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Updated on Friday, October 24 at 08:44 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Tiger,©Jan Wilczur

24 Oct [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
24 Oct 10/23/14 - Lake Selmac : RED-THROATED PIPIT ["" ]
24 Oct Re: Least Tern ["Phil Pickering" ]
23 Oct Re: Red-throated Pipit ["Tim Janzen" ]
23 Oct Least Tern [Susan Norris ]
23 Oct Re: Owen's Pipit pics [Bob Archer ]
23 Oct Re: Owen's Pipit pics [Shawneen Finnegan ]
23 Oct Re: Owen's Pipit pics [Bob Archer ]
23 Oct Re: id help needed! (bud break in the Willamette Valley) [Wayne Hoffman ]
23 Oct Re: Owen's Pipit pics [Russ Namitz ]
23 Oct BirdsEye-Redmond Sewage Ponds-2014-10-23 ["kimdelo AT yahoo.com" ]
23 Oct Re: id help needed! (bud break in the Willamette Valley) [Joel Geier ]
23 Oct PHOTOS: sun, then rain, then sun again [Mike Patterson ]
23 Oct Marion County Geese and Buzzards. 10/23/2014 [Roy Gerig ]
23 Oct Owen's Pipit pics [Bob Archer ]
23 Oct Red-throated Pipit [paultsullivan ]
23 Oct A couple of Strix owls - ID question (Spotted vs. "Sparred") [Hendrik Herlyn ]
23 Oct Boiler Bay ["Phil Pickering" ]
23 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: without getting up so early! ["Craig Tumer" ]
23 Oct Re: Red-throated Pipit chasing [Zia Fukuda ]
23 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: without getting up so early! [Joel Geier ]
23 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE ]
23 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Harry Fuller ]
23 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Tim Rodenkirk ]
23 Oct Red-throated Pipit yes 10:51am [Chuck Gates ]
23 Oct Re: RED-THROATED PIPIT present this morning ["Dennis Vroman" ]
23 Oct RED-THROATED PIPIT present this morning [Russ Namitz ]
23 Oct Re: id help needed! [David Irons ]
23 Oct Re: id help needed! [Linda Fink ]
23 Oct Re: Red-throated Pipit chasing [David Irons ]
23 Oct Red-throated Pipit chasing [Alan Contreras ]
23 Oct more on pelagic peregrines [Lars Per Norgren ]
23 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Janet Leavens ]
23 Oct [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
23 Oct Wallowa county 10-21-14 ["Paul Sullivan" ]
23 Oct Wallowa county 10-21-14 ["Paul Sullivan" ]
22 Oct RBA: Portland, OR 10-23-14 [Harry Nehls ]
22 Oct ID help needed-Linda Fink's warbler [Lars Per Norgren ]
23 Oct Re: id help needed! [David Irons ]
22 Oct Re: Red-throated Pipit specifics [Forrest English ]
22 Oct KLAMATH RAPTORS AND EURASIAN WIGEON [Harry Fuller ]
22 Oct Red-throated Pipit today [Owen Schmidt ]
22 Oct Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 10/22/2014 [Wink Gross ]
22 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Hendrik Herlyn ]
22 Oct Red-throated Pipit specifics [Russ Namitz ]
22 Oct Re: id help needed! [David Irons ]
22 Oct Wednesday in Jefferson County The Cove, Rereg and Pelton, Haystack, back roads! ROSY=FINCH top of Round Butte ["judy" ]
22 Oct Varied Thrushes [Joel Geier ]
22 Oct binocular inquiry [Alan Contreras ]
22 Oct id help needed! [Linda Fink ]
22 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Tom McNamara ]
22 Oct Fred Chancey - OOPS! ["Mary Anne Sohlstrom" ]
22 Oct Fred Chancey ["Mary Anne Sohlstrom" ]
22 Oct Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Rachel Kapelle ]
22 Oct On pelagic Gyrfalcons ["Jenkins, Maurice A." ]
22 Oct Photos: 53 photos taken last weekend at Ankeny NWR [Jim Leonard ]
22 Oct Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Janet Leavens ]
22 Oct Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm [Molly Monroe ]
22 Oct Wed morning, Eugene [Lawrence McQueen ]
22 Oct Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm [Molly Monroe ]
22 Oct Storm birds [Wayne Hoffman ]
22 Oct Jim Leonard's Branta [Lars Per Norgren ]
22 Oct Photo: Need ID Cackling or Dusky or another species of Goose? [Jim Leonard ]
22 Oct Re: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac [David Irons ]
22 Oct FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac [Russ Namitz ]
22 Oct weekend notes, mostly Benton County [Lars Per Norgren ]
22 Oct Re: pelagic peregrines [Steve Engel ]
22 Oct White-winged Scoter at Foster Lake, Linn County ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
22 Oct Oct 19 Benton belated late date migrant ["Karan Fairchild" ]
22 Oct Curry CC Longspur 10/21/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
22 Oct Fw: RT Pipit Photo Lake Selmac ["Jeff Schwilk" ]
21 Oct Fwd: pelagic falcons [Jeff Gilligan ]
21 Oct PRAIRIE FALCON, Lane County ["Allen Prigge" ]
21 Oct Falcon Migration [clay crofton ]
21 Oct More Gyr Info [Tim Rodenkirk ]
21 Oct CALIFORNIA QUAIL COVEY OF 200, 1973 [Harry Fuller ]

Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 06:15:51 -0700

From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 24, 2014 6:08:31 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Surf Scoter (2 Klamath)
Common Loon (4 Klamath)
Semipalmated Plover (1 Clatsop)
Short-billed Dowitcher (1 Deschutes)
Red-necked Phalarope (1 Lane)
Elegant Tern (2 Clatsop)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (1 Curry)
Swainson's Thrush (1 Benton)
Red-throated Pipit (6 Josephine)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: 10/23/14 - Lake Selmac : RED-THROATED PIPIT
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "AVITOURS@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 06:30:17 -0400
 
Birders - 
Mike  Mahoney and I just returned (10/24, 2:30 AM), from a successful trip 
to Lake  Selmac to see the continuing RED-THROATED PIPIT.  A few things that 
I noticed during our  visit that might be helpful for future searchers 
include:  Being patient.  The Pipits seem to prefer the SW  mudflat, but do 
travel around the lake shore.  If they are not at the SW mudflat, check  the 
rocky rip-raff at the spillway/impoundment near the western portion of the  
lake.  As we traveled to and from  the SW and SE portions of the lake, I had 
the passenger window down, and I heard  Pipits near the damn.  I would not  
doubt that this is a secondary location for these Pipits.  We also checked the 
SE portion of the  lake near the boat ramp, but came up empty handed; 
however, this may be a good place to check if they are nowhere else to be 
found. 

 Cellular phone service can be spotty  around the lake.  If you plan on  
being connected with other birders around the lake, maybe bring 2-way  radios. 
 It appears that the whole  lake shore is either private or Josephine 
County Park. The Park Rangers may enforce a 4 $ per vehicle per day fee, as it 

is posted at numerous locations around the lake.  Thanks again, Russ for 
finding the  bird and giving great directions and specifics.  Thanks to Judy 
Meridith and Bob Stites  for calling and getting us back on the bird.  This 
was a life bird for Mike and  me. 
Good  birding, Trent
 
Subject: Re: Least Tern
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 00:11:26 -0700
I believe this is an Arctic - proportionately very small
bill, rounded head, very short reddish-black legs etc.
Very nice photos.

The 1st fall bird I saw at Boiler Bay this morning could
well have been also, although it had unexpectely
heavily marked upperwings (retained juv coverts?)

Cheers, Phil


-----Original Message----- 
From: Susan Norris 
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 10:49 PM 
To: OBOL 
Subject: [obol] Least Tern 


This cute little Least Tern showed up on the Nehalem Bay Jetty around 4:45pm 
tonight. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/128134659 AT N04/



Sue Norris


No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4040/8442 - Release Date: 10/23/14



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Subject: Re: Red-throated Pipit
From: "Tim Janzen" <tjanzen AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 23:36:10 -0700
Dear All,

I thought I would add that there were no pipits of any kind to be found at 2 pm 
when I arrived. Paul fortunately spotted the Red-throated Pipit at about 3:20 
pm and then within 10 minutes or so after that a small flock of about 9 or so 
American Pipits showed up. I heard an American Pipit fly over the mudflats 
somewhere around 3:10 pm or so. In any case, if you don't see or hear any 
pipits when you first arrive it may pay off to hang around for a while since 
the pipits could show up later. Exactly where the flock of American Pipits and 
the Red-throated Pipit was between 2 pm and 3:20 pm is unclear to me. I 
certainly couldn't find them on any of the mudflats during that period of time. 
There was also a MERLIN flying around the lake when I arrived and it may have 
spooked the pipits before I arrived. I didn't see any major field marks that 
would suggest Pechora Pipit as I was studying the Red-throated Pipit in the 
scope. A GREAT EGRET was also present at the lake. 


Sincerely,

Tim Janzen

Portland

 

From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of 
paultsullivan 

Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 3:41 PM
To: obol AT freelists.org; paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com; namitzr AT hotmail.com
Subject: [obol] Red-throated Pipit

 

Found at 3:20 pm after just a few minutes.

Paul & Carol
Subject: Least Tern
From: Susan Norris <norris6158 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 22:49:04 -0700
This cute little Least Tern showed up on the Nehalem Bay Jetty around
4:45pm tonight.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/128134659 AT N04/


Sue Norris
Subject: Re: Owen's Pipit pics
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 21:40:07 -0700
I will add a plug to that Birds of Korea site, they have lots of good info 
there about birds that could show up over here, including the pipits. Good site 
to bookmark. 


Bob Archer



> On Oct 23, 2014, at 9:03 PM, Shawneen Finnegan  
wrote: 

> 
> When we first saw the photos we looked through the Per Alstrom and Krister 
Mild book Pipits and Wagtails and couldn’t turn it into anything but a RTPI. 

> 
> I had experience with multiple Pechora Pipits many years ago during the 
Spring of 1988 on Attu. They have a very different call note than Red-throated. 

> 
> If anyone hears the bird, one should note that Pechora’s give a singular 
monosyllabic note that can be heard on the Xeno-canto site at: 

> 
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Anthus-gustavi
> 
> Red-throated give a drawn out wheezy “speeeee” note that is very 
different. 

> 
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Anthus-cervinus
> 
> For more information on separating these two species there is an online 
article by Nial Moores. It is quite long but if you are interested in learning 
more about them then give it a read. 

> 
> 
http://www.birdskorea.org/Birds/Identification/ID_Notes/BK-ID-Pechora-Pipit.shtml 

> 
> Shawneen Finnegan
> Portland, OR
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Owen's Pipit pics
From: Shawneen Finnegan <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 21:03:45 -0700
When we first saw the photos we looked through the Per Alstrom and Krister Mild 
book Pipits and Wagtails and couldnt turn it into anything but a RTPI. 


I had experience with multiple Pechora Pipits many years ago during the Spring 
of 1988 on Attu. They have a very different call note than Red-throated. 


If anyone hears the bird, one should note that Pechoras give a singular 
monosyllabic note that can be heard on the Xeno-canto site at: 


http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Anthus-gustavi

Red-throated give a drawn out wheezy speeeee note that is very different.

http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Anthus-cervinus

For more information on separating these two species there is an online article 
by Nial Moores. It is quite long but if you are interested in learning more 
about them then give it a read. 



http://www.birdskorea.org/Birds/Identification/ID_Notes/BK-ID-Pechora-Pipit.shtml 


Shawneen Finnegan
Portland, OR


Subject: Re: Owen's Pipit pics
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 20:18:26 -0700
Hi:

Yes, I saw some more of Owen's pics and they are the underside of the opposite 
wing's tertials. It has no primary projection. I did not want to doubt the id, 
just wanted to be sure I wasn't seeing a projection. Luv them pipits. Sorry for 
unclear email, should have added sentence stating a RTPI would not have a 
projection. 


Bob
Pdx



> On Oct 23, 2014, at 8:07 PM, Russ Namitz  wrote:
> 
> Bob et al~
> 
> I think the tertials from the other side of the bird overlay the nearside 
tertials (i.e. the right tertials are on top of the left tertials). Hence, we 
are seeing the dark inner edge of the right tertials. 

> 
> Also, I assume that Bob's reference to the unpatterned nape was alluding to 
the possibility of a Pechora Pipit. Not that he suggested otherwise, but it 
made me do a little research in the subtle differences between the two. Aside 
from the field guides, it can be instructive to flip through Google images of 
each. 

> 
> I think this is a juvenile bird as it has crisp, fresh plumage. It lacks 
frayed edges to the wing coverts and tertials and also lacks red in the throat. 

> 
> Cheers,
> Russ Namitz
> Medford, OR
Subject: Re: id help needed! (bud break in the Willamette Valley)
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 20:15:03 -0700
Hi,  Joel -

You posed an interesting and important question,

"Obviously this creates a problem, if the calendars for migrant
wood-warblers and the trees that they depend on for insects continue to
diverge.The question is whether birds will be able to adapt fast enough,
through natural selection in favor of early migrants, to the rapid
changes that we're seeing in tree phenology."

I do not see this a a major problem for spring arrivals.  I suspect that
spring insect availability increases continuously from bud break on through
the breeding season.  So food availability may be higher now than in the
past.

There may instead be a problem for birders:  it is so much more satisfying
to watch warblers in a Big-leaf Maple at bud break than when the tree is
leafed out!

Possibly there could be a pinch at the other end, when leaves are turning
and dropping earlier, relative to the migrants' programmed departure times.

Wayne

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 7:13 PM, Joel Geier  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I agree with Dave Irons' detailed analysis that this looks like a
> Wilson's Warbler.
>
> I believe that the comment, about the two plates of undertail patterns
> in Dunn & Garrett's warbler guide being "the most useful plates in any
> field guide," is due to Mike Patterson, in a review of this field guide
> that he posted on OBOL when it first came out.
>
> About using vegetation as a clue to warbler ID, a cautionary note
> (although it doesn't contradict Dave's analysis -- in fact it reinforces
> it for this instance) is that the timing of spring bud-break in the
> Willamette Valley has advanced by about a week, over the past decade.
>
> This information comes in part from systematic observations made as part
> of a global phenology project, by students and faculty of the Jane
> Goodall Environmental Middle School (JGEMS) in Salem, which I've been
> privileged to be a part of. The interesting thing (though this is
> wandering off-topic) is that the fall phenology for trees changing color
> and dropping their leaves has also advanced by about a week.
>
> That might seem counterintuitive, as climate change has been extending
> the frost-free season (astonishingly apparent this year -- it looks like
> we could make it all the way into November before we have our first
> frost on the valley floor). The simplified version of the explanation
> that I've heard is that autumn leaf changes are basically dictated by
> time-dependent chemical processes that are set in motion when the trees
> leaf out in spring. So the season in which leaves are on the trees has
> basically just shifted forward by one week, rather than becoming longer.
>
> Getting back on topic, what I've noticed over my 18 years of residence
> here in the Camp Adair area of the mid-Willamette Valley is that migrant
> warbler species that used to peak in passage during big-leaf maples
> bud-break, now tend to show up a bit later, during bud-break for Oregon
> white oaks.
>
> This makes sense based on the idea that neotropical migrants are
> programmed to respond to changes in day length rather than temperature,
> while trees are chemistry-driven critters that seem to respond more
> directly to temperature, which influences the rate of chemical
> reactions.
>
> Obviously this creates a problem, if the calendars for migrant
> wood-warblers and the trees that they depend on for insects continue to
> diverge.The question is whether birds will be able to adapt fast enough,
> through natural selection in favor of early migrants, to the rapid
> changes that we're seeing in tree phenology.
>
> Good birding,
> Joel
>
> Dave Irons wrote:
>
>         1. Vegetation -- The deciduous tree in the photo is just
>         starting to bud and leaf out. In the Willamette Valley that
>         typically happens from late March to mid-April with bigger
>         trees. You say this photo was taken in April, but don't give us
>         the exact date. I think that if this image had been taken in the
>         latter days of April the leaf out would be further along.
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
>
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Owen's Pipit pics
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 20:07:15 -0700
Bob et al~
I think the tertials from the other side of the bird overlay the nearside 
tertials (i.e. the right tertials are on top of the left tertials). Hence, we 
are seeing the dark inner edge of the right tertials. 

Also, I assume that Bob's reference to the unpatterned nape was alluding to the 
possibility of a Pechora Pipit. Not that he suggested otherwise, but it made me 
do a little research in the subtle differences between the two. Aside from the 
field guides, it can be instructive to flip through Google images of each. 

I think this is a juvenile bird as it has crisp, fresh plumage. It lacks frayed 
edges to the wing coverts and tertials and also lacks red in the throat. 

Cheers,Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: BirdsEye-Redmond Sewage Ponds-2014-10-23
From: "kimdelo AT yahoo.com" <kimdelo@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 19:49:36 -0700
Observer: Kimdel Owen
2014-10-23 19:41
Redmond Sewage Ponds
Protocol: Traveling
1 Miles
20 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
  1  Eurasian Wigeon   
  25  Mallard   
  25  Northern Shoveler   
  12  Northern Pintail   
  20  Green-winged Teal   
  1  Hooded Merganser   
  8  Eared Grebe   
  75  American Coot   
  18  Killdeer   
  1  Greater Yellowlegs   
  5  Dunlin   
  1  Pectoral Sandpiper   
  1  Short-billed Dowitcher   
  17  Long-billed Dowitcher   
  3  Wilson's Snipe   
  2  Common Raven   
  4  European Starling   
  2  Savannah Sparrow   

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog 
(http://birdseyebirding.com/) 


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Subject: Re: id help needed! (bud break in the Willamette Valley)
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 19:13:35 -0700
Hi all,

I agree with Dave Irons' detailed analysis that this looks like a
Wilson's Warbler.

I believe that the comment, about the two plates of undertail patterns
in Dunn & Garrett's warbler guide being "the most useful plates in any
field guide," is due to Mike Patterson, in a review of this field guide
that he posted on OBOL when it first came out.

About using vegetation as a clue to warbler ID, a cautionary note
(although it doesn't contradict Dave's analysis -- in fact it reinforces
it for this instance) is that the timing of spring bud-break in the
Willamette Valley has advanced by about a week, over the past decade. 

This information comes in part from systematic observations made as part
of a global phenology project, by students and faculty of the Jane
Goodall Environmental Middle School (JGEMS) in Salem, which I've been
privileged to be a part of. The interesting thing (though this is
wandering off-topic) is that the fall phenology for trees changing color
and dropping their leaves has also advanced by about a week. 

That might seem counterintuitive, as climate change has been extending
the frost-free season (astonishingly apparent this year -- it looks like
we could make it all the way into November before we have our first
frost on the valley floor). The simplified version of the explanation
that I've heard is that autumn leaf changes are basically dictated by
time-dependent chemical processes that are set in motion when the trees
leaf out in spring. So the season in which leaves are on the trees has
basically just shifted forward by one week, rather than becoming longer.

Getting back on topic, what I've noticed over my 18 years of residence
here in the Camp Adair area of the mid-Willamette Valley is that migrant
warbler species that used to peak in passage during big-leaf maples
bud-break, now tend to show up a bit later, during bud-break for Oregon
white oaks. 

This makes sense based on the idea that neotropical migrants are
programmed to respond to changes in day length rather than temperature,
while trees are chemistry-driven critters that seem to respond more
directly to temperature, which influences the rate of chemical
reactions. 

Obviously this creates a problem, if the calendars for migrant
wood-warblers and the trees that they depend on for insects continue to
diverge.The question is whether birds will be able to adapt fast enough,
through natural selection in favor of early migrants, to the rapid
changes that we're seeing in tree phenology. 

Good birding,
Joel

Dave Irons wrote:

        1. Vegetation -- The deciduous tree in the photo is just
        starting to bud and leaf out. In the Willamette Valley that
        typically happens from late March to mid-April with bigger
        trees. You say this photo was taken in April, but don't give us
        the exact date. I think that if this image had been taken in the
        latter days of April the leaf out would be further along. 
        
--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: PHOTOS: sun, then rain, then sun again
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 16:45:27 -0700
We were in between heavy weather systems today.  This seems
to have the shorebirds moving.  ELEGANT TERN numbers were also
way down at the boat basin.

I managed one or two documentary photographs today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbalame/archives/date-posted/2014/10/23/?view=md


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: Marion County Geese and Buzzards. 10/23/2014
From: Roy Gerig <roygerig AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 16:00:45 -0700
There were 75 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE, 5 SNOW GEESE, and 40 LB DOWITCHERS 
on Pintail Marsh in Ankeny NWR south of Salem today. I did not used to think of 
White fronts as wintering birds here, but the past few winters there has been a 
flock of 24-40 White fronts at Ankeny. Not all the time, but some of the time. 
This year they seem to be staying around a lot longer than usual, and not just 
at Ankeny. 

Out at Duckflat Road, east of there, you could see 25 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, and 
some LB DOWITCHERS beyond the burn area where the Epilobium (weed looking, 
native Willow Herb or whatever) field was, and still is, the burn won't hurt 
them - it is good management practice. The area is managed by USFWS, I think, 
and they do the right thing. 

4 TURKEY VULTURES floated slowly south over my house this afternoon. October 
23. 

Roy Gerig, Salem OR   		 	   		  
Subject: Owen's Pipit pics
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:55:41 -0700
Hi:  

So on the third photo down on Owen's link he posted, those are tertials that 
are dark edged sticking out from the other white edged tertials? Have to be, 
right. I guess It does look like an unpatterned nape. So no alarm bells from 
me, just would call those primaries if on any other bird. Maybe they are too 
blunt. 



Bob Archer
Pdx





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Subject: Red-throated Pipit
From: paultsullivan <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:41:28 -0700
Found at 3:20 pm after just a few minutes.
Paul & Carol




Sent from Samsung Mobile
Subject: A couple of Strix owls - ID question (Spotted vs. "Sparred")
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:43:08 -0700
Hello folks,

While cruising the wet Coast Range woods of Southern Benton and Northern
Lane Counties this morning in search of fancy forest chickens, chanterelles
and other goodies, Oscar and I came upon two different Strix owls, about
5-6 miles apart.We got decent looks at the first bird, but only managed
sideways looks at the second, so I never got a full-on frontal view of the
belly pattern. I did manage a few mediocre photos (see link below). I would
very much appreciate the input of anyone who has experience with Strix
owls, especially separating true Spotted from "Sparred" Owls, regarding the
identification of these two birds:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5Bo7sj

The first three photos are of a putative Spotted Owl, seen in N. Lane Co.
Much of it looks good for Spotted to me, but the plumage looks rather
disheveled (probably wet), and I can't tell if I am only looking at wet
feathers on the flanks or if there is some actual streaking, which might
indicate some Barred Owl genes, making this a potential "Sparred" Owl
(shudder!).

The second bird was found about an hour later in Southern Benton Co. I
never got a better view than what the photo shows. The strong streaking on
the sides indicates Barred Owl, but I'm willing to be convinced otherwise.

Neither of the birds vocalized. They both flew in silently, obligingly
perched for us, and eventually took off again.

Any thoughts on these birds would be welcome. Regardless of what they turn
out to be, it was an amazing experience to see two of these beauties fly
through the forest in one morning!

Happy fall birding to all

Hendrik & Oscar

BTW, we did manage to find one Ruffed Grouse, and yes, we also came across
a few more chanterelles. :-)


-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Boiler Bay
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:24:48 -0700
9:15-12:45 (10/23):
overcast for most of duration with
some partial clearing after noon.
wind SW 10-30, swells 10+

Tubenoses mostly distant during first
hour then gradually pushed in by single
dense squall line that hit shore 11:35

300+ Red-throated Loon
7000+ Pacific Loon (briefly to 120/min during
     first hour, steady 15-60/min after)
500+ Common Loon
2 Horned Grebe
25 Red-necked Grebe (S)
20 Western Grebe
3500+ Northern Fulmar (steady S, 98% dark-end,
   10-25/min most of duration, briefly to 60+/min
   in front of squall, still many moving when I left)
500+ Buller's Shearwater (S, majority seen in dense
     flight in front of incoming squall, few detected
     after noon)
800+ Pink-footed Shearwater (steady S increasing
      in front of squall, few detected after noon)
100+ Sooty Shearwater
4+ Short-tailed Shearwater
1 Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
4 Leach's Storm-Petrel
2500+ Brown Pelican (steady small flocks S)
400 Double-crested Cormorant (S)
600 Brandt's Cormorant (most S)
50 Pelagic Cormorant
1 BROWN BOOBY (good look at juv S roughly 
     3/4 mile, uniformly dark with contrastingly
     paler axillaries/underwing coverts)
24 Canada Goose
400 Aleutian Cackling Goose
135 Brant (small flocks S)
25 Northern Pintail
6 American Wigeon
2 Northern Shoveler
300 Green-winged Teal
50 Greater Scaup
10 Lesser Scaup
600 scaup sp.
5 Harlequin Duck
1 Long-tailed Duck
3 Black Scoter
100 White-winged Scoter
8000 Surf Scoter
6 Red-breasted Merganser
1 Merlin
300 Dunlin
4000+ Red Phalarope (steady S with a few
         feeding)
1+ Red-necked Phalarope
28 Pomarine Jaeger (S)
3 Parasitic Jaeger
5+ jaeger sp.
1 SOUTH POLAR SKUA (S about 1 mile)
8 Bonaparte's Gull
300+ Mew Gull
3000+ California Gull
300+ Herring Gull
200 Western Gull
100 Glaucous-winged Gull
5000+ Heermann's Gull (steady dense S flight)
1 Sabine's Gull (juv)
2 Black-legged Kittiwake (adults)
1 small sterna sp. (confusing 1st fall bird S but
    seemed most likely to be a Common)
300 Common Murre
6 Pigeon Guillemot
6 Marbled Murrelet (S)
20+ Ancient Murrelet (S)
150+ Cassin's Auklet (S)
300 Rhinoceros Auklet (S)

Phil
philliplc AT charter.net


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Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: without getting up so early!
From: "Craig Tumer" <craig AT greatskua.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:44:58 -0700




Subject: Re: Red-throated Pipit chasing
From: Zia Fukuda <zialeefukuda AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:30:00 -0700
Hi all,
If Russ isn't planning on heading out there  tomorrow,  I wouldn't mind
seeing the pipit again and could probably point folks in the initial right
direction of where the bird has been hanging out.  Let me know.
Cheers,
Zia
On Oct 23, 2014 9:37 AM, "David Irons"  wrote:

> Our plan is to be there by about 8:30am
>
> Dave Irons
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Oct 23, 2014, at 9:34 AM, "Alan Contreras" 
> wrote:
>
> I might chase it on Friday if it is still hanging around.  Will anyone be
> there early Friday who could post its status?
>
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 22, 2014, at 8:56 PM, Russ Namitz wrote:
>
> Hello all~
>
> I've had a few inquiries about how easy is this bird to find.  Google maps
> doesn't accurately show the exposed mud right now, but the bird spent the
> majority of its time here.
> 42.258508, -123.584698
>
> Sometimes, it flew the mud 50 feet to the north and when I first saw it,
> it was on the mudflat 100 feet to the east.  It is a very small spot.  It
> will be immediately obvious where to look for the bird and also, where to
> park.  Technically, there is a $4 parking fee if you use any of the county
> park parking areas.  However, you can park anywhere along this curve.
>  42.258508, -123.584698
>
> Best of luck to those coming over tomorrow.
>
> Sincerely,
> Russ Namitz
> Medford, OR
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: without getting up so early!
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:18:46 -0700
Hi Janet & All,

As Tim and others have mentioned, Varied Thrushes are often out at first
light on roads in forested areas of the mountains, below the snow line.

However, for people who want to sleep in longer and not go driving
around in the mountains, there are good numbers of Varied Thrushes on
the Willamette Valley floor already this month. 

A good place to look for them is under overgrown fruit trees (apples or
pears), especially ones where the fruit has been left on the ground to
decay. There will be plenty of American Robins in this same situation. 

In mid-morning or afternoon you'll more often hear their "chup!" call
than their tin-whistle song (which you'll hear more often around dawn,
or when light gets dim due to passing rain clouds). It's worth listening
to recordings of this "chup!" call to familiarize yourself before you go
out, and compare with the "tuk" call of Hermit Thrush, and the "churk"
or "tuk-tuk" calls of American Robin.

If you can do a soft screech-owl imitation, often the Varied Thrushes
will fly up into the interior branches of the tree that they're foraging
under, so you can have a good look. They characteristically hold
themselves at an uptilted angle when they're doing this -- that and
their slim, pointy profile will help you to distinguish them from robins
if the light inside the tree is poor.

One place with an abundance of unmanaged fruit trees is E.E. Wilson
Wildlife Area (Willamette Valley Birding Trail site L11) but I'm sure
you can find that type of habitat in the Portland metro area. 

I'd think that The Nature Conservancy's Camassia Preserve (Site H1 on
the WV birding trail) should have Varied Thrushes by now, and the trail
is interesting in other ways.

Good luck,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis




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Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE <ninerharv2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:36:09 -0700




Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:31:53 -0700
there were many Varied Thrush on the back roads of Jackson and Klamath
Counties as I drove back and forth yesterday in the cascades, mostly above
4000 in conifers, they are still not often seen down in the Rogue
Valley...we'll see what happens when snow comes and berries up high are gone

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 11:26 AM, Tim Rodenkirk 
wrote:

> Janet,
>
> You can listen for them but just driving along forested roads at dawn is
> the best- Hendrick Herlyn had some good locations.  If you are out and
> about on back roads that are heavily forested from about dawn to
> sunrise  those robin-sized birds you see flying up off the road are often
> Varied Thrushes. Once the sun is up they leave the roadsides and are much
> more difficult to find. I don't know Mt. Tabor at all but I imagine if you
> get there at sunrise or a bit before you could see quite a few of them.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>
> On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 7:00 AM, Janet Leavens 
> wrote:
>
>> Wow! Oregon birders are so helpful! I got at least 17 responses to my
>> query.
>>
>> The general consensus was that we need to haul our butts out of bed a lot
>> earlier (although this advice was always phrased much more politely :-) )
>> and listen for them calling (in appropriate habitat) at the crack of dawn.
>> We'll have a chance to do that Friday, Saturday and Sunday morning. I'll
>> write back if we've had any success.
>>
>> Thanks so much!
>>
>> Janet Leavens
>> Oviedo, FL
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 6:09 PM, Janet Leavens 
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi all,
>>>
>>> My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
>>> Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
>>> luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
>>> Heerman's Gull.
>>>
>>> However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
>>> eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
>>> every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
>>> hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
>>> we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
>>> us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
>>> calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
>>> favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
>>> be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
>>> Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
>>> find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
>>> reliable for the species?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for any info!
>>>
>>> Janet Leavens
>>> Oviedo, FL
>>>
>>
>>
>


-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:26:44 -0700
Janet,

You can listen for them but just driving along forested roads at dawn is
the best- Hendrick Herlyn had some good locations.  If you are out and
about on back roads that are heavily forested from about dawn to
sunrise  those robin-sized birds you see flying up off the road are often
Varied Thrushes. Once the sun is up they leave the roadsides and are much
more difficult to find. I don't know Mt. Tabor at all but I imagine if you
get there at sunrise or a bit before you could see quite a few of them.

Good luck!

Tim R
Coos Bay

On Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 7:00 AM, Janet Leavens 
wrote:

> Wow! Oregon birders are so helpful! I got at least 17 responses to my
> query.
>
> The general consensus was that we need to haul our butts out of bed a lot
> earlier (although this advice was always phrased much more politely :-) )
> and listen for them calling (in appropriate habitat) at the crack of dawn.
> We'll have a chance to do that Friday, Saturday and Sunday morning. I'll
> write back if we've had any success.
>
> Thanks so much!
>
> Janet Leavens
> Oviedo, FL
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 6:09 PM, Janet Leavens 
> wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
>> Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
>> luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
>> Heerman's Gull.
>>
>> However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
>> eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
>> every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
>> hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
>> we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
>> us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
>> calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
>> favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
>> be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
>> Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
>> find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
>> reliable for the species?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for any info!
>>
>> Janet Leavens
>> Oviedo, FL
>>
>
>
Subject: Red-throated Pipit yes 10:51am
From: Chuck Gates <cgates326 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:51:41 -0700

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Re: RED-THROATED PIPIT present this morning
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:42:35 -0700
If the bird isn't seen at the SW flats, folks should give the exposed flats at 
the SE corner a look before giving up completely. Not as good habitat, but then 
the flock might settle there before leaving altogether. 


Dennis
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Russ Namitz 
  To: OBOL Freelist 
  Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 10:20 AM
  Subject: [obol] RED-THROATED PIPIT present this morning


 Trent Bray just called to report that he saw the RED-THROATED PIPIT at the 
Lake Selmac SW mudflats this morning. 



 A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK scattered the flock and it hasn't been since since. A 
couple Portland birders are onsite and a group from Bend should be arriving 
shortly. 



  It is raining.  Be prepared.


  Good birding,
  Russ Namitz

Subject: RED-THROATED PIPIT present this morning
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:20:13 -0700
Trent Bray just called to report that he saw the RED-THROATED PIPIT at the Lake 
Selmac SW mudflats this morning. 

A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK scattered the flock and it hasn't been since since. A 
couple Portland birders are onsite and a group from Bend should be arriving 
shortly. 

It is raining.  Be prepared.
Good birding,Russ Namitz

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: id help needed!
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:51:02 -0700
Linda et al., 

The usefulness of specific date and location are often unestimated clues when 
identifying mystery birds. Like Lars, as soon as I saw the budding tree foliage 
I knew it probably wasn't a Yellow Warbler. 


For those that own it, the Peterson "Warblers" guide by Jon Dunn and Kimball 
Garrett has wonderful plates that show only the undertail and undertail coverts 
of all the North American warblers. I can't remember who said it, but someone 
is quoted as saying these are the most useful plates found in any North 
American field guide. I can't disagree. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 23, 2014, at 9:39 AM, "Linda Fink"  wrote:

> Wow!! Thanks so much, Dave, for the detailed analysis. I have learned that 
crummy photos are a good way to teach me to look at more than the obvious field 
marks. As for the date of the photo, it was taken April 23. We are about 2 
weeks later than Salem here in the Coast Range. We can watch the seasons 
changing in the spring as we drive from Grand Ronde to Salem. Yellow warblers, 
do, now that you mention it, show up much later here than do Wilson's. 

> 
> We have many Wilson's Warblers here on our farm, seasonally, so that makes a 
great deal of sense. I confess that I mostly identify "yellow" warblers by 
voice and have not paid that much attention to obscure (to me) field marks. You 
have educated me greatly and I appreciate it! 

> 
> Linda
> 
> On 10/22/2014 11:17 PM, David Irons wrote:
>> Linda,
>> 
>> There are several clues here that I think help answer your warbler ID
>> question. Here's what I see.
>> 
>> 1. Vegetation -- The deciduous tree in the photo is just starting to bud
>> and leaf out. In the Willamette Valley that typically happens from late
>> March to mid-April with bigger trees. You say this photo was taken in
>> April, but don't give us the exact date. I think that if this image had
>> been taken in the latter days of April the leaf out would be further
>> along. This alone likely takes Yellow Warbler out of the equation. The
>> first northbound Yellow Warblers normally arrive in the Willamette
>> Valley about 25 April or later and they are generally scarce before the
>> 1st of May.
>> 
>> 2. Undertail coverts -- Another strike against Yellow Warbler is the
>> length of the undertail coverts (along with the lack of yellow going out
>> to the end of the tail, which you mention). Yellow Warblers have long
>> undertail coverts, which tend to make the tail look short from below,
>> which is clearly not the case with this bird.
>> 
>> 3. Bill shape -- Looking at the bill of this bird, the tip seems
>> somewhat blunt. Orange-crowned Warblers and other species in the genus
>> /Oreothlypis/ (formerly/Vermivora/) have thin bills that come to a very
>> sharp point. On bill shape alone I think we can eliminate Orange-crowned
>> Warbler, which leaves us with only Wilson's Warbler as a likely
>> candidate (the only other all-yellow warbler that one would expect in
>> Oregon during April).
>> 
>> 4. Bill color -- This is the clincher. The underside of the bill is very
>> pale and looks quite yellowish. After hatch-year Orange-crowned Warblers
>> have all-dark bills with no yellow whatsoever. Conversely, Wilson's
>> Warblers show yellow mandibles (the lower half of the bill). In spring,
>> Yellow Warblers also have dark bills.
>> 
>> 5. Tertial edges -- On the top photo I think that we can see enough of
>> the upper wing to determine that edges of the tertials (the inner most
>> folded feathers on the wings) do not contrast with the rest of those
>> feathers. In all plumages, Yellow Warblers have darker duskier tertials
>> with noticeably pale edges. This is a great field mark if you are ever
>> struggling to sort out dull immature Yellows and Orange-crowneds.
>> 
>> Given the presumed date (based on condition of the vegetation), the
>> mostly yellow coloration, the somewhat blunt-tipped bill that is pale
>> below, and the lack of contrast in the tertials, I think it is pretty
>> safe to conclude that this bird is a Wilson's Warbler. Wilson's
>> typically return to Oregon by the second week of April, not long after
>> the arrival of the first Orange-crowneds. When I first started paying
>> attention to such things (late 1970's), the average arrival dates for
>> Wilson's fell around the 17th of April and Wilson's were exceptionally
>> rare in Oregon during winter. Over recent decades the mean arrival date
>> for Wilson's seems to have moved forward by about a week and this
>> species is now found in Oregon in most winters.
>> 
>> Dave Irons
>> Portland, OR
>> 
>> > Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:45:00 -0700
>> > From: linda AT fink.com
>> > To: OBOL AT freelists.org
>> > Subject: [obol] id help needed!
>> >
>> > I had the brainwave to put the list of all 148 birds seen on our farm
>> > since 1977 on my Birds blog with photos. So I am going through old
>> > photos and came across this one from April 2012 of a warbler, or two
>> > warblers. My brain seems to be off duty as I cannot tell if this is a
>> > Yellow Warbler or an Orange-crowned Warbler or something else I'm not
>> > thinking of. Help, please!
>> >
>> >
>> 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/yellow-warbler-orange-crowned-warbler.html 

> 
> -- 
> http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
> http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
> http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
> http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 


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Subject: Re: id help needed!
From: Linda Fink <linda AT fink.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:38:46 -0700
Wow!! Thanks so much, Dave, for the detailed analysis. I have learned 
that crummy photos are a good way to teach me to look at more than the 
obvious field marks. As for the date of the photo, it was taken April 
23. We are about 2 weeks later than Salem here in the Coast Range. We 
can watch the seasons changing in the spring as we drive from Grand 
Ronde to Salem. Yellow warblers, do, now that you mention it, show up 
much later here than do Wilson's.

We have many Wilson's Warblers here on our farm, seasonally, so that 
makes a great deal of sense. I confess that I mostly identify "yellow" 
warblers by voice and have not paid that much attention to obscure (to 
me) field marks. You have educated me greatly and I appreciate it!

Linda

On 10/22/2014 11:17 PM, David Irons wrote:
> Linda,
>
> There are several clues here that I think help answer your warbler ID
> question. Here's what I see.
>
> 1. Vegetation -- The deciduous tree in the photo is just starting to bud
> and leaf out. In the Willamette Valley that typically happens from late
> March to mid-April with bigger trees. You say this photo was taken in
> April, but don't give us the exact date. I think that if this image had
> been taken in the latter days of April the leaf out would be further
> along. This alone likely takes Yellow Warbler out of the equation. The
> first northbound Yellow Warblers normally arrive in the Willamette
> Valley about 25 April or later and they are generally scarce before the
> 1st of May.
>
> 2. Undertail coverts -- Another strike against Yellow Warbler is the
> length of the undertail coverts (along with the lack of yellow going out
> to the end of the tail, which you mention). Yellow Warblers have long
> undertail coverts, which tend to make the tail look short from below,
> which is clearly not the case with this bird.
>
> 3. Bill shape -- Looking at the bill of this bird, the tip seems
> somewhat blunt. Orange-crowned Warblers and other species in the genus
> /Oreothlypis/ (formerly/Vermivora/) have thin bills that come to a very
> sharp point. On bill shape alone I think we can eliminate Orange-crowned
> Warbler, which leaves us with only Wilson's Warbler as a likely
> candidate (the only other all-yellow warbler that one would expect in
> Oregon during April).
>
> 4. Bill color -- This is the clincher. The underside of the bill is very
> pale and looks quite yellowish. After hatch-year Orange-crowned Warblers
> have all-dark bills with no yellow whatsoever. Conversely, Wilson's
> Warblers show yellow mandibles (the lower half of the bill). In spring,
> Yellow Warblers also have dark bills.
>
> 5. Tertial edges -- On the top photo I think that we can see enough of
> the upper wing to determine that edges of the tertials (the inner most
> folded feathers on the wings) do not contrast with the rest of those
> feathers. In all plumages, Yellow Warblers have darker duskier tertials
> with noticeably pale edges. This is a great field mark if you are ever
> struggling to sort out dull immature Yellows and Orange-crowneds.
>
> Given the presumed date (based on condition of the vegetation), the
> mostly yellow coloration, the somewhat blunt-tipped bill that is pale
> below, and the lack of contrast in the tertials, I think it is pretty
> safe to conclude that this bird is a Wilson's Warbler. Wilson's
> typically return to Oregon by the second week of April, not long after
> the arrival of the first Orange-crowneds. When I first started paying
> attention to such things (late 1970's), the average arrival dates for
> Wilson's fell around the 17th of April and Wilson's were exceptionally
> rare in Oregon during winter. Over recent decades the mean arrival date
> for Wilson's seems to have moved forward by about a week and this
> species is now found in Oregon in most winters.
>
> Dave Irons
> Portland, OR
>
>  > Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:45:00 -0700
>  > From: linda AT fink.com
>  > To: OBOL AT freelists.org
>  > Subject: [obol] id help needed!
>  >
>  > I had the brainwave to put the list of all 148 birds seen on our farm
>  > since 1977 on my Birds blog with photos. So I am going through old
>  > photos and came across this one from April 2012 of a warbler, or two
>  > warblers. My brain seems to be off duty as I cannot tell if this is a
>  > Yellow Warbler or an Orange-crowned Warbler or something else I'm not
>  > thinking of. Help, please!
>  >
>  >
> 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/yellow-warbler-orange-crowned-warbler.html 


-- 
http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/


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Subject: Re: Red-throated Pipit chasing
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:37:19 -0700
Our plan is to be there by about 8:30am 

Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 23, 2014, at 9:34 AM, "Alan Contreras"  wrote:

> I might chase it on Friday if it is still hanging around. Will anyone be 
there early Friday who could post its status? 

> 
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> 
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Oct 22, 2014, at 8:56 PM, Russ Namitz wrote:
> 
>> Hello all~
>> 
>> I've had a few inquiries about how easy is this bird to find. Google maps 
doesn't accurately show the exposed mud right now, but the bird spent the 
majority of its time here. 

>> 42.258508, -123.584698
>> 
>> Sometimes, it flew the mud 50 feet to the north and when I first saw it, it 
was on the mudflat 100 feet to the east. It is a very small spot. It will be 
immediately obvious where to look for the bird and also, where to park. 
Technically, there is a $4 parking fee if you use any of the county park 
parking areas. However, you can park anywhere along this curve. 42.258508, 
-123.584698 

>> 
>> Best of luck to those coming over tomorrow.
>> 
>> Sincerely,
>> Russ Namitz
>> Medford, OR
> 
Subject: Red-throated Pipit chasing
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:34:10 -0700
I might chase it on Friday if it is still hanging around. Will anyone be there 
early Friday who could post its status? 


.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Oct 22, 2014, at 8:56 PM, Russ Namitz wrote:

> Hello all~
> 
> I've had a few inquiries about how easy is this bird to find. Google maps 
doesn't accurately show the exposed mud right now, but the bird spent the 
majority of its time here. 

> 42.258508, -123.584698
> 
> Sometimes, it flew the mud 50 feet to the north and when I first saw it, it 
was on the mudflat 100 feet to the east. It is a very small spot. It will be 
immediately obvious where to look for the bird and also, where to park. 
Technically, there is a $4 parking fee if you use any of the county park 
parking areas. However, you can park anywhere along this curve. 42.258508, 
-123.584698 

> 
> Best of luck to those coming over tomorrow.
> 
> Sincerely,
> Russ Namitz
> Medford, OR
Subject: more on pelagic peregrines
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 08:30:39 -0700
 Just read this on facebook:" We are only 101 Peregrines away from a new world 
record at the Florida Keys Hawkwatch! As of today, we have counted 3910 PEFAs 
for the season, inching ever closer to last year's record of 4010..."A visit to 
the official Fb page reveals the above quote to be old, the season's tally up 
to 4012 on 10/20 when two Peregrines flew by at once. 

 This thread started as a discussion of raptor migration strategies. I now 
offer two tangents: When I was in grade school, the difference between 
California Condor and Peregrine was slim--I never expected to see either of 
them in the wild. By the time my children were in grade school I was not 
allowed to stop for eagles, at least not Bald Eagles. My kids just found them 
boring. 

 The second thought--"raptor" is a term describing a life style, not a 
cladistic relationship. Most of us grew up with and all of us own field guides 
recognizing "Falconiformes". This order included eagles, hawks, ospreys, as 
well as falcons. We now know that falcons are much closer to parrots and not 
related to hawks at all. So what is the name of the order falcons are now 
classified by? What human construct do we impose upon them? And do Caracaras 
and Lammergeiers get to join the party too? What is the name of the order 
covering eagles, hawks, and ospreys? 

 Alan Jenkins posted a link at 4:53 yesterday that is well worth the time. 
About 50 satelite transmitters were placed on Gyrfalcons all over Greenland, 
one of which worked for two fall migrations and the time in between--some 
failed right away. One male had a breeding season territory on Ellesmere 
Island, truly the end of the earth. The next time you see a Thayer's Gull 
eating spilled french fries in the Fred Meyer parking lot or Sanderlings 
dodging traffic on Clatsop beach, think of how they too could have hatched on 
Ellesmere Island and survived the hungry attentions of this long lost cousin of 
the parrots. Lars 


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Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Janet Leavens <janet.leavens1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:00:09 -0400
Wow! Oregon birders are so helpful! I got at least 17 responses to my
query.

The general consensus was that we need to haul our butts out of bed a lot
earlier (although this advice was always phrased much more politely :-) )
and listen for them calling (in appropriate habitat) at the crack of dawn.
We'll have a chance to do that Friday, Saturday and Sunday morning. I'll
write back if we've had any success.

Thanks so much!

Janet Leavens
Oviedo, FL



On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 6:09 PM, Janet Leavens 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
> Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
> luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
> Heerman's Gull.
>
> However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
> eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
> every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
> hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
> we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
> us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
> calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
> favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
> be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
> Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
> find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
> reliable for the species?
>
> Thanks in advance for any info!
>
> Janet Leavens
> Oviedo, FL
>
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 06:31:49 -0700

From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 23, 2014 6:09:01 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Pacific Loon (1 Jefferson)
Short-billed Dowitcher (1 Deschutes)
Elegant Tern (1 Clatsop, 2 Tillamook)
Western Scrub-Jay (1 Grant)
Violet-green Swallow (1 Curry)
Bewick's Wren (1 Wheeler)
Red-throated Pipit (1 Josephine)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Wallowa county 10-21-14
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 03:36:54 -0700
We visited Wallowa County on Tues. Oct. 21.  The weather was showery.

 

At the Fishhatchery pond:

- many Robins

- C. Waxwings

- R-c Kinglet

- Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

Near/in Joseph:

- Osprey

- Merlin

-Cooper's Hawk

- many Red-tails

 

Wallowa Lake:

27  Canada Geese

  7  Common Loon

  8  Eared Grebes

  4  Horned Grebes

15  Western Grebes

100 C. Mergansers

  15 Calif. Gulls

    2 Bald Eagles near nest

    1 Dipper

    6  R-b Nuthatches

     Clark's nutcrackers  

 

Near Elgin (Union co)

   5 Wild Turkeys

 

Good birding, everyone,

 

Paul Sulllivan & Carol Karlen

McMinnville
Subject: Wallowa county 10-21-14
From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 03:36:54 -0700
We visited Wallowa County on Tues. Oct. 21.  The weather was showery.

 

At the Fishhatchery pond:

- many Robins

- C. Waxwings

- R-c Kinglet

- Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

Near/in Joseph:

- Osprey

- Merlin

-Cooper's Hawk

- many Red-tails

 

Wallowa Lake:

27  Canada Geese

  7  Common Loon

  8  Eared Grebes

  4  Horned Grebes

15  Western Grebes

100 C. Mergansers

  15 Calif. Gulls

    2 Bald Eagles near nest

    1 Dipper

    6  R-b Nuthatches

     Clark's nutcrackers  

 

Near Elgin (Union co)

   5 Wild Turkeys

 

Good birding, everyone,

 

Paul Sulllivan & Carol Karlen

McMinnville
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Subject: RBA: Portland, OR 10-23-14
From: Harry Nehls <hnehls6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:53:08 -0700
- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* October 23, 2014
* ORPO1410:23

-birds mentioned

Eurasian Wigeon
White-winged Scoter
American White Pelican
Brown Pelican
Black-bellied Plover
Ruff
Dunlin
Franklins Gull
Heermanns Gull
Elegant Tern
Acorn Woodpecker
Gyrfalcon
Tropical Kingbird
BLUE JAY
Northern Mockingbird
American Pipit
RED-THROATED PIPIT
Lapland Longspur
CHESTNUT-COLLARED LONGSPUR
Palm Warbler
Clay-colored Sparrow
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch

- transcript

hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976  
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday October 23. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls
at 503-233-3976.

A RED-THROATED PIPIT has been easily observed and photographed all week at
Lake Selmac north of Cave Junction. On October 17 a CHESTNUT-COLLARED
LONGSPUR was seen north of gearhart. Another was seen October 20 near Cape
Blanco. A BLUE JAY was Langlois south of Bandon  October 19. Another was at
LaGrande October 16. TROPICAL KINGBIRDS were reported during the week from
Cape Blanco, North Spit of Coos Bay, Waldport, and in Newport.

On October 18 a GYRFALCON was seen at New River south of Bandon. Two
CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS were at Euchre Creek the next day. Over 500 BROWN
PELICANS and 2500 HEERMANNS GULLS passed Boiler Bay October 19. Many
ELEGANT TERNS are still being seen along the coast.

Two ACORN WOODPECKERS were regularly seen during the week near the visitors
center of Fort Vancouver. A PALM WARBLER was at Ridgefield NWR October 10.
On October 17 a FRANKLINS GULL, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, and 35 DUNLIN were at
Smith/Bybee Lakes in North Portland. A female EURASIAN WIGEON has been seen
all week at Commonwealth Lake in Beaverton. On October 19 a flock of 175
WHITE PELICANS passed over southeast Portland. A flock of about 300 AMERICAN
PIPITS were near Turner October 17. On October 16 a MOCKINGBIRD was in
Albany. A RUFF was seen October 19 along Eicher Road east of Albany. A
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER was seen October 22 on Foster Reservoir east of Sweet
Home.

On October 16 a group of ROSY-FINCHES were on Pilot Butte in Bend.

Thats it for this week.

- end transcript 






Subject: ID help needed-Linda Fink's warbler
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:38:48 -0700
 Here we have multiple pictures of the same bird. I have read countless times 
in this forum,"It's extremely difficult/foolish/misleading to base an ID on a 
single photo." Here it's difficult to discern a single field mark in Any of the 
photos. One shows a deeply notched tail. After 46 years of birding I was 
unaware of wood warblers having such. The tail rather reminds me of a 
goldfinch. Now someone will probably post a goldfinch photo showing no notch. 

 I was oblivious to Linda's reference to "April". But I note a bunch of swollen 
yet completely unopened leaf or flower buds--must be April, probably first 
twenty days in April. Basically all trees native or not, with the exception of 
"English"(Circassian)Walnut , have broken bud in Grande Ronde , Oregon by May 
Day. Orange-crowned Warblers appear there as early as March 25, coincident with 
red alders leafing out. This tree seems to be a cherry or plum, certainly not 
Alnus rubra. Yellow Warblers mostly appear after May 1st and are always quite 
uncommon on the Coast Range's eastern flank. Away from conifers O-Cs are the 
default warbler in that same geography, outnumbering all other warblers 
combined. Since I began typing this Dave Irons has posted with nearly identical 
pointers, plus some actual comments on plumage. Lars 


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Subject: Re: id help needed!
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 06:17:26 +0000
Linda,

There are several clues here that I think help answer your warbler ID question. 
Here's what I see. 


1. Vegetation -- The deciduous tree in the photo is just starting to bud and 
leaf out. In the Willamette Valley that typically happens from late March to 
mid-April with bigger trees. You say this photo was taken in April, but don't 
give us the exact date. I think that if this image had been taken in the latter 
days of April the leaf out would be further along. This alone likely takes 
Yellow Warbler out of the equation. The first northbound Yellow Warblers 
normally arrive in the Willamette Valley about 25 April or later and they are 
generally scarce before the 1st of May. 


2. Undertail coverts -- Another strike against Yellow Warbler is the length of 
the undertail coverts (along with the lack of yellow going out to the end of 
the tail, which you mention). Yellow Warblers have long undertail coverts, 
which tend to make the tail look short from below, which is clearly not the 
case with this bird. 


3. Bill shape -- Looking at the bill of this bird, the tip seems somewhat 
blunt. Orange-crowned Warblers and other species in the genus Oreothlypis 
(formerlyVermivora) have thin bills that come to a very sharp point. On bill 
shape alone I think we can eliminate Orange-crowned Warbler, which leaves us 
with only Wilson's Warbler as a likely candidate (the only other all-yellow 
warbler that one would expect in Oregon during April). 


4. Bill color -- This is the clincher. The underside of the bill is very pale 
and looks quite yellowish. After hatch-year Orange-crowned Warblers have 
all-dark bills with no yellow whatsoever. Conversely, Wilson's Warblers show 
yellow mandibles (the lower half of the bill). In spring, Yellow Warblers also 
have dark bills. 


5. Tertial edges -- On the top photo I think that we can see enough of the 
upper wing to determine that edges of the tertials (the inner most folded 
feathers on the wings) do not contrast with the rest of those feathers. In all 
plumages, Yellow Warblers have darker duskier tertials with noticeably pale 
edges. This is a great field mark if you are ever struggling to sort out dull 
immature Yellows and Orange-crowneds. 


Given the presumed date (based on condition of the vegetation), the mostly 
yellow coloration, the somewhat blunt-tipped bill that is pale below, and the 
lack of contrast in the tertials, I think it is pretty safe to conclude that 
this bird is a Wilson's Warbler. Wilson's typically return to Oregon by the 
second week of April, not long after the arrival of the first Orange-crowneds. 
When I first started paying attention to such things (late 1970's), the average 
arrival dates for Wilson's fell around the 17th of April and Wilson's were 
exceptionally rare in Oregon during winter. Over recent decades the mean 
arrival date for Wilson's seems to have moved forward by about a week and this 
species is now found in Oregon in most winters. 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR  

> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:45:00 -0700
> From: linda AT fink.com
> To: OBOL AT freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] id help needed!
> 
> I had the brainwave to put the list of all 148 birds seen on our farm 
> since 1977 on my Birds blog with photos. So I am going through old 
> photos and came across this one from April 2012 of a warbler, or two 
> warblers. My brain seems to be off duty as I cannot tell if this is a 
> Yellow Warbler or an Orange-crowned Warbler or something else I'm not 
> thinking of. Help, please!
> 
> 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/yellow-warbler-orange-crowned-warbler.html 

> -- 
> http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
> http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
> http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
> http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/
> 
> 
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Manage your account or unsubscribe: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> Contact moderators: obol-moderators AT freelists.org
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Red-throated Pipit specifics
From: Forrest English <forrest.english AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 22:51:18 -0700
While I was there today the flock of pipits spent the whole time hopping
between the various mudflats. It's a pretty small area, and there are good
views of most exposed areas either from the road near the intersection, or
from the end of the... jetty? Not sure what to call it.

If you don't see or hear pipits at first, I recommend grabbing a snack from
your car and giving it a second scan. Worked for me anyhow.

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 8:56 PM, Russ Namitz  wrote:

> Hello all~
>
> I've had a few inquiries about how easy is this bird to find.  Google maps
> doesn't accurately show the exposed mud right now, but the bird spent the
> majority of its time here.
> 42.258508, -123.584698
>
> Sometimes, it flew the mud 50 feet to the north and when I first saw it,
> it was on the mudflat 100 feet to the east.  It is a very small spot.  It
> will be immediately obvious where to look for the bird and also, where to
> park.  Technically, there is a $4 parking fee if you use any of the county
> park parking areas.  However, you can park anywhere along this curve.
>  42.258508, -123.584698
>
> Best of luck to those coming over tomorrow.
>
> Sincerely,
> Russ Namitz
> Medford, OR
>



-- 
Forrest English
Subject: KLAMATH RAPTORS AND EURASIAN WIGEON
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 22:50:33 -0700
Nice pics of dark-morph Ferruginous, taiga Merlin and a show-off Golden
Eagle...Eurasian Wigeon inside the Oregon border:
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/klamath-rapto-round-up/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Red-throated Pipit today
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt AT att.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:40:49 -0700
........... photos here:
http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/RTPI.html

Looks like my post from my phone earlier today did not go through. This is the 
bird found by Russ Namitz on Monday, pointed out to us by Forrest English as we 
arrived today. Thank you! Other observers: Jack Kiley and John Elizalde. 


Cheers! 

oschmidt AT att.net
Wednesday, October 22, 2014





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Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 10/22/2014
From: Wink Gross <winkg AT hevanet.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:15:35 -0700
Here is the summary of my morning dogwalks from NW Seblar Terrace to the 
Pittock Mansion for the week 10/16/14 to 10/22/14. Species neither seen nor 
heard the previous week are in ALL CAPS. 


Additional information about my dogwalk, including an archive of weekly 
summaries and a checklist, may be found at 
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/dogwalkpage.html 


The sightings are also in eBird.

We did the walk 4 days this week.

Species                # days found  (peak #, date)

Cackling Goose              2  (40, 10/17)
COOPERS HAWK               1  (1, 10/17)
Band-tailed Pigeon          1  (1, 10/16)
MOURNING DOVE               1  (1, 10/17)
Anna's Hummingbird          4  (3)
Red-breasted Sapsucker      2  (2, 10/17)
Downy Woodpecker            1  (1, 10/17)
Northern Flicker            4  (5)
Steller's Jay               4  (5)
American Crow               4  (10)
VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW        1  (5, 10/16)
Black-capped Chickadee      4  (15, 10/17)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee   3  (7)
Bushtit                     1  (15, 10/17)	
Red-breasted Nuthatch       3  (3)
Pacific Wren                2  (3, 10/17)
Bewicks Wren               1  (2, 10/21)
Golden-crowned Kinglet      1  (3+, 10/17)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet        1  (3, 10/16)
HERMIT THRUSH               1  (1, 10/21)
American Robin              3  (9)
Varied Thrush               3  (6)
European Starling           3  (7)
Spotted Towhee              3  (5)
Song Sparrow                4  (7)
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW       1  (1, 10/17)
Dark-eyed Junco             4  (18, 10/16)
House Finch                 2  (1)
PINE SISKIN                 1  (5, 10/21)
Lesser Goldfinch            2  (4)
American Goldfinch          1  (1, 10/16)

In the neighborhood but not found on dogwalk: Turkey Vulture, Red-tailed Hawk, 
Great Horned Owl, Vauxs Swift, COMMON RAVEN, BROWN CREEPER 


Misses (birds found at least 3 days during previous 2 weeks [9/25-10/1 and 
10/9-10/15] but not found this week: Red-breasted Sapsucker, Huttons Vireo, 
Golden-crowned Sparrow, Evening Grosbeak 


Wink Gross
Portland

Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:56:47 -0700
Hi Janet,

Too bad you are in Portland and not here in Corvallis. Right now, Varied
Thrushes are THICK in the Coast Range south and west of town. The best time
is early in the morning - we literally have to dodge dozens of them on the
forest roads around Alsea Falls. But even a drive up Marys Peak on a paved
road will usually result in dozens, if not 100s of VATHs, if you can beat
the traffic there (just before sunrise is best!).

In addition, Marys Peak is a great place to find Sooty Grouse and Mountain
Quail, and on a clear day you can enjoy a gorgeous view!

Good luck in your quest

Hendrik

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 4:59 PM, Rachel Kapelle  wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I saw a few yesterday afternoon in West Salem at the Wallace Marine Park
> softball complex. They were just north of the northernmost parking lot
> there--along the trail between the parking lot and the little pond in the
> woods. Since this was the first time I had seen them there, however, I
> can't say whether this is a usual spot for them.
>
> -Rachel
>
> On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 3:09 PM, Janet Leavens 
> wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
>> Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
>> luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
>> Heerman's Gull.
>>
>> However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
>> eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
>> every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
>> hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
>> we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
>> us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
>> calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
>> favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
>> be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
>> Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
>> find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
>> reliable for the species?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for any info!
>>
>> Janet Leavens
>> Oviedo, FL
>>
>
>


-- 
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."     -- Gary Snyder*
Subject: Red-throated Pipit specifics
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:56:47 -0700
Hello all~
I've had a few inquiries about how easy is this bird to find. Google maps 
doesn't accurately show the exposed mud right now, but the bird spent the 
majority of its time here.42.258508, -123.584698 

Sometimes, it flew the mud 50 feet to the north and when I first saw it, it was 
on the mudflat 100 feet to the east. It is a very small spot. It will be 
immediately obvious where to look for the bird and also, where to park. 
Technically, there is a $4 parking fee if you use any of the county park 
parking areas. However, you can park anywhere along this curve. 42.258508, 
-123.584698 

Best of luck to those coming over tomorrow.
Sincerely,Russ NamitzMedford, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: id help needed!
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 19:47:10 -0700
Habitat and date suggest Orange-crowned and that is what this bird appears to 
be on my phone. I will look at this on my computer later tonight and try to 
confirm this tentative ID. 


Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 22, 2014, at 6:46 PM, "Linda Fink"  wrote:

> I had the brainwave to put the list of all 148 birds seen on our farm since 
1977 on my Birds blog with photos. So I am going through old photos and came 
across this one from April 2012 of a warbler, or two warblers. My brain seems 
to be off duty as I cannot tell if this is a Yellow Warbler or an 
Orange-crowned Warbler or something else I'm not thinking of. Help, please! 

> 
> 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/yellow-warbler-orange-crowned-warbler.html 

> -- 
> http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
> http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
> http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
> http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/
> 
> 
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> 
> 


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Subject: Wednesday in Jefferson County The Cove, Rereg and Pelton, Haystack, back roads! ROSY=FINCH top of Round Butte
From: "judy" <jmeredit AT bendnet.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 19:47:50 -0700
Haystack was the first stop, with a few waterfowl.  No shorebirds, the res
is full of water to the edges.  We had a close Peregrine working on a meal.
On the way out, the bare stubble field next to the KOA had about 200
American Pipits working it. We watched them for a long time hoping a
different individual would appear but it was not to happen. At one point
some of us thought we saw a longspur but it never appeared again. Toward The
Cove and birding the back roads around there, we found Merlin, another
Peregrine at Culver ponds, Dunlin at first pond.  Not much in the
campground. Down in the water near the marina, seven deer were swimming
from  one edge to the other. A long distance swim. From the overlook at
Pelton re=reg we had a few good birds for the day, Pacific Loon, many
Dowitchers, White=fronted geese.  The bird of the day was at the top of
Round Butte, a single ( or a small flock? ) of Gray Crowned Rosy=finch. Most
of us had started down but returned to the top when Tim and Nancy reported
Rosy=finches. We searched around there for at least 30 minutes but were
unable to relocate any. No Turkey Vultures today. Strong winds today.

This report was mailed for Judy Meredith by http://birdnotes.net
Greater White-fronted Goose         4
Canada Goose                      470
Wood Duck                           1
American Wigeon                  30
Mallard
Northern Shoveler                  20
Northern Pintail                       8
Green-Winged Teal                30
Ring-necked Duck                  70
Lesser Scaup                           1
Surf Scoter                            1  from Overlook Pelton re=reg
Bufflehead                            30
Hooded Merganser                2     "         "
Common Merganser              1
Ruddy Duck                         12   old Madras WW ponds
California Quail
Pacific Loon                        1  From overlook Pelton re reg
Common Loon                     1  now I wonder, was there really 1 at
Haystack?
Horned Grebe                      1
Eared Grebe                        14
Western Grebe                       4
Double-crested Cormorant           40+  some each stop
Bald Eagle                          3  two at Haystack and 1 or more Cove.
Northern Harrier                    7
Cooper's Hawk                       1  cove
Rough-legged Hawk               1 near Culver, in a field near one full of
pumpkins
Red-tailed Hawk                    10
American Kestrel                    8
Merlin                                   3
Peregrine Falcon                    2
American Coot                     200
Killdeer                                 2
Dunlin                                   1  edge of first pond Culver WW
ponds
LB/Unidentified Dowitcher   17  distant on muddy edge at Pelton re reg res.
Wilson's Snipe                        3 along canal near Haystack, 2 at    "
"            "
Ring-billed Gull                    10
California Gull                     10
Rock Dove
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher                      1
Northern Flicker                      10
Western Scrub-Jay                   1 Cove campground
Black-billed Magpie                20
American Crow                       4  near Culver
Common Raven
Horned Lark                             2  with Pipits near Haystack
Mountain Chickadee                  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet                7  campground Cove
Townsend's Solitaire                1
American Robin
European Starling
American Pipit                          200  bare/stubble field beside KOA
by Haystack
Cedar Waxwing                  flocks from highway near Redmond, Cove
campground
Yellow-rumped Warbler              17
Spotted Towhee                          5
Savannah Sparrow                      3
Song Sparrow                              1
White-crowned Sparrow             x  no big flocks yet.
Golden-crowned Sparrow           x
Dark-eyed Junco                       20
Red-winged Blackbird                1
Yellow-headed Blackbird           2  in feedlot near The Cove.
Brewer's Blackbird
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch             1  top of Round Butte, gravel edge near
the road. Only seen by Tim and Nancy
House Finch                                 4
American Goldfinch                    2
House Sparrow

Total number of species seen: 68
Birders today, Kim Kathol, Chuck Gates, Tom Penpraze, Sherrie Pierce, Mike
Golden, Diane Burgess, Ted Groszkiewicz, Cathy Beck, Howard Horvath, Tim
Smith and Nancy Abrams, and Judy Meredith. 



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Subject: Varied Thrushes
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 19:34:21 -0700
Hi Janet & all,

This is unfortunately another example of the limitations of eBird. it's
easy to see what birds eBirders have been finding, but good luck trying
to contact them to ask for more specifics!

Why eBird still makes it so difficult to contact observers directly is a
huge mystery to me, especially as www.birdnotes.net (which was operating
in Oregon 5+ years before eBird) always made this easy, with no evidence
of problems. But that's just how it is. There are eBirders who post bird
sightings under pseudonyms such as "Anonymous eBirder" (actually, I know
who that guy is and yeah, it's a guy).

This whole cloak-and-dagger thing just seems silly if the idea is to
share observations. Let me know if you're still looking for a Varied
Thrush. I've been hearing them regularly at our house adjacent to E.E.
Wilson Wildlife Area, a bit north of Corvallis. It would take more
effort to actually see one, but they're out there.

Good birding,
Joel
541 745-5821


Hi all,

My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
Heerman's Gull.

However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
reliable for the species?

Thanks in advance for any info!

Janet Leavens




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Subject: binocular inquiry
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:55:47 -0700
Anyone out there have an older pair of Swarovski 12x50 binocs they'd be 
interested in selling? I am trawling new and used for something stronger than 
my 8.5 for coastal birding. 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: id help needed!
From: Linda Fink <linda AT fink.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:45:00 -0700
I had the brainwave to put the list of all 148 birds seen on our farm 
since 1977 on my Birds blog with photos. So I am going through old 
photos and came across this one from April 2012 of a warbler, or two 
warblers. My brain seems to be off duty as I cannot tell if this is a 
Yellow Warbler or an Orange-crowned Warbler or something else I'm not 
thinking of. Help, please!


http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/2014/10/yellow-warbler-orange-crowned-warbler.html 

-- 
http://lindafink.blogspot.com/
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blogspot.com/
http://fffwildflowers.blogspot.com/
http://finkfamilyfarmtrees.blogspot.com/


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Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Tom McNamara <tmcmac67 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:43:21 -0700
Janet,

You are *very likely *(assured?) to see and hear Varied Thrushes these days
in Mt Tabor Park (see google maps) especially on the north and east sides.
Morning is good for them.
Tom

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 3:09 PM, Janet Leavens 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
> Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
> luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
> Heerman's Gull.
>
> However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
> eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
> every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
> hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
> we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
> us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
> calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
> favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
> be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
> Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
> find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
> reliable for the species?
>
> Thanks in advance for any info!
>
> Janet Leavens
> Oviedo, FL
>
Subject: Fred Chancey - OOPS!
From: "Mary Anne Sohlstrom" <masohlstrom AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:13:27 -0700
  Oregon Trail Council BSA is in Eugene!  Near Autzen Stadium.

Mary Anne
Subject: Fred Chancey
From: "Mary Anne Sohlstrom" <masohlstrom AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:09:10 -0700
All – for those of you who knew Fred, there is a nice obit in todays Salem 
Statesman Journal (http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/statesmanjournal/). 
Memorial service will be 2:00 PM, December 7th at the Oregon Trail Council Boy 
Scouts of America building (in Salem). I am surprised I never came across him 
in my Scouting years. 


I only met Fred a couple of times and wish I’d known him longer and better. 
One of the nice guys. 


Mary Anne Sohlstrom
Subject: Re: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Rachel Kapelle <rkapelle AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:59:19 -0700
Hello,

I saw a few yesterday afternoon in West Salem at the Wallace Marine Park
softball complex. They were just north of the northernmost parking lot
there--along the trail between the parking lot and the little pond in the
woods. Since this was the first time I had seen them there, however, I
can't say whether this is a usual spot for them.

-Rachel

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 3:09 PM, Janet Leavens 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
> Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
> luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
> Heerman's Gull.
>
> However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
> eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
> every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
> hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
> we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
> us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
> calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
> favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
> be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
> Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
> find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
> reliable for the species?
>
> Thanks in advance for any info!
>
> Janet Leavens
> Oviedo, FL
>
Subject: On pelagic Gyrfalcons
From: "Jenkins, Maurice A." <alanjenkins AT ou.edu>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:52:14 +0000
"Gyrfalcons tagged with satellite-received transmitters showed characteristics 
associated with both obligate and facultative migration. Their winter ranges 
varied greatly in size, with the largest, ~172,000 km2, being the biggest ever 
documented for a raptor. Many individuals made long movements within a winter, 
and some spent up to a month at sea. They may have rested on ice and fed upon 
seabirds." From the Abstract: Inter- and intraspecific variation of breeding 
biology, movements, and genotype in Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus and 
Gyrfalcon F. rusticolus populations in Greenland. Author: Burnham, Kurt K. 
University of Oxford, 2007. 


For a less formal presentation see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/13791688, 
"Gyrfalcons are 'secret seabirds.'" 


Alan Jenkins
Creswell, Oregon

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Subject: Photos: 53 photos taken last weekend at Ankeny NWR
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:11:07 -0700
I went to Pintail Marsh last Saturday and Sunday morning at Ankeny NWR.
Lots to Canada Geese and White-fronted Geese activity.  Photographed
several varieties of ducks.  I took one blurry photo of the White-faced
Ibis on the far east side of Pintail Marsh just to show it was there  Click
on link below for photos.  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6073159992459168433?authkey=CI_d-IqB0e2lRw 
Subject: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Janet Leavens <janet.leavens1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:09:44 -0400
Hi all,

My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
Heerman's Gull.

However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
reliable for the species?

Thanks in advance for any info!

Janet Leavens
Oviedo, FL
Subject: Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm
From: Molly Monroe <monroemolly AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:58:07 -0700
My apologies, this looked much different on my end prior to clicking send. 
Here's the correct link for the event (and flyer) on the Ankeny Facebook page: 

https://www.facebook.com/events/1566040500296077/
 
Hope to see you all at Ankeny NWR for a fun day on the 1st!
Molly~
 
_( '<
/ ) )
//"   
 I love to see anything that implies a simpler mode of life and a greater 
nearness to the earth. 


                - Henry David Thoreau 


 
> From: monroemolly AT hotmail.com
> To: birding AT midvalleybirding.org; mid-valley-nature AT googlegroups.com; 
obol AT freelists.org 

> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:41:41 -0700
> CC: 
> Subject: [birding] Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm
> 
> Experience Fall Wildlife Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge 
> Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife 
Refuge Complex Saturday, November 1, 2014 Birding Walks! Rail Trail Trailhead 
Walks 9:00 am and 11:00 am 

> Pintail Marsh Birding Stations (drop-in) Walk the future Nature Center site! 
Ankeny Hill (drop-in) Join a Volunteer Work Party to Pull Ivy! Meet at Ankeny 
Hill 9:00 am 

> More information and directions available at 
> https://www.facebook.com/events/1566040500296077/or call 503-623-2749 
> 
>  
>  		 	   		  _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
 		 	   		  
Subject: Wed morning, Eugene
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:44:57 -0700
Expecting the predicted wind and rain, we opted to do car birding for raptors 
out Greenhill Road and around the Eugene airport. Because serious rain never 
materialized, we stopped at various places which included Meadowlark Prairie, 
Fern Ridge dam, Kirk Park and Shore Lane, Clear Lake area at the south edge of 
the airport, and Alvadore. The Mockingbird at Alvadore was not showing itself, 
but we saw the two W-t Kites that hang out nearby. Three good size flocks of 
Meadowlarks were at Meadowlark Prairie and just north of Clear Lake Road. Our 
view of Fern Ridge lake from Shore Lane did not reveal much except distant 
views of gulls, some ducks and grebes to the south plus two Bald Eagles perched 
on the mudflat. We never did the airport raptor run. 


Cackling Goose - few geese on the ground.  Flying geese included Canadas
Gadwall - 2 from Shore Lane 
Mallard - 16 mostly at Clear Lake
Wild Turkey - 3 different groups, one group contained about 15 birds, another 
group had a couple of young, about 1/4 grown. 

Pied-billed Grebe - 7
Western Grebe 22
Double-crested Cormorant - 3
Great Blue Heron -1 
Turkey Vulture -2
White-tailed Kite - 2 perched in meadow, in west Alvadore
Northern Harrier - 5
Bald Eagle - 2 adults seen to the south from Shore Lane, which could have been 
the same birds later at the dam. 

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2 (Alvadore and Shore Lane)
Red-tailed Hawk - 6
American Coot - 1 
Ring-billed Gull - 1 at the dam
California Gull - 1 at the dam
Gull species - 14 south from Shore Lane
Band-tailed Pigeon - 1 probable 
Mourning Dove - 6
Eurasian Collared Dove - 20 at Clear Lake 
Belted Kingfisher - 3 
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Northern Flicker - 9
American Kestrel - 10
Steller's Jay - 3
Western Scrub-Jay - expected number
American Crow - helter skelter 
Common Raven - 5
Black-capped Chickadee - 4
Brown Creeper - 2
Bewick's Wren - 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  - 1
Wrentit - 1 heard at Kirks Park
American Robin - 2
European Starling - several flocks
Cedar Waxwing - 70 (two flocks)
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 3
Spotted Towhee - 2
Savannah Sparrow - 1
Song Sparrow - 8
White-crowned Sparrow - 7
Golden-crowned Sparrow - one good flock, several scattered individuals 
Dark-eyed Junco - 25
Red-winged Blackbird - 20
Western Meadowlark - 3 good flocks, probably exceeding 50 total
Brewer's Blackbird - 12
House Finch -2

Silvia Maulding, Don Schrouder, Dave Brown, Randy Sinnott, and Larry McQueen
 
Subject: Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm
From: Molly Monroe <monroemolly AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:41:41 -0700
Experience Fall Wildlife Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge 
Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife 
Refuge Complex Saturday, November 1, 2014 Birding Walks! Rail Trail Trailhead 
Walks 9:00 am and 11:00 am 

Pintail Marsh Birding Stations (drop-in) Walk the future Nature Center site! 
Ankeny Hill (drop-in) Join a Volunteer Work Party to Pull Ivy! Meet at Ankeny 
Hill 9:00 am 

More information and directions available at 
https://www.facebook.com/events/1566040500296077/or call 503-623-2749 

 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Storm birds
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:55:49 -0700
Hi -

A few sightings from Yaquina Bay South Jetty in heavy rain and 30 mph+
winds:

Parasitic Jaeger                                    1  winter adult pale
phase lit on water in channel
Marbled Godwit                                     2  at gull spot
Dunlin                                                    20  brief visit
to gull spot
Green-winged Teal                                2  gull spot, females

Western Gull                                          10+
GW Gull                                                  15
Herring Gull                                             1     Adult
Heermann's Gulls                                    6
Mew Gulls                                                4
California Gull                                          600

Wayne
Subject: Jim Leonard's Branta
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:38:23 -0700
 It's totally a Cackler, Jim. What I call a "True" Cackler (minima) and what I 
saw Wayne Hoffman call a "real" Cackler earlier this month. Keep up the good 
work, Wayne. The ABA can perform as many unnatural acts as they wish, some 
folks have a grip. Lars 


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Subject: Photo: Need ID Cackling or Dusky or another species of Goose?
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:14:07 -0700
I need help identifying a goose photo I took at Pintail Marsh at Ankeny NWR
last weekend.  Is it a Cackling, Dusky or another species?  Thanks, Jim
Leonard.  Click on link for photo.





https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6073073811789053361?authkey=CKC62P_1u97DpQE 
Subject: Re: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:39:46 -0700
Keep the updates coming. I am hoping to come see this bird on Friday.

Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 22, 2014, at 9:31 AM, "Russ Namitz"  wrote:

> The bird is still being seen today, Wednesday morning. Thanks for the update 
Forrest and congratulations. 

> 
> Russ
> 
> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:17:52 -0700
> Subject: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
> From: forrest.english AT gmail.com
> To: rv-birds AT googlegroups.com
> 
> As of now still hopping between mudflats in SW corner with the AMPI flock.
> 
> --
> Forrest English
> 
> Sent from a mobile device
> 
> 
> -- 
> -- 
> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
> rv-birds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com
> 
> --- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
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Subject: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:30:21 -0700
The bird is still being seen today, Wednesday morning. Thanks for the update 
Forrest and congratulations. 

Russ

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:17:52 -0700
Subject: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
From: forrest.english AT gmail.com
To: rv-birds AT googlegroups.com

As of now still hopping between mudflats in SW corner with the AMPI flock.
--

Forrest English
Sent from a mobile device




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Subject: weekend notes, mostly Benton County
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:19:29 -0700
 About 2:30 pm Sat (10/18) 8 Turkey Vultures passed quickly over downtown 
Manning (mp 47, Hwy 26). Surely the latest date for me. This is the eastern 
front of the Coast Range, as is the Fairchilds' residence outside Philomath 
where they saw a TV the next day. Pintail Marsh at Ankeny NWR was negative for 
White-faced Ibis from 5-6pm Saturday evening. Good light and no heat 
distortion. The entire impoundment was full of a wonderful mix of birds. Best 
was perhaps a female REDHEAD. There were Gadwall and Ring-necked Ducks in full 
breeding plumage. A seemingly all black Redtail on the powerline to the west 
turned out to be a rather normally colored Redtail from the ventral 
perspective. Lots of Greater White-fronted Geese on the water. This is only two 
miles off I-5. Take Exit 242 (Talbot) just north of the Santiam Rest Area. 

 Heavy fog and a balmy 57 degrees in Corvallis on Sunday morning. October fog I 
recall vividly from grade school onwards, but it was typically near freezing. 
The obvious choice was Mary's Peak, well above the fog. I have never 
encountered so many vehicles headed downhill at 8am on a Sunday morning. Six I 
believe, and deer season in progress I imagine. My son accused me of some kind 
of scurious profiling when I surmised that the two gravity favored vehicles of 
a Subaru make were occupied by birders. In any event, zero grouse, quail, and 
Varied Thrushes on the pavement or shoulders. Apparently a sea breeze, a 
classic part of summer in Corvallis, was going strong October 19, 2014. The 
area east of the Coast Range was a white sea of high fog, while bits of the 
Alsea basin were under clear skies. Sunny and 52 at that first pullout on the 
summit, but a wind approaching gale force. No birds of any kind detected. 

 Shortly after leaving the parking lot on foot the whole summit became capped 
in ground fog. It had been clearly visible as we drove up. My son snapped a 
picture of two birds on the wing while I was gazing at the gravel. The chances 
of something really good on Mary's Peak are well above average in October. I'll 
try to look at them enlarged on his computer screen and take a guess. We spent 
a long time on the summit, wrapped in table cloths because our parkas were safe 
in Corvallis. A dicky bird flushed from the grass, and on its second sally 
vocalized, so I know it was an American Pipit. I saw one in equally heavy grass 
there Sept. 30 this year on a warm, windless afternoon. An adult Red-tailed 
Hawk was at the first meadow pullout at the west end of the summit (as 
mentioned above.) 

 At the now abandoned railroad crossing of Finley Road around 2:30pm small 
birds flew off the gravel onto the newly ploughed and planted field on the 
north side. I stopped and the first two to flush were HORNED LARKS, one in 
heated pursuit of the other. I've not seen the species here before, perhaps 
largely due to lack of effort. The remaining birds were all pipits, presumably 
American. A while later, eastbound, I stopped and examined the field east of 
the abandoned RR right-of-way. There were hundreds of pipits, "easily" observed 
by scope because the rye-grass or wheat is only an inch high. Given the size of 
the flock and the time of the year, I knew I should give the spot some effort. 
But the heat distortion was substantial, 76 degrees, w/o a breeze it would have 
been hopeless. The flock was concentrated in the north and east part of the 
field, very far from the road. I saw pipits with pale backgrounds and bold 
stripes, pipits with yellow-green bellies and diffuse strip 

 es, no russet-throated ones because that picture in the field guide is a true 
red herring--it's the spring plumage isn't it? I was more expecting longspurs 
given the many reports the past week. 

 Gail and I heard Bluebirds when parked at the ne corner of the cultivated 
field west of the Prairie Overlook. I assume they were overhead as we never saw 
any, yet heard them for well over a minute, always at the same volume. IN the 
field east of McFadden Marsh a sizeable flock was hawking, about an hour later. 
Each bird hovered about 3m off the ground, then dropped to earth to grab 
something. Upon arising they always drifted east, away from me, with the slight 
breeze. I assume Western Bluebirds do this, but I didn't get unequivocal proof 
they weren't Mountain Bluebirds. It was 77 degrees in the field west of the 
Bruce Road overlook, south of Pigeon Butte. A rotund fellow with an enormous 
backpack was traversing the field and none of the raptors seen on my last visit 
were in evidence. The field south of Bruce Road had two Northern Harriers on 
the ground. A first year bird was eating something near the road while a coyote 
walking east along the hedge at the south end (very 

  distant) caught what I assume was a mouse while it ambled along.
 The heat waves were very bad at the Prairie Overlook, making even the birds 
perched 15m off the ground disappointing. A Red-shouldered Hawk called 
frequently to the north, near where Finley Road dog-legs south. A Red-tail 
showed up that looked just like the one at Ankeny the night before, but much 
closer: very dark brown from head to tail on top. A cool (bluish) dark 
chocolate on the whole head. It was evenly hooded w/o any markings. Underneath 
it had a nearly normal redtail and pale breast. Two kites were over the south 
end of the prairie at 3 and again visible about 5. Through the scope at five I 
could see that one was a juvenile. They were in close association on the wing. 
I wonder if it was still trying to get fed? Lars 


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Subject: Re: pelagic peregrines
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 08:37:56 -0700
In 1992 I observed a peregrine falcon pursuing a golden plover over one of the 
Revillagigedo Islands off the west coast of Mexico. The nearest land mass north 
or east is over 200 miles away. 


Steve Engel, Nature Program Supervisor
NEW FALL PROGRAMS!:  http://www.hillsboro-oregon.gov/index.aspx?page=1370

Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve | Parks and Recreation Department 
2600 SW Hillsboro Hwy., Hillsboro, OR 97123
Phone: 503-681-6283 |fax 503-681-6277
email: steve.engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov


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Subject: White-winged Scoter at Foster Lake, Linn County
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 08:13:46 -0700
Viewed from east end of weigh station area along Hwy 20. Associating with coots 
and Western Grebes in shallow water with exposed stumps on northeast side of 
lake. 


Doug





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Subject: Oct 19 Benton belated late date migrant
From: "Karan Fairchild" <alderspr AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 07:24:12 -0700
Along the Finley NWR Homer Campbell trail to Cabell Marsh, Karan and I both
heard a SWAINSON'S THRUSH whit call numerous times, but without being able
to see it among the dense shrub layer, or draw it into view with pishing.
Pretty unmistakable as one of our most abundant migrants.   We heard it very
near the resting bench with the small Corvallis Audubon plaque.

Less surprising, later in the day at home (see eBird Alder Spring tract
hotspot) our ever-vigilant dog drew our attention to a  single TURKEY
VULTURE.  
Jim and Karan Fairchild
6 mi SW of Philomath, Benton County






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Subject: Curry CC Longspur 10/21/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 06:46:56 -0700
Terry Wahl called me and described a longspur he saw or tried to see at his
family ranch near Cape Blanco yesterday.  Sounded like a CHESTNUT-COLLARED
LONGSPUR to me.  Terry has seen several on the ranch before, this one made
a different call though, not the uual kiddle call.  I have seen them
several times also in Coos and they have a couple calls besides the kiddle
call I have heard.  Anyhow, he never got really good looks at it (which is
typical) so he wasn't sure on the ID but I imagine that was what it was.

They can be a real frustrating species as they tend to fly off and then
drop like rocks before you can see them and when you try and sneak up on
them they fly again and drop again and on and on.  You can play this game
of trying to sneak up on them but never seeing them for an hour+ and never
get good looks which is what happened to Tery yesterday.

Oh saw the 2 PALM WARBLERS again at the Coos Bay office in N. Bend on
Monday morning.

ENJOY!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Fw: RT Pipit Photo Lake Selmac
From: "Jeff Schwilk" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "harpagornis26@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 00:14:45 -0700



On Wednesday, October 22, 2014 12:05 AM, Jeff Schwilk  
wrote: 

 


Hello,

After less than ideal viewing conditions yesterday evening at Lake Selmac 
(heavy rain) I returned around noon today and easily re-found the RT Pipit. 
Attached is one of the better photos. Thanks Russ for the amazing find! 


http://harpagornis.smugmug.com/Other/North-American-Birds/i-vq5kxtt


Jeff Schwilk
Subject: Fwd: pelagic falcons
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:29:29 -0700


> I have been on pelagic cruises off Oregon for about 20 years (one to four 
trips per year). I recall a Peregrine coming to the ship once and a Merlin also 
once coming to the ship. Both were fall trips. Neither bird stayed with the 
ship. 

> 
> Whether they were migrants crossing the ocean from the Aleutians or Haida 
Gwai I do not know. We have also had Eurasian Collared Doves, a Green Heron, a 
White-faced Ibis, and many other land bird species. 

> 
> 
> 
> Jeff Gilligan



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Subject: PRAIRIE FALCON, Lane County
From: "Allen Prigge" <prigge1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 19:00:21 -0700

-This afternoon I went looking for the large raptor reported this morning  
in the vicinity of the Alvadore/Meadowview Rd. junction. I did not find a  
raptor fitting the description of the bird seen in the morning, but did  
find a PRAIRIE FALCON on a post adjacent to Franklin Rd. I was able to get  
photos.

Also seen were a MERLIN from the end of Starlite Lane, Alvadore--and the  
ever faithful NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD guarding its' territory from the top of  
the Holly tree.

Al Prigge


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Subject: Falcon Migration
From: clay crofton <ruffledgrouch AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:15:39 -0700
One of the Peregrine tracked by the Falcon Research Group recently crossed
the Caribbean. About 1000 miles.

Link to map data       http://frg.org/track_pefa12.htm

-- 


*Happy birdingClay*
*The boy Who* *Cried Wrentit*
Subject: More Gyr Info
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:56:17 -0700
Yeah, so Gyrs (one, two who knows?) are following the Aleutians down, we
have known this for years.  The Gyrs are arriving when the big numbers of
Aleutians are here.  Most years the Aleutians are in by late September and
mostly gone by mid-November but a few hundred have started to overwinter.
Their wintering and migration staging areas are fairly plastic and have
changed over the past decade although they seem to use the New River
bottoms area both in the spring and fall.  There are in fact credible
oversummering records in recent years also!  I have some more specific info:

Our first Floras Lake Gyr sighting was in 2001, there had been very few Gyr
sightings ever in either Coos or Curry before that.  Aleutian Cackling
Geese numbers were beginning their rebound then and use the private
pastures (New River bottomlands) north of there.

Sep. 22, 2003- first Gyr sighting in Coos Bay, bird overwintered on North
Spit, frequent reports from the New River bottoms that year- one or two
birds?

Sept. 26, 2004 first sighting in New River bottoms, bird overwintered there
and was seen taking Aleutians down regularly.

Overwintered same area next winter (2005/2006).

Sept. 27, 2006 first Coos Bay sighting. I heard bird was overwintering down
in New River bottoms, but never personally saw it.

Oct. 23, 2007 first sighting in Coos Bay. Still in New River bottomlands?
Hard to say as people had become "use" to seeing them and I had reports of
Gyrs year-round at Cape Blanco (the host was telling this to people at one
point). Obvious confusion between Peregrines and Gyrs.

early November 2008 first New River bottoms sightings I heard of.

2009/2010- overwintered in New River bottoms

From 2010 I didn't hear much until this year but I heard that birds were
sighted off and on.  Also I think this coincides with reports starting in
CA about birds following them down there, not exactly when that first
happened or how many years they were seen down with the Aleutians there-
would be fun to know though?

I bet there is more info out there, just not sure how much some folks want
to discuss Gyrs on-line.

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: CALIFORNIA QUAIL COVEY OF 200, 1973
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:04:42 -0700
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/21/quail-stairs/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com