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Updated on Wednesday, October 22 at 06:39 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Pallass Sandgrouse,©BirdQuest

22 Oct Photos: 53 photos taken last weekend at Ankeny NWR [Jim Leonard ]
22 Oct Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought! [Janet Leavens ]
22 Oct Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm [Molly Monroe ]
22 Oct Wed morning, Eugene [Lawrence McQueen ]
22 Oct Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm [Molly Monroe ]
22 Oct Storm birds [Wayne Hoffman ]
22 Oct Jim Leonard's Branta [Lars Per Norgren ]
22 Oct Photo: Need ID Cackling or Dusky or another species of Goose? [Jim Leonard ]
22 Oct Re: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac [David Irons ]
22 Oct FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac [Russ Namitz ]
22 Oct weekend notes, mostly Benton County [Lars Per Norgren ]
22 Oct Re: pelagic peregrines [Steve Engel ]
22 Oct White-winged Scoter at Foster Lake, Linn County ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
22 Oct Oct 19 Benton belated late date migrant ["Karan Fairchild" ]
22 Oct Curry CC Longspur 10/21/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
22 Oct Fw: RT Pipit Photo Lake Selmac ["Jeff Schwilk" ]
21 Oct Fwd: pelagic falcons [Jeff Gilligan ]
21 Oct PRAIRIE FALCON, Lane County ["Allen Prigge" ]
21 Oct Falcon Migration [clay crofton ]
21 Oct More Gyr Info [Tim Rodenkirk ]
21 Oct CALIFORNIA QUAIL COVEY OF 200, 1973 [Harry Fuller ]
21 Oct Re: RT Pipit -- Yes [David Irons ]
21 Oct Photo Quiz: out of context [Mike Patterson ]
21 Oct RT Pipit -- Yes [Robert Lockett ]
21 Oct Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014 [David Irons ]
21 Oct Peregrine at sea [ed mcv ]
21 Oct Possible BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER song heard in Salem [Shawneen ]
21 Oct FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated pipit [Russ Namitz ]
21 Oct On time RB Sapsucker [DJ Lauten and KACastelein ]
21 Oct pelagic falcons [Lars Per Norgren ]
21 Oct Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014 [Wayne Hoffman ]
21 Oct Large falcon NW of Eugene [Bruce Newhouse ]
21 Oct Willet; Godwits Seaside [David Bailey ]
21 Oct [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
21 Oct Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
21 Oct Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014 [David Irons ]
20 Oct JoCo RED-THROATED PIPIT photos [Russ Namitz ]
20 Oct Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT [frank lospalluto ]
20 Oct Re: join us in Salem Oct 21 [Stephanie Hazen ]
21 Oct Fw: Cascade Head Science Symposium (off topic) []
20 Oct a little bit from our archives: Oregon's first Great Gray Owl nest discovery re-discovered [Harry Fuller ]
20 Oct join us in Salem Oct 21 [Stephanie Hazen ]
20 Oct Pelagic results: OCT 18 [Jeff Gilligan ]
20 Oct Asian strays [Alan Contreras ]
20 Oct Seawatches: Clatsop Co 10/20/2014 [Mike Patterson ]
20 Oct geese at Westmoreland Park, Portland ["WLRisser" ]
20 Oct Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014 [Alan Contreras ]
20 Oct Re: Newport Tropical Kingbird--Yes [Range Bayer ]
20 Oct Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
20 Oct Re: Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT ["Dennis Vroman" ]
20 Oct ODFW asking for public input on search for new director [Joel Geier ]
20 Oct Re: Newport Tropical Kingbird--Yes [Range Bayer ]
20 Oct Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT [Russ Namitz ]
20 Oct Wasco and Sherman Counties: Trikes and Shrikes [Bill Bradford ]
20 Oct Tillamook Bayocean Spit October 19 [James Billstine ]
20 Oct [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Treesa Hertzel ]
20 Oct Re: Lewis's Woodpecker, Cathlamet, WA [Joel Geier ]
20 Oct Brown Pelicans on Bayocean Peninsula - 10/19/14 [Lillian ]
19 Oct Lewis's Woodpecker, Cathlamet, WA [Darrel Whipple ]
19 Oct Curry Birds today Blue Jay et al. 10/19/2014 [Tim Rodenkirk ]
19 Oct GREBE TAKES DOWN FISH [Harry Fuller ]
19 Oct lincoln birds, 2 TROPICAL K Waldport [Alan Contreras ]
19 Oct Newport Tropical Kingbird [Range Bayer ]
19 Oct Waterhouse Linear Trail []
19 Oct Boiler Bay 10/19 ["Phil Pickering" ]
19 Oct Boiler Bay Sunday AM [David Irons ]
19 Oct Linn County Ruff ["W. Douglas Robinson" ]
19 Oct Rentenaar Road yesterday ["WLRisser" ]
19 Oct Acorn Woodpecker, Ft Vancouver WA [Ray ]
19 Oct Neck-collared Canada Goose, Eugene - help with photo [Barbara Combs ]
18 Oct Harlequin Ducks [Frank Kolwicz ]
19 Oct Tillamook birds this afternoon [Stefan Schlick ]
18 Oct Mandarin Duck continuing at Hillsboro- Dawson Creek [EV Armitage ]
18 Oct Re: Franklin's Gull? - Smith and Bybee Lakes [Bob Archer ]
18 Oct Franklin's Gull? - Smith and Bybee Lakes [Daniel Mroz ]
18 Oct Franklin's Gull? - Smith and Bybee Lakes [Daniel Mroz ]

Subject: Photos: 53 photos taken last weekend at Ankeny NWR
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:11:07 -0700
I went to Pintail Marsh last Saturday and Sunday morning at Ankeny NWR.
Lots to Canada Geese and White-fronted Geese activity.  Photographed
several varieties of ducks.  I took one blurry photo of the White-faced
Ibis on the far east side of Pintail Marsh just to show it was there  Click
on link below for photos.  Happy Birding, Jim Leonard.






https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6073159992459168433?authkey=CI_d-IqB0e2lRw 
Subject: Finding a Varied Thrush in the Portland area: not as easy as I thought!
From: Janet Leavens <janet.leavens1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:09:44 -0400
Hi all,

My husband and I are here visiting the Portland area for the week (from
Central Florida). We've already visited the coast and have had lots of
luck, finding 9 lifers including Northern Shrike; White-tailed Kite and
Heerman's Gull.

However, we've had no luck whatsoever with Varied Thrush. According to
eBird, they seem to be all around us and have been reported from almost
every location we've birded. Yet, although we've seen other skulkers and
hard to see birds (Hermit Thrush, Pacific and Bewick's Wren, Brown Creeper)
we've yet to (knowingly) see or hear a Varied Thrush. So, can anyone give
us any tips? Are Varied Thrushes still singing (I suppose not)? Are they
calling? Are they only really active at one particular time of day? Do the
favor some specific habitat that we're missing? I have been assuming they'd
be found in well wooded areas like Hermit Thrushes, but maybe I'm wrong.
Does luck really have something to do with it -- as is some days you can
find 5 and others zero? Is there any particular spot that is really
reliable for the species?

Thanks in advance for any info!

Janet Leavens
Oviedo, FL
Subject: Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm
From: Molly Monroe <monroemolly AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:58:07 -0700
My apologies, this looked much different on my end prior to clicking send. 
Here's the correct link for the event (and flyer) on the Ankeny Facebook page: 

https://www.facebook.com/events/1566040500296077/
 
Hope to see you all at Ankeny NWR for a fun day on the 1st!
Molly~
 
_( '<
/ ) )
//"   
 I love to see anything that implies a simpler mode of life and a greater 
nearness to the earth. 


                - Henry David Thoreau 


 
> From: monroemolly AT hotmail.com
> To: birding AT midvalleybirding.org; mid-valley-nature AT googlegroups.com; 
obol AT freelists.org 

> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:41:41 -0700
> CC: 
> Subject: [birding] Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm
> 
> Experience Fall Wildlife Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge 
> Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife 
Refuge Complex Saturday, November 1, 2014 Birding Walks! Rail Trail Trailhead 
Walks 9:00 am and 11:00 am 

> Pintail Marsh Birding Stations (drop-in) Walk the future Nature Center site! 
Ankeny Hill (drop-in) Join a Volunteer Work Party to Pull Ivy! Meet at Ankeny 
Hill 9:00 am 

> More information and directions available at 
> https://www.facebook.com/events/1566040500296077/or call 503-623-2749 
> 
>  
>  		 	   		  _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> birding AT midvalleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
 		 	   		  
Subject: Wed morning, Eugene
From: Lawrence McQueen <larmcqueen AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:44:57 -0700
Expecting the predicted wind and rain, we opted to do car birding for raptors 
out Greenhill Road and around the Eugene airport. Because serious rain never 
materialized, we stopped at various places which included Meadowlark Prairie, 
Fern Ridge dam, Kirk Park and Shore Lane, Clear Lake area at the south edge of 
the airport, and Alvadore. The Mockingbird at Alvadore was not showing itself, 
but we saw the two W-t Kites that hang out nearby. Three good size flocks of 
Meadowlarks were at Meadowlark Prairie and just north of Clear Lake Road. Our 
view of Fern Ridge lake from Shore Lane did not reveal much except distant 
views of gulls, some ducks and grebes to the south plus two Bald Eagles perched 
on the mudflat. We never did the airport raptor run. 


Cackling Goose - few geese on the ground.  Flying geese included Canadas
Gadwall - 2 from Shore Lane 
Mallard - 16 mostly at Clear Lake
Wild Turkey - 3 different groups, one group contained about 15 birds, another 
group had a couple of young, about 1/4 grown. 

Pied-billed Grebe - 7
Western Grebe 22
Double-crested Cormorant - 3
Great Blue Heron -1 
Turkey Vulture -2
White-tailed Kite - 2 perched in meadow, in west Alvadore
Northern Harrier - 5
Bald Eagle - 2 adults seen to the south from Shore Lane, which could have been 
the same birds later at the dam. 

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2 (Alvadore and Shore Lane)
Red-tailed Hawk - 6
American Coot - 1 
Ring-billed Gull - 1 at the dam
California Gull - 1 at the dam
Gull species - 14 south from Shore Lane
Band-tailed Pigeon - 1 probable 
Mourning Dove - 6
Eurasian Collared Dove - 20 at Clear Lake 
Belted Kingfisher - 3 
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Northern Flicker - 9
American Kestrel - 10
Steller's Jay - 3
Western Scrub-Jay - expected number
American Crow - helter skelter 
Common Raven - 5
Black-capped Chickadee - 4
Brown Creeper - 2
Bewick's Wren - 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  - 1
Wrentit - 1 heard at Kirkís Park
American Robin - 2
European Starling - several flocks
Cedar Waxwing - 70 (two flocks)
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 3
Spotted Towhee - 2
Savannah Sparrow - 1
Song Sparrow - 8
White-crowned Sparrow - 7
Golden-crowned Sparrow - one good flock, several scattered individuals 
Dark-eyed Junco - 25
Red-winged Blackbird - 20
Western Meadowlark - 3 good flocks, probably exceeding 50 total
Brewer's Blackbird - 12
House Finch -2

Silvia Maulding, Don Schrouder, Dave Brown, Randy Sinnott, and Larry McQueen
 
Subject: Ankeny NWR 50th Celebration, Nov 1st 9am-1pm
From: Molly Monroe <monroemolly AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:41:41 -0700
Experience Fall Wildlife Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge 
Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife 
Refuge Complex Saturday, November 1, 2014 Birding Walks! Rail Trail Trailhead 
Walks 9:00 am and 11:00 am 

Pintail Marsh Birding Stations (drop-in) Walk the future Nature Center site! 
Ankeny Hill (drop-in) Join a Volunteer Work Party to Pull Ivy! Meet at Ankeny 
Hill 9:00 am 

More information and directions available at 
https://www.facebook.com/events/1566040500296077/or call 503-623-2749 

 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Storm birds
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:55:49 -0700
Hi -

A few sightings from Yaquina Bay South Jetty in heavy rain and 30 mph+
winds:

Parasitic Jaeger                                    1  winter adult pale
phase lit on water in channel
Marbled Godwit                                     2  at gull spot
Dunlin                                                    20  brief visit
to gull spot
Green-winged Teal                                2  gull spot, females

Western Gull                                          10+
GW Gull                                                  15
Herring Gull                                             1     Adult
Heermann's Gulls                                    6
Mew Gulls                                                4
California Gull                                          600

Wayne
Subject: Jim Leonard's Branta
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:38:23 -0700
 It's totally a Cackler, Jim. What I call a "True" Cackler (minima) and what I 
saw Wayne Hoffman call a "real" Cackler earlier this month. Keep up the good 
work, Wayne. The ABA can perform as many unnatural acts as they wish, some 
folks have a grip. Lars 


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Subject: Photo: Need ID Cackling or Dusky or another species of Goose?
From: Jim Leonard <photojleonard AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:14:07 -0700
I need help identifying a goose photo I took at Pintail Marsh at Ankeny NWR
last weekend.  Is it a Cackling, Dusky or another species?  Thanks, Jim
Leonard.  Click on link for photo.





https://plus.google.com/photos/108302360004365615395/albums/6073073811789053361?authkey=CKC62P_1u97DpQE 
Subject: Re: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:39:46 -0700
Keep the updates coming. I am hoping to come see this bird on Friday.

Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 22, 2014, at 9:31 AM, "Russ Namitz"  wrote:

> The bird is still being seen today, Wednesday morning. Thanks for the update 
Forrest and congratulations. 

> 
> Russ
> 
> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:17:52 -0700
> Subject: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
> From: forrest.english AT gmail.com
> To: rv-birds AT googlegroups.com
> 
> As of now still hopping between mudflats in SW corner with the AMPI flock.
> 
> --
> Forrest English
> 
> Sent from a mobile device
> 
> 
> -- 
> -- 
> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
> rv-birds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com
> 
> --- 
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"Rogue Valley Birds" group. 

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Subject: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:30:21 -0700
The bird is still being seen today, Wednesday morning. Thanks for the update 
Forrest and congratulations. 

Russ

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:17:52 -0700
Subject: [RV Birds] Red-throated Pipit still at Lake Selmac
From: forrest.english AT gmail.com
To: rv-birds AT googlegroups.com

As of now still hopping between mudflats in SW corner with the AMPI flock.
--

Forrest English
Sent from a mobile device




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Subject: weekend notes, mostly Benton County
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:19:29 -0700
 About 2:30 pm Sat (10/18) 8 Turkey Vultures passed quickly over downtown 
Manning (mp 47, Hwy 26). Surely the latest date for me. This is the eastern 
front of the Coast Range, as is the Fairchilds' residence outside Philomath 
where they saw a TV the next day. Pintail Marsh at Ankeny NWR was negative for 
White-faced Ibis from 5-6pm Saturday evening. Good light and no heat 
distortion. The entire impoundment was full of a wonderful mix of birds. Best 
was perhaps a female REDHEAD. There were Gadwall and Ring-necked Ducks in full 
breeding plumage. A seemingly all black Redtail on the powerline to the west 
turned out to be a rather normally colored Redtail from the ventral 
perspective. Lots of Greater White-fronted Geese on the water. This is only two 
miles off I-5. Take Exit 242 (Talbot) just north of the Santiam Rest Area. 

 Heavy fog and a balmy 57 degrees in Corvallis on Sunday morning. October fog I 
recall vividly from grade school onwards, but it was typically near freezing. 
The obvious choice was Mary's Peak, well above the fog. I have never 
encountered so many vehicles headed downhill at 8am on a Sunday morning. Six I 
believe, and deer season in progress I imagine. My son accused me of some kind 
of scurious profiling when I surmised that the two gravity favored vehicles of 
a Subaru make were occupied by birders. In any event, zero grouse, quail, and 
Varied Thrushes on the pavement or shoulders. Apparently a sea breeze, a 
classic part of summer in Corvallis, was going strong October 19, 2014. The 
area east of the Coast Range was a white sea of high fog, while bits of the 
Alsea basin were under clear skies. Sunny and 52 at that first pullout on the 
summit, but a wind approaching gale force. No birds of any kind detected. 

 Shortly after leaving the parking lot on foot the whole summit became capped 
in ground fog. It had been clearly visible as we drove up. My son snapped a 
picture of two birds on the wing while I was gazing at the gravel. The chances 
of something really good on Mary's Peak are well above average in October. I'll 
try to look at them enlarged on his computer screen and take a guess. We spent 
a long time on the summit, wrapped in table cloths because our parkas were safe 
in Corvallis. A dicky bird flushed from the grass, and on its second sally 
vocalized, so I know it was an American Pipit. I saw one in equally heavy grass 
there Sept. 30 this year on a warm, windless afternoon. An adult Red-tailed 
Hawk was at the first meadow pullout at the west end of the summit (as 
mentioned above.) 

 At the now abandoned railroad crossing of Finley Road around 2:30pm small 
birds flew off the gravel onto the newly ploughed and planted field on the 
north side. I stopped and the first two to flush were HORNED LARKS, one in 
heated pursuit of the other. I've not seen the species here before, perhaps 
largely due to lack of effort. The remaining birds were all pipits, presumably 
American. A while later, eastbound, I stopped and examined the field east of 
the abandoned RR right-of-way. There were hundreds of pipits, "easily" observed 
by scope because the rye-grass or wheat is only an inch high. Given the size of 
the flock and the time of the year, I knew I should give the spot some effort. 
But the heat distortion was substantial, 76 degrees, w/o a breeze it would have 
been hopeless. The flock was concentrated in the north and east part of the 
field, very far from the road. I saw pipits with pale backgrounds and bold 
stripes, pipits with yellow-green bellies and diffuse strip 

 es, no russet-throated ones because that picture in the field guide is a true 
red herring--it's the spring plumage isn't it? I was more expecting longspurs 
given the many reports the past week. 

 Gail and I heard Bluebirds when parked at the ne corner of the cultivated 
field west of the Prairie Overlook. I assume they were overhead as we never saw 
any, yet heard them for well over a minute, always at the same volume. IN the 
field east of McFadden Marsh a sizeable flock was hawking, about an hour later. 
Each bird hovered about 3m off the ground, then dropped to earth to grab 
something. Upon arising they always drifted east, away from me, with the slight 
breeze. I assume Western Bluebirds do this, but I didn't get unequivocal proof 
they weren't Mountain Bluebirds. It was 77 degrees in the field west of the 
Bruce Road overlook, south of Pigeon Butte. A rotund fellow with an enormous 
backpack was traversing the field and none of the raptors seen on my last visit 
were in evidence. The field south of Bruce Road had two Northern Harriers on 
the ground. A first year bird was eating something near the road while a coyote 
walking east along the hedge at the south end (very 

  distant) caught what I assume was a mouse while it ambled along.
 The heat waves were very bad at the Prairie Overlook, making even the birds 
perched 15m off the ground disappointing. A Red-shouldered Hawk called 
frequently to the north, near where Finley Road dog-legs south. A Red-tail 
showed up that looked just like the one at Ankeny the night before, but much 
closer: very dark brown from head to tail on top. A cool (bluish) dark 
chocolate on the whole head. It was evenly hooded w/o any markings. Underneath 
it had a nearly normal redtail and pale breast. Two kites were over the south 
end of the prairie at 3 and again visible about 5. Through the scope at five I 
could see that one was a juvenile. They were in close association on the wing. 
I wonder if it was still trying to get fed? Lars 


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Subject: Re: pelagic peregrines
From: Steve Engel <Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 08:37:56 -0700
In 1992 I observed a peregrine falcon pursuing a golden plover over one of the 
Revillagigedo Islands off the west coast of Mexico. The nearest land mass north 
or east is over 200 miles away. 


Steve Engel, Nature Program Supervisor
NEW FALL PROGRAMS!:  http://www.hillsboro-oregon.gov/index.aspx?page=1370

Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve | Parks and Recreation Department 
2600 SW Hillsboro Hwy., Hillsboro, OR 97123
Phone: †503-681-6283 |fax 503-681-6277
email:† steve.engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov


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Subject: White-winged Scoter at Foster Lake, Linn County
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 08:13:46 -0700
Viewed from east end of weigh station area along Hwy 20. Associating with coots 
and Western Grebes in shallow water with exposed stumps on northeast side of 
lake. 


Doug





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Subject: Oct 19 Benton belated late date migrant
From: "Karan Fairchild" <alderspr AT peak.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 07:24:12 -0700
Along the Finley NWR Homer Campbell trail to Cabell Marsh, Karan and I both
heard a SWAINSON'S THRUSH whit call numerous times, but without being able
to see it among the dense shrub layer, or draw it into view with pishing.
Pretty unmistakable as one of our most abundant migrants.   We heard it very
near the resting bench with the small Corvallis Audubon plaque.

Less surprising, later in the day at home (see eBird Alder Spring tract
hotspot) our ever-vigilant dog drew our attention to a  single TURKEY
VULTURE.  
Jim and Karan Fairchild
6 mi SW of Philomath, Benton County






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Subject: Curry CC Longspur 10/21/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 06:46:56 -0700
Terry Wahl called me and described a longspur he saw or tried to see at his
family ranch near Cape Blanco yesterday.  Sounded like a CHESTNUT-COLLARED
LONGSPUR to me.  Terry has seen several on the ranch before, this one made
a different call though, not the uual kiddle call.  I have seen them
several times also in Coos and they have a couple calls besides the kiddle
call I have heard.  Anyhow, he never got really good looks at it (which is
typical) so he wasn't sure on the ID but I imagine that was what it was.

They can be a real frustrating species as they tend to fly off and then
drop like rocks before you can see them and when you try and sneak up on
them they fly again and drop again and on and on.  You can play this game
of trying to sneak up on them but never seeing them for an hour+ and never
get good looks which is what happened to Tery yesterday.

Oh saw the 2 PALM WARBLERS again at the Coos Bay office in N. Bend on
Monday morning.

ENJOY!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Fw: RT Pipit Photo Lake Selmac
From: "Jeff Schwilk" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "harpagornis26@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 00:14:45 -0700



On Wednesday, October 22, 2014 12:05 AM, Jeff Schwilk  
wrote: 

 


Hello,

After less than ideal viewing conditions yesterday evening at Lake Selmac 
(heavy rain) I returned around noon today and easily re-found the RT Pipit. 
Attached is one of the better photos. Thanks Russ for the amazing find! 


http://harpagornis.smugmug.com/Other/North-American-Birds/i-vq5kxtt


Jeff Schwilk
Subject: Fwd: pelagic falcons
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:29:29 -0700


> I have been on pelagic cruises off Oregon for about 20 years (one to four 
trips per year). I recall a Peregrine coming to the ship once and a Merlin also 
once coming to the ship. Both were fall trips. Neither bird stayed with the 
ship. 

> 
> Whether they were migrants crossing the ocean from the Aleutians or Haida 
Gwai I do not know. We have also had Eurasian Collared Doves, a Green Heron, a 
White-faced Ibis, and many other land bird species. 

> 
> 
> 
> Jeff Gilligan



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Subject: PRAIRIE FALCON, Lane County
From: "Allen Prigge" <prigge1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 19:00:21 -0700

-This afternoon I went looking for the large raptor reported this morning  
in the vicinity of the Alvadore/Meadowview Rd. junction. I did not find a  
raptor fitting the description of the bird seen in the morning, but did  
find a PRAIRIE FALCON on a post adjacent to Franklin Rd. I was able to get  
photos.

Also seen were a MERLIN from the end of Starlite Lane, Alvadore--and the  
ever faithful NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD guarding its' territory from the top of  
the Holly tree.

Al Prigge


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Subject: Falcon Migration
From: clay crofton <ruffledgrouch AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:15:39 -0700
One of the Peregrine tracked by the Falcon Research Group recently crossed
the Caribbean. About 1000 miles.

Link to map data       http://frg.org/track_pefa12.htm

-- 


*Happy birdingClay*
*The boy Who* *Cried Wrentit*
Subject: More Gyr Info
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:56:17 -0700
Yeah, so Gyrs (one, two who knows?) are following the Aleutians down, we
have known this for years.  The Gyrs are arriving when the big numbers of
Aleutians are here.  Most years the Aleutians are in by late September and
mostly gone by mid-November but a few hundred have started to overwinter.
Their wintering and migration staging areas are fairly plastic and have
changed over the past decade although they seem to use the New River
bottoms area both in the spring and fall.  There are in fact credible
oversummering records in recent years also!  I have some more specific info:

Our first Floras Lake Gyr sighting was in 2001, there had been very few Gyr
sightings ever in either Coos or Curry before that.  Aleutian Cackling
Geese numbers were beginning their rebound then and use the private
pastures (New River bottomlands) north of there.

Sep. 22, 2003- first Gyr sighting in Coos Bay, bird overwintered on North
Spit, frequent reports from the New River bottoms that year- one or two
birds?

Sept. 26, 2004 first sighting in New River bottoms, bird overwintered there
and was seen taking Aleutians down regularly.

Overwintered same area next winter (2005/2006).

Sept. 27, 2006 first Coos Bay sighting. I heard bird was overwintering down
in New River bottoms, but never personally saw it.

Oct. 23, 2007 first sighting in Coos Bay. Still in New River bottomlands?
Hard to say as people had become "use" to seeing them and I had reports of
Gyrs year-round at Cape Blanco (the host was telling this to people at one
point). Obvious confusion between Peregrines and Gyrs.

early November 2008 first New River bottoms sightings I heard of.

2009/2010- overwintered in New River bottoms

From 2010 I didn't hear much until this year but I heard that birds were
sighted off and on.  Also I think this coincides with reports starting in
CA about birds following them down there, not exactly when that first
happened or how many years they were seen down with the Aleutians there-
would be fun to know though?

I bet there is more info out there, just not sure how much some folks want
to discuss Gyrs on-line.

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: CALIFORNIA QUAIL COVEY OF 200, 1973
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:04:42 -0700
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/21/quail-stairs/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: RT Pipit -- Yes
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:56:35 -0700
Congratulations Bob. Glad to hear that the streak is intact.

Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 21, 2014, at 2:26 PM, "Robert Lockett"  
wrote: 


> Looking at the Red-throated Pipit at Southwest corner of Lake Selmac right 
now 2:22 pm, Tuesday 10/21 first found by Russ Namitz yesterday. My record of 
an ABA bird seen annually since 1963 still stands! 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Photo Quiz: out of context
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:44:36 -0700
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: RT Pipit -- Yes
From: Robert Lockett <robert.s.lockett AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:26:52 -0700
Looking at the Red-throated Pipit at Southwest corner of Lake Selmac right now 
2:22 pm, Tuesday 10/21 first found by Russ Namitz yesterday. My record of an 
ABA bird seen annually since 1963 still stands! 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:14:14 -0700
I went online looking for sources documenting both over water and non-stop 
overnight/long-distance migrations of falcons. I found one reference to a 
Peregrine making non-stop 4200 mile flight from Europe to Africa. On Sunday 
Phil Pickering and I had an adult Peregrine come in off the ocean first thing 
in the morning at Boiler Bay. Hard to know if it was on a hunting run or a 
migrant. 


I agree with Wayne. Adaptation to new food sources is often a factor in new 
patterns of occurrence in raptors. If it works it will be repeated. 


Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 21, 2014, at 11:43 AM, "Wayne Hoffman"  wrote:

> Hi - 
> 
> Dave is correct that most raptors follow migratory routes mostly over land. 
Many have great unwillingness to cross water, and some seem to suffer mortality 
on even modest crossings. From my years in the Florida Keys, I have a lot of 
experience with raptors travelling down the Keys in fall, and then certain 
species retracing their course back to the mainland. Turkey Vultures, 
Swainson's Hawks, Broad-winged Hawks, and Short-tailed Hawks in particular were 
often seen making these return trips. At that time Swainson's and Short-tails 
were unknown in Cuba, just 90 miles to the south, even though both species were 
regular moving up and down the Keys. I also heard several accounts from boaters 
of finding multiple "hawks" floating dead on the water off the keys during the 
period of fall migration. We were never able to find out which species, or 
determine causes of death, but evidently for some species, ocean crossings were 
very difficult or risky. 

> 
> This does not apply to Peregrine Falcons, however, as they are well-known to 
regularly make long over-water flights. Merlins also seemed very willing to 
head out over the ocean. Ospreys and Swallow-tailed Kites also regularly 
migrate south out of Florida toward Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula. I don't 
think we know enough about Gyrfalcon movements to be able to say how willing 
they are to make long ocean crossings. I suspect they are physiologically 
capable of flying directly from SW Alaska to Oregon or northern California. I 
doubt they regularly try to kill geese over the ocean, as I imagine they would 
have difficulty feeding on them at sea, particularly if the surface was at all 
rough. 

> 
> So, the possibility of following geese south remains speculative. The most 
likely alternative explanation for the regular occurrence of Gyrfalcons with 
geese in SW Oregon/NW California is that individuals that made it into that 
area over land encountered the geese, and made a habit of returning in 
subsequent years. I do not know whether we know ages on many of the fall birds 
down here, but if many are adults, return migration would be supported. The 
fall concentrations of Cackling Geese in those areas is a recent development, 
so however the Gyrs are getting there, it probably is recent as well. 

> 
> Wayne
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 4:57 AM, Tim Rodenkirk  
wrote: 

> The migration route difference makes sense Dave, I wonder how the Gyr(s) find 
the cacklers? There has been a Gyr or several Gyrs that show up where the 
Aleutian cacklers are for the past decade or so. The Gyr reports have followed 
the cacklers south into CA some years also if I remember correctly. 

> 
> Tim R
> Coos Bay  
> 
> On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 11:40 PM, David Irons  wrote:
> Alan et al.,
> 
> I suspect that the apparent connection between the arrival of Aleutian 
Cackling Geese and the earliest Gyrfalcons of the season in Coos County is 
temporal only and that it has little to do with the route each species took to 
get here. As a general rule, raptors are diurnal migrants whose migratory 
routes are mostly over land, which allows them to take advantage of thermal 
uplift that occurs during daylight hours. Aleutian Cackling Geese take a more 
direct route from their Arctic breeding grounds, which takes them across well 
over a thousand miles of open ocean. When migrating, geese to continue flying 
all day and all night, making a mostly non-stop flight. When hunting waterfowl, 
falcons essentially blast their prey to the ground with a high-speed stoop from 
above. I can't imagine a falcon, even a Gyr grabbing a goose out of midair or 
carrying one very far after knocking it down into the water. With no terra 
firma on which to dine, what point would there be to the falcons following 
their prey base out over the open ocean? 

> 
> Dave Irons
> Portland, OR  
> 
> Subject: [obol] Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
> From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:06:26 -0700
> CC: obol AT freelists.org
> To: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> There has been a pattern of occasional October Gyrs on the south coast. I 
wonder if they simply fly down with the geese. Why not? 

> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> 
> Eugene, Oregon
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Oct 20, 2014, at 3:01 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
> 
> Jim Heaney observed a GYRFALCON at New River, Coos this past weekend (on 
Saturday). I remember when Dave Pitkin was still alive, that he observed a 
Gyrhanging with the ALEUTIAN CACKLING GEESE in that same area for a few falls 
and perhaps followed the flocks down from Alaska. I was with Terry Wahl on 
Sunday (the 19th) and he got a call from Rick McKenzie who has a large ranch 
near New Lake in the same area where the Gyr was seen. Rick said he had 20,000 
Aleutians on his ranch, a pretty huge number for fall (perhaps the most he has 
had on his place this time of year?). 

>  
> Jim mentioned seeing the Gyr carrying a gull but also saw evidence of cackler 
kills along the beach there... 

>  
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Peregrine at sea
From: ed mcv <ed.mcvicker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:40:52 -0700
In Sept., 2008, I was on a cruise ship 30 miles off northern Oregon coast
when a Peregrine appeared.  It hung around and on the ship for about an
hour before heading east toward shore.  It was fun getting some photos.

https://www.flickr.com/search/?deleted=3061013899&w=10665268 AT N04&q=peregrine


Ed McVicker
Portland
Subject: Possible BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER song heard in Salem
From: Shawneen <shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:21:09 -0700
David Mandell just called. At approx. 12:30 PM he heard only once, what 
distinctly sounded just like a Black-throated Green Warbler song. He did not 
have time to look for it but thought if someone wanted to check it out he 
wanted to notify folks. Given he didn't see the bird he was making no promises 
that it was one. 


The location was on the Willamette University property directly across the 
street from the west side of the state Capitol building. Looking at Google maps 
it would appear it is more south than west and across State Street. 


Shawneen Finnegan
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: FW: [RV Birds] Red-throated pipit
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:19:01 -0700
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:48:33 -0700
From: mchar5 AT msn.com
To: rv-birds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [RV Birds] Red-throated pipit

This morning the Red-throated pipit was still in the location where Mr. Namitz 
found it. Very active and moving but fairly easily found. Also, found a 
Portland birder who is doing a big year and she was very excited to have seen 
the pipit. 





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Subject: On time RB Sapsucker
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein <deweysage AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:15:39 -0700
As per normal, the RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER showed up in our yard 
today.    North of Bandon, Coos Co.

Cheers
Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein


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Subject: pelagic falcons
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:11:27 -0700
 To add to Wayne's observations on raptor migration in the Florida Keys: I was 
on a boat trip to the Dry Tortugas led by Davis Finch and Will Russell in 1977. 
It was sometime in April. The Coast Guard station west of the fort was swarming 
with Peregrines and Merlins. In 1977 Peregrines were a real rarity. I don't 
recall how many we saw, maybe dozens. Everyone said it was the most Peregrines 
they'd ever seen at once. I was about 17 years old and by far the youngest 
passenger on the trip. 38 years later I still haven't seen that many Peregrines 
in a 24 hour period, let alone a single point count. Lars 


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Subject: Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: Wayne Hoffman <whoffman AT peak.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:42:24 -0700
Hi -

Dave is correct that most raptors follow migratory routes mostly over
land.  Many have great unwillingness to cross water, and some seem to
suffer mortality on even modest crossings.  From my years in the Florida
Keys, I have a lot of experience with raptors travelling down the Keys in
fall, and then certain species retracing their course back to the
mainland.  Turkey Vultures, Swainson's Hawks, Broad-winged Hawks, and
Short-tailed Hawks in particular were often seen making these return
trips.  At that time Swainson's and Short-tails were unknown in Cuba, just
90 miles to the south, even though both species were regular moving up and
down the Keys.  I also heard several accounts from boaters of finding
multiple "hawks" floating dead on the water off the keys during the period
of fall migration.  We were never able to find out which species, or
determine causes of death, but evidently for some species, ocean crossings
were very difficult or risky.

This does not apply to Peregrine Falcons, however, as they are well-known
to regularly make long over-water flights.  Merlins also seemed very
willing to head out over the ocean.  Ospreys and Swallow-tailed Kites also
regularly migrate south out of Florida toward Cuba and the Yucatan
Peninsula.   I don't think we know enough about Gyrfalcon movements to be
able to say how willing they are to make long ocean crossings.  I suspect
they are physiologically capable of flying directly from SW Alaska to
Oregon or northern California.  I doubt they regularly try to kill geese
over the ocean, as I imagine they would have difficulty feeding on them at
sea, particularly if the surface was at all rough.

So, the possibility of following geese south remains speculative.  The most
likely alternative explanation for the regular occurrence of Gyrfalcons
with geese in SW Oregon/NW California is that individuals that made it into
that area over land encountered the geese, and made a habit of returning in
subsequent years.  I do not know whether we know ages on many of the fall
birds down here, but if many are adults, return migration would be
supported.  The fall concentrations of Cackling Geese in those areas is a
recent development, so however the Gyrs are getting there, it probably is
recent as well.

Wayne




On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 4:57 AM, Tim Rodenkirk 
wrote:

> The migration route difference makes sense Dave, I wonder how the Gyr(s)
> find the cacklers? There has been a Gyr or several Gyrs that show up where
> the Aleutian cacklers are for the past decade or so.  The Gyr reports have
> followed the cacklers south into CA some years also if I remember correctly.
>
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>
> On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 11:40 PM, David Irons  wrote:
>
>> Alan et al.,
>>
>> I suspect that the apparent connection between the arrival of Aleutian
>> Cackling Geese and the earliest Gyrfalcons of the season in Coos County is
>> temporal only and that it has little to do with the route each species took
>> to get here. As a general rule, raptors are diurnal migrants whose
>> migratory routes are mostly over land, which allows them to take advantage
>> of thermal uplift that occurs during daylight hours. Aleutian Cackling
>> Geese take a more direct route from their Arctic breeding grounds, which
>> takes them across well over a thousand miles of open ocean. When migrating,
>> geese to continue flying all day and all night, making a mostly non-stop
>> flight. When hunting waterfowl, falcons essentially blast their prey to the
>> ground with a high-speed stoop from above. I can't imagine a falcon, even a
>> Gyr grabbing a goose out of midair or carrying one very far after knocking
>> it down into the water. With no terra firma on which to dine, what point
>> would there be to the falcons following their prey base out over the open
>> ocean?
>>
>> Dave Irons
>> Portland, OR
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> Subject: [obol] Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
>> From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:06:26 -0700
>> CC: obol AT freelists.org
>> To: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
>>
>>
>> There has been a pattern of occasional October Gyrs on the south coast.
>> I wonder if they simply fly down with the geese.  Why not?
>> .
>> .
>> Alan Contreras
>> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>>
>> Eugene, Oregon
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Oct 20, 2014, at 3:01 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>>
>> Jim Heaney observed a GYRFALCON at New River, Coos this past weekend (on
>> Saturday).  I remember when Dave Pitkin was still alive, that he observed a
>> Gyrhanging with the ALEUTIAN CACKLING GEESE in that same area for a few
>> falls and perhaps followed the flocks down from Alaska.  I was with Terry
>> Wahl on Sunday (the 19th)  and he got a call from Rick McKenzie who has a
>> large ranch near New Lake in the same area where the Gyr was seen.  Rick
>> said he had 20,000 Aleutians on his ranch, a pretty huge number for fall
>> (perhaps the most he has had on his place this time of year?).
>>
>> Jim mentioned seeing the Gyr carrying a gull but also saw evidence of
>> cackler kills along the beach there...
>>
>> Merry migration!
>> Tim R
>> Coos Bay
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Large falcon NW of Eugene
From: Bruce Newhouse <newhouse AT efn.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:55:03 -0700
10:45 a.m., Tuesday, 2014-10-21
"Raptor Magnet" Alby Thoumssin just called and said he had just seen a 
large FALCON chased off a utility pole by ravens, and it was larger than 
the ravens.  He said overall the bird did not seem to have much in the 
way of contrasting colors, and seemed to have a large body.  He suspects 
Gyrfalcon, but hopes someone else will find and photograph the bird!

The location was at the intersection of Meadowview and Alvadore roads, 
which is a little less than 2 miles west of Hwy. 99, NW of Eugene, NE of 
Fern Ridge Reservoir, and SE of Junction City.

Bruce Newhouse in Eugene



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Subject: Willet; Godwits Seaside
From: David Bailey <davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:44:35 -0700
Tuesday 21 October 2014
Seaside, Clatsop County

The WILLET and two MARBLED GODWITS were again present at the the Necanicum
Estuary off the Overlook Park west of the high school. This morning they
were on the east side of the tip of the south spit with a mixed flock of
gulls, including several Heermann's Gulls, Double-crested Cormorants,  and
Brown Pelicans.

The RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was calling (incessantly) and visible in a spruce
along Coho Creek immediately south of the ball fields by the hospital.

David

David C. Bailey
Seaside, Oregon
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 06:21:07 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 21, 2014 6:09:37 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Mandarin Duck (1 Washington)
Elegant Tern (1 Clatsop)
Red-throated Pipit (4 Josephine)
Common Yellowthroat (2 Multnomah)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 04:57:51 -0700
The migration route difference makes sense Dave, I wonder how the Gyr(s)
find the cacklers? There has been a Gyr or several Gyrs that show up where
the Aleutian cacklers are for the past decade or so.  The Gyr reports have
followed the cacklers south into CA some years also if I remember correctly.

Tim R
Coos Bay

On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 11:40 PM, David Irons  wrote:

> Alan et al.,
>
> I suspect that the apparent connection between the arrival of Aleutian
> Cackling Geese and the earliest Gyrfalcons of the season in Coos County is
> temporal only and that it has little to do with the route each species took
> to get here. As a general rule, raptors are diurnal migrants whose
> migratory routes are mostly over land, which allows them to take advantage
> of thermal uplift that occurs during daylight hours. Aleutian Cackling
> Geese take a more direct route from their Arctic breeding grounds, which
> takes them across well over a thousand miles of open ocean. When migrating,
> geese to continue flying all day and all night, making a mostly non-stop
> flight. When hunting waterfowl, falcons essentially blast their prey to the
> ground with a high-speed stoop from above. I can't imagine a falcon, even a
> Gyr grabbing a goose out of midair or carrying one very far after knocking
> it down into the water. With no terra firma on which to dine, what point
> would there be to the falcons following their prey base out over the open
> ocean?
>
> Dave Irons
> Portland, OR
>
> ------------------------------
> Subject: [obol] Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
> From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
> Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:06:26 -0700
> CC: obol AT freelists.org
> To: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
>
>
> There has been a pattern of occasional October Gyrs on the south coast.  I
> wonder if they simply fly down with the geese.  Why not?
> .
> .
> Alan Contreras
> acontrer56 AT gmail.com
>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 20, 2014, at 3:01 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>
> Jim Heaney observed a GYRFALCON at New River, Coos this past weekend (on
> Saturday).  I remember when Dave Pitkin was still alive, that he observed a
> Gyrhanging with the ALEUTIAN CACKLING GEESE in that same area for a few
> falls and perhaps followed the flocks down from Alaska.  I was with Terry
> Wahl on Sunday (the 19th)  and he got a call from Rick McKenzie who has a
> large ranch near New Lake in the same area where the Gyr was seen.  Rick
> said he had 20,000 Aleutians on his ranch, a pretty huge number for fall
> (perhaps the most he has had on his place this time of year?).
>
> Jim mentioned seeing the Gyr carrying a gull but also saw evidence of
> cackler kills along the beach there...
>
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 06:40:14 +0000
Alan et al.,

I suspect that the apparent connection between the arrival of Aleutian Cackling 
Geese and the earliest Gyrfalcons of the season in Coos County is temporal only 
and that it has little to do with the route each species took to get here. As a 
general rule, raptors are diurnal migrants whose migratory routes are mostly 
over land, which allows them to take advantage of thermal uplift that occurs 
during daylight hours. Aleutian Cackling Geese take a more direct route from 
their Arctic breeding grounds, which takes them across well over a thousand 
miles of open ocean. When migrating, geese to continue flying all day and all 
night, making a mostly non-stop flight. When hunting waterfowl, falcons 
essentially blast their prey to the ground with a high-speed stoop from above. 
I can't imagine a falcon, even a Gyr grabbing a goose out of midair or carrying 
one very far after knocking it down into the water. With no terra firma on 
which to dine, what point would there be to the falcons following their prey 
base out over the open ocean? 


Dave Irons
Portland, OR  

Subject: [obol] Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:06:26 -0700
CC: obol AT freelists.org
To: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com

There has been a pattern of occasional October Gyrs on the south coast. I 
wonder if they simply fly down with the geese. Why not? 


..Alan Contrerasacontrer56 AT gmail.com
Eugene, Oregon



On Oct 20, 2014, at 3:01 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:Jim Heaney observed a 
GYRFALCON at New River, Coos this past weekend (on Saturday). I remember when 
Dave Pitkin was still alive, that he observed a Gyrhanging with the ALEUTIAN 
CACKLING GEESE in that same area for a few falls and perhaps followed the 
flocks down from Alaska. I was with Terry Wahl on Sunday (the 19th) and he got 
a call from Rick McKenzie who has a large ranch near New Lake in the same area 
where the Gyr was seen. Rick said he had 20,000 Aleutians on his ranch, a 
pretty huge number for fall (perhaps the most he has had on his place this time 
of year?). Jim mentioned seeing the Gyr carrying a gull but also saw evidence 
of cackler kills along the beach there... Merry migration!Tim RCoos Bay 


 		 	   		  
Subject: JoCo RED-THROATED PIPIT photos
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:37:51 -0700
I said "probable" this morning because at 730am it was dark and raining and I 
could not see the white "braces" on the back. Everything else looked good. 
However, as the morning progressed and the light became better, they became 
evident. 


https://picasaweb.google.com/113581614565937060167/JosephineCountyRareBirds#6072490915978773186 

Other good birds in Josephine County were as follows.
LAKE SELMAC (AM)36 Western Grebe (Norm Barrett reported 50 by the afternoon)1 
Clark's Grebe3 Horned Grebe1 Bonaparte's Gull 

COPELAND PONDS (PM)5 Long-billed Dowitcher2 Dunlin16 Western Grebe1 Clark's 
Grebe 

PROVOLT POND (PM)1 American Bittern (heard only)
Good birding,Russ NamitzMedford 		 	   		  
Subject: Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT
From: frank lospalluto <fdlospalluto AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:27:44 -0700
Still there late this afternoon I counted 18 pipits at one point. The bird
does limp but the boldly streaked backand the bold streaking on the buffy
underparts  I was able to view the bird in good light despite the rain. It
did come within a rictal bristle  of becoming a Peregrine Falcon meal. A
falcon stooped on the bar where the pipits were feeding along with 3
Killdeer .
The bird was still there at 1810hrs. when I left.


https://www.google.com/maps/place/42%C2%B015'30.2%22N+123%C2%B035'01.0%22W/ AT 42.258386,-123.583608,16z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0 

.

Thanks Russ, another great find!

frank
Subject: Re: join us in Salem Oct 21
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:57:56 -0700
Correction, red-faced!

Joe spells his last name Liebezeit!

Stephanie
On Oct 20, 2014, at 5:04 PM, Stephanie Hazen  
wrote: 


> http://www.salemaudubon.org/assets/docs/2014_october_ekestrel.pdf
> 
> 
> Click on link above to the Salem Audubon Societyís newsletter, The Kestrel, 
and scroll to page 6. 

> 
> Joe Liebezeitz, Portland Audubonís Avian Conservation Program Manager will be 
giving a talk 

> about his 12 years of work on the Northern Alaskaís Arctic Coastal Plain 
Tuesday October 21 

> at Salem Public Library in Louckís Auditorium. 
> 
> Joe's wildlife photography is superb. The tales and adventures of 12 summers 
in a fragile environment 

> filled with breeding and nesting birds, polar bears, musk oxen and vast herds 
of carribou is not to be missed! 

> 
> Joeís work led to significant wildlife protection in the area of Teshekpuk 
Lake 

> 
> doors open 6:30 meeting starts 7 pm. at Louckís Auditorium, Salem Public 
Library. 

> 
> Stephanie Hazen



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Subject: Fw: Cascade Head Science Symposium (off topic)
From: d_villa AT mail.com
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 03:44:21 +0200
Short notice, but if you are interested in Cascade Head and/or the Salmon River 
Estuary restoration and have the weekend open, you might enjoy the science 
symposium that is part of the 40th anniversary of the Cascade Head Management 
Plan. 


 
dawn v
Lincoln City/Nelscott
 
 

Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 at 1:46 PM
From: "Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council" 
To: d_villa AT mail.com
Subject: Cascade Head Science Symposium

It is not too late to register for the
   

CASCADE HEAD  
SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM

About the Symposium 
The Cascade Head Science Symposium is an opportunity to hear directly from many 
of the scientists who have conducted research within the Cascade Head Scenic 
Research Area. Please join us to explore the significance of their findings 
relative to other Pacific Northwest coastal 
environments.                 


Date      
Friday-Saturday, October 24th-25th 

 
Location 

Camp Westwind
 
Cost 
$200 - with lodging (Fri-Sat) at Westwind, transportation (across the Salmon 
River) and meals  

or 
$150 - per day, with transportation (across the Salmon River) and lunches
 
Registration
To register, please visit the
Westwind Stewardship Group Website 
(http://www.westwind.org/news-and-events/2014-Westwind-Fall-Stewardship-Weekend) 
 or contact 

sarah AT westwind.org[sarah AT westwind.org] 
--------------------------------------------------------------  
Symposium Hosted by 
Camp Westwind
Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council | PO Box 112 | Neotsu | OR | 97364


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Subject: a little bit from our archives: Oregon's first Great Gray Owl nest discovery re-discovered
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:19:43 -0700
before you look, guess the year?  California-1914; Washington State-1991.
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/20/some-ornitharchaeology/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: join us in Salem Oct 21
From: Stephanie Hazen <stephaniehazen17 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:04:56 -0700
http://www.salemaudubon.org/assets/docs/2014_october_ekestrel.pdf


Click on link above to the Salem Audubon Societyís newsletter, The Kestrel, and 
scroll to page 6. 


Joe Liebezeitz, Portland Audubonís Avian Conservation Program Manager will be 
giving a talk 

 about his 12 years of work on the Northern Alaskaís Arctic Coastal Plain 
Tuesday October 21 

at Salem Public Library in Louckís Auditorium. 

Joe's wildlife photography is superb. The tales and adventures of 12 summers in 
a fragile environment 

filled with breeding and nesting birds, polar bears, musk oxen and vast herds 
of carribou is not to be missed! 


Joeís work led to significant wildlife protection in the area of Teshekpuk Lake

doors open 6:30 meeting starts 7 pm. at Louckís Auditorium, Salem Public 
Library. 


Stephanie Hazen

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Subject: Pelagic results: OCT 18
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:43:24 -0700
Birders from 5 states and one province (Judy Meredith. Sheran Wright, Mike 
Toochin, Ed Boyd, Jim Stasz, Terry and Danuta Edwards, Tom Crabtree, Owen 
Schmidt, and others and I) did a birding cruise off the Oregon coast on 
Saturday. 


The rarest birds were 2 ASHY STORM-PETRELS and  2 COOK'S PETRELS.

Only 4 Long-tailed Jaegers were seen, but both of the other jaeger species were 
seen much of the day, as were a few South Polar Skuas. 


Cassin's Auklets were seen throughout the day, but only 2 Rhinoceros Auklets, 
and no other alcids. 


Other species seen:

Black-footed Albatross
Pink-footed Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Short-tailed Shearwater
Buller's Shearwater  (2)  
N. Fulmar
Leach's Storm-Petrel
Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
Herring Gull
Sabine's Gull  (3?)  
Arctic Tern (6 only) 
Red  Phalarope (numerous)
Red-necked Phalarope


The most surprising thing of the trip to me was the 5 Eared Grebes on the ocean 
about 40 miles off the Big Sur coast of central California. 


The "whaling" was good off California (where the ocean was much calmer):
1 Blue Whale
Minke, Sei, Fin, Humpbacked Whales
Orca

We also went through miles of water off California where there were frequent 
Blue Sharks near the surface. 



Jeff Gilligan



 

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Subject: Asian strays
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:23:58 -0700
For those who hadn't heard, a flock of at least 12 migrant songbirds arrived at 
Kure atoll in the Hawaiian islands this morning. That is big news in itself, 
but the flock contained at least four Bramblings. The other birds have not yet 
been identified. 


So check those little sparrowy birds carefully, especially on the coast with 
the series of SW fronts coming through. Last week there was a strong NW wind 
system over the eastern Siberian coast for at least a couple of days. 


Stuff is movin'.

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Seawatches: Clatsop Co 10/20/2014
From: Mike Patterson <celata AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:04:06 -0700
I spent an hour at the South Jetty of the Columbia River watching
a very rough and hazy ocean this morning from 8:25 to 9:25.  There
was almost nothing on the near ocean because of the rough seas, but
out beyond the end of the jetty I could see lots of smallish gulls
that were most probably BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKES.  Ten kittiwakes
came in close enough to ID.  I also saw a single unidentified jaeger.

I the went to Hammond Boat Basin and did a 1 hour station count from
the parking area on the river.  That's where the real action was.

Highlight include:
   250 Elegant Terns
   3 Parasitic Jaegers
   1 Pomarine Jaeger
   1 Long-tailed Jaeger
   95 Brown Pelicans

and easily 1000 gulls of all sorts of shapes and sizes.


-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
String Theory
http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/northcoastdiaries/?p=2182



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Subject: geese at Westmoreland Park, Portland
From: "WLRisser" <wlrisser AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:14:34 -0700
A friend and I spent some time diagnosing the geese grazing on the grass at
the far end of the big pond at Westmoreland Park in Portland yesterday.  In
spite of the large number of humans, we were able to get close to a good mix
of Canada and cackling geese and their subspecies.  Highly recommended.
Will Risser, Portland
Subject: Re: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:06:26 -0700
There has been a pattern of occasional October Gyrs on the south coast. I 
wonder if they simply fly down with the geese. Why not? 

.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon




On Oct 20, 2014, at 3:01 PM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:

> Jim Heaney observed a GYRFALCON at New River, Coos this past weekend (on 
Saturday). I remember when Dave Pitkin was still alive, that he observed a 
Gyrhanging with the ALEUTIAN CACKLING GEESE in that same area for a few falls 
and perhaps followed the flocks down from Alaska. I was with Terry Wahl on 
Sunday (the 19th) and he got a call from Rick McKenzie who has a large ranch 
near New Lake in the same area where the Gyr was seen. Rick said he had 20,000 
Aleutians on his ranch, a pretty huge number for fall (perhaps the most he has 
had on his place this time of year?). 

>  
> Jim mentioned seeing the Gyr carrying a gull but also saw evidence of cackler 
kills along the beach there... 

>  
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
Subject: Re: Newport Tropical Kingbird--Yes
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:01:50 -0700
Hi,

Chuck Philo also saw the Tropical Kingbird on top of a windblown
spruce tree in the same area at about 2:15 PM.  He saw it at 749 SW
11th Street.

To get to 1206 SW Abbey Street where Pete Lawson originally found this
Tropical Kingbird: from HWY 101 in south Newport, follow the signs to
Samaritan Pacific Hospital by turning onto SW Abbey Street, keep on SW
Abbey just north of the ER and main entrance to the Hospital and go up
the hill to 1206 SW 6th Street that is at the end of the street--do
not turn to drive down the hill to the Bayfront.  Street map to this
address is at http://bit.ly/1nxe4zN   Although  this location is just
north of the Newport Bayfront, it is not possible to drive directly to
it from the Bayfront.

To get to 749 SW 11th Street where Chuck most recently reported it,
drive on SW Abbey that flows into SW Harbor View towards the Bayfront
at the east edge of the Hospital campus, and turn on SW 11th that is
at east edge of Hospital campus.  749 SW 11th is the Bayview Building
where Samaritan Pacific Hospice is located.  Street map to 749 SW 11th
is at http://bit.ly/11Ztvat   This is about 300-400 ft south of 1206
SW Abbey, so the Tropical Kingbird is evidently moving around in that
general area.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon

On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 10:32 AM, Range Bayer  wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Pete Lawson reports that the Tropical Kingbird is still present this
> morning (Oct. 20) through at least 10 AM at the yard at 1206 Abbey
> Street, just north of the Newport Bayfront .
>
> Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon
>
> On Sun, Oct 19, 2014 at 2:44 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> Pete Lawson found a Tropical Kingbird near 1206 Abbey Street, just
>> north of the Newport Bayfront at about 1:45 PM this afternoon (Oct.
>> 19).  It was hawking insects.  No white edges to the notched, brown
>> tail.
>>
>> Range Bayer, Newport


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Subject: Coos Gyr, lotsa Cacklers 10/18/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:01:43 -0700
Jim Heaney observed a GYRFALCON at New River, Coos this past weekend (on
Saturday).  I remember when Dave Pitkin was still alive, that he observed a
Gyrhanging with the ALEUTIAN CACKLING GEESE in that same area for a few
falls and perhaps followed the flocks down from Alaska.  I was with Terry
Wahl on Sunday (the 19th)  and he got a call from Rick McKenzie who has a
large ranch near New Lake in the same area where the Gyr was seen.  Rick
said he had 20,000 Aleutians on his ranch, a pretty huge number for fall
(perhaps the most he has had on his place this time of year?).

Jim mentioned seeing the Gyr carrying a gull but also saw evidence of
cackler kills along the beach there...

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: Re: Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT
From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman AT budget.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 12:53:11 -0700
"Eagle eye" Russ spots another great find for Josephine County. Many thanks for 
letting us know Russ. The Pipit was still present at the same location around 
1130 am (has a right club-foot, still limping). Bird seen by Romain Cooper, 
Christie Dunn, Norm Barrett and myself this morning. Russ got photos and 
perhaps Norm will also. 


Dennis
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Russ Namitz 
  To: obol AT freelists.org ; rv-birds AT googlegroups.com 
  Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 8:34 AM
  Subject: [obol] Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT


 On the SW mudflats of Lake Selmac (Josephine County) this morning, there is a 
probable RED-THROATED PIPIT with American Pipits. It has a hurt foot & limps. 


 More info to follow with photos. There is also a BONAPARTE'S GULL feeding with 
about 35 WESTERN GREBES. 


  Good birding,
  Russ Namitz
  Medford
Subject: ODFW asking for public input on search for new director
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 07:59:14 -0700
Hi all,

The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) is looking for a new
director, after the current director (Roy Elicker) announced that he is
leaving the agency for a federal position.

ODFW is requesting public input as it starts this search, via a survey
at this link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ODFWDirector

You can also get to the survey via ODFW's home page:

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/

If you have ideas on what ODFW should be doing to improve its management
of wildlife habitat, this is a chance to tell ODFW your opinions!

In addition to managing wildlife areas such as E.E. Wilson, Fern Ridge,
Sauvie Island, Summer Lake etc., and regulating hunting, fishing,
trapping & falconry, ODFW also deals with wolf/cougar issues, cormorants
along the coast, etc. 

It would be good for them to hear a good representation of opinions from
birders, wildlife photographers, and all-around naturalists.

Happy clicking,
Joel

P.S. I just took the survey. Here's a brief summary of the questions.
Questions 2, 3 and 4 are "essay" questions so you might find it helpful
to see the questions and think about your answers in advance:

1. What are the most important qualities for an ODFW director? (you get
to rank a list of 8 categories);

2. Are there any additional qualities that the next director should
have?

3. What are the critical issues or key challenges you believe the new
Director and/or the agency faces over the next 10 years?

4. Is there anything else you would like to share with us that will be
helpful in our selection process?

5. If you have any suggestions for marketing/advertising and outreach
for this position, please provide them below.

6. May we provide announcement materials for you to distribute to your
contacts/networks?

7. Stakeholder Information: Please select the group you MOST identify
with: (choose from a list which includes "hunters," "conservation
organization," "wildlife viewers" etc.)


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis






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Subject: Re: Newport Tropical Kingbird--Yes
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:32:13 -0700
Hi,

Pete Lawson reports that the Tropical Kingbird is still present this
morning (Oct. 20) through at least 10 AM at the yard at 1206 Abbey
Street, just north of the Newport Bayfront .

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon

On Sun, Oct 19, 2014 at 2:44 PM, Range Bayer  wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Pete Lawson found a Tropical Kingbird near 1206 Abbey Street, just
> north of the Newport Bayfront at about 1:45 PM this afternoon (Oct.
> 19).  It was hawking insects.  No white edges to the notched, brown
> tail.
>
> Range Bayer, Newport


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Subject: Lake Selmac RED-THROATED PIPIT
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 08:34:40 -0700
On the SW mudflats of Lake Selmac (Josephine County) this morning, there is a 
probable RED-THROATED PIPIT with American Pipits. It has a hurt foot & limps. 


More info to follow with photos. There is also a BONAPARTE'S GULL feeding with 
about 35 WESTERN GREBES. 


Good birding,
Russ Namitz
Medford
 		 	   		  
Subject: Wasco and Sherman Counties: Trikes and Shrikes
From: Bill Bradford <billbradford1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 08:03:28 -0700
We looped around Sherman and Wasco counties last weekend, camping at the
almost-empty Rock Creek Reservoir in Wasco Co. Highlights:

* On Sunday, there was a flock of TRICOLORED BLACKBIRDS on Smock Road at a
marshy area .8 miles south of Rock Creek Road (Wasco County, near Wamic).
We were able to ID by sight ten Tricoloreds amidst the cattails, but
judging from the cacophony it was a much larger flock. There also were
Red-winged and Brewer's BBs in the area, but the sounds of the Trikes
dominated.

* Someone must've flipped the switch on NORTHERN SHRIKES. Not only did we
see our first-of-season bird, but we spotted a total of six over the course
of two days (Gordon Ridge, Kaseberg, and Liberty Roads in Sherman Co on
Saturday; East Wapanitia, Back Walters, and Easton Canyon Roads in Wasco Co
on Sunday).

* On Saturday, we came upon a flock of 120 to 150 AMERICAN PIPITS working a
field next to Bakeoven Road east of Maupin. Several flew up to an adjacent
fenceline and gave us great eye-level views.

* At Rock Creek Reservoir, a male and female EURASIAN WIGEON shared the
water with 28 Common Mergansers, three American Widgeons, and a Bald Eagle.
We also had a BARN OWL in the early evening at the campground. We hear a
lot of Great-horned Owls at night when we're camping, but there's nothing
quite like the screech of a Barn Owl when you're trying to wind down from
the day.

Bill Bradford & Lora Minty
Portland
Subject: Tillamook Bayocean Spit October 19
From: James Billstine <billstinj AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 07:31:31 -0700
I walked the dike road yesterday. It was very dead passerine-wise, a couple
Golden-Crowned, Fox, and Song Sparrows, and a flock of mixed
Chestnut-Backed and Black-Capped Chickadees. There was a flock of wigeon at
the edge of optics range in the bay, and some Western Grebes feeding closer
in, along with a few Greater Scaup. The weather was starting to turn ugly
as I left at about 10:30.
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
From: Treesa Hertzel <Autumn207 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 06:33:03 -0700
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
Subject: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 20, 2014 6:10:01 AM PDT

*** Species Summary:

Snow Goose (5 Klamath)
Mandarin Duck (4 Washington)
Surf Scoter (1 Yamhill)
Western Grebe (1 Baker)
Clark's Grebe (1 Linn)
American Bittern (2 Klamath)
Franklin's Gull (1 Multnomah)
Lewis's Woodpecker (5 Klamath)
Peregrine Falcon (North American) (1 Klamath)
Black Phoebe (1 Klamath)
Vesper Sparrow (1 Benton)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Oregon Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View this alert on the web at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35555 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
Subject: Re: Lewis's Woodpecker, Cathlamet, WA
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier AT peak.org>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 05:43:57 -0700
A first "recent" record, for Wahkiukum County, perhaps!

According to the species account in /Birds of Washington: Status and
Distribution/ (Wahl et al., 2005, OSU Press):

"Jewett et al. (1953) listed westside breeding records for Clark, Gray's
Harbor, Pacific, Skamania, Wahkiukum, and Whatcom Cos."

On the Oregon side, Gabrielson & Jewett (1940) described Lewis's
Woodpecker as "Summer resident in every part of State," presumably
including along the lower Columbia.

We've gotten so accustomed to the disappearance of this species from
their historic breeding range in western Washington and in the
Willamette Valley, that we've come to see them practically as vagrants
when one shows up in winter.

What's the phrase for this kind of lowering of expectations, from one
generation of naturalists to the next?

Good birding,
Joel


        Saturday, Oct. 18, a Lewis's Woodpecker was photographed and
        reported by  Robert, Lisa and Sam Sudar near 257A Elochoman
        Valley Road, Cathlamet, WA. Russ  Koppendrayer found it there
        Sunday morning, and it was still there Sunday at  3:30 pm when I
        checked it out. This is likely a first record for Wahkiakum
        County.
        
        Darrel Whipple
        Rainier, Oregon




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Subject: Brown Pelicans on Bayocean Peninsula - 10/19/14
From: Lillian <lillian.e AT prodigy.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 01:01:20 -0700
Hello Birders!

About 4pm this afternoon (10/19/14) we spotted between 200 - 300 Brown Pelicans 
(both mature & juvenile) resting on the east bank at the north end of Bayocean 
Peninsula. They were viewable while driving on 101 just north of Garibaldi. The 
best place to see them was from the View Point turnout (next to the Pirate's 
Cove Restaurant) just north of mile Marker 55. The pelicans were a little north 
of the pullout and across the water. There were also at least 4 mature pelicans 
that could be seen flying and in the water at Garibaldi Marina. - There are a 
couple of terrible photos (just good enough to prove we actually did see the 
birds) posted here: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/11594253 AT N02/sets/72157648810779146 


Good Birding…
Lillian
Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker, Cathlamet, WA
From: Darrel Whipple <dwhipple AT opusnet.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:50:32 -0700
Saturday, Oct. 18, a Lewis's Woodpecker was photographed and reported by 
Robert, Lisa and Sam Sudar near 257A Elochoman Valley Road, Cathlamet, WA. Russ 
Koppendrayer found it there Sunday morning, and it was still there Sunday at 
3:30 pm when I checked it out. This is likely a first record for Wahkiakum 
County. 


Darrel Whipple
Rainier, Oregon

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Subject: Curry Birds today Blue Jay et al. 10/19/2014
From: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 18:30:22 -0700
I spent a good part of the day birding with Terry Wahl in Curry.  Weather
was, well, pretty crappy most of the day with high winds from the SW and
rain off and on in the AM. It finally got less moist by late AM but the
winds were howling out of the SW.  Here are our highlights:

Ophir- Euchre Creek area:
2- CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS  we heard their distinctive high pitch soft call
note then found them together and watched them flit around a while.

Gold Beach, later in the AM (really crappy weather there):
We found a large blackbird flock behind the high school and with it was a
female YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD.

We then headed north and decided to stop at Otter Point, a nice sea watch
spot just a few miles north of Gold Beach.  We spent over an hour here as
we had a steady flow of ELEGANT TERNS, but no other tern species (much to
Terry's chagrin).  Saw maybe 50 total, there were none in Gold Beach as far
as we could tell in the blowing rain. Anyhow, there were two PARASITIC
JAEGERS not to far offshore that would hit on the terns from time to time
then fly back down onto the water right off the point.  We had great views
of them.  Other birds of note included a couple close BONIE GULLS and 2
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKES. Not a shearwater anywhere, but this spot would not
be a good spot for them as we were on the wrong side of the reef there
which extends quite a way offshore.  Sure was fun watching the jaegers from
point blank range though.

As we left we got a call from Knute Andersson about a BLUE JAY at his
feeder which was still around when I finally arrived there a couple hours
later.  Gorgeous bird. I think this is about the 5th Curry record, amazing
coming off last year's bird in Brookings in Nov/Dec hosted by Christi
Loring (thanks Christi).  I never thought I would see a second one in
Curry!   Knute puts out prodigious amounts of seed at his place and it pays
off- nice work Knute!!!! I bet Knute and Lois will have some nice pictures
of this bird.

Fun day. My wife tells me it was over 70F at the house in Coos Bay today,
not so warm or nice down south- go figure?

Merry migration,
Tim R
Coos Bay
Subject: GREBE TAKES DOWN FISH
From: Harry Fuller <atowhee AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 16:34:18 -0700
THREE OREGONIANS WITNESSED THIS IS A NEARBY STATE.;PIED-BILLED TAKES IN
PERCH BIGGER THAN ITS THROAT:
http://atowhee.wordpress.com/2014/10/19/a-grebes-life-tough-to-swallow-indeed/

-- 
Harry Fuller
author of FREEWAY BIRDING, see: *freewaybirding.com
*
Atowhee AT gmail
http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
Subject: lincoln birds, 2 TROPICAL K Waldport
From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 16:18:39 -0700
I birded Lincoln Co with Hendrik Herlyn, Oscar Harper and Tristen Hynes today. 
I left about 2:30 to come home; they may report additional birds. 


Highlight and Lowlight at the same time were two KINGBIRDs, presumably 
Tropicals, that we saw above the Waldport marina. I say "above" because as we 
got out of the car they apparently came up from the small shrubs in the 
duneline at the SW corner of marina parking (the truck and trailer parking 
area) and were blowing northward in the 30-mile winds. Unfortunately as we 
watched them, mostly silhouetted, they "flew" sideways clear across the 
estuary, fetching up in the trees on the steep hillside below the fancy homes. 
We never saw them again, even by scoping the trees. The wind was a factor. We 
cruised the fancy house street and did not find them, but did see a Merlin and 
a Greater Yellowlegs, the latter further up the bay. 


Other birds of the day were a Red-shouldered Hawk and Lincoln's Sparrow behind 
the Marine Science Center and some in-your-face looks at Common Loon and 
Western Grebe along the Yaquina jetty. By late morning the wind was a serious 
factor and birding was limited. 


I'll let H add any other notes.
.
.
Alan Contreras
acontrer56 AT gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon



Subject: Newport Tropical Kingbird
From: Range Bayer <range.bayer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 14:44:41 -0700
Hi,

Pete Lawson found a Tropical Kingbird near 1206 Abbey Street, just
north of the Newport Bayfront at about 1:45 PM this afternoon (Oct.
19).  It was hawking insects.  No white edges to the notched, brown
tail.

Range Bayer, Newport


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Subject: Waterhouse Linear Trail
From: weberhome AT att.net
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 13:59:00 -0700
OBOL, hello;

We were on the trail around 12:30 pm today and saw only a couple of Purple 
Finches and an LBJ; but the real reason I'm reporting is not the birds but a 
school of little minnow-ish fish we spotted down in Bronson Creek from the 
boardwalk. Till today I assumed that Bronson was way too polluted to support 
aquatic life so those teensy little Moby Dick wannabees were a very pleasant 
surprise. The larger of the little fishies had some yellow stripes on the top 
sides of their shoulders. 


Where? The boardwalk is roughly 50 yards south of the intersection of NW 
Josceylon Street and NW 165th Place in the Bethany area of Beaverton. Page 594 
of the Thomas Portland Street Guide; square G2. 


ADA Friendly?  Yes, very smooth, fully paved path.

Off-Street Parking?  No, but there is ample curbside parking.

Cliff & Joanne Weber
Beaverton (Bethany area)
Subject: Boiler Bay 10/19
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 13:30:14 -0700
my numbers to supplement what
Dave Irons reported -
8:00-12:00:
dense overcast with brief light rain early
gradually becoming partly clear. Wind SSE
early shifting to SSW 10-30, swells 8-10

200+ Red-throated Loon
3000+ Pacific Loon (intermittently to 40/min)
15 Common Loon
20 Western Grebe
2 Red-necked Grebe
3 BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (pair S spotted
    by Dave 3+ miles, then later single S between
    2-3 miles)
1 Northern Fulmar (Dave)
600+ Pink-footed Shearwater (conservative, 
    at times 5-10/min. visible S on the horizon 
    depending on lighting, many thousands
    must be present near shore at this latitude
    currently)
300+ Sooty Shearwater (S)
500+ Brown Pelican (some flocks N early shifting
         to steady thin S flight)
1 Double-crested Cormorant
900+ Brandt's Cormorant (streaming N early
     shifting to minor movement S)
50 Pelagic Cormorant
230 Aleutian Cackling Goose (flocks to 80 plus
      lone juv hanging out with gulls on the lawn)
2 Mallard
8 Northern Pintail
16 American Wigeon
1 Green-winged Teal
3 Greater Scaup
5 scaup sp.
40 White-winged Scoter
400 Surf Scoter
2 Peregrine (S)
4 Dunlin
2 Pomarine Jaeger
1 Parasitic Jaeger
1 jaeger sp.
1 Bonaparte's Gull
400+ Mew Gull
3000+ California Gull (mixed ages S)
200 Western Gull
40 Glaucous-winged Gull
2500+ Heermann's Gull (steady moderate
    S movement for entire duration)
120 Common Murre
6 Pigeon Guillemot
21 Marbled Murrelet (S)
2 Ancient Murrelet (pair on the water)
3 Cassin's Auklet (2 S, 1 on the water)
11 Rhinoceros Auklet (S)
2 American Pipit (Dave)

Phil
philliplc AT charter.net


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Subject: Boiler Bay Sunday AM
From: David Irons <llsdirons AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 12:40:54 -0700
Phil Pickering and I did a four-hour sea watch at Boiler Bay this morning. 
Strong southerly winds turned slightly more southwesterly after the first hour 
or so. 


Highlights included:
Black-footed Albatross --3
Pink-footed Shearwater -- 600 (conservative)
Sooty Shearwater -- 200
N. Fulmar -- 1
Ancient Murrelet -- 2
Marbled Murrelet -- 16
Rhinoceros Auklet -- 8
Cassin's Auklet -- 3
Pomarine Jaeger -- 1 or 2
Parasitic Jaeger -- 1

All morning modest numbers of Pacific Loons, Brown Pelicans, Heermann's Gulls, 
California Guls and Mew Gulls streamed by. We had 41 species in all. 


After lunch I will turn my attentions to land birding.

Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Linn County Ruff
From: "W. Douglas Robinson" <w.douglas.robinson AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 11:01:10 -0700
A juvenile was at the far north end of Eicher Rd quarry lake. More later

Doug





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Subject: Rentenaar Road yesterday
From: "WLRisser" <wlrisser AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 10:43:48 -0700
Yesterday must have been a non-goose hunting day on Rentenaar Road on Sauvie
Island near Portland.   We drove to the end of R. Road and climbed the dike.
We estimated 3000 cackling and Canada geese feeding (mostly cackling geese).
We sat there for about two hours and more and more geese came in. We
estimated 6000-7000 by the time that we left.  It was a wonderful show.

Some of the cackling geese had yellow neckbands, and we got some numbers.
Can anyone who reads this help us know what to look for on the bands and
whom to contact with the information?

Several times harriers passed low over the flock, and once a peregrine did
so, and the geese ignored both.

When we arrived, an immature northern shrike (brown version) was feeding
from the big woodpile below the dike to the right, and it slowly made its
way down the row of woodpiles further to the right , until it disappeared.

 

Jan and Will Risser, Portland
Subject: Acorn Woodpecker, Ft Vancouver WA
From: Ray <rkorpi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 09:17:17 -0700
Hi all,
I realize this is a WA sighting, but many folks have come across the river to 
see birds before. Thursday, Cindy McCormick found an ACORN WOODPECKER at Ft 
Vancouver, west of the visitors center. Thursday, per Tweeters, two were seen. 
I finally got there yesterday afternoon, after driving by three times before I 
knew the birds were there. I worked with Les Carlson and Ken Knittle to find 
one of the birds, which we had adequate looks at. 


One of the birds was first found in a large oak just south of the gazebo which 
is essentially across from the Grant House Restaurant on Officers Row. When we 
found the bird yesterday, it was SW of that area, in a large group of oaks 
south of the row of barracks, as Ken noted, about 200 feet east of McMillian 
and Ft Vancouver Way. The bird was relatively quiet. I heard it once, that sent 
us in that direction, and then it called again. It stayed very high in the oak 
and very quiet until right before it flew, when it proceeded east along the row 
of barracks and made a 90-degree left turn back toward the big gazebo oak 


As you may know, Acorns are only generally found in WA in the Lyell area. Many 
of those with large Clark Co. lists are adding this bird. I'll try to get down 
there at some point Tuesday to take a peek and see if it is around 

RK

Ray Korpi

rkorpi AT hotmail.com

Vancouver WA
 		 	   		  
Subject: Neck-collared Canada Goose, Eugene - help with photo
From: Barbara Combs <bcombs232 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 00:15:33 -0700
A few weeks ago I found a Canada Goose with a neck collar.
It was at the West Lawn Cemetery off West 11th in Eugene.
The collar was 292V, black letters on a white background.
I reported it to the bird banding laboratory.

The goose was banded in June 1992.  It has leg band #0828-93292.

The banding lab would like a picture of this bird with its collar, as it is
an older bird.
If you find this bird, please take a picture of it, with neck collar
showing, and send the picture to the lab.  I know they'll appreciate it.

The URL for reporting bands is:
https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbl/bblretrv/index.cfm






-- 
Barbara Combs   obie '70
Lane County, OR
Subject: Harlequin Ducks
From: Frank Kolwicz <kolwicz AT minetfiber.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 22:24:41 -0700
I seem to remember something about hunters seeking uncommon waterfowl 
and, perhaps, watching this list for possible birds to "bag".

With that in mind, I wish to report 6 of them along the central coast 
today. If it's important to you and you are a birder whose name I'll 
recognize from this list, respond directly to me and I'll send you the 
location and a photo or two for your delectation.

Frank
in Monmouth


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Subject: Tillamook birds this afternoon
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 00:51:58 -0400
I enjoyed the drizzle in the Tillamook area today. While I didn't find anything 
unusual this afternoon, I easily located the local specialties (adult 
Red-shouldered Hawk at Fenk Rd; 2 Black Phoebes, one at Olson Rd, the other at 
Tillamook Wetlands; 3 White-tailed Kites, 2 at Tillamook Wetlands, 1 off South 
Prairie Rd). Also at the Tillamook Wetlands were a White-throated Sparrow 
(parking area), immature Northern Shrike and 2 counter-singing Sooty Fox 
Sparrows. At Bayocean Spit, a Marbled Godwit, 2 Black-bellied Plovers and a 
small flock of Western Sandpipers were feeding on the bay-side mudflats near 
low tide. 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR 		 	   		  
Subject: Mandarin Duck continuing at Hillsboro- Dawson Creek
From: EV Armitage <evarmitage AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:54:26 -0700
The female Mandarin Duck was still at Dawson Creek midday Oct 18, mixed in
with Wood Ducks and Mallards, at the east pond with the wood bridge. She
was at the south end of the pond where it narrows to a stream.
Subject: Re: Franklin's Gull? - Smith and Bybee Lakes
From: Bob Archer <rabican1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:42:40 -0700
Link says photo not available but there has been a Franklin's there for a 
number of weeks. 


Bob Archer
Pdx




> On Oct 18, 2014, at 4:35 PM, Daniel Mroz  wrote:
> 
> This morning I saw gull that was new for me on Smith lake. I was able to get 
a picture of it and with a few other people I met along the way, I think it is 
a Franklin's gull. I was about to report it on e-bird, but was warned that it 
was a rare bird for this area. Can anyone confirm if I am right? 

> 
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/106823420424049912470/albums/6071685526939125585/6071685536962075522?pid=6071685536962075522&oid=106823420424049912470 
Subject: Franklin's Gull? - Smith and Bybee Lakes
From: Daniel Mroz <simplymrozthejew AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:35:03 -0700
This morning I saw gull that was new for me on Smith lake. I was able to
get a picture of it and with a few other people I met along the way, I
think it is a Franklin's gull. I was about to report it on e-bird, but was
warned that it was a rare bird for this area. Can anyone confirm if I am
right?


https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/106823420424049912470/albums/6071685526939125585/6071685536962075522?pid=6071685536962075522&oid=106823420424049912470 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Franklin's Gull? - Smith and Bybee Lakes
From: Daniel Mroz <simplymrozthejew AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:35:03 -0700
This morning I saw gull that was new for me on Smith lake. I was able to
get a picture of it and with a few other people I met along the way, I
think it is a Franklin's gull. I was about to report it on e-bird, but was
warned that it was a rare bird for this area. Can anyone confirm if I am
right?


https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/106823420424049912470/albums/6071685526939125585/6071685536962075522?pid=6071685536962075522&oid=106823420424049912470