [David Bailey ]
22 Jul South Jetty this morning - 7/22/2014 [Mike Patterson ]
22 Jul 7/22/14 - Union County, OR : Fall Shorebird Fall-out ["" ]
22 Jul 7/22/14 - Union County, OR : Fall Shorebird Fall-out []
22 Jul Older BIRDING, American Birds, NAB available for adoption [Shawneen Finnegan ]
22 Jul Keizer Area Birding Summary [Mike Unger ]
22 Jul ECD []
22 Jul Fwd: Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
22 Jul goshawk []
22 Jul goshawk []
22 Jul Pectoral SP [Daniel Farrar ]
22 Jul Josephine Co barred owl fledglings [Romain Cooper ]
22 Jul Bend Hooded Oriole [Charles Gates ]
21 Jul camping at Lost Lake [Stephanie Hazen ]
21 Jul BirdsEye-Redmond Sewage Ponds-2014-7-21 ["kimdelo AT yahoo.com" ]
21 Jul Wandering Tattler - Ecola State Park [Bill Bradford ]
21 Jul Benton Co. shorebirds [Hendrik Herlyn ]
21 Jul Coos shorebirds [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]

Subject: Re: recommended bird apps
From: Brandon Wagner <bmwboarder AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:17:53 -0700
Hey Roger,
The others have some good ideas.  I think I will represent the other side
of the coin though..

iBird Pro: tons of calls/songs and descriptions.
BirdLog North America: To make checklists to submit straight to ebird.
Easier than pen/paper.
BirdsEye: Locate a specific bird, see bar charts, and see rare bird alerts.
Oregon2020: View the Hotspot squares for helping with the Oregon 2020
project.
Master Birder by Larkwire: Bird sounds quiz/game.
Rode Rec: Good recording app - for recording unknown calls and then
puzzling over them later.

Not totally related, but Motion-X GPS:  You can pre-download terrain maps
for areas you wont' have cell service, the gps still works when out of cell
range, giving you a second version of whatever is your primary map. (it
does use up your battery a lot though).

I had other ones similar to iBird Pro (Peterson Birds Field Guide), but I
didn't use it much, and didn't have enough space on my phone for all of
them.

Cheers,
Brandon Wagner
Subject: No More Turkey
From: "L Markoff" <canyoneagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:03:55 -0700
Hi Obol,

 

I am on the road quite a bit, sometimes for family reasons, other times
because I love exploring.  When I am on the road my husband, Paul, is kind
enough to take charge of putting out chow and water for my birds and
critters.  While I was on the road for several weeks in June moving our
daughter from Austin, TX to Beaverton, OR, Paul discovered a hen Turkey with
8 poults in our yard.  

 

He watched them with growing interest and in short time became quite fond of
them.  One night after I was home again I gave him Turkey for supper.  He
had a hard time eating it.  He didn't like the idea of eating something akin
to his new friends.  So I told him I won't buy any more Turkey.  I asked him
how it was different than eating beef.  He replied that he doesn't have a
cow in his backyard.  

 

I stopped eating meat 8 years ago and am pleased that he doesn't want to eat
Turkey any more.  Hmmmmmm... Maybe I should get a pet cow for the backyard.
It would be worth it if I could get him to stop eating meat!

 

For some photos of Henrietta and her eight kids go here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/gp/canyoneagle/d979M2/

 

Lori Markoff

Eugene

 

 

 
Subject: Re: birding apps
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:38:38 -0700
I am downloading all of those. Great stuff.

The iPad is another good one. I keep phone in my hip pocket for safety when I 
slip on gravel coming down mountain trails. 


Bob Archer



> On Jul 25, 2014, at 10:28 AM, "Tom Crabtree"  wrote:
> 
> Those are good ones, to be sure, Joel. My favorite app, is an oldie, and they 
sure don't make 'em like they used to. It was iRack (sometimes with a "Q") but 
it is so unstable with these new OS's that you can't use it reliably any more. 

> 
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf 
Of Joel Geier 

> Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 8:00 AM
> To: Oregon Birders OnLine
> Subject: [obol] Re: birding apps
> 
> Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile phone 
applications that I've found most useful: 

> 
> 1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your eyebrows 
for a better look at the bird. 

> 
> You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of the 
newer phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small that they 
no longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development is that some 
manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for members of the Baby 
Boom generation. 

> 
> 2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird with 
the other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird astonishingly similar 
to what you'll find on most birding websites. 

> 
> 3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of scale 
which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral Sandpiper 
into a stint. 

> 
> 3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download the 
app, just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding will 
increase by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims that this 
app also leads to seven times more keen observations of bird behavior, though 
how they quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess. 

> 
> Happy birding,
> Joel
> 
> --
> Joel Geier
> Still happily birding in the paleodigital age Camp Adair area north of 
Corvallis 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or 
unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol 

> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:32:22 -0800
Suzy,

 

You are right it is best to report on possibilities. I don’t think most or 
even many people assumed you were texting while driving any more than we assume 
that every message on OBOL is composed in that fashion. You were the 
unfortunate victim of someone who jumped to an erroneous conclusion. Keep the 
reports coming and go catch up on your sleep. 


 

Tom

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Alan Contreras 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 7:26 AM
To: suzantmurphy AT msn.com
Cc: OBOL
Subject: [obol] Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River

 

Good job. It is always better to report a "maybe" so others can check it out. 
somehow I doubted that you were steering with your toes. 


Alan Contreras

Eugene, Oregon

 

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

 

Sent from my iPhone 





 


On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:13 AM, "Susan T. Murphy"  wrote:

late posting: 
Subject: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River

 

Yesterday around 10.30 am what looked me as a seabird flew in front of my 
vehicle on I84W at close range from the mouth of the Deschutes towards the 
Columbia River. It was a white bird with long narrow pointed wings that had a 
band of sharply contrasting black that seemed to go the length of the wing. My 
look was very brief as driving, but my attention was drawn to the long white 
streaming tail feathers, i would estimate several inches long. Now that i am 
home, it looks to me a possible Red-billed tropic bird. Don't know if one ever 
seen this far north or this far inland. It struck me as very unusual and in the 
obol spirit of making information available, i had my passenger send notice to 
someone who could get the word out. I am not a nut, altho i did make a joke 
about hallucinating after several days of driving. 

I have seen tropicbirds before, but in recent years, and the possibility was 
not on my radar with the initial report. I didnt think it was required to be 
certain of a sighting to report the possibility. I didn't think i had to 
explain who was sending notice for me either, but am doing so to clarify my 
sighting details and to end any questions about my driving safety. If anyone in 
the area, they may want to keep an eye out for this bird. suzy 




Subject: Re: birding apps
From: "Tom Crabtree" <tc AT empnet.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:28:23 -0800
Those are good ones, to be sure, Joel. My favorite app, is an oldie, and they 
sure don't make 'em like they used to. It was iRack (sometimes with a "Q") but 
it is so unstable with these new OS's that you can't use it reliably any more. 


Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
Joel Geier 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 8:00 AM
To: Oregon Birders OnLine
Subject: [obol] Re: birding apps

Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile phone 
applications that I've found most useful: 


1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your eyebrows for 
a better look at the bird. 


You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of the newer 
phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small that they no 
longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development is that some 
manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for members of the Baby 
Boom generation. 


2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird with the 
other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird astonishingly similar to 
what you'll find on most birding websites. 


3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of scale 
which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral Sandpiper 
into a stint. 


3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download the app, 
just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding will increase 
by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims that this app also 
leads to seven times more keen observations of bird behavior, though how they 
quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess. 


Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Still happily birding in the paleodigital age Camp Adair area north of 
Corvallis 





OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Manage your account or 
unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol 

Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org




OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: Bend to Malheur
From: Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:21:33 -0700
Compliments of East Cascades Audubon Society and Harneybirder.com

http://birdingoregon.info/Home/HarneyCounty/tabid/189/Default.aspx


On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 9:10 AM, Colleen McDaniel <
colleen.mcdaniel79 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> I'm heading down to Bend from Portland for the first time this Sunday and
> then down to Malheur on Monday for work.
>
> Could I get some suggestions on places to go for birding? Any
> advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
>
> Bird on!
> Colleen McDaniel
>
>
>


-- 
Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon
Subject: Bend to Malheur
From: Colleen McDaniel <colleen.mcdaniel79 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:10:20 -0700
I'm heading down to Bend from Portland for the first time this Sunday and
then down to Malheur on Monday for work.

Could I get some suggestions on places to go for birding? Any
advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Bird on!
Colleen McDaniel
Subject: Make that TWO catbirds at HMSC
From: "Harris, Dawn" <dawn_harris AT fws.gov>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:01:52 -0700
Mike Patterson just dropped into my office to share some news: he was
watching the gray catbird this morning along the HMSC nature trail when,
much to his surprise, two catbirds appeared near the twinberry bush at the
end of the bridge.  Another birder from Arkansas was present to see the two
catbirds.  Mike believes he has a photo showing both at the same time and
will share later.


Dawn Harris
Visitor Services Manager

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex
2127 SE Marine Science Drive
Newport OR 97365
541-867-4550

www.facebook.com/usfwsoregoncoast
Subject: Re: birding apps
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:59:39 -0700
Not sure if I've mentioned these before, but these are the three mobile
phone applications that I've found most useful:

1) iShade : When dealing with bright sun, hold the phone over your
eyebrows for a better look at the bird.

You can also try this to shade your binoculars. Unfortunately some of
the newer phones (though thankfully not iPads yet) have gotten so small
that they no longer work for standard-sized bins. A hopeful development
is that some manufacturers have begun marketing "large-print" phones for
members of the Baby Boom generation.

2) iBall : Cover one eyeball with your phone, while you watch the bird
with the other eyeball. This gives you a 2-D view of the bird
astonishingly similar to what you'll find on most birding websites. 

3-D views just bring in unnecessary complications, such as a sense of
scale which will only make it more difficult to turn that next Pectoral
Sandpiper into a stint.

3) iPayAttention : This is the simplest app to use. After you download
the app, just put the phone in your pocket, and your rate of birdfinding
will increase by up to a factor of three. The developer's advert claims
that this app also leads to seven times more keen observations of bird
behavior, though how they quantify "keenness" is anyone's guess.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Still happily birding in the paleodigital age
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Seabird in Columbia Gorge
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:27:03 -0700
 I vote "Caspian Tern". I saw one at Mosier (from freeway, at freeway speeds) 
two days earlier. Sharper cut to the wing than the Cal Gulls, bigger, streaming 
tail of sorts. Always an inspirational bird. Put it on my life list at Thompson 
Reservoir (Lake County) when I was six years old, 1967. That's some distance 
from the ocean, but very close to Winter Rim. Lars 


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:26:27 -0700
Good job. It is always better to report a "maybe" so others can check it out. 
somehow I doubted that you were steering with your toes. 


Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPhone 



> On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:13 AM, "Susan T. Murphy"  wrote:
> 
>> late posting: 
>> Subject: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
>>> 
>>> Yesterday around 10.30 am what looked me as a seabird flew in front of my 
vehicle on I84W at close range from the mouth of the Deschutes towards the 
Columbia River. It was a white bird with long narrow pointed wings that had a 
band of sharply contrasting black that seemed to go the length of the wing. My 
look was very brief as driving, but my attention was drawn to the long white 
streaming tail feathers, i would estimate several inches long. Now that i am 
home, it looks to me a possible Red-billed tropic bird. Don't know if one ever 
seen this far north or this far inland. It struck me as very unusual and in the 
obol spirit of making information available, i had my passenger send notice to 
someone who could get the word out. I am not a nut, altho i did make a joke 
about hallucinating after several days of driving. 

>>> I have seen tropicbirds before, but in recent years, and the possibility 
was not on my radar with the initial report. I didnt think it was required to 
be certain of a sighting to report the possibility. I didn't think i had to 
explain who was sending notice for me either, but am doing so to clarify my 
sighting details and to end any questions about my driving safety. If anyone in 
the area, they may want to keep an eye out for this bird. suzy 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
Subject: Fwd: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: "Susan T. Murphy" <suzantmurphy AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:13:00 -0700
> late posting: 
> Subject: Seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
>> 
>> Yesterday around 10.30 am what looked me as a seabird flew in front of my 
vehicle on I84W at close range from the mouth of the Deschutes towards the 
Columbia River. It was a white bird with long narrow pointed wings that had a 
band of sharply contrasting black that seemed to go the length of the wing. My 
look was very brief as driving, but my attention was drawn to the long white 
streaming tail feathers, i would estimate several inches long. Now that i am 
home, it looks to me a possible Red-billed tropic bird. Don't know if one ever 
seen this far north or this far inland. It struck me as very unusual and in the 
obol spirit of making information available, i had my passenger send notice to 
someone who could get the word out. I am not a nut, altho i did make a joke 
about hallucinating after several days of driving. 

>> I have seen tropicbirds before, but in recent years, and the possibility was 
not on my radar with the initial report. I didnt think it was required to be 
certain of a sighting to report the possibility. I didn't think i had to 
explain who was sending notice for me either, but am doing so to clarify my 
sighting details and to end any questions about my driving safety. If anyone in 
the area, they may want to keep an eye out for this bird. suzy 

>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Recommended Apps
From: roger freeman <carrotguy55 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:47:50 -0700
I'm sure this question has been asked 1000 times, but I would appreciate
some recommendations of favorite birding Apps for iPad/iPhones  that some
of you have used/tried.  I can imagine Sibley, or NatGeo are a couple.
Thanks for the input!
Roger Freeman
Silverton Oregon
Subject: Sauvie Island Yellow-headed Blackbirds
From: Max Smith <oregonmax AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:00:45 -0700
While making a brief stop at the Reeder Road observation shelter, I spotted
two unmistakable Yellow-headed Blackbird males perched near a feeder at the
ODFW equipment yard. Apart the active Osprey nest, Rentenaar Road was
pretty quiet.

Max Smith

Portland
Subject: *Re: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:13:26 -0700
Hi Nels,

Thanks for your message.  Perhaps the texter was riding as a
passenger, but Shawneen wrote " I received several text messages from
Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH."

Shawneen later wrote: "She has been driving a long time"

When I am a passenger in a vehicle, I do not say I have been driving
and don't think of myself as driving.  When I talk about others
driving, the only person I refer to as driving is the driver.  Perhaps
others include being a passenger when they use "while driving" or to a
person "has been driving."  You are correct, the text that Shawneen
quotes from the texter does not indicate that the texter texts that
she was driving or was riding.

You are right, I jumped to a conclusion that the texter was driving; I
apologize for not making it clear in my email that it is not clear in
Shawneen's email if the texter was driving or riding, and that
hopefully the texter was riding because there is a safety concern with
texting while driving.

Thanks for your comments.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 2:32 PM, Nels Nelson  wrote:
> Hi RB,
>
> Haven't met you yet and don't mean to pick a fight, but there is ZERO
> evidence in Suzy's
> or Shawneen's emails or texts saying they wrote or sent the texts WHILE
> DRIVING.
> She SAW THE BIRD while driving, as I (and I assume you) and all of us
> birders have
> at one time or another.
>
> I'm with you 100% in your thinking and comments about thoughtless,
> inconsiderate
> and outright DANGEROUS drivers that mess with their electronic gadgets,
> keypads
> and text while driving.  They ought to make the fines high enough that
> drivers
> wouldn't even THINK about writing or sending a text while driving a vehicle.
>
> Jumping to conclusions is another matter.
>
> Happy Birding,
>
> Nels Nelson
> (Hillsboro Birder, retired after 30+ years in law enforcement)
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Hmmm, I have almost been hit several times by distracted drivers using
>> electronic devices, and it is illegal now to do so  in Oregon with the
>> exception of police, emergency responders and drivers in emergency
>> situations (http://www.drivinglaws.org/oregon.php).  Texting while
>> driving 65 mph and  pulling a camper...
>>
>> Range Bayer
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen 
>> wrote:
>> > For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
>> > messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
>> >
>> >
>> > " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65
>> > miles
>> > per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white
>> > pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers.
>> > Can't
>> > stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out.
>> >
>> > Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
>> >
>> >
>> > "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
>> > longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
>> > impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like
>> > whole
>> > trailing edge."
>> >
>> >
>> > She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days
>> > and
>> > no references to check at present.
>> >
>> >
>> > lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
>> >
>> >
>> > Shawneen Finnegan
>> >
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>>
>>
>


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: SAS Keizer Rapids Field Trip Summary
From: Mike Unger <unger730 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:02:01 -0700
Hello Birders:



For today's Salem Audubon birding field trip at Keizer Rapids Park,
Barbara, Carolyn and I were joined by 9 others.  The group survived through
a brief shower or two but the consensus of the group was that it always
rains when Mike leads a walk.  But it was not a wash out by any stretch of
the imagination.  We walked 2 miles through three distinct habitats and
identified (saw or heard) a record 42 birds for Keizer Rapids Park!



After Keizer Rapids Park, six of us went to Country Glen Park in Keizer
which was quite nice even the sun showed through and there was no rain.  We
walked about one mile while identifying 23 species.



Most notable sightings:

·  Two *Sharp-shinned Hawks* in the Gallery Forest at Keizer Rapids;

·  Four *Osprey* over the river;

·  Two *Bald Eagles* flew by us in the north part of Keizer Rapids Park;

·  One *Cooper’s Hawk* at Keizer Rapids;

·  Two *Vaux’s Swifts* over the parking lot at Keizer Rapids just as we
were getting ready to leave;

·  Two *Rufous* and two *Anna’s* Hummingbirds at Country Glen Park.  The
Rufous Hummingbirds were getting nectar from some Hostas;

·  Two *Common Yellowthroats* at Country Glen Park that we got a good look
at.  (One female and a young one).  The female had a quite bright yellow
throat;

·  In general, *Cedar Waxwings* and *American Goldfinches* were the most
prevalent at Country Glen Park but the Western Scrub-Jays were the most
active and noisiest.

A complete list of today's birds follows.


*Our next SAS field trip will be at Minto-Brown Island Park on Wednesday,
August 6th at 7:30 a.m.*   Join us if you can.


Mike Unger

Keizer, OR

-------------------------------------------------------------------


*Checklist Summary for July 24, 2014 *
Number of Checklists: 2
Number of Species: 49

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Keizer Rapids Park  AT  7:20 AM
(2): Country Glen Park  AT  11:10 AM



34 Canada Goose -- (1)
10 Mallard -- (1)
1 California Quail -- (1)
4 Great Blue Heron -- (1)
6 Turkey Vulture -- (1),(2)
4 Osprey -- (1)
2 Sharp-shinned Hawk -- (1)
1 Cooper's Hawk -- (1)
2 Bald Eagle -- (1)
3 Red-tailed Hawk -- (1)
1 Spotted Sandpiper -- (1)
10 Mourning Dove -- (1),(2)
2 Vaux's Swift -- (1)
2 Anna's Hummingbird -- (2)
2 Rufous Hummingbird -- (2)
2 Belted Kingfisher -- (1)
4 Downy Woodpecker -- (1),(2)
1 Northern Flicker -- (1)
1 Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) -- (2)
8 Western Wood-Pewee -- (1),(2)
3 Steller's Jay -- (1)
3 Western Scrub-Jay -- (1)
21 Western Scrub-Jay (Coastal) -- (1),(2)
2 American Crow -- (1)
8 Violet-green Swallow -- (1)
6 Barn Swallow -- (1),(2)
1 Cliff Swallow -- (1)
40 swallow sp. -- (1)
22 Black-capped Chickadee -- (1),(2)
41 Bushtit -- (1)
1 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (1)
1 White-breasted Nuthatch -- (1)
1 Brown Creeper -- (1)
3 Bewick's Wren -- (1),(2)
3 Swainson's Thrush -- (1),(2)
12 American Robin -- (1),(2)
2 European Starling -- (2)
41 Cedar Waxwing -- (1),(2)
3 Common Yellowthroat -- (1),(2)
1 Yellow Warbler -- (1)
16 Spotted Towhee -- (1),(2)
18 Song Sparrow -- (1),(2)
4 White-crowned Sparrow -- (1)
2 Black-headed Grosbeak -- (2)
2 Brewer's Blackbird -- (2)
14 House Finch -- (1),(2)
1 Purple Finch -- (1)
39 American Goldfinch -- (1),(2)
15 House Sparrow -- (2)
Subject: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Nels Nelson <nelsnelson7 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:32:01 -0700
Hi RB,

Haven't met you yet and don't mean to pick a fight, but there is ZERO
evidence in Suzy's
or Shawneen's emails or texts saying they wrote or sent the texts WHILE
DRIVING.
She SAW THE BIRD while driving, as I (and I assume you) and all of us
birders have
at one time or another.

I'm with you 100% in your thinking and comments about
thoughtless, inconsiderate
and outright DANGEROUS drivers that mess with their electronic gadgets,
keypads
and text while driving.  They ought to make the fines high enough that
drivers
wouldn't even THINK about writing or sending a text while driving a vehicle.

Jumping to conclusions is another matter.

Happy Birding,

Nels Nelson
(Hillsboro Birder, retired after 30+ years in law enforcement)





On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Hmmm, I have almost been hit several times by distracted drivers using
> electronic devices, and it is illegal now to do so  in Oregon with the
> exception of police, emergency responders and drivers in emergency
> situations (http://www.drivinglaws.org/oregon.php).  Texting while
> driving 65 mph and  pulling a camper...
>
> Range Bayer
>
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen 
> wrote:
> > For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
> > messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
> >
> >
> > " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65
> miles
> > per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white
> > pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers.
> Can't
> > stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out.
> >
> > Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
> >
> >
> > "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
> > longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
> > impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like
> whole
> > trailing edge."
> >
> >
> > She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days
> and
> > no references to check at present.
> >
> >
> > lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
> >
> >
> > Shawneen Finnegan
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: [PortlandAreaBirds] Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:43:10 -0700
Jeff and Adrian,

I agree! I saw an adult today out on the N. Spit of Coos Bay.  I checked my
data base which goes back to 1998.  The only other yrs. I found July
Pecs was in 2005 and 2010.  As I remember both yrs. I had one of the few
adult reports in Oregon so it sure seems like a banner yr!

Merry migration,
Tim R
Coos Bay


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:35 PM, Jeff Gilligan 
wrote:

>
> >
> > Seems like the best adult Pectoral year I can remember!
> >
> > Happy fall,
> >
> > Adrian Hinkle
> >
> > --
> > -
>
> You are young - but your memory is accurate.  It is also the best I can
> remember, and I am nearly certain of that.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Nehalem Sewage Ponds Stint NO
From: James Billstine <billstinj AT sou.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:18:18 -0700
I lurked along the edge of the Nehalem sewage ponds today from 9 to about
11 and couldn't find a stint-like bird. Four Pectoral Sandpipers, a Spotted
Sandpiper, a Killdeer, and a handful of Least and Western Sandpipers. Also,
a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE.

On the way back home, I stopped at the Bay City Sewage ponds and found a
BLACK PHOEBE.

Good Shorebirding,

James Billstine
Subject: Re: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:00:24 -0700
Hi,

Hmmm, I have almost been hit several times by distracted drivers using
electronic devices, and it is illegal now to do so  in Oregon with the
exception of police, emergency responders and drivers in emergency
situations (http://www.drivinglaws.org/oregon.php).  Texting while
driving 65 mph and  pulling a camper...

Range Bayer

On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen  wrote:
> For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
> messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
>
>
> " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65 miles
> per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white
> pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers. Can't
> stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out.
>
> Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
>
>
> "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
> longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
> impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like whole
> trailing edge."
>
>
> She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days and
> no references to check at present.
>
>
> lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
>
>
> Shawneen Finnegan
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Shawneen <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 11:27:35 -0700
For anyone birding near the Deschutes River. I received several text messages 
from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH. 


" Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65 miles per 
hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and white pattern 
light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail feathers. Can't stop 
hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can check it out. 

Thanks,Suzy Murphy"

"It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the longest 
streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My impression was 
the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like whole trailing edge." 


She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days and no 
references to check at present. 


lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.

Shawneen Finnegan 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 06:24:04 -0700

From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: July 24, 2014 6:08:56 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Horned Grebe (3 Deschutes)
Black-necked Stilt (1 Polk)
American Avocet (1 Hood River)
Snowy Plover (1 Clatsop)
Sanderling (1 Union)
Pectoral Sandpiper (3 Deschutes)
Black-chinned Hummingbird (1 Jefferson)
Veery (1 Multnomah)
Yellow-breasted Chat (1 Jefferson)
Tricolored Blackbird (1 Jefferson)
Yellow-headed Blackbird (2 Columbia)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 7-24-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:14:14 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* July 24, 2014
* ORPO1406.24

- birds mentioned

American White Pelican
Black-bellied Plover
Snowy Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Solitary Sandpiper
Wandering Tattler
Marbled Godwit
Stilt Sandpiper
LONG-TOED STINT
Sanderling
Dunlin
Bairds Sandpiper
LITTLE STINT
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
ELEGANT TERN
Gray Catbird
HOODED ORIOLE

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday July 24. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls at
503-233-3976.

On July 19 a male HOODED ORIOLE visited a feeder near Bend. It did not
remain. A probable LITTLE STINT was seen July 21 at the South Jetty of the
Columbia River. A possible LONG-TOED STINT was seen July 23 at the Nehalem
Sewage Ponds. On July 19 five ELEGANT TERNS were at the mouth of the
Columbia River.

Shorebird movements continued during the week with several PECTORAL
SANDPIPERS reported. On July 21 a BAIRDS SANDPIPER and a SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER were at New River in Coos County. On July 20, 12 MARBLED GODWITS
were at Coos Bay. A MARBLED GODWIT was at Yaquina Bay July 22. The Marine
Science Center CATBIRD continues to be seen. On July 21 a TATTLER was at
Ecola State Park. On the beach at Gearhart July 19 were a SNOWY PLOVER, 23
SANDERLINGS, and 128 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS.

Among the shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR July 22 was a BAIRDS SANDPIPER. On
July 23 a SOLITARY SANDPIPER was on the refuge. On July 20 forty WHITE
PELICANS were at Smith/Bybee Lakes in North Portland. Two STILT SANDPIPERS
were at the Tualatin NWR July 23. Four DUNLIN and a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER were
there July 22. On July 21 a BAIRDS SANDPIPER was at the Philomath Sewage
Ponds.

At Ladd Marsh near LaGrande July 22 were four MARBLED GODWITS and a juvenile
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. ON July 20 a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and a MARBLED
GODWIT were at Wickiup Reservoir south of Bend.

Thats it for this week.

- end transcript














Subject: In memoriam: Jack Walters
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:53:52 -0700
Hi all,

I mentioned Jack Walters in passing in my preceding post to the Oregon
Birding list. Most Oregon birders probably won't be familiar with the
name.

Jack was one of the greatest birding story-tellers that I never met.

Due to my tendency to wander down to the NW corner of Nevada now and
then, I used to hear from him via e-mail every winter, when he'd start
thinking about the possibilities for "Arctic wonders" such as Gyrfalcon
or Common Redpoll.

Jack passed away some years back, but I still can never go out to the
Coleman Valley, or Sheldon NWR, without thinking about him.

Jack's postings on the NVBIRDS list were hands-down some of the best
birding stories that have ever been written for our part of the
continent. Who else would ever have written about bringing in small owls
by setting up a Coleman cooler with the lid up, and a lantern light
trained on it to draw in moths?

I see that his books are still for sale even though he's passed away.
Hopefully his widow (who presumably had to put up with his birding
activities for many years) is still benefiting from the sales. Anyway
here are a couple of links where you can find Jack's remarkable stories:


https://www.leg.state.nv.us/app/lcbstore/a/p-114-bird-stories-and-sightings-in-nevada-volume-1-loons-to-nighthawks.aspx 



http://books.google.com/books/about/Bird_Stories_and_Sightings_in_Nevada.html?id=QG4zAAAACAAJ 


Considering Jack's legacy, it seems good to point out that he put "bird
stories" first in his title, before "sightings."

A good way to honor Jack's memory would be, on your next bird outing, to
think not what was the best bird, but what was the best bird story that
you came back with from the field.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corallis




OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: Request for help with grouse ID
From: Craig Miller <gismiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:44:04 -0700
RE: Ruffed Grouse - I've heard this species multiple times along Silver
Creek near Silver Creek Marsh Campground (north of Thompson Reservoir).
Also, I've seen one at Chandler State Park (along Hwy 395 between Valley
Falls and Lakeview). I believe they are uncommon to rare throughout the
Fremont National Forest in riparian areas.

RE: Sooty Grouse - they nest in good numbers along Winter Rim; I hear them
every spring nearly as far north as Summer Lake Refuge Headquarters. I hear
them occasionally on my Breeding Bird Survey route between Gearhart
Mountain and Dairy Creek (in the Fremont National Forest). Also I have seen
one along Hwy 395 about 2 miles south of Chandler State Park. It is my
impression that they are prevalent over most of the Fremont National
Forest, and as Kevin notes, in the north Warner Mountains.

Craig Miller


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 8:39 PM, Kevin Spencer  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> As far as I know, the "Blue Grouse" on Winter Rim would be Sooty Grouse.
> I've encountered them many times there, and in the forest to the west. I
> have also encountered Sooty Grouse in the North Warners (really just The
> Warners, but I mean the Oregon portion of the  Warner Mountains).
>
> As for the maps ..... I'd say grouse maps for both Ruffed and Sooty are
> lacking in that part of the state for both Ruffed and Sooty, and maybe the
> whole state (I can only comment  about Klamath and Lake Cos.) and that goes
> for both National Geographic and Sibley's. Maybe the maps for those grouse
> didn't receive much attention, due to lack of reports, observations... I
> don't know. What may have happened is that Breeding Bird Surveys were used,
> or partly used, as a way to base or outline the margins of presence. With a
> lack of reporting on BBS for grouse in general it could influence a loss of
> area where they normally occur. I know hunters could be a good source for
> knowledge of occurance as they generally are not going to be hunting where
> there is not any chance of bagging game. Maybe they should be consulted.
>
> The map for Sooty Grouse, in  Sibley's Guide, shows a departure towards
> the west at the CA/OR state line. A more accurate line might be to continue
> northward with a small peak to include the north end of the Warner
> Mountains. The map for Oregon could widen its main eastern north-south
> line, somewhat, to include Winter Rim. North of Winter Rim the habitat
> really shrinks westward, so including Winter Rim would be a slight
> adjustment. The National Geographic map appears very similar to the Sibley
> Guide's Sooty Grouse map. So, that map should consider the same
> adjustments.
>
>
> The Ruffed Grouse map in Sibley's Guide appears to make that species  look
> like it is restricted to the coast range in Oregon. I am not familiar
> enough with Ruffed Grouse statewide to comment for the whole state, but for
> Klamath County it is a somewhat common species, especially in the deciduous
> areas around Upper Klamath Lake. That is a unique area admittedly, but it
> is significant enough that it should have been included in the range map
> for that species. I have heard of a few Ruffed Grouse being reported in
> Lake County, scattered, but none for the Warner Mountains. I have not heard
> of Ruffed  Grouse being reported between Upper Klamath Lake and say
> Gearhart Wilderness (just a place that's east of Klamath Falls that people
> are familiar with). The reports  I've heard were from approx. Gearhart
> eastward to the westside of Goose Lake Valley. I dont know if those few
> reports should cause inclusion of that area on a fieldguide range map. But
> definitely the perimeter of the Upper Klamath Lake area and outward along
> its tributaries should be included.
>
> The National Geographic map for Ruffed Grouse appears to be accurate for
> the most part, at the map shows eastward extension into Klamath County. Not
> including any of Lake County if find, and then encountering one, say  in
> Lake County, being at the edge, or an outlier, would then be significant,
> and definitely worth reporting, or talking about, especially by a hunter
> (which is one my sources for Ruffed Grouse in Lake County... about 35 years
> ago... but I have not encounter Ruffed Grouse in Lake County myself).
>
> I'd say the grouse is a Sooty Grouse, and that both Sibley's and National
> Geographic's field guides should make some slight adjustments to their
> Sooty Grouse maps. (and Sibley's map for Ruffed Grouse too).
>
> Good for you, pointing that out.
>
> Kevin Spencer
> rriparia AT charter.net
> Klamath Falls, OR
>
> I ' on a field trip to the Summer Lake area this weekend (Sat-Tue).  On
> Sunday, we drove up Winter Ridge to Pioneer Peak, then south along the
> ridge road (NR26?) to the switchbacks.  While on top of the ridge, we came
> upon a hen or juvenile grouse sitting in the middle of the road,  Click on
> the link below for a series of low resolution photos.
>
>
>
> 
*https://plus.google.com/photos/107892236367702076331/albums/6039284676539261153?authkey=CMDqo_P87szkxAE* 

> 
 

>
>
> The grouse appeared to be either a sooty or dusky grouse.  We are fairly
> certain that it wasn't a greater sage-grouse because of our grouse's tail,
> which was blunt.  Sage-grouse have a long, pointed tail, and they probably
> wouldn't be found in that habitat.
>
>
> Sibley 2nd edition field guide range maps don't show either of these
> "blue" grouse in the Winter Ridge area.  It appears that the sooty grouse
> doesn't normally come as far east as Winter Ridge, and the dusky grouse is
> only found in the Enterprise/Joseph area in Oregon.
>
>
> Can anyone tell us if either (or both) of the sooty or dusky grouse can be
> found on Winter Ridge?  Also, can anyone venture an opinion on the identity
> of the grouse in the photos?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Tim Johnson
> Salem, OR
>
>
Subject: Nehalem Lagoons
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:32:27 -0700
 The place closes at 4pm on weekdays. I was staring at three Pecs and two 
Leasts at the north bank when an employee drove out to tell me "We lock the gat 
at 4". The wind was a constant 30mph when I was there, making it hard to use a 
scope. The sun was out and heat waves bad. Then I got drenched in the three or 
four minutes walking to the car. The small rocks of the rip-rap are brown and 
make for lots of hiding places. My first pass along the north shore I flushed 
various birds before I saw them. Careful scoping on the return pass still 
failed to reveal one sandpiper that flushed from underfoot. 

 There was lots of activity in the ne corner of the sw pond, sandpipers 
repeatedly fluttering up into view in the same area where Canada Geese and 
California Gulls were loafing. Lars 


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: Request for help with grouse ID
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:05:20 -0700
Hi All,

Sorry that I overlooked Tim's original request for ID help on photos,
until I saw Kevin's response.

The grouse in the photo appears to be a "Blue Grouse" based on overall
shape of the neck and head and proportions relative to the body. It is
hard to get a sense of scale, and I'm not going to try to dissect the
plumage details, but my impression is that it's a juvenile bird, not
full grown. That might explain why it looks pale in comparison with a
normal adult female Sooty Grouse. 

From the link to Michael Schroeder's article that I posted previously:

http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01312/wdfw01312.pdf

 you can see that the detailed range map for Sooty vs. Dusky Grouse
shows only Sooty Grouse in the Fremont-Winema National Forest area that
includes Winter Rim, Gearhart Mtn, and the Warner Mtns. As the article
also makes clear, identification of female birds in the field is tough
(unless you can somehow count tail feathers). Sorting out juveniles is
even tougher, unless of course you see mom nearby. So this is one where
you really have to go by range.

The range map in Michael Schroeder's article is carefully drawn, based
on the best available data, and the details in Oregon have been
confirmed by the upland gamebird professional who is in best position to
know based on hunter check station data. I suggest to just ignore the
maps in Sibley, NG and any other general guide in favor of this map (I
actually printed out this map on small scale and stuck it between the
pages of my Sibley guide).

Turning to Ruffed Grouse (though I'm pretty certain that this bird in
the photo was not a Ruffed Grouse), Kevin is right that the Ruffed
Grouse map in Sibley is very deceptive. Ruffed Grouse is a fairly common
bird in the Ochoco Mountains, particularly on the north slope. I've seen
& heard far more Ruffed Grouse than "Blue" Grouse in Wheeler County.
We've also found them out in the pine/juniper zones of the Antone CBC
away from the Ochocos proper. Steve Shunk once found a Ruffed Grouse
coming to water with a flock of 20-some Mountain Quail up a canyon
northwest of Picture Gorge. Seems to me that they also occur farther
north in Wheeler.Co.

Kevin is also right that the Tri-State area where California, Nevada,
and Oregon come together is also a problematic area for a lot of field
guides. This extends to a lot of other species including sapsuckers (and
perhaps in future editions, Scrub-Jays!). 

The problem is that this is a very complex biogeographical area (as
others have commented), but it tends to be a neglected area for birders
in all three states. Many Oregon birders are only interested in this
area as a place to notch Juniper Titmouse on their year lists.
California birders occasionally get interested if someone finds a Yellow
Rail up at Cow Head lake, but otherwise there is frankly not much reason
to go there. For Nevada birders, this is a long way from Reno and even
farther from Las Vegas, and the only real attraction is the very distant
hope, in winter, of finding a Gyrfalcon. 

Despite my youth on a farm and a few college years working as a de facto
machinist, I still have enough fingers and toes to count all of the
birders who have ever posted a substantial list for the Tri-State area,
either on OBOL or NVBIRDS. 

After you get past Kevin Spencer (who I think has more experience than
anyone in this area), then Craig & Marilyn Miller (the most experienced
for Lake County as a whole), the late great Jack Walters (a truly
remarkable & larger-than-life fellow from Elko, maybe the most
accomplished birder who ever had a side career in servicing
rock-crushers for hard-rock mines), Rose Strickland (based in Reno), Roy
Gerig, Don Albright, Hendrik Herlyn & Oscar Harper, Bruce Van Dyk
(seasonal homeowner near Vya, who may have actually spent more time in
the region than anyone and -- by the way -- his Rancho Recluso near Vya,
NV is still up for sale, check the want ads on www.hcn.org), and ...
well my memory is failing me but there must be a few more folks ... it's
a scant few birders who have spent any significant time in this region.

OK, I wandered off the topic of grouse ID for just a bit. But I think
this is a juvenile "Blue" Grouse by appearances. Based on range it
should be a Sooty Grouse

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:53:36 -0700
On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:44 PM, David Bailey  wrote:

> This is a good cautionary Jeff. I believe that the size dimorphism is the 
opposite of what you stated though, and the opposite of the majority of the 
those in the sandpiper family (SCOLOPACIDAE). The male is the larger sex, the 
female Pectoral is the smaller. 

> 


Yes - you are correct - females are the smaller in Pectoral Sandpipers.

http://www.birdguide.com/brdpgs/239.htm

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:51:35 -0700
On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:44 PM, David Bailey  wrote:

> This is a good cautionary Jeff. I believe that the size dimorphism is the 
opposite of what you stated though, and the opposite of the majority of the 
those in the sandpiper family (SCOLOPACIDAE). The male is the larger sex, the 
female Pectoral is the smaller. 

> 


David - you are probably right. I thought I recalled that female Pectorals were 
larger. As you mentioned, it varies by species in members of the genus: 


" Males are larger than females in ruffs and several sandpipers, but are 
smaller than females in the knots, curlews, phalaropes and godwits. The sexes 
are similarly sized in the snipes, woodcock and tringine sandpipers." 
Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:44:03 -0700
This is a good cautionary Jeff. I believe that the size dimorphism is the
opposite of what you stated though, and the opposite of the majority of the
those in the sandpiper family (*SCOLOPACIDAE*). The male is the larger sex,
the female Pectoral is the smaller.


On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 9:22 PM, Jeff Gilligan 
wrote:

>
> For anyone looking for this bird, I offer a note of caution.  Male
> Pectoral Sandpipers are much smaller than females.  Pectoral Sandpipers
>  have a pale base to the lower mandible, as do many Long-toed Stints.
>  While a Long-toed Stint is larger than a Least Sandpiper, it isn't so by
> much.  I have seen Leasts near a Long-toed once (the photographed bird from
> Clatsop County) and I could easily see a size difference.  I am not sure
> that the Long-toed Stints I have seen in Asia looked larger than a Least
> with no Least  present.
>
> Long-toed Stints and Pectoral Sandpipers can be confused.  I very
> traveled, experienced and  intelligent birder from Belfast who I knew (he
> has deceased) once put out an alert for Long-toed Stint from Northern
> Ireland, but the bird turned out to be a male Pectoral - a much more
> expected vagrant there.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>
>
> On Jul 23, 2014, at 10:52 AM, David Bailey 
> wrote:
>
> > Wednesday 23 July 2014
> > Tillamook County, Oregon
> > Nehalem Sewage Ponds
> > NE pond along the North rock-edged shore
> >
> > In the company of adult Pectoral Sandpipers (three) and in direct
> comparison to at least one that was less than a foot away was a
> dull-yellow-legged Calidrid in adult plumage with a very obvious pale base
> to the bill, a strikingly (given how many Least Sandpipers on which I have
> looked for this trait over the years) obvious dark cap that seamlessly met
> the upper mandible, pale whitish supercillium widening behind the eye,
> obvious white eye-ring, coverts and tertials collectively making a paler
> panel of plumage compared to the darker scapulars and mantle, and to top it
> all off the bird had that upright and long-necked stance that, of course
> Least perform when startled or alert (and frequently enough that it is not
> a diagnostic field mark), but this bird kept this stance throughout and
> looked pretty odd for doing so, very much more like a Sharp-tailed or
> Pectoral Sandpiper than a Least. Perhaps because of this, or other
> structural nuances, the stint appeared to be about 2/3 the size of the
> adjacent Pectoral Sandpiper--giving the impression of being more the size
> of a Western Sandpiper than a Least. The plumage of the bird was overall
> worn and not showing much color, though I was viewing it under overcast
> skies and through light rain. The birds flew off and all I heard were the
> obvious calls of Pectoral Sandpipers and perhaps a call from the peep, but
> I heard no sounds typical of Least Sandpiper. I did not see the toes well
> enough on the standing bird (due to my viewing angle) or in flight to
> assess their relative lengths. The Tarsus did appear long on the standing
> bird and probably contributed to the impression that the bird was much
> larger than a typical Least Sandpiper.
> >
> > To be sure, I am not trying to start any sort of Asian stint fever, and
> were my observations in sum to come to me as a member of the Oregon Birds
> Records Committee, of which I am a former member, I would vote to not
> accept this record due to the fact that all these field marks are
> supportive and subtle with nothing solid to hang my hat on so to speak. I
> made a personal promise to myself long ago to be sure to avoid being
> stringy when it comes to identification, especially when it came to small
> sandpipers in the genus Calidris, and especially so with Long-toed Stint, I
> can say without hesitation that the peep/stint I saw this morning at the
> Nehalem Sewage Ponds so stood out given the marks I have listed that I feel
> it warrants  an RBA on the chance that others can get out there today or
> tomorrow to photo-document this potential (and I saw that with emphasis
> again, "potential") mega-rarity for our region. At the risk of being
> redundant let me restate that Long-toed stint makes for an exceedingly
> difficult identification and that the bird of interest I saw today was in
> worn adult plumage.
> >
> > I think it likely that the bird may be hanging around the ponds as the
> three PECTORAL SANDPIPERS are staging there assuming that they are the same
> adults I noted yesterday and the weather has taken a turn for the worse in
> regard to good weather for migrating. In other somewhat be related odd
> shorebird migration news three adult RED KNOTS flew a couple circles around
> the ponds before heading out to the the NW while I was there with this peep
> too.
> >
> > I Still haven't relocated the Bank Swallow I found there last week.
> >
> >
> > David
> >
> > David C. Bailey
> > Manzanita, Oregon for the summer
>
>
Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 7/23/2014
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:39:08 -0700
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 7/17/14 to 7/23/14. Species neither seen nor heard 
the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 6 days this week.

Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

Coopers Hawk               2  (1, 7/18 & 20)
Band-tailed Pigeon          4  (8)
Vauxs Swift                1  (1, 7/18)
Anna's Hummingbird          5  (4)
Rufous Hummingbird          5  (5, 7/17)
Downy Woodpecker            1  (1, 7/20)
Northern Flicker            6  (4, 7/19)
Pileated Woodpecker         3  (1)
Olive-sided Flycatcher      2  (1, 7/18 & 19)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher    2  (1, 7/20 & 22)
HUTTONS VIREO              2  (1, 7/18 & 20)
Steller's Jay               5  (8)
American Crow               6  (9)
Violet-green Swallow        2  (6, 7/19)
Black-capped Chickadee      6  (11)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   3  (8, 7/21)
Bushtit                     4  (27, 7/18)	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       5  (4)
BROWN CREEPER               5  (2)
American Robin              6  (6)
Black-throated Gray Warbler 1  (1, 7/17)
Wilson's Warbler            1  (1, 7/19)
Spotted Towhee              6  (9, 7/19)
Song Sparrow                6  (7)
Dark-eyed Junco             6  (5)
Black-headed Grosbeak       1  (1, 7/19)
House Finch                 3  (2)
Purple Finch                2  (2, 7/19)
RED CROSSBILL               2  (2+, 7/19)
Lesser Goldfinch            1  (2, 7/17)
American Goldfinch          2  (1, 7/17 & 20)
EVENING GROSBEAK            1  (3, 7/18)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: TURKEY VULTURE, Western 
Screech-Owl, BARRED OWL 


Misses (birds found at least 3 days in previous 2 weeks but not found this 
week): Bewicks Wren, Swainsons Thrush 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Pond--a few more notes
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:35:05 -0700
Here are a few more notes about my encounter with the possible Long-toed
Stint this morning at the Nehalem Sewage Ponds.

First, I forgot to mention that while I was getting out of my car to go
bird the site I saw a small flock of about 20 peeps flying across the SE
pond headed west. I presume they went to roost in one of the areas of the
ponds closed to public access. There are probably quite a few shorebirds
scattered around the pond exteriors that we won't see due to the access
restrictions. We used to have access to the entire facility....but perhaps
if one stays around the ponds for some time some of the hidden birds might
move to more viewable regions of the ponds.

There had be heavy showers over the course of the morning. Many of the
immature gulls at the ponds had what looked like waterlogged plumage. The
possible stint may have had some effects of excess rain on its plumage as
well. The plumage struck me as very worn--more so than I would have
expected for a full adult a this time of the year. It occurred to me at the
time that the bird may have been in only its second calendar year and have
retained plumage. I have seen over-summering Western Sandpipers that have
shown these warn plumage characters and we have assumed them to be 2nd year
birds with retained juvenile flight feathers and coverts. There are some
pictures at this web link
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/tracy.mann/LTSArticle.htm of a 2nd -year
Long-toed Stint that share some of the characteristics of the bird I saw,
but these pictures depict a bird a few months later in the season and with
some new basic plumage coming in--that I did not see on the bird today.

 I noticed hardly any projection of the primaries on the bird I saw today.
I also noted that the bird had some streaking on sides of the breast, but
no thick streaking with a distinct boarder to belly like a Pectoral
Sandpiper shows--It crossed my mind briefly in the field that I might be
looking at an extremely small female Pectoral, as that species shows marked
sexual dimorphism in size, but the the breast plumage was wrong and the
bird was not nearly big enough to be that species. The bill was too short
for Pectoral as well. The bill was similar in size and shape to a Least
Sandpiper, but perhaps a bit longer and a bit less attenuated (pointy). It
had was slightly decurved. Th belly flanks and underparts appeared white
and without streaks or spots form what I could see.

I will walk around the ponds again tomorrow after my morning survey in the
nearby Clatsop State Forest and report back then.

Jeff is correct the gate the ponds is locked around 5pm each day and opened
by 8 or maybe earlier. I will try to find out for sure tomorrow. I believe
the gate is opened during the days on the weekends, but I will check on
that too.

David

David C. Bailey
Manzanita, Oregon for the summer
Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:22:30 -0700
For anyone looking for this bird, I offer a note of caution. Male Pectoral 
Sandpipers are much smaller than females. Pectoral Sandpipers have a pale base 
to the lower mandible, as do many Long-toed Stints. While a Long-toed Stint is 
larger than a Least Sandpiper, it isn't so by much. I have seen Leasts near a 
Long-toed once (the photographed bird from Clatsop County) and I could easily 
see a size difference. I am not sure that the Long-toed Stints I have seen in 
Asia looked larger than a Least with no Least present. 


Long-toed Stints and Pectoral Sandpipers can be confused. I very traveled, 
experienced and intelligent birder from Belfast who I knew (he has deceased) 
once put out an alert for Long-toed Stint from Northern Ireland, but the bird 
turned out to be a male Pectoral - a much more expected vagrant there. 


Jeff Gilligan


On Jul 23, 2014, at 10:52 AM, David Bailey  
wrote: 


> Wednesday 23 July 2014
> Tillamook County, Oregon
> Nehalem Sewage Ponds 
> NE pond along the North rock-edged shore
> 
> In the company of adult Pectoral Sandpipers (three) and in direct comparison 
to at least one that was less than a foot away was a dull-yellow-legged 
Calidrid in adult plumage with a very obvious pale base to the bill, a 
strikingly (given how many Least Sandpipers on which I have looked for this 
trait over the years) obvious dark cap that seamlessly met the upper mandible, 
pale whitish supercillium widening behind the eye, obvious white eye-ring, 
coverts and tertials collectively making a paler panel of plumage compared to 
the darker scapulars and mantle, and to top it all off the bird had that 
upright and long-necked stance that, of course Least perform when startled or 
alert (and frequently enough that it is not a diagnostic field mark), but this 
bird kept this stance throughout and looked pretty odd for doing so, very much 
more like a Sharp-tailed or Pectoral Sandpiper than a Least. Perhaps because of 
this, or other structural nuances, the stint appeared to be about 2/3 t 

 he size of the adjacent Pectoral Sandpiper--giving the impression of being 
more the size of a Western Sandpiper than a Least. The plumage of the bird was 
overall worn and not showing much color, though I was viewing it under overcast 
skies and through light rain. The birds flew off and all I heard were the 
obvious calls of Pectoral Sandpipers and perhaps a call from the peep, but I 
heard no sounds typical of Least Sandpiper. I did not see the toes well enough 
on the standing bird (due to my viewing angle) or in flight to assess their 
relative lengths. The Tarsus did appear long on the standing bird and probably 
contributed to the impression that the bird was much larger than a typical 
Least Sandpiper. 

> 
> To be sure, I am not trying to start any sort of Asian stint fever, and were 
my observations in sum to come to me as a member of the Oregon Birds Records 
Committee, of which I am a former member, I would vote to not accept this 
record due to the fact that all these field marks are supportive and subtle 
with nothing solid to hang my hat on so to speak. I made a personal promise to 
myself long ago to be sure to avoid being stringy when it comes to 
identification, especially when it came to small sandpipers in the genus 
Calidris, and especially so with Long-toed Stint, I can say without hesitation 
that the peep/stint I saw this morning at the Nehalem Sewage Ponds so stood out 
given the marks I have listed that I feel it warrants an RBA on the chance that 
others can get out there today or tomorrow to photo-document this potential 
(and I saw that with emphasis again, "potential") mega-rarity for our region. 
At the risk of being redundant let me restate that Long-toed stint make 

 s for an exceedingly difficult identification and that the bird of interest I 
saw today was in worn adult plumage. 

> 
> I think it likely that the bird may be hanging around the ponds as the three 
PECTORAL SANDPIPERS are staging there assuming that they are the same adults I 
noted yesterday and the weather has taken a turn for the worse in regard to 
good weather for migrating. In other somewhat be related odd shorebird 
migration news three adult RED KNOTS flew a couple circles around the ponds 
before heading out to the the NW while I was there with this peep too. 

> 
> I Still haven't relocated the Bank Swallow I found there last week. 
> 
> 
> David
> 
> David C. Bailey
> Manzanita, Oregon for the summer



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds NO (details)
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:40:39 -0700
On Jul 23, 2014, at 3:11 PM, James Billstine  wrote:

> While not the best shorebirder I drove up from Tillamook after I read the 
report and found no Stint, but I did relocate the three pectoral sandpipers, a 
spotted sandpiper, 1 western and 3 leasts. I took really long looks at the 
leasts but wasn't able to differentiate any of the markers that David pointed 
out, or anything that I studied up on in O'Brien's The Shorebird Guide. 
However, as I was leaving a flock of 6 peeps flushed and flew out of sight to 
the restricted area of the ponds (I was observing the 3 pectoral sandpipers on 
the other end.) 

> 
> I don't think my failure definitively means anything. I may run back there 
again this evening. 

> 
> Good Chasing
> 
> James


I detoured to Nehalem on my way from Portland to Nachotta. I was there at just 
after 6 PM. The gate was locked. Presumably they lock it when there are no 
employees present. I have an old key to the facility from years ago, but I 
doubt it works on the subject lock, or that I should use it now without 
reminding them. In any case, don't expect access during non-business hours. 


Jeff Gilligan


 
Subject: Re: Request for help with grouse ID
From: Kevin Spencer <rriparia AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 23:39:28 -0400 (EDT)
Hi,

As far as I know, the "Blue Grouse" on Winter Rim would be Sooty Grouse. 
I've encountered them many times there, and in the forest to the west. I 
have also encountered Sooty Grouse in the North Warners (really just The 
Warners, but I mean the Oregon portion of the  Warner Mountains).

As for the maps ..... I'd say grouse maps for both Ruffed and Sooty are 
lacking in that part of the state for both Ruffed and Sooty, and maybe 
the whole state (I can only comment  about Klamath and Lake Cos.) and 
that goes for both National Geographic and Sibley's. Maybe the maps for 
those grouse didn't receive much attention, due to lack of reports, 
observations... I don't know. What may have happened is that Breeding 
Bird Surveys were used, or partly used, as a way to base or outline the 
margins of presence. With a lack of reporting on BBS for grouse in 
general it could influence a loss of area where they normally occur. I 
know hunters could be a good source for knowledge of occurance as they 
generally are not going to be hunting where there is not any chance of 
bagging game. Maybe they should be consulted.

The map for Sooty Grouse, in  Sibley's Guide, shows a departure towards 
the west at the CA/OR state line. A more accurate line might be to 
continue northward with a small peak to include the north end of the 
Warner Mountains. The map for Oregon could widen its main eastern 
north-south line, somewhat, to include Winter Rim. North of Winter Rim 
the habitat really shrinks westward, so including Winter Rim would be a 
slight adjustment. The National Geographic map appears very similar to 
the Sibley Guide's Sooty Grouse map. So, that map should consider the 
same adjustments.

The Ruffed Grouse map in Sibley's Guide appears to make that species 
look like it is restricted to the coast range in Oregon. I am not 
familiar enough with Ruffed Grouse statewide to comment for the whole 
state, but for Klamath County it is a somewhat common species, 
especially in the deciduous areas around Upper Klamath Lake. That is a 
unique area admittedly, but it is significant enough that it should have 
been included in the range map for that species. I have heard of a few 
Ruffed Grouse being reported in Lake County, scattered, but none for the 
Warner Mountains. I have not heard of Ruffed  Grouse being reported 
between Upper Klamath Lake and say Gearhart Wilderness (just a place 
that's east of Klamath Falls that people are familiar with). The reports 
I've heard were from approx. Gearhart eastward to the westside of Goose 
Lake Valley. I dont know if those few reports should cause inclusion of 
that area on a fieldguide range map. But definitely the perimeter of the 
Upper Klamath Lake area and outward along its tributaries should be 
included.

The National Geographic map for Ruffed Grouse appears to be accurate for 
the most part, at the map shows eastward extension into Klamath County. 
Not including any of Lake County if find, and then encountering one, say 
in Lake County, being at the edge, or an outlier, would then be 
significant, and definitely worth reporting, or talking about, 
especially by a hunter (which is one my sources for Ruffed Grouse in 
Lake County... about 35 years ago... but I have not encounter Ruffed 
Grouse in Lake County myself).

I'd say the grouse is a Sooty Grouse, and that both Sibley's and 
National Geographic's field guides should make some slight adjustments 
to their Sooty Grouse maps. (and Sibley's map for Ruffed Grouse too).

Good for you, pointing that out.

Kevin Spencer
rriparia AT charter.net
Klamath Falls, OR

I ' on a field trip to the Summer Lake area this weekend (Sat-Tue).  On 
Sunday, we drove up Winter Ridge to Pioneer Peak, then south along the 
ridge road (NR26?) to the switchbacks.  While on top of the ridge, we 
came upon a hen or juvenile grouse sitting in the middle of the road,  
Click on the link below for a series of low resolution photos.

 

https://plus.google.com/photos/107892236367702076331/albums/6039284676539261153?authkey=CMDqo_P87szkxAE 


 


The grouse appeared to be either a sooty or dusky grouse.  We are fairly 
certain that it wasn't a greater sage-grouse because of our grouse's 
tail, which was blunt.  Sage-grouse have a long, pointed tail, and they 
probably wouldn't be found in that habitat.

Sibley 2nd edition field guide range maps don't show either of these 
"blue" grouse in the Winter Ridge area.  It appears that the sooty 
grouse doesn't normally come as far east as Winter Ridge, and the dusky 
grouse is only found in the Enterprise/Joseph area in Oregon.

Can anyone tell us if either (or both) of the sooty or dusky grouse can 
be found on Winter Ridge?  Also, can anyone venture an opinion on the 
identity of the grouse in the photos?

Thanks,

Tim Johnson
Salem, OR
Subject: Re: [PortlandAreaBirds] Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:35:55 -0700
> 
> Seems like the best adult Pectoral year I can remember!
> 
> Happy fall,
> 
> Adrian Hinkle
> 
> -- 
> -

You are young - but your memory is accurate. It is also the best I can 
remember, and I am nearly certain of that. 


Jeff Gilligan





OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Vanport Wetlands (Portland) shorebirds
From: Adrian Hinkle <adrian.hinkle AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 19:51:12 -0700
This afternoon at Vanport Wetlands I saw:

Killdeer - 6
Greater Yellowlegs - 1
Western Sandpiper - 1 adult
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1 juv
Pectoral Sandpiper - 1 adult
Least Sandpipers - 25 (adults)
Long-billed Dowitcher - 25 (adults)

Lots of Yellow-headed Blackbird, Redhead, and Ruddy Duck families as well.
Without a scope, I surely missed some additional ducks and shorebirds that
were out there.

Seems like the best adult Pectoral year I can remember!

Happy fall,

Adrian Hinkle
Subject: Black Swifts Nesting at Salt Creek Falls East of Eugene
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:51:52 -0700
Hi,

Eric Horvath is having problems posting to OBOL and asked me to post
the following:

I [Eric Horvath] checked out the Black Swifts nesting at Salt Creek
Falls, hwy 58 E of Eugene, on 20 & 21 July 2014.    There are two pair
nesting in the same general area as in 2012, but in different niches
than 2012.   Unfortunately this year they are not using the obvious
ledge of 2012, which was a wide open view.       To see the birds on
the nest this year is much more difficult due to blocking ferns.    If
you want to try for them now in late July the best bet is look in the
sky between 8-9 PM:   Look from the upper viewpoint.    We saw 4 in
the air, foraging, on 20 July.

 If you want to try to see them on the nest, then you have to bring a
scope down to the lower viewpoint at the bottom of the trail.    They
are in the maidenhair fern patch which is to the left of the falling
water as you look at the falls from the lower viewpoint.    The nests
are just behind the edge of the veil from this vantage, pretty much at
eye level.    If you have patience, the birds will show you their nest
as they fly to it, but you may have to wait for hours.      This year
the photo opportunities are poor since the nests are behind part of
the curtain of spray, and the best light is at 6 pm but that also
illuminates the spray.   When you consider the entire range of the
Black Swift, Salt Creek Falls turns out to be an awfully difficult
place to see them on their nest ledges since the waterfall is so huge
and the viewpoint so very far away.    Best views are to be had
elsewhere such as Box Canyon Falls in Ouray Colorado.

To my knowledge Salt Creek Falls is still the only confirmed nest site
in Oregon for Black Swifts.   Send me an email if you know otherwise.
 Thanks.

--Eric Horvath
horvath AT pioneer.net


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Pole Creek Woodpeckers and Flycatchers
From: Stephen Shunk <steve AT paradisebirding.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:36:36 -0700
All,
I scoured the Pole Creek burn this week south of Sisters and found at least
a dozen BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS and even more HAIRY WOODPECKERS.
Sapsuckers are harder to find now that known nests have fledged, but a
fledgling RED-BREASTED has been reliably present with one of its parents
along upper Trout Creek off FR 1018. The best BLACK-BACK tallies have been
along FR 1516 and FR 1526. In addition to the woodpeckers, most of the
nesting forest flycatchers are still quite vocal, including PEWEE,
OLIVE-SIDED, DUSKY and many PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS (or at least
Pac-slope-types).

The other major highlight will only excite those of you who are willing to
stop birding long enough to literally smell the flowers! There are some
major patches of fireweed in stunning display along FR 1514, uphill from
and shortly after crossing Pole Creek (maybe a cpl miles south of FR 15).
Some of the fireweed in there is well over my head. Also check the ditch
along the road there for a nice array of flowers, especially the great bog
orchid display, but also plenty of hedge nettle, thistle, and others. As a
bonus, the RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS are going nuts in there.

Enjoy the cooler weather!
Steve Shunk

-- 
*Check out our new web site!*
*www.paradisebirding.com *

Stephen Shunk
Paradise Birding
P.O. Box 547
Sisters, OR 97759
541-408-1753
Subject: Pole Creek Woodpeckers and Flycatchers
From: Stephen Shunk <steve AT paradisebirding.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:36:36 -0700
All,
I scoured the Pole Creek burn this week south of Sisters and found at least
a dozen BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS and even more HAIRY WOODPECKERS.
Sapsuckers are harder to find now that known nests have fledged, but a
fledgling RED-BREASTED has been reliably present with one of its parents
along upper Trout Creek off FR 1018. The best BLACK-BACK tallies have been
along FR 1516 and FR 1526. In addition to the woodpeckers, most of the
nesting forest flycatchers are still quite vocal, including PEWEE,
OLIVE-SIDED, DUSKY and many PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS (or at least
Pac-slope-types).

The other major highlight will only excite those of you who are willing to
stop birding long enough to literally smell the flowers! There are some
major patches of fireweed in stunning display along FR 1514, uphill from
and shortly after crossing Pole Creek (maybe a cpl miles south of FR 15).
Some of the fireweed in there is well over my head. Also check the ditch
along the road there for a nice array of flowers, especially the great bog
orchid display, but also plenty of hedge nettle, thistle, and others. As a
bonus, the RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS are going nuts in there.

Enjoy the cooler weather!
Steve Shunk

-- 
*Check out our new web site!*
*www.paradisebirding.com *

Stephen Shunk
Paradise Birding
P.O. Box 547
Sisters, OR 97759
541-408-1753_______________________________________________
COBOL mailing list
COBOL AT lists.oregonstate.edu
http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

To unsubscribe, send a message to:
COBOL-request AT lists.oregonstate.edu
with the word "unsubscribe" in the body.
Subject: Re: Winter Rim Grouse
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:34:25 -0700
Hi all,

Without going too deep into the paleogeography, here's a link to the
Washington Birder article by Washington DFW biologist Michael Schroeder,
which includes a range map for Sooty & Dusky Grouse:

http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01312/wdfw01312.pdf

as well as ID tips. WDFW has a similar map up on their website, but
there are no significant differences so far as I recall.

Dave Budeau (who manages Oregon DFW's upland gamebird program statewide)
confirmed several years ago that this map agrees with ODFW's data from
hunter check stations. They were collecting grouse wings & tail data
from check stations long before AOU decided to split Blue Grouse, so
they were out in front of most of us birders on this issue (except those
of us who started birding in the early 1900s).

As Wayne noted, there is still fairly continuous pine forest habitat all
the way from Willamette Pass to Winter Rim and on to Gearhart Mtn. I
think a grouse could even make it to Crane Mtn in the Warner Mtns on
foot by way of Chandler St. Wayside, without ever being too far from the
nearest pine.

If anyone wants to dip into the paleo issues, here's an interesting
study based on pollen data for the NW Great Basin, including a couple of
sites in the Warner Mtns (the current easternmost location for Sooty
Grouse in Oregon):


http://www7.nau.edu/mpcer/direnet/publications/publications_m/files/Minckley_TA_Whitlock_C_Bartlein_PJ_Veg_Fire_climate_history.pdf 


The key relevant bit in the conclusions seems to be this:

        The regional vegetation history indicates a greater-than-present
        areal extent of low and high elevation steppe grassland from ca
        11,000 to 7000 calyrBP, followed by an expansion of forest and
        increase of grasses in steppe regions. The dominant conifers of
        the region (i.e., white fir, western white pine, and whitebark
        pine) have been present in the region since ca 12,000 calyrBP.
        
So this fits with Wayne's suggestion that the period of extensive lakes
between the Ochocos and what is today Fremont-Winema National Forest
would have been followed fairly quickly by intervening steppe-type
grasslands, followed by forest expansion.

An interesting question might be whether Sooty (or any Blue) Grouse only
expanded into this part of their range in the past 7000 years.

Good birding,
Joel

P.S. Lars, I'm still hunting for your book on the Ft. Rock caves, which
would also have some good info on this topic.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds NO (details)
From: James Billstine <billstinj AT sou.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:11:18 -0700
While not the best shorebirder I drove up from Tillamook after I read the
report and found no Stint, but I did relocate the three pectoral
sandpipers, a spotted sandpiper, 1 western and 3 leasts. I took really long
looks at the leasts but wasn't able to differentiate any of the markers
that David pointed out, or anything that I studied up on in O'Brien's *The
Shorebird Guide*. However, as I was leaving a flock of 6 peeps flushed and
flew out of sight to the restricted area of the ponds (I was observing the
3 pectoral sandpipers on the other end.)

I don't think my failure definitively means anything. I may run back there
again this evening.

Good Chasing

James
Subject: Re: Possible Stilt at Tualatin NWR - Need id help for pics
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:57:17 -0700
I see a dowitcher sp. and a Western Sandpiper.  A Stilt sandpiper would be
closer in size to the dowitcher.

David

David C. Bailey
Manzanita, Oregon




*Subject: Possible Stilt at Tualatin NWR - Need id help for pics*
> Date: Wed Jul 23 2014 16:44 pm
> From: mapsout AT comcast.net
>
> I took photos of this sandpiper around noon today after Thomas Love's RBA
>
> for a Stilt Sandpiper at TNWR.  I would appreciate any id comments.  The
>
> photos are lousy - the weather was rainy and windy!  There are 5 photos at
>
> my Flickr photo stream including one where he is flying back to the far
>
> back pond.
>
> https://flic.kr/p/ore5Wn
> https://flic.kr/p/ore5Ut
>
>
> Thanks - Beverly Hallberg
>
> - See more at: http://birding.aba.org/maillistdigest/OR01#739933
>
Subject: Possible Stilt at Tualatin NWR - Need id help for pics
From: Beverly Hallberg <mapsout AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:43:52 -0700
I took photos of this sandpiper around noon today after Thomas Love's RBA
for a Stilt Sandpiper at TNWR.  I would appreciate any id comments.  The
photos are lousy - the weather was rainy and windy!  There are 5 photos at
my Flickr photo stream including one where he is flying back to the far
back pond.

https://flic.kr/p/ore5Wn
https://flic.kr/p/ore5Ut

Thanks - Beverly Hallberg
Subject: Re: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:06:59 -0700
Does anyone have an update on this?

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 23, 2014, at 10:53, "David Bailey"  
wrote: 

> 
> Wednesday 23 July 2014
> Tillamook County, Oregon
> Nehalem Sewage Ponds 
> NE pond along the North rock-edged shore
> 
> In the company of adult Pectoral Sandpipers (three) and in direct comparison 
to at least one that was less than a foot away was a dull-yellow-legged 
Calidrid in adult plumage with a very obvious pale base to the bill, a 
strikingly (given how many Least Sandpipers on which I have looked for this 
trait over the years) obvious dark cap that seamlessly met the upper mandible, 
pale whitish supercillium widening behind the eye, obvious white eye-ring, 
coverts and tertials collectively making a paler panel of plumage compared to 
the darker scapulars and mantle, and to top it all off the bird had that 
upright and long-necked stance that, of course Least perform when startled or 
alert (and frequently enough that it is not a diagnostic field mark), but this 
bird kept this stance throughout and looked pretty odd for doing so, very much 
more like a Sharp-tailed or Pectoral Sandpiper than a Least. Perhaps because of 
this, or other structural nuances, the stint appeared to be about 2/3 the size 
of the adjacent Pectoral Sandpiper--giving the impression of being more the 
size of a Western Sandpiper than a Least. The plumage of the bird was overall 
worn and not showing much color, though I was viewing it under overcast skies 
and through light rain. The birds flew off and all I heard were the obvious 
calls of Pectoral Sandpipers and perhaps a call from the peep, but I heard no 
sounds typical of Least Sandpiper. I did not see the toes well enough on the 
standing bird (due to my viewing angle) or in flight to assess their relative 
lengths. The Tarsus did appear long on the standing bird and probably 
contributed to the impression that the bird was much larger than a typical 
Least Sandpiper. 

> 
> To be sure, I am not trying to start any sort of Asian stint fever, and were 
my observations in sum to come to me as a member of the Oregon Birds Records 
Committee, of which I am a former member, I would vote to not accept this 
record due to the fact that all these field marks are supportive and subtle 
with nothing solid to hang my hat on so to speak. I made a personal promise to 
myself long ago to be sure to avoid being stringy when it comes to 
identification, especially when it came to small sandpipers in the genus 
Calidris, and especially so with Long-toed Stint, I can say without hesitation 
that the peep/stint I saw this morning at the Nehalem Sewage Ponds so stood out 
given the marks I have listed that I feel it warrants an RBA on the chance that 
others can get out there today or tomorrow to photo-document this potential 
(and I saw that with emphasis again, "potential") mega-rarity for our region. 
At the risk of being redundant let me restate that Long-toed stint makes for an 
exceedingly difficult identification and that the bird of interest I saw today 
was in worn adult plumage. 

> 
> I think it likely that the bird may be hanging around the ponds as the three 
PECTORAL SANDPIPERS are staging there assuming that they are the same adults I 
noted yesterday and the weather has taken a turn for the worse in regard to 
good weather for migrating. In other somewhat be related odd shorebird 
migration news three adult RED KNOTS flew a couple circles around the ponds 
before heading out to the the NW while I was there with this peep too. 

> 
> I Still haven't relocated the Bank Swallow I found there last week. 
> 
> 
> David
> 
> David C. Bailey
> Manzanita, Oregon for the summer
ڭb0yb(ڭbnLjv{*.rzmyb(%
if׫j+jz祊l
Subject: Re: Winter Rim grouse
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:14:52 -0700
Hi -

Two thoughts:

First, my recollection of the ranges of Sooty and Dusky grouse put the
Winter Rim / Gearhart Mtn area in Sooty Grouse territory.  This fits with
other species - these pine forests have more of a connection to the
Cascades than to the Blue Mountains.  In fact, pine forests are still
pretty continuous (except for clearcuts) from the Cascades around Mt.
Thielsen all the way to Yamsey Mt., Winter Rim,and Gearhart Mt.

Second, the area between the Blues/Ochocos and Winter Rim probably was not
continuous forest, 10,000 BP because it was interrupted by a series of very
large lakes.  Summer Lake and Abert Lake were probably connected into one
huge lake.  Silver Lake would have extended from just below the west side
of Winter Rim west well past the current village of Silver Lake.  The area
around Fort Rock is a lake bed that extends east well past Christmas Lake.
 Dry River Canyon through Horse Ridge southeast of Bend was the outlet of a
lake that occupied the whole basin east of there, including Millican,
Brothers, and Hampton.  The view from the top of Newberry Volcano would
have been lake after lake to the northeast, east, and southeast.  By 10,000
BP these lakes were probably in decline, but I think they went directly
from Lakes to semidesert conditions without a forested interlude.  Joel
Geier probably knows a lot more details.

Wayne




On Wed, Jul 23, 2014 at 10:34 AM, Lars Per Norgren  wrote:

>     The Oregon Breeding Bird Atlas indicates Blue Grouse in both the
> Winter Rim and Warner Mtns (yet further east) of Lake County. I would be
> surprised by the species' absence in either place. Birds of Oregon lists
> three subspecies before the split, two belonging to what now is Sooty
> Grouse. I imagine the subspecies in Lake County would be sierrae. This
> location would be worthy of scrutiny. I have always thought of this as a
> bird of the vast conifer forests, but someone posted a link here to a
> Washington State fish and game article. In that state Dusky Grouse is an
> habitué of shrub-steppe adjacent to conifers. The distance between the
> Blue/Ochocco system and Winter Rim isn't that great and ten thousand years
> ago the forest between the two was probably continuous.
>      Lars
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Pectoral Sandpiper, Fern Ridge
From: Joni Dawning <dawning AT efn.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:14:06 -0700
There were 3 Pectoral Sandpipers on the east side of the Barn Pond at Fern 
Ridge this morning. 



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: RBA: Long-toed Stint at Nehalem Sewage Ponds
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:52:15 -0700
Wednesday 23 July 2014
Tillamook County, Oregon
Nehalem Sewage Ponds
NE pond along the North rock-edged shore

In the company of adult Pectoral Sandpipers (three) and in direct
comparison to at least one that was less than a foot away was a
dull-yellow-legged Calidrid in adult plumage with a very obvious pale base
to the bill, a strikingly (given how many Least Sandpipers on which I have
looked for this trait over the years) obvious dark cap that seamlessly met
the upper mandible, pale whitish supercillium widening behind the eye,
obvious white eye-ring, coverts and tertials collectively making a paler
panel of plumage compared to the darker scapulars and mantle, and to top it
all off the bird had that upright and long-necked stance that, of course
Least perform when startled or alert (and frequently enough that it is not
a diagnostic field mark), but this bird kept this stance throughout and
looked pretty odd for doing so, very much more like a Sharp-tailed or
Pectoral Sandpiper than a Least. Perhaps because of this, or other
structural nuances, the stint appeared to be about 2/3 the size of the
adjacent Pectoral Sandpiper--giving the impression of being more the size
of a Western Sandpiper than a Least. The plumage of the bird was overall
worn and not showing much color, though I was viewing it under overcast
skies and through light rain. The birds flew off and all I heard were the
obvious calls of Pectoral Sandpipers and perhaps a call from the peep, but
I heard no sounds typical of Least Sandpiper. I did not see the toes well
enough on the standing bird (due to my viewing angle) or in flight to
assess their relative lengths. The Tarsus did appear long on the standing
bird and probably contributed to the impression that the bird was much
larger than a typical Least Sandpiper.

To be sure, I am not trying to start any sort of Asian stint fever, and
were my observations in sum to come to me as a member of the Oregon Birds
Records Committee, of which I am a former member, I would vote to not
accept this record due to the fact that all these field marks are
supportive and subtle with nothing solid to hang my hat on so to speak. I
made a personal promise to myself long ago to be sure to avoid being
stringy when it comes to identification, especially when it came to small
sandpipers in the genus Calidris, and especially so with Long-toed Stint, I
can say without hesitation that the peep/stint I saw this morning at the
Nehalem Sewage Ponds so stood out given the marks I have listed that I feel
it warrants  an RBA on the chance that others can get out there today or
tomorrow to photo-document this potential (and I saw that with emphasis
again, "potential") mega-rarity for our region. At the risk of being
redundant let me restate that Long-toed stint makes for an exceedingly
difficult identification and that the bird of interest I saw today was in
worn adult plumage.

I think it likely that the bird may be hanging around the ponds as the
three PECTORAL SANDPIPERS are staging there assuming that they are the same
adults I noted yesterday and the weather has taken a turn for the worse in
regard to good weather for migrating. In other somewhat be related odd
shorebird migration news three adult RED KNOTS flew a couple circles around
the ponds before heading out to the the NW while I was there with this peep
too.

I Still haven't relocated the Bank Swallow I found there last week.


David

David C. Bailey
Manzanita, Oregon for the summer
Subject: Winter Rim grouse
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:34:02 -0700
 The Oregon Breeding Bird Atlas indicates Blue Grouse in both the Winter Rim 
and Warner Mtns (yet further east) of Lake County. I would be surprised by the 
species' absence in either place. Birds of Oregon lists three subspecies before 
the split, two belonging to what now is Sooty Grouse. I imagine the subspecies 
in Lake County would be sierrae. This location would be worthy of scrutiny. I 
have always thought of this as a bird of the vast conifer forests, but someone 
posted a link here to a Washington State fish and game article. In that state 
Dusky Grouse is an habitu of shrub-steppe adjacent to conifers. The distance 
between the Blue/Ochocco system and Winter Rim isn't that great and ten 
thousand years ago the forest between the two was probably continuous. 

     Lars

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Request for help with grouse ID
From: Tim Johnson <tim.the.fisherman AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:06:27 -0700
Hi all:

A group of us from Salem Audubon went on a field trip to the Summer Lake
area this weekend (Sat-Tue).  On Sunday, we drove up Winter Ridge to
Pioneer Peak, then south along the ridge road (NR26?) to the switchbacks.
While on top of the ridge, we came upon a hen or juvenile grouse sitting in
the middle of the road,  Click on the link below for a series of low
resolution photos.


https://plus.google.com/photos/107892236367702076331/albums/6039284676539261153?authkey=CMDqo_P87szkxAE 


The grouse appeared to be either a sooty or dusky grouse.  We are fairly
certain that it wasn't a greater sage-grouse because of our grouse's tail,
which was blunt.  Sage-grouse have a long, pointed tail, and they probably
wouldn't be found in that habitat.

Sibley 2nd edition field guide range maps don't show either of these "blue"
grouse in the Winter Ridge area.  It appears that the sooty grouse doesn't
normally come as far east as Winter Ridge, and the dusky grouse is only
found in the Enterprise/Joseph area in Oregon.

Can anyone tell us if either (or both) of the sooty or dusky grouse can be
found on Winter Ridge?  Also, can anyone venture an opinion on the identity
of the grouse in the photos?

Thanks,

Tim Johnson
Salem, OR
Subject: local RBA?: STILT S at Tual R NWR
From: Thomas Love <tlove AT linfield.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:48:29 +0000
I stopped in at Tualatin River NWR nr Sherwood this morning, in hop4s that the 
abrupt weather change might have led to some grounding of shorebirds. Among a 
few each of LEAST S and WESTERN S were five LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS and what I'm 
quite sure were two STILT SANDPIPERS hanging with the dows  long, thin, 
drooping bill, small-headed, longer-necked, a bit dumpy looking, slightly 
smaller overall than the associating dows. This was about 08:00 on the far big 
pond, viewed from the deck by the refuge bookstore bldg. (I had no time to walk 
the dike road to get a closer look, unfortunately). 


Hope someone can check these out!

Tom L.
Subject: local RBA?: STILT S at Tual R NWR
From: Thomas Love <tlove AT linfield.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:43:56 +0000
I stopped in at Tualatin River NWR nr Sherwood this morning, h
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 06:15:54 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: July 23, 2014 6:08:01 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Horned Grebe (1 Deschutes)
Black-necked Stilt (1 Polk)
Pectoral Sandpiper (1 Deschutes)
Short-billed Dowitcher (1 Union)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1 Crook, 1 Curry)
Gray Catbird (1 Lincoln)

---------------------------------------------
The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on 
the web at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, Tenmile Coos Cty
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 04:35:53 -0700
I can add one bird to this impressive list- a juvie WILLET that I saw a
Bandon Marsh with some Marbled Godwits and BB Plovers. What a summer for
adult Pecs, seems like the best in years.

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay



On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 6:46 PM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <
deweysage AT frontier.com> wrote:

> We heard from Joe Metzler today....he reports 15 species of shorebirds
> Tenmile, Coos Cty.
>
> Semipalmated Sandpiper
> Western and Least Sandpiper
> Spotted Sandpiper
> Dunlin
> Sanderling
> Pectoral Sandpiper
> Short-billed Dowitcher
> Greater Yellowlegs
> Whimbrel
> Marebled Godwit
> Snowy Plover
> Semipalmated Plover
> Killdeer
> Black-bellied Plover
>
> We had large numbers of shorebirds along South Beach Coos Bay North Spit,
> but did not note anything unusual.
>
> Cheers
> Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Shorebird survey today at TRNWR
From: StevenMauvais <stevenmauvais AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 04:18:25 +0000 (UTC)
Our survey today at the Tualatin River Nat'l Wildlife Refuge amongst the usual 
Killdeer, Spotted Sandpipers and Least/Western Sandpipers also yielded the 
following: 

36 Long-billed Dowitchers (down from the 65 seen last week) 
4 Dunlin in non-breeding plumage 
1 Semi-palmated Plover 

Good birding, 
Steve Mauvais 

Subject: Baskett Slough Trip Summary
From: Mike Unger <unger730 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:06:02 -0700
Tuesday afternoon my wife and I went to Baskett Slough and it was somewhat
active with shorebirds and other larger birds.  The Black-necked Stilts
were still at The Narrows on Colville Rd.  We also saw 27 American White
Pelicans and three Great Egrets.

Further down Colville Road toward Hwy. 99 we observed numerous Turkey
Vultures, American Kestrels and a Northern Harrier all actively hunting
with some success.  We also saw a lone Ring-necked Pheasant just before
reaching the Rich Guadagno Trail parking lot.

Mike Unger
Keizer, OR

*Here is today's list for July 22, 2014:*

Number of Checklists: 2
Number of Species: 17

Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Oregon2020--The Narrows  AT  4:14 PM
(2): Colville Road from The Narrows to Highway 99W  AT  4:57 PM

42 Mallard -- (1)
1 Ring-necked Pheasant -- (2)
1 Pied-billed Grebe -- (1)
27 American White Pelican -- (1)
2 Great Blue Heron -- (1)
3 Great Egret -- (1)
8 Turkey Vulture -- (2)
1 Northern Harrier -- (2)
4 American Coot -- (1)
4 Black-necked Stilt -- (1)
1 Killdeer -- (1)
1 Spotted Sandpiper -- (1)
1 Greater Yellowlegs -- (1)
4 Least Sandpiper -- (1)
6 American Kestrel -- (2)
21 American Crow -- (2)
200 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1)
Subject: Hatfield Marine Science Center Catbird, Marbled Godwit, & Great Egrets
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:12:26 -0700
Hi,

At the Hatfield Marine Science Center Nature Trail this morning
(7/22), Chuck Philo saw the lingering Gray Catbird.  He was the first
to see it in that area on June 18, so it has lingered over a month.

At Idaho Flats near the Nature Trail today, he saw 1 Marbled Godwit,
20 peeps, and 3 Great Egrets.  These may be the first Great Egrets of
the season in lower Yaquina Bay.  In the past, Great Egrets also
usually showed up in lower Yaquina Bay in mid- to late July, though
scattered ones could be elsewhere in the County during June-early
July.

"Fall" shorebird migration in which we now are in has been an iffy
proposition in the past as well as today.  They are not as
concentrated, numerous, and as predictable as during spring migration.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Shorebirds, Tenmile Coos Cty
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:46:26 -0700
We heard from Joe Metzler today....he reports 15 species of shorebirds 
Tenmile, Coos Cty.

Semipalmated Sandpiper
Western and Least Sandpiper
Spotted Sandpiper
Dunlin
Sanderling
Pectoral Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Greater Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Marebled Godwit
Snowy Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Black-bellied Plover

We had large numbers of shorebirds along South Beach Coos Bay North 
Spit, but did not note anything unusual.

Cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein




OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Pectoral Sandpipers at Nehalem S. Ponds
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:04:05 -0700
Tuesday 22 July 2014

I took a walk around the public areas of the Nehalem sewage ponds
(Tillamook County) this morning a few hours before high tide. Not one, but
three PECTRORAL SANDPIPERS, at least two of which were adults (the third I
did not see well enough to age before it flew off), were roosting on the
rock edges. Two LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS and two LEAST SANDPIPERS were the
only other migrant shorebirds around other than a single SPOTTED SANDPIPER
and KILLDEER which are probably a resident breeder. A half dozen CINNAMON
TEAL were paddling the ponds with about 50 or so MALLARDS. Lots of
swallows  representing all species that occur in Oregon were working the
aerial plankton over the NW pond, with the exception of Bank Swallow. I
tried to relocate the one I saw there last week with no positive result. A
juvenile YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was in the small hybrid poplar patch on the
N. side of the compound.

David

David C. Bailey
Manzanita, Oregon (for the summer)
Subject: South Jetty this morning - 7/22/2014
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:55:19 -0700
I spent just short of three hours today not seeing rare Eurasian Stints.

It seemed pretty clear that there had been a turn over in the
shorebirds.  There were fewer birds in general.  The river beach flock
had a juvenile WESTERN SANDPIPER and an adult and a juvenile
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER.  Neither of these were noted yesterday during
the same time interval of watching.

A juvenile LEAST SANDPIPER was at the big shorebird pond on the flats-
a tall, rangy one with long toes...

Also a single LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER and not much else.

No birds on the Hammond jetty during the high tide either which was kind
of weird.

Photos at:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/?details=1

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: 7/22/14 - Union County, OR : Fall Shorebird Fall-out
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "AVITOURS@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:04:26 -0400 (EDT)
Birders -

Cathy Nowak called me this morning (6/22, 7:50 am), reporting that she had  
located 4 MARBLED GODWITS south of the Schoolhouse Pond.  I arrived at the  
Schoolhouse Pond a bit before 9 am and with a little patience, was able to  
relocate the four MARBLED GODWITS.  Cool birds, Cathy!  Other  Shorebirds 
scattered around the mud flats included:
6 - WHITE-FACED IBIS  (Adults with juveniles, I am certain they bred here 
again!)
1 - SEMIPALMATED  PLOVER (with an apparent injured right foot)
7 - PECTORAL SANDPIPER (a first  for the year for me)
1 - calling juvenile SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER with 15  LONG-BILLEDS 
Bunches of SPOTTED, WESTERN & LEAST SANDPIPERS,  BLACK-NECKED STILTS, 
WILSON'S & RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were present  too.
According to eBird and our Listservs, it looks like shorebirds are  showing 
up in all available habitats around these parts, thanks in  part to the 
cooler July weather which recently hit. 
Good Shorebirding,

- Trent Bray
The Bobolink - Linking Birders  & Birds
1707 5th Street
La Grande, OR  97850
(541) 963 -  2888
avitours AT aol.com
 


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: 7/22/14 - Union County, OR : Fall Shorebird Fall-out
From: AVITOURS AT aol.com
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:04:26 -0400
Birders -

Cathy Nowak called me this morning (6/22, 7:50 am), reporting that she had  
located 4 MARBLED GODWITS south of the Schoolhouse Pond.  I arrived at the  
Schoolhouse Pond a bit before 9 am and with a little patience, was able to  
relocate the four MARBLED GODWITS.  Cool birds, Cathy!  Other  Shorebirds 
scattered around the mud flats included:
6 - WHITE-FACED IBIS  (Adults with juveniles, I am certain they bred here 
again!)
1 - SEMIPALMATED  PLOVER (with an apparent injured right foot)
7 - PECTORAL SANDPIPER (a first  for the year for me)
1 - calling juvenile SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER with 15  LONG-BILLEDS 
Bunches of SPOTTED, WESTERN & LEAST SANDPIPERS,  BLACK-NECKED STILTS, 
WILSON'S & RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were present  too.
According to eBird and our Listservs, it looks like shorebirds are  showing 
up in all available habitats around these parts, thanks in  part to the 
cooler July weather which recently hit. 
Good Shorebirding,

- Trent Bray
The Bobolink - Linking Birders  & Birds
1707 5th Street
La Grande, OR  97850
(541) 963 -  2888
avitours AT aol.com
 
_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
Subject: Older BIRDING, American Birds, NAB available for adoption
From: Shawneen Finnegan <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:53:16 -0700
Before I recycle or take them to Goodwill, is anyone interested in older bird 
magazines? NOT complete sets. 



BIRDING Magazine: mostly from the early 2000's but also a few from the 1990's 
to 2007. 


AMERICAN BIRDS/Audubon Field Notes, NAB (various names for the same magazine): 
Many -- from the early 1970's to a few years ago. 


Please let me know if you have any interest or suggestions of who might want 
them. 


Shawneen Finnegan
shawneenfinnegan at gmail.com



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Keizer Area Birding Summary
From: Mike Unger <unger730 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:41:33 -0700
Hello Birders:



Roy and I birded three locales in the Keizer area this morning.  It was
rather quiet but the weather was nice except for a brief light shower at
Spong’s Landing.  We walked about 3.3 miles through the three locales and
identified (saw or heard) 34 birds.



*Most notable sightings:*

·  Two *Green Herons* at Willow Lake Treatment Plant;

·  Seven *Marsh Wrens* that were quite vocal at Willow Lake Treatment Plant;

·  One *Greater Yellowlegs* at Spong’s Landing along the Willamette River;

·  One *Red-breasted Nuthatch* and one *White-breasted Nuthatch* at Spong’s
Landing;

·  Two *Spotted Sandpipers* at Spong’s Landing on the other side of the
river;

·  One *Purple Finch* at Spong’s Landing;

·  One young *Common Yellowthroat* was seen at Country Glen Park.

A complete list of today's birds follows.

Mike Unger

Keizer, OR

-------------------------------------------------------------------

BirdLog Checklist Summary for July 22, 2014


Number of Checklists: 3
Number of Species: 34



Checklists included in this summary:
(1): Willow Lake Treatment Plant  AT  8:00 AM
(2): Spong’s Landing  AT  9:11 AM
(3): Country Glen Park  AT  10:26 AM

43 Canada Goose -- (2)
3 Mallard -- (1),(2),(3)
1 Great Blue Heron -- (2)
2 Green Heron -- (1)
2 Spotted Sandpiper -- (2)
1 Greater Yellowlegs -- (2)
4 Mourning Dove -- (1),(3)
1 Anna's Hummingbird -- (3)
1 Downy Woodpecker -- (3)
1 Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) -- (2)
2 Western Wood-Pewee -- (2)
4 Steller's Jay -- (2)
7 Western Scrub-Jay (Coastal) -- (1),(3)
7 American Crow -- (1)
2 Tree Swallow -- (1)
12 Barn Swallow -- (1),(3)
21 Black-capped Chickadee -- (1),(2),(3)
1 Red-breasted Nuthatch -- (2)
1 White-breasted Nuthatch -- (2)
1 Brown Creeper -- (2)
7 Marsh Wren -- (1)
1 Swainson's Thrush -- (2)
2 American Robin -- (1),(3)
6 European Starling -- (1),(3)
2 Cedar Waxwing -- (3)
2 Common Yellowthroat -- (1),(3)
5 Spotted Towhee -- (1),(2),(3)
7 Song Sparrow -- (2),(3)
3 Black-headed Grosbeak -- (2),(3)
11 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1)
5 House Finch -- (3)
1 Purple Finch -- (2)
24 American Goldfinch -- (1),(3)
5 House Sparrow -- (3)
Subject: ECD
From: Bobolink06 AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:12:59 +0000 (UTC)
Obolites, This morning I observed a Eurasian Collared Dove on Villard St. in 
Eugene. I had heard it for several days in the alley way , but it was on the 
street perched on a utility wire this A.M. Any other observations in the South 
Eugene area? Bob Bender 
Subject: Fwd: Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:11:17 -0700
OBOLers,

An update on shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR in Clark County, Washington.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jim Danzenbaker 
Date: Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 9:21 AM
Subject: Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds
To: tweeters tweeters 


Tweeters,

Since it was raining down here in Clark County this morning and since Randy
Hill found a Semipalmated Sandpiper at Ridgefield yesterday, I decided to
visit the refuge this morning and try my luck.  Shorebirds are definitely
arriving and any visit to the refuge specifically to look for shorebirds
should be planned based on the tides.  High Tide or the rising tide is
best.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of
the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and
12):

Killdeer: 15
Greater Yellowlegs: 15
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1
Least Sandpiper: 40
Western Sandpiper: 12
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1 (first of season - adult)
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5+ (first of season - presumably all adults - 2
observed on the mud and nearby vegetation and a flock of four flying off to
nearby Campbell Lake)
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10
Wilson's Snipe: 6

I wasn't able to locate the Semipalmated Sandpiper.

There were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly enjoying
their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there was one lone Long-billed Dowitcher on the edge of
it this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: goshawk
From: Bobolink06 AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:05:38 +0000 (UTC)
Birders, on Sunday we saw a large accipiter fly by our cabin on the Metolius 
River.My impression was a large long tailed, robust, fast flying bird at mid 
Ponderosa level. My diagnosis was Goshawk.The look was brief as usual, but it 
seemed to be too big for a Coopers. Supporting evidence could be a pile of 
Raven feathers we discovered near our cabin and at the base of a tree where it 
must have been plucked.This was in mid June at the time of the Woodpecker 
Festival. We have had almost annual sightings of Goshawk near our cabin but 
have not discovered a nest in the area. Bob Bender. Camp Sherman and Eugene 
Subject: goshawk
From: Bobolink06 AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:05:38 +0000 (UTC)
Birders, on Sunday we saw a large accipiter fly by our cabin on the Metolius 
River.My impression was a large long tailed, robust, fast flying bird at mid 
Ponderosa level. My diagnosis was Goshawk.The look was brief as usual, but it 
seemed to be too big for a Coopers. Supporting evidence could be a pile of 
Raven feathers we discovered near our cabin and at the base of a tree where it 
must have been plucked.This was in mid June at the time of the Woodpecker 
Festival. We have had almost annual sightings of Goshawk near our cabin but 
have not discovered a nest in the area. Bob Bender. Camp Sherman and Eugene 
_______________________________________________
COBOL mailing list
COBOL AT lists.oregonstate.edu
http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

To unsubscribe, send a message to:
COBOL-request AT lists.oregonstate.edu
with the word "unsubscribe" in the body.
Subject: Pectoral SP
From: Daniel Farrar <jdanielfarrar AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:03:57 -0700
Obol,
     Today there is an adult PECTORAL SANDPIPER at Tenmile Creek Coos
county mixed with the more regulars.   Starting to see hatch year
shorebirds but still mostly adults.

Daniel Farrar


-- 
Daniel Farrar
Dunes City, Oregon
jdanielfarrar AT gmail.com
Subject: Josephine Co barred owl fledglings
From: Romain Cooper <romain AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:34:33 -0700
Here at our place on the edge of our garden, Takilma area, Illinois 
Valley, Josephine County, On July 20th, just as it was getting dark, 
Christie heard what she thought were begging calls from owl young.

We never got great looks at them but saw and heard 2 Barred Owl 
fledglings with a female adult.  IDed the species from the adult's 
"contact call".

Barred Owl have been very vocal here lately with some hooting (8 note 
location calls, etc.) during daytime.

Romain Cooper
10398 Takilma Road
Cave Junction, OR 97523
541-592-2311 



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: Bend Hooded Oriole
From: Charles Gates <cgates326 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 06:46:14 -0700
The Hooded Oriole was seen for the third consecutive day yesterday east 
of Bend in Deschutes County.  Some image can be seen at 
https://flic.kr/s/aHsjZhPNUJ.

-- 
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for 
sure that just ain't so. 

Mark Twain

Chuck Gates
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon
Oregon Birding Site Guide
www.birdingoregon.info



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: camping at Lost Lake
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:16:46 -0700
https://picasaweb.google.com/101700670573128910486/CampingLostLakeJuly202014?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJXb1YLV39nPBw&feat=directlink 


Click on link to see what we saw camping at Lost Lake.  What a wonderful place!

Stephanie Hazen
Ray Temple
Salem

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org

Subject: BirdsEye-Redmond Sewage Ponds-2014-7-21
From: "kimdelo AT yahoo.com" <kimdelo@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:43:50 -0700
Observer: Kimdel Owen
2014-07-21 19:20
Redmond Sewage Ponds
Protocol: Traveling
2 Miles
45 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
  3  Canada Goose   
  50  Mallard   
  1  Cinnamon Teal   
  1  Green-winged Teal   
  1  Ring-necked Duck   
  18  Bufflehead   
  2  Hooded Merganser   
  1  Common Merganser   
  1  Ruddy Duck   
  1  Horned Grebe   
  1  Great Blue Heron   
  2  Red-tailed Hawk   
  1  American Coot   
  1  Semipalmated Plover   
  30  Killdeer   
  4  Spotted Sandpiper   
  3  Greater Yellowlegs   
  1  Lesser Yellowlegs   
  28  Least Sandpiper   
  3  Pectoral Sandpiper   
  15  Western Sandpiper   
  13  Long-billed Dowitcher   
  1  Wilson's Snipe   
  2  Wilson's Phalarope   
  4  Mourning Dove   
  30  Common Nighthawk   
  1  White-throated Swift   
  1  Ash-throated Flycatcher   
  2  Western Kingbird   
  5  Black-billed Magpie   
  15  European Starling   
  28  Brewer's Blackbird   

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog 
(http://birdseyebirding.com/) 


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
_______________________________________________
COBOL mailing list
COBOL AT lists.oregonstate.edu
http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/cobol

To unsubscribe, send a message to:
COBOL-request AT lists.oregonstate.edu
with the word "unsubscribe" in the body.
Subject: Wandering Tattler - Ecola State Park
From: Bill Bradford <billbradford1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:13:49 -0700
Today we got reasonably good views of a WANDERING TATTLER, first on the
sand and then on a rock, below the wooden viewing platform facing south
just off the south parking lot at Ecola State Park. It was too distant for
pictures but we saw it well, including its tail bobbing behavior. This
wasn't far from where Diana Byrne saw a pair of them on July 27, 2013.

Other highlights of the trip were 6 TUFTED PUFFINS at Haystack Rock (around
8 to 8:30 AM), a few flocks of 12 to 15 WESTERN SANDPIPERS, mixed with a
handful of LEAST SANDPIPERS and SEMI-PALMATED PLOVERS at Bayocean Spit.
There were also 5 WIMBRELS at the Spit. Lots of small groups of RHINOCEROS
AUKLETS were on the move by Barview Jetty. The huge numbers of COMMON
MURRES everywhere were impressive.

Bill Bradford & Lora Minty
Subject: Benton Co. shorebirds
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:18:09 -0700
Two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and a single BAIRD'S SANDPIPER were the only
shorebirds in evidence at the Philomath Sewage Ponds this morning.Also
present were 69 CALIFORNIA GULLS.

Hendrik & Oscar

-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Coos shorebirds
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 15:29:44 -0700
A BAIRD'S SANDPIPER and a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER were at New River, Coos 
Cty today.

Cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein


OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org