Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Ohio Birds

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, April 17 at 10:49 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-browed Robin-Chat,©Barry Kent Mackay

17 Apr Western Ohio Birding Looking for Lifers [Steve Jones ]
17 Apr Indian Lake - American White Pelican [Don Niece ]
17 Apr Indian Lake - American White Pelican [Don Niece ]
17 Apr 8 warbler day in southern Ohio [Ken Ostermiller ]
17 Apr Mystery bird-help please! [Rachel Shamy ]
17 Apr Surprising behavior [James Muller ]
17 Apr Secor Park Birding-Lucas County [Rachel Shamy ]
17 Apr Surprising accipiter behavior [James Muller ]
17 Apr Bonaparte's Gulls on West Harbor - Ottawa County [Tara Baranowski ]
17 Apr Great Horned Owl Nest, Erie Co. [Sheryl Young ]
17 Apr Re: American Goldfinch [Judith Espedal ]
17 Apr Glen Echo Park - Prairie Warbler - Columbus OH [Anthony Fries ]
17 Apr Henslow's Sparrow Wendy Park [jen brumfield ]
17 Apr My Backyard Bird Count [Rachel Shamy ]
17 Apr Re: Goldfinches [Deb ]
17 Apr Saint Marys State Fish Hatchery-2015-4-17 [Steve Jones ]
17 Apr Re: Goldfinches ["J. Hochadel" ]
17 Apr Re: Darke Shorebirds [Bill Whan ]
16 Apr CVNP Field Trip [Ben Waner ]
16 Apr Any C. Raven records recently? [Ben Waner ]
16 Apr Darke Shorebirds [Regina Schieltz ]
16 Apr Re: Lesser Frigatebird, Findlay [Ben Waner ]
16 Apr Sandy Ridge Lorain Cty [Photography by Wolfbrancher ]
16 Apr Grebes [Hayward Chappell ]
16 Apr RFI White-Winged Scoter at St Mary's & Smith's Longspurs... [Steve Jones ]
16 Apr Re: Big Island Wildlife Area Pelicans yes, Long-tailed Duck...Maybe. :-D [Steve Jones ]
16 Apr Big Island Wildlife Area Pelicans yes, Long-tailed Duck...Maybe. :-D [Steve Jones ]
16 Apr CVNP -- Pine Hollow [ ]
16 Apr New Daily Morning Song [Rachel Shamy ]
16 Apr Golden Finches [Haans Petruschke ]
16 Apr Re: American Goldfinch [Brad Perkins ]
16 Apr American Goldfinch [Trish Shaffer ]
15 Apr Re: Rustys [Steve Jones ]
15 Apr Veteran's Park (Mentor) [Richard ]
15 Apr Tree Swallows / Bluebirds [Dillon Nott ]
15 Apr Goldfinches [ ]
15 Apr Long-tailed Duck [Doreene Linzell ]
15 Apr Gold Finches [Rachel Shamy ]
15 Apr No Subject [Ken Ostermiller ]
15 Apr Ever-so-slightly extralimital - Brooks Bird Club of WV June Foray Info [Ryan Tomazin ]
15 Apr New eBird shared bird reporting hotspots [Ken Ostermiller ]
15 Apr Grackle with poop on it's head??? [Rachel Shamy ]
15 Apr NO SIGHTING- Piping Plover Info [Robert Sams ]
15 Apr thanks all: Re: Wood ducks and unknown [Kathy Shank ]
15 Apr Wood ducks and unknown [Kathy Shank ]
15 Apr Fish Crow, Lake Erie Bluffs, 4/15 [John Pogacnik ]
15 Apr Cont. Ross's Goose Old Reid Park, Clark County [Stefan Minnig ]
14 Apr Barred Owl - New Albany [Jason Wakley ]
14 Apr Blacklick Metro Park (Columbus) et al [Bob and Elaine McNulty ]
14 Apr FOS Chipping Sparrow - Summit County ["Barrett,Robert P" ]
14 Apr Darke County [Regina Schieltz ]
14 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [Bill Whan ]
14 Apr Conservation of bird habitat in Ohio, (things few birders actually do) [Haans Petruschke ]
14 Apr FOS Tree Swallow - Lorain County [Spencer ]
14 Apr Lake Erie Bluffs Hawk Watch 4/13 [John Pogacnik ]
14 Apr Laughing Gull Wendy Park [jen brumfield ]
14 Apr Re: Snowy Plover no, Piping Plover yes, Findlay Reservoirs [Robert Sams ]
14 Apr Re: ShawneeClearcuts ["Stierhoff, Elayna M." ]
13 Apr Purple finches - Hocking County. [James E Fry ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeClearcuts [rob thorn ]
13 Apr Snowy Plover no, Piping Plover yes, Findlay Reservoirs [Robert Sams ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [ ]
13 Apr Blendon Woods Metro Park Columbus [Bob and Elaine McNulty ]
13 Apr Orioles and Tanagers [Dillon Nott ]
13 Apr Findlay plover [H Thomas Bartlett ]
13 Apr Bay Village garden birds [Dave Lewis ]
13 Apr Saw my 1st ruby crown of year at holden Arb. [Laura Peskin ]
13 Apr Possible Snowy Plover - Findlay Reservoir, Hancock County [H Thomas Bartlett ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [Bob Hinkle ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [Cheryl Harner ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [Brad Perkins ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [Robert Evans ]
13 Apr Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts [Robert Hinkle ]
13 Apr Upcoming talk from birder and author Kent Nelson ["Boutis, Nick" ]
13 Apr Ducks at Kuehnle, Green Darner on South Bass [Lisa Brohl ]
13 Apr Fish Crows, Lake Erie Bluffs, 4/13 [John Pogacnik ]

Subject: Western Ohio Birding Looking for Lifers
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 23:45:57 -0400
For my birthday birding bash, I tried to hit the spots out in western Ohio
that tI haven't gotten to yet, and try to get some lifers out of my eBird
alert list. Then finish up the day getting my Big Island List caught
up...and get my wife a lifer duck.  Long day, lots of birds.

Lists of my days travels are below.  Not listed was Keiser Lake (I had to
stop and use the "facilities")  I had White-throated Sparrows, a  Parula
and a Yellow-throated Warbler calling in the trees.

Pics of everything on the lists, and a few on the Facebook page.

Happy Birding and God Bless

Steve J.


Saint Marys State Fish Hatchery, Auglaize, US-OH
Apr 17, 2015 8:31 AM - 9:04 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Submitted from  BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.6
21 species

Greater White-fronted Goose  1     Brown goose with pinkish/orange bill,
white rump, smaller than Canada geese that were around it.
SJLaRue
Photography: Greater White-fronted Goose &emdash; Greater White-Fronted
Goose
Canada Goose  40
Mallard  6
Blue-winged Teal  8
Lesser Scaup  8
White-winged Scoter  1     Continuing bird seen by many.
SJLaRue Photography: White-winged Scoter &emdash; White-winged Scoter
Red-breasted Merganser  10
Great Blue Heron  2
Killdeer  6
Ring-billed Gull  6
Mourning Dove  7
American Crow  2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  20
American Robin  20
European Starling  50
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  30
Common Grackle  10
Brown-headed Cowbird  8
House Sparrow  10

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22904093

Old Reid Park, Clark, US-OH
Apr 17, 2015 1:40 PM - 2:17 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     Submitted from  BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.6
13 species

Ross's Goose  1     Continuing bird seen by others.  Almost all white with
a small bill and black wing tips.

SJLaRue Photography: Ross's Goose &emdash; Ross's Goose
Canada Goose  30
Mallard  10
Great Blue Heron  2
Black Vulture  10
Mourning Dove  4
Tree Swallow  10
American Robin  10
European Starling  20
Song Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  20
Common Grackle  8

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22908429



Lawrence Woods State Nature Preserve, Hardin, US-OH
Apr 17, 2015 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Submitted from  BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.6
31 species

Canada Goose  3
Ring-necked Pheasant  2
Turkey Vulture  12
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  4
Red-headed Woodpecker  5
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  2
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  4
Carolina Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
Winter Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  5
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Hermit Thrush  2
American Robin  6
European Starling  10
Yellow-rumped Warbler  8
American Tree Sparrow  2
Chipping Sparrow  2
Field Sparrow  10
Song Sparrow  4
Northern Cardinal  4
Red-winged Blackbird  20
Eastern Meadowlark  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  8
American Goldfinch  4

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22917034


Big Island Wildlife Area--North of Larue-Prospect Rd., Marion, US-OH
Apr 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM
Protocol: Stationary
34 species

Canada Goose  30
Mute Swan  2
Trumpeter Swan  5
Wood Duck  2
Gadwall  8
American Wigeon  20
American Black Duck  4
Mallard  20
Blue-winged Teal  10
Northern Shoveler  12
Green-winged Teal  2
Redhead  20
Ring-necked Duck  10
Lesser Scaup  20
Long-tailed Duck  1     First seen by Ron Sempier

SJLaRue
Photography: Long-tailed Duck &emdash; Long-tailed Duck; Big Island
Wildlife Area
Bufflehead  8
Hooded Merganser  4
Red-breasted Merganser  4
Ruddy Duck  30
Pied-billed Grebe  10
Horned Grebe  10
Double-crested Cormorant  8
Great Egret  12
Turkey Vulture  10
Bald Eagle  4
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Common Gallinule  2
American Coot  300
Killdeer  4
Ring-billed Gull  20
Mourning Dove  4
Tree Swallow  50
Song Sparrow  4
Red-winged Blackbird  30

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22916929

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Indian Lake - American White Pelican
From: Don Niece <don.niece AT COMPLIGHT-LLC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 21:25:32 -0400
Sorry for previous (lack of) message, don't know what happened.

Approximately 30-40 American White Pelicans in NE part of the lake across the 
channel from Acheson's Landing off Turkey Foot Road. May be possibility of 
seeing them from that area. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Indian Lake - American White Pelican
From: Don Niece <don.niece AT COMPLIGHT-LLC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 21:18:24 -0400
Approximately 30-40 American White Pelicans in North East part of Indian Lake. 
Possibly visible from area near Acheson's Landing on Turkey Foot Road looking 
east across the channel. Other sightings around the lake consisted of: 


Glaucous gull at Old Field Beach
Great Blue Herons
Great Egret - 1
Osprey - 8
Bald Eagle - 2 adult near Pony Island

Area of flooded field near Russells Point still active with many Blue-winged 
Teal, Mallard, Glaucous Gull (1). 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: 8 warbler day in southern Ohio
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 21:14:11 -0400
​On our way to southern Ohio for the Arc of Appalachia Wildflower Weekend
we stopped at four locations and saw 8 warbler species! Nice to see the
spring migration in progress.

(1): Tar Hollow SP
Date: Apr 17, 2015, 9:59 AM
(2): Tar Hollow State Forest (Ross Co.)
Date: Apr 17, 2015, 11:36 AM
(3): Scioto Trail SP
Date: Apr 17, 2015, 1:31 PM
(4): Paint Creek Dam
Date: Apr 17, 2015, 4:24 PM

3 Ovenbird -- (1),(2)
2 Louisiana Waterthrush -- (2),(3)
1 Black-and-white Warbler -- (1)
9 Hooded Warbler -- (2),(3)
4 Northern Parula -- (1)
8 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (1),(2),(4)
5 Yellow-throated Warbler -- (1),(3)
1 Black-throated Green Warbler -- (2)

Ken Ostermiller​

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Mystery bird-help please!
From: Rachel Shamy <shamytwinsmom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 21:01:13 -0400
I had sent an email after my trip to TN about my bird sightings but am
still frustrated by a gorgeous yellow bird with a black chin. I really
would like someone to help me figure out what this beautiful bird is!!!! I
have pictures!

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Surprising behavior
From: James Muller <jrmuller12+birding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 20:46:00 -0400
I went to the laundry facility in my apartment complex about 15 minutes ago
and noticed what I thought were my FOY Chimney Swifts. A closer look
revealed them to be bats (still FOY). As I watched for a few moments, a
juvenile Cooper's Hawk appeared from nowhere and made a pass at one of the
bats! No dice, but the hawk have it three attempts before he moved on. Has
anybody seen accipiters hunt bats before? It was an awesome but of urban
birding for me!

James Muller

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Secor Park Birding-Lucas County
From: Rachel Shamy <shamytwinsmom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 20:53:22 -0400
Went to Secor Metropark in Lucas County today with my Son and saw the
following:

Turkey Vulture-3
Crows- 8
Black Capped Chickadees- 6
Robins-at least 1
Goldfinches-1
Brown Headed Cowbirds-2
Downy Woodpecker-1
Red Eyed Vireo-1
RW Blackbird- at least 1
Chipping Sparrows-2
Dark Eyed Juncos-3
blue jay-1
Tufted Titmouse-1
Mourning Dove-1
White Breasted Nuthatches-1
Cardinals-2
Canada Geese-2

Wished we could've stayed longer. Heard Red Bellied Woodpecker and possibly
a single Pileated Woodpecker calling.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Surprising accipiter behavior
From: James Muller <jrmuller12+birding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 20:50:01 -0400
I went to the laundry facility in my apartment complex about 15 minutes ago and 
noticed what I thought were my FOY Chimney Swifts. A closer look revealed them 
to be bats (still FOY). As I watched for a few moments, a juvenile Cooper's 
Hawk appeared from nowhere and made a pass at one of the bats! No dice, but the 
hawk have it three attempts before he moved on. Has anybody seen accipiters 
hunt bats before? It was an awesome but of urban birding for me! 


James Muller

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Bonaparte's Gulls on West Harbor - Ottawa County
From: Tara Baranowski <tbaranowski AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 19:30:32 +0000
While walking the Great Egret Marsh Preserve today along West Harbor I saw 
several Bonaparte's gulls fly overhead and there were also gadwall, blue-winged 
teal, wood duck, mallard, Canada geese, trumpeter swan and common merganser in 
the marsh and harbor. Many great blue heron and great egret were lining the 
harbor today and I paused for a spell to watch a watersnake "swim" along the 
channel bordering the preserve's marsh. I also inadvertently flushed a brown 
thrasher from the edge of the marsh as I rounded a corner. Hoping everyone gets 
a chance to get out and enjoy this beautiful day. 


Tara B.
Ottawa County

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Great Horned Owl Nest, Erie Co.
From: Sheryl Young <000001163286a6c4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 14:03:39 -0400
There is a Great Horned Owl nesting in a former eagle's nest on the west
side of Erie County (between Castalia and Bay View).  A scope is best for
viewing, but the outline of the adult's head (showing the "horn" feather
tufts)  is easily seen with binoculars.  Hopefully, the young will soon be
visible.

The nest can be viewed looking south from the parking lot of the  tavern at
the corner of Rt 6 and Rt 269.  I would provide you with the  address but
the google map does not seem to give the proper  directions.  To reach this
spot, exit Rt 2 at the Bay View exit, just  before crossing Sandusky Bay.
Head south, and following Rt 269  South.  You will turn right at the "T"
intersection. The tavern/drive through is on the corner at the next left. It 

is hard to miss - it has a fiberglass  Bison on the roof.

Sheryl Young
Sandusky

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: American Goldfinch
From: Judith Espedal <jespedal AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 16:45:25 +0000
I have seen a drop in the number of goldfinches at my feeder the past couple of 
weeks.It seems to have coincided with the males molting into their bright 
summer colors. I doubt the other goldfinches just disappeared.  Could they be 
getting territorial rather early for goldfinches this year? 

 


 On Thursday, April 16, 2015 12:09 AM, Trish Shaffer  
wrote: 

   

 I too have noticed a drop in Goldfinch numbers in Scioto County. I am in
West Portsmouth & 5 years ago I was having 15 at one time on 3 feeders.  My
mother, in Wheelersburg has a wooded yard and would also have large numbers
20-30.

The past 2 winters I have only seen 2 or 3 at a time.  Currently I have 3
pair of the American Goldfinch coming to the feeders

My mother has 6 pair of the American Goldfinch coming to her feeders.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org



______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Glen Echo Park - Prairie Warbler - Columbus OH
From: Anthony Fries <friesac AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 11:57:21 -0400
Good morning in Glen Echo Ravine in Columbus with:

Prairie (active and singing)
Louisiana
Northern parula
Yellow-throated
Yellow-rumped
Loads of blue-gray gnatcatchers

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22905266

Still good looks at dark-eyed juncos, white-throated sparrows and 
yellow-bellied sapsuckers too. 


Tony Fries 




                                          
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Henslow's Sparrow Wendy Park
From: jen brumfield <elfin_skimmer AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 11:30:08 -0400
A Henslow's Sparrow is among a number of newly arrived migrants at Wendy Park 
in Cleveland. All right in and around the main woodlot 



JB
CLE, OH
www.jenbrumfield.com
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: My Backyard Bird Count
From: Rachel Shamy <shamytwinsmom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 09:39:43 -0400
This morning was the first morning our Dawnsong played for the Purple
Martins. Not sure if this has anything to do with it but we had our foy,
first ever backyard Male Tree Swallow.😀

Other birds being seen & heard:

2 Pairs of Cardinals
1 Pair of White Breasted Nuthatches
1 pr Red Bellied Woodpeckers, seen/calling(especially loud last evening)
1 pr Downy Woodpeckers
6 prs of House Finches
1 pr of Goldfinches
1 pr of Black Capped Chickadees
2 calling, prob Male, Chipping Sparrows, singing
2+ Song Sparrows, singing
3 Common Grackles
6-8 American Robins
5+ European Starlings
5? House Sparrows, trying to eradicate them

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Goldfinches
From: Deb <dsfromnj AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 09:37:26 -0400
Goldfinches and mourning doves were the predominant birds at my feeders all 
winter. I usually have a few individuals but this year there were 20+ 
goldfinches daily and almost that number of doves. The goldfinches are still 
around. 


I only feed sunflower kernels. I gave up on thistle after it took over my 
garden at my last house. The folks who live there now are still trying to get 
rid of it. 


I've lived in this older, developed suburb for over 20 years and the bird life 
has really changed. Less pigeons (thank you hawks) less house sparrows. There 
are several nesting pairs of red-tailed hawks, one pair quite vocal over my 
yard yesterday. I saw a wild turkey while out walking Monday and a coyote on 
Wednesday. 

Grateful for this change for the better. 

Deborah Smith
Cleveland Heights
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Saint Marys State Fish Hatchery-2015-4-17
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 09:19:14 -0400
Greetings!

Scoter still present. with a bonus Greater White-fronted Goose!

Happy birding and God bless.

Steve J

Observer: sjlarue
2015-04-17 08:31
Saint Marys State Fish Hatchery
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 Miles
33 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
    1    Greater White-fronted Goose    "Brown goose with pink bill, white
rump, smaller than Canada geese that were around it. will post pictures
later."
    40    Canada Goose
    6    Mallard
    8    Blue-winged Teal
    8    Lesser Scaup
    1    White-winged Scoter    Continuing bird seen by many. will post
pictures later.
    10    Red-breasted Merganser
    2    Great Blue Heron
    6    Killdeer
    6    Ring-billed Gull
    7    Mourning Dove
    2    American Crow
    2    Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    20    Tree Swallow
    20    American Robin
    50    European Starling
    2    Northern Cardinal
    30    Red-winged Blackbird
    10    Common Grackle
    8    Brown-headed Cowbird
    10    House Sparrow

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog (
http://birdseyebirding.com/)

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Goldfinches
From: "J. Hochadel" <jahochadel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 08:18:43 -0400
The maximum count for Goldfinches this winter at my feeding station was 36
individuals present at one given time. I only have one 8-port thistle
feeder and a small hopper feeder filled with black oil sunflower seed, so
most of the Goldfinches were eating seed on the ground below the feeders or
were waiting/fighting for an open spot at the feeders. When temperatures
dropped below zero, they fed almost exclusively on the sunflower seeds,
presumably because they could expend less energy in order to quickly
increase their caloric intake. A flock of about 20 visited daily, with
numbers increasing right before and then when a storm occurred. While
watching them during these "feeding frenzies," I was wishing that I was
still involved in bird banding so I could track how many, if any, return
next year and how many are locals. I'd be delighted to discuss a more
formal study here if anyone wants to do one. It will be interesting to see
the high count next winter. I may go broke buying seed... haha

Now the high count has dropped to six, and they spend about the same amount
of time at both feeders. (These are probably my neighborhood Goldfinches.)

Judy Hochadel
Champion Twp, Trumbull County

On Wed, Apr 15, 2015 at 7:44 PM, Carole Babyak <
000001100197cc98-dmarc-request AT listserv.miamioh.edu> wrote:

> I had 15 - 20 Goldfinch most of the winter.   They left when the Coopers
> Hawk dove into the feeding area
>
> in February, but have returned.    Funny thing is I had bought a new
> thistle sox for them (end of Jan.) and moved the thistle
>
> tube feeder to a shepherd hook.  The winter Goldfinches continued to feed
> from the tube feeder and only
>
> Chickadees investigated the sox.      When they started to get flecks of
> gold several Goldfinches were on the sox
>
> and they continue to feed from the sox and the tube feeder.
> Conclusion could be that the Goldfinches move
>
> around and the ones I have now were not the ones I had in Jan &
> Feb......or as they became gold they became
>
> more inquisitive, daring ......      or perhaps the winter Goldfinches had
> never seen a sox and it took new comers
>
> to recognize it and then everyone fed from it.???             I may have
> more now because they are on the sunflower
>
> feeders as well as the thistle,  and the males are gold  so more
> noticeable.         Birds are Great.
>
> Carole Babyak  Trumbull Co. Howland Twp.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Darke Shorebirds
From: Bill Whan <billwhan AT COLUMBUS.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 08:04:26 -0400
Hi, Regina and all--
        Interesting about the pectorals. I'd think that is far and away the
largest incursion this year thus far. The farther west you go in Ohio
the easier it is to see spring pectoral flocks (in the fall, they split
up and don't flock much). Comparatively far fewer show up in eastern
Ohio, and the farthest east I've seen big spring flocks is occasionally
at Killdeer Plains, where thousands may appear. Once only, I saw ~2000
here in Franklin Co, just after the parks flooded what were once corn
fields. Northbound pectorals tend to stick to the central flyway on
their way to the high Arctic, and I have wondered if we see the birds
going to a recently-recognized isolated and much closer nest site on
Hudson Bay (you can barely see a little pink dot in the Natl Geo birds
book). I imagine Darke Co gets more black-bellied plovers, too, for a
lot of the same reasons. Probably more of both can be displaced by
winds, too.
Thanks for the reminder,
Bill Whan

On 4/16/2015 9:39 PM, Regina Schieltz wrote:
> There are 3 places where I saw a large number of pectoral sandpipers and
> smaller numbers of Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs today.
>
> All in Darke Co.    Greenville:  Sebring-Warner Road just west of st. rt.
> 127 in a flooded field.
>                             Elroy A large pot hole-flooded field just east
> of Elroy on Ansonia-Elroy Road.
>                             Greenville on Hillgrove-Woodington Road just
> east of St. Rt. 118
>
> Since Sunday the numbers of these 3 shorebirds have been increasing, but I
> have not seen any other species except Killdeer.
>
> Woods Road still has a selection of ducks and at least 38 coots.
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: CVNP Field Trip
From: Ben Waner <wbirding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 22:18:03 -0400
Highlights were one female YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, an OSPREY, a light morph 
BROAD-WINGED HAWK, a PILEATED WOODPECKER, and a single FISH CROW 




______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Any C. Raven records recently?
From: Ben Waner <wbirding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 21:49:44 -0400
Any records of ravens in 2014/15 ?

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Darke Shorebirds
From: Regina Schieltz <reginasch54 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 21:39:31 -0400
There are 3 places where I saw a large number of pectoral sandpipers and
smaller numbers of Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs today.

All in Darke Co.    Greenville:  Sebring-Warner Road just west of st. rt.
127 in a flooded field.
                           Elroy A large pot hole-flooded field just east
of Elroy on Ansonia-Elroy Road.
                           Greenville on Hillgrove-Woodington Road just
east of St. Rt. 118

Since Sunday the numbers of these 3 shorebirds have been increasing, but I
have not seen any other species except Killdeer.

Woods Road still has a selection of ducks and at least 38 coots.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Lesser Frigatebird, Findlay
From: Ben Waner <wbirding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 21:30:10 -0400
Is this an April fools joke?

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Sandy Ridge Lorain Cty
From: Photography by Wolfbrancher <wolfbrancher AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 17:07:03 -0400
Wood ducks & Pileated woodpecker
Great Blue Heron

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Grebes
From: Hayward Chappell <hayward.chappell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 16:27:40 -0400
I was passing through Hillsboro Ohio today and stopped at Rocky Fork Park.
I saw three grebes- 2 in breeding plumage. It was raining and I had my
backup binocs so I was stuck between an eared or a horned grebe. It seemed
to me more like the Eared BUT my field guide (National Geographic) said
they were rare in the east.

Pictures on Cornell's "All About Birds" are very striking- ones I saw
huddled up in the rain and colrs looked somewhat mottled so hard to call

Any ideas?

Also saw 3 Great Egrets and bunch of cormorants

Hayward Chappell
Lawrence County



--
Hayward Chappell
766 Private Rd. 3952
Willow Wood, OH 45696

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: RFI White-Winged Scoter at St Mary's & Smith's Longspurs...
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 15:17:46 -0400
Going to try for two to three lifer's tomorrow...

Any update on the White Winged Scoter at The Fish hatchery? And any good
Smith's Longspurs sightings...I saw one on my alert list, but that has been
a few days ago,

Thinking of trying for those and the Ross's Goose down in Springfield.

Thanks

Steve J.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Big Island Wildlife Area Pelicans yes, Long-tailed Duck...Maybe. :-D
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 14:34:45 -0400
hit the wrong key. :-D  Big Island list below:

Big Island Wildlife Area--North of Larue-Prospect Rd., Marion, US-OH
Apr 16, 2015 9:02 AM - 10:08 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Submitted from  BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.6
33 species

Canada Goose  30
Mute Swan  2
Trumpeter Swan  4
Wood Duck  2
Gadwall  5
American Wigeon  30
Mallard  20
Blue-winged Teal  20
Northern Shoveler  10
Green-winged Teal  1
Redhead  30
Ring-necked Duck  30
Bufflehead  20
Ruddy Duck  30
Pied-billed Grebe  10
Horned Grebe  10
Double-crested Cormorant  5
American White Pelican  9     Continuing pod of Pelicans.

SJLaRue
Photography: American Pelican &emdash; American White Pelican, Marion

SJLaRue
Photography: American Pelican &emdash; American White Pelican, Marion

SJLaRue
Photography: American Pelican &emdash; American White Pelican, Marion
Great Blue Heron  4
Great Egret  2
Turkey Vulture  12
Bald Eagle  10
Red-tailed Hawk  1
American Coot  400
Killdeer  4
Bonaparte's Gull  10
Ring-billed Gull  30
Mourning Dove  8
Tree Swallow  30
American Robin  20
European Starling  20
Song Sparrow  4
Red-winged Blackbird  30

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22889453

On Thu, Apr 16, 2015 at 2:33 PM, Steve Jones  wrote:

> Well, I popped over to Big Island to try and find the Long-tailed Duck,
> but there were too many tucked in noses, and ruddy ducks to pick it out
> from amongst the bajillion (It seemed) coots.
>
> The 9 Pelicans are still there, and gave me a really good flyby as they
> moved from the East pond to the Western edge of the center pond.:
> http://www.sjlarue.com/p598998142/h4283F331#h4283f331
>
> Not to be outdone were all of the Eagles...They tried to prove that they
> were the masters of the sky.
> Other notables were a pair of Mute Swans.
>
> List below:
>
>
> Happy Birding and God Bless
>
> Steve J
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Big Island Wildlife Area Pelicans yes, Long-tailed Duck...Maybe. :-D
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 14:33:30 -0400
Well, I popped over to Big Island to try and find the Long-tailed Duck, but
there were too many tucked in noses, and ruddy ducks to pick it out from
amongst the bajillion (It seemed) coots.

The 9 Pelicans are still there, and gave me a really good flyby as they
moved from the East pond to the Western edge of the center pond.:
http://www.sjlarue.com/p598998142/h4283F331#h4283f331

Not to be outdone were all of the Eagles...They tried to prove that they
were the masters of the sky.
Other notables were a pair of Mute Swans.

List below:


Happy Birding and God Bless

Steve J

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: CVNP -- Pine Hollow
From: Lisle Merriman <000000f3462a9e25-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 14:46:26 +0000
Ruby-Crowned Kinglets, Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers, Field Sparrows at Pine Hollow in 
the Cuy Valley Nat'l Park yesterday evening (Summit County).  Beautiful area 
for birding. 

Lisle MerrimanShaker Heights

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: New Daily Morning Song
From: Rachel Shamy <shamytwinsmom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 09:12:49 -0400
I've been hearing this new song (to me) the last maybe week now. I knew it
was a sparrow but hadn't really investigated, thought it looked like a
female house sparrow. Well today after daily serenades, I took pictures and
audio,video. The singers are my Chipping Sparrows, love having another song
to my bird choir in the morning here. 😀

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Golden Finches
From: Haans Petruschke <haans42 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 09:00:25 -0400
Hi,

Here in my small part of the state (~41.5 N x 81.3 W) the numbers of
American Golden Finches is average.

Keep in mind that populations have random variation, and this is normal.
It takes considerable analysis to determine if there is a special or
assignable cause to any change which goes far beyond anecdotal
observation.  Regression based analysis (T tests and similar tools) usually
consider far too limited a data set and do not look at variation around the
mean in a way that determines if variation is normal and random or due to a
special (outside) cause.

This is not to say that anecdotal observation is not important.  If
multiple observers across a wide area report similar conditions these can
be indicative of a wider and more significant phenomena.

Haans

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: American Goldfinch
From: Brad Perkins <bperkin2 AT ROCKTENN.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 12:27:08 +0000
I have seen no dropoff of gold finches at my house in Muskingum County. I have 
had 20-30 all winter and so far this spring. 


Brad Perkins
Nashport,Ohio

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of Trish 
Shaffer 

Sent: Thursday, April 16, 2015 12:06 AM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: [Ohio-birds] American Goldfinch

I too have noticed a drop in Goldfinch numbers in Scioto County. I am in West 
Portsmouth & 5 years ago I was having 15 at one time on 3 feeders. My mother, 
in Wheelersburg has a wooded yard and would also have large numbers 20-30. 


The past 2 winters I have only seen 2 or 3 at a time. Currently I have 3 pair 
of the American Goldfinch coming to the feeders 


My mother has 6 pair of the American Goldfinch coming to her feeders.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: American Goldfinch
From: Trish Shaffer <trish.shaffer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 00:05:47 -0400
I too have noticed a drop in Goldfinch numbers in Scioto County. I am in
West Portsmouth & 5 years ago I was having 15 at one time on 3 feeders.  My
mother, in Wheelersburg has a wooded yard and would also have large numbers
20-30.

The past 2 winters I have only seen 2 or 3 at a time.  Currently I have 3
pair of the American Goldfinch coming to the feeders

My mother has 6 pair of the American Goldfinch coming to her feeders.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Rustys
From: Steve Jones <sjlarue1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 23:38:59 -0400
Hey, while you guys are at Magee, keep an eye out.  I had lots of both
Rustys and Grackles...made for fun counting.
On Apr 15, 2015 4:38 PM, "Ken Ostermiller" 
wrote:

> ​Thanks to all who help track the migration of Rusty Blackbirds in Ohio
> this spring. The Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz ends today in Ohio.
> However, the national coordinator is asking us to keep reporting checklists
> to eBird if we find late migrants, especially since the spring got off to
> such a cold beginning.
>
> You can see the checklists reported in Ohio for March and April on eBird:
>
> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/rusbla?neg=true&env.minX=-88.78314405156249&env.minY=37.42406037233251&env.maxX=-76.55536084843749&env.maxY=42.893479724553124&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=3&emo=4&yr=cur 

>
> Ken Ostermiller
> Judy Kolo-Rose
> Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
> coordinators for Ohio​
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at
> www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Veteran's Park (Mentor)
From: Richard <beckwith24 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 22:46:25 -0400

This afternoon included a very cooperative
pine warbler, also palm warbler, yellow-rumped warbler, spotted sandpiper, 
brown 

creeper, blue-gray gnatcatcher, ruby-crowned kinglet (all on stretch between 
bluebird boxes and observation deck). 

On the lake:   pied-bill grebes, canvasback, redhead, bufflehead, gadwall,
ring-necked ducks, coots. -- Rich Beckwith

                                          
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Tree Swallows / Bluebirds
From: Dillon Nott <dnott621 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 16:54:57 -0700
Well I put up 2 more houses on some fence post in the pasture, I got
2 Bluebirds & 4 Swallows
I've had many many Tree Swallows flying by just not taking notice to the
boxes.
Earlier as I was putting up a 3 holed/ room box, at least 8 Swallows were
flying with in 5 feet of me, being very impatient as I put up the box :-D
Surprisingly, Sparrows haven't been a problem at all this year, haven't
seen a single one in the pasture.
Anyway the Bluebirds are about 1/4 done with the nest.
Also yesterday driving we past a farm with many Barn Swallows, very good
their finally here as well!

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Goldfinches
From: Carole Babyak <000001100197cc98-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 19:44:29 -0400
I had 15 - 20 Goldfinch most of the winter. They left when the Coopers Hawk 
dove into the feeding area 


in February, but have returned. Funny thing is I had bought a new thistle sox 
for them (end of Jan.) and moved the thistle 


tube feeder to a shepherd hook. The winter Goldfinches continued to feed from 
the tube feeder and only 


Chickadees investigated the sox. When they started to get flecks of gold 
several Goldfinches were on the sox 


and they continue to feed from the sox and the tube feeder. Conclusion could be 
that the Goldfinches move 


around and the ones I have now were not the ones I had in Jan & Feb......or as 
they became gold they became 


more inquisitive, daring ...... or perhaps the winter Goldfinches had never 
seen a sox and it took new comers 


to recognize it and then everyone fed from it.??? I may have more now because 
they are on the sunflower 


feeders as well as the thistle, and the males are gold so more noticeable. 
Birds are Great. 


Carole Babyak  Trumbull Co. Howland Twp.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Long-tailed Duck
From: Doreene Linzell <dlinzell611 AT WOWWAY.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 19:34:36 -0400
Ron Sempier has texted me with news of a Long-tailed Duck at Big Island. He 
located it in the SE corner of the middle pond along LaRue/Prospect Rd. He said 
that it blends in real well with the coots!! 


Also, the 9 American White Pelicans are still present at Big Island Wildlife 
Area. 


Doreene Linzell
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Gold Finches
From: Rachel Shamy <shamytwinsmom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 17:33:26 -0400
Has anyone else been wondering where all the Gold Finches are??? I haven't
been seeing posts of anyone seeing any. We just got a single female my
sister, also in Lucas cty saw 1 male Gold Finch . That's the extent of
them. We usually have a LOT!!!! We still have 6prs of House Finches but
really missing our Golds. Any thoughts???

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: No Subject
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 16:37:39 -0400
​Thanks to all who help track the migration of Rusty Blackbirds in Ohio
this spring. The Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz ends today in Ohio.
However, the national coordinator is asking us to keep reporting checklists
to eBird if we find late migrants, especially since the spring got off to
such a cold beginning.

You can see the checklists reported in Ohio for March and April on eBird:

http://ebird.org/ebird/map/rusbla?neg=true&env.minX=-88.78314405156249&env.minY=37.42406037233251&env.maxX=-76.55536084843749&env.maxY=42.893479724553124&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=3&emo=4&yr=cur 


Ken Ostermiller
Judy Kolo-Rose
Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
coordinators for Ohio​

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Ever-so-slightly extralimital - Brooks Bird Club of WV June Foray Info
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 15:42:42 -0400
Hello All,

As Co-Director of this year's Foray, I wanted to let you know that our Brooks 
Bird Club of WV will be having our annual Foray in early June, this time in 
beautiful Preston County, WV. This area includes Cranesville Swamp, the Cheat 
River, Cathedral State Park, and more. We compile county-wide data on birds, 
plants, herps, mushrooms and more, and it is published in The Redstart, our 
scientific publication of which you might be aware (editor: Albert "Jay" 
Buckelew). 


Where this could be advantageous to students or any other young 
birders/naturalists that you might know is that scholarships are available for 
applicants to cover their expenses, and we are always looking for new talent to 
enrich the group. While many of our members are West Virginians, we 
'cross-pollinate' with other groups, and we have a number of members in Ohio 
that participate. If you want forms and information, please feel free to 
contact me Even for adults/paying participants, it is only $272 per person if 
they stay the whole 7+ days, all inclusive minus gasoline. 


The Foray has been going on for 76 years now, and it is really fun and 
interesting. This is also a good opportunity for students and adults alike to 
meet people 'in the field' that might be springboards for them. 


Thanks for your time, and keep your eyes to the skies,

Ryan Tomazin - Brooks Bird Club Co-Director - 412-220-9726 - 
wvwarblers AT hotmail.com - in Bridgeville, PA 

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: New eBird shared bird reporting hotspots
From: Ken Ostermiller <ken.ostermiller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 14:22:33 -0400
​Ohio birders have added several new shared bird reporting hotspots to
eBird.

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Birding+in+Ohio



Ashtabula County

Lampson Reservoir

http://ohioebirdhotsots.wikispaces.com/Lampson+Reservoir



Franklin County

Hoover Reservoir--Walnut Boat Ramp

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Hoover+Reservoir+Walnut+Boat+Ramp



Medina County

Spencer Reservoir

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Spencer+Reservoir



Mercer County

Eastview Park

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Eastview+Park



Noble County

Caldwell Lake

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Caldwell+Lake



Shelby County

Tawawa Park

http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com/Tawawa+Park



Warren County

Gulley Park and Trail

http://ohioebirdhotsots.wikispaces.com/Gulley+Park+and+Trail
​
​Ken Ostermiller
eBird Hotspot reviewer for Ohio​

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Grackle with poop on it's head???
From: Rachel Shamy <shamytwinsmom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 14:06:57 -0400
So we continue to see this poor Grackle with a white blotch on his head. As
we continue to check this weird spot out on this bird, it's looking less
and less like bird poop. Does anyone have any thoughts on what could be
going on with him??? Or what it is???

I have pictures I can email those curious.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: NO SIGHTING- Piping Plover Info
From: Robert Sams <bcchcach AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 14:05:00 -0400
I received an email back from Alice Van Zoeren, of the Great Lakes Piping
Plover Conservation Team regarding the Piping Plover from the Findlay
Reservoirs.  Based on a picture taken in less-than-ideal conditions, she
was able to tell us this much:

This photo is good enough to know something about this plover. To know
exactly which plover it is would take a better photo than anyone is likely
to have gotten on a cloudy evening. We'd have to be able to tell what color
dot is on the orange band high on the left leg, or read a three-digit
number on the light blue band low on the left leg. I don't think it would
have been possible even if you knew to look for it.

What I can say is that this plover is from the Great Lakes population. It
looks like a male. It hatched on North Manitou Island in Sleeping Bear
Dunes National Lakeshore in either 2009, 2012 or 2013. There were two males
with this combination that were in competition for territory on North
Manitou last summer, but neither found a mate. Once this plover does find a
mate and put in a nest we will trap it and re-band it with an individually
unique pattern of band colors so if you see it again we'd be able to tell
exactly which plover it is.

For those who don't know, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is in the
lower peninsula of Michigan, not far from Traverse City, along Lake
Michigan.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22851234

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: thanks all: Re: Wood ducks and unknown
From: Kathy Shank <kshank AT WOWWAY.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 11:45:47 -0400
I believe they were Ruby-Crowned Kinglets, esp. with their obvious habit of 
flitting about in low branches. Thanks everyone. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Wood ducks and unknown
From: Kathy Shank <kshank AT WOWWAY.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 10:47:50 -0400
Saw a pair of wood ducks in the main pond at the entrance to the Rocky River 
Interpretive Center in the Rocky River Reservation of the Cleveland Metroparks. 
Also saw an identical pair of warbler-sized greenish-yellow birds. I obviously 
don't know my warblers, so if anyone has any thoughts, I'd appreciate a 
possible ID. No other markings that stood out, however, I was walking three 
dogs at the time and had no binoculars, so I may have missed other identifying 
markings. (Did get a good front, side and top view though as they were fairly 
close and low to the ground). 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Fish Crow, Lake Erie Bluffs, 4/15
From: John Pogacnik <jpogacnik AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 10:10:36 -0400
A single fish Crow flew east along the shoreline at the bluffs this morning 
around 9:50. Migrating crows along the lake in this region should be checked. 


There are a few birds migrating despite the north winds. There was also a 
female Long - tailed duck off the northwest corner of the Lane Road loop trail. 
It's hanging north of the merganser flocks. Also a couple bank swallows this 
morning. 


John Pogacnik


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Cont. Ross's Goose Old Reid Park, Clark County
From: Stefan Minnig <stefanminnig AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 09:42:44 -0400
The Ross's Goose is still present at Old Reid Park in Clark County as of 7:15am 
this morning. It was located in the same area as I last spotted itin the pond 
near the exit of Old Reid Park. Once again, it's rather approachable. 

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Barred Owl - New Albany
From: Jason Wakley <wakleyjp AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 20:14:32 -0400
Saw my first Barred Owl today at my office in New Albany(Franklin county).

My office is surrounded by about 30 acres of forest and transitional field to 
forest. 


I watched it for 10 minutes while it surveyed the nearby field for dinner.

Really beautiful bird that made a long day at work much better!

Jason Wakley

Sent from my iPhone
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Blacklick Metro Park (Columbus) et al
From: Bob and Elaine McNulty <bob.mcn AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 17:52:56 -0400
Blacklick Metro Park
Hooded warbler (maple trail)
yellow throated warbler
yellow rumped warbler

Blendon Woods Metro Park
Pine warbler (silent, west blind)
Louisiana waterthrush (lower brookside trail actively feeding along water 
edge)(also silent) 


Wild flowers
Blue Cohosh

Woodside green (Gahanna)
Pine siskin (7)
Barred owl
yellow throated warbler

Bob and Elaine McNulty

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: FOS Chipping Sparrow - Summit County
From: "Barrett,Robert P" <rbarret AT UAKRON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 17:43:31 +0000
I saw the little guy singing from a pine branch in the CVNP this noon

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Darke County
From: Regina Schieltz <reginasch54 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 11:51:30 -0400
New birds for today are House Wrens and Cat BIrds.
Since Sunday evening there has been a nice movement of shorebirds at the
different flooded fields in the county.  Lesser and Greater Yellowlegs and
Pectorals.
One flooded field held a Great Egret.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Bill Whan <billwhan AT COLUMBUS.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 10:13:40 -0400
The Shawnee is managed by ODNR's Division of Forestry. The Division of
Wildlife has a different mission, and I imagine it properly should take
more effort and time to secure permission for harvesting trees on its
properties. The money should be less of an incentive. Because the DOW
commits a lot of effort to serving hunters (and of course wildlife), it
has to balance the income that timber harvests provide against its
mission to foster wildlife--from mushrooms to deer. Huntable species
like deer and turkeys kinda like dense forests, but the DOW is fond of
promoting the early growth following clear-cuts as habitat for the
ruffed grouse; here there are of course at least double monetary
incentives--money from the timber industry, and from grouse licenses.
Grouses are getting harder and harder to find, though, despite lots more
clear-cuts. The theory that thinned-down forests promote grouse habitat
is perhaps convenient for a state land manager, but maybe not for a
grouse. Our senior ornithologist Wheaton wrote long ago that this
species "was formerly much more numerous and widely distributed than
now, and has decreased in numbers with the rapid clearing away of
timbered lands" (1882:p.447). Trautman seems to have accepted the ODW
line, but had to reveal it didn't make much sense: in his "Birds of
Buckeye Lake" (1940:223) he writes: "The original forests, with their
cover and abundance of berries and other foods, presented a favorable
environment. Later, when the forests were replaced by brushlands and
clearings, conditions should have become more favorable, and it seems
probable that the grouse then became more numerous that (sic) it had
been at the advent of the white man." Without explanation, he goes on to
say that "the species was very numerous between 1860 and 1870, that it
decreased sharply in abundance between 1875 and 1885, and that by 1890
it had become rare or absent."
        My view is that we have a boatload of clearcuts in Ohio already, some
of them covered in asphalt to be sure, but if we continue to regard the
ragged remnants of the original forests as tree farms our wildlife will
continue to disappear.
Bill Whan


On 4/13/2015 1:19 PM, Brad Perkins wrote:
> I recently had an ODNR Division of Wildlife employee complain to me
> about the amount of effort and time it took to get timber harvests,
> including clearcuts, approved on ODNR Division of Wildlife
> properties. His professional opinion is that a whole tree chipping
> contractor, doing a series of patch (5 to 20 acres in size)
> clearcuts, in one week can do more to enhance wildlife(including game
> and non-game species of birds) numbers and diversity, than he would
> be able to do in his entire career using other wildlife habitat
> enhancement methods. I have had first hand experience with several of
> these projects, and am very impressed with the results, both for the
> timber regrowth and for the improvement in wildlife habitat and
> diversity.
>
> Brad Perkins
>
> Nashport, Ohio

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Conservation of bird habitat in Ohio, (things few birders actually do)
From: Haans Petruschke <haans42 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 08:28:50 -0400
Hi,

An interesting discussion about forest management.  The sort of thing I
find  far more interesting than just sighting reports.

We must all consider that state and national forests are not parks or
preserves but rather viewed as resources.  Good management of those
resources are essential. Unfortunately ordinary citizens have little say in
actual practice as we are not the primary constituents of the managing
authority and generally the environmental community is against any
exploitation of these resources, as a result, they are not taken seriously.

People interested in conservation of bird habitat can however do concrete
things to preserve and protect habitat.  Unfortunately, given real evidence
it seems they are very reluctant to do so.

First they can purchase an Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp.  These are available
from the Division of Wildlife at www.wildohio.gov  With the stamp you will
get a pin, and I encourage birders to wear this pin in the field to show
they support habitat conservation.

Additionally they can contribute to established not for profit institutions
which manage habitat in Ohio.  Mentor Marsh is a favorite spot for birders
and is jointly managed by the Division of Natural Areas and Preserves, AND
the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.  If you have been to Wake Robin
Trail in the past few years you have seen the tremendous effort the museum
is putting into restoring the marsh in that area.  You can contribute to
this effort by making a donation the Museums Mentor Marsh fund.

There are other legitimate organizations in Ohio which have similar
projects or preserve large tracts of land.  Mentor Marsh is one that just
happens to come to mind.

One other thing you can do is contribute to the Friends of Magee Marsh fund
for rebuilding of the boardwalk.  Because those 7 acres are a great birding
spot and concentrate migrants in a small area where they are easy to see,
it attracts lots of visitors and the boardwalk is essential to protecting
the area and keeping it viable as a good place to see birds.
Unfortunately, even given thousands of visits every year, the Friends do
not have enough money to do the full rebuild project, simply because
visitors are not contributing. (If every visitor contributes a paltry $3 it
will take 6 to 10 years to raise the needed funds)

I would challenge the birding community in Ohio to put their money into
habitat conservation.  Compared to what is spent on travel to see birds
alone it is a very small outlay that will go a long way.

Haans

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: FOS Tree Swallow - Lorain County
From: Spencer <spencerryan AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 08:12:54 -0400
Saw my FOS Tree Swallow in my neighborhood this morning. Bluebirds made an 
appearance as well. It's going to be a great day! 


Spencer A Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Lake Erie Bluffs Hawk Watch 4/13
From: John Pogacnik <jpogacnik AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 08:06:32 -0400
I was able to do a little hawk watching yesterday (4/13) at Lake Erie Bluffs. 
The bluffs are a great spot for spring hawk watching. You can watch right from 
the turnaround at the end of Lane Road or go down the trails. Here my totals 
for about 2 hours. 

Turkey Vulture (318), osprey (2), bald eagle (1 ad, 1 imm.), northern harrier 
(3), sharp-shinned hawk (268), Cooper's hawk (2), red-shouldered hawk (3), 
broad-winged hawk (122), red-tailed hawk (265), rough-legged hawk (2), American 
kestrel (2). There are a number of eagles in the area. The two counted appeared 
to be migrating. The red-shouldered hawks were all immature as were about half 
of the red-tailed hawks that I got a good look at. It was interesting that a 
number of the vultures were missing feathers. It appears we are getting toward 
the latter parts of the red-tailed, red-shouldered, and vulture flights. 

Other birds of note for the bluffs yesterday were great egret (1), SANDHILL 
CRANE, (2), Wilson's snipe (4), FISH CROW (4), brown thrasher (4), eastern 
towhee (11), vesper sparrow (1), savannah sparrow (2), fox sparrow (7), rusty 
blackbird (60+), and purple finch (3). 


For directions see lakemetroparks.com 
John Pogacnik                                     
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Laughing Gull Wendy Park
From: jen brumfield <elfin_skimmer AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 07:47:10 -0400
An adult Laughing Gull, likely the same individual that Chuck had off the end 
of the old coast guard station, is on the outer break wall straight north of 
whiskey island marina, at Wendy Park 



JB
CLE, OH
www.jenbrumfield.com
______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: Snowy Plover no, Piping Plover yes, Findlay Reservoirs
From: Robert Sams <bcchcach AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 07:43:55 -0400
A link to the eBird checklist with Piping Plover pics.  My loon pics are
unusable; will have to try for better later.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22851234

On Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 8:48 PM, Robert Sams  wrote:

> Looking at my pics, I made a dumb goof on leg color.  Reddish pink legs
> and color on bill = Piping Plover.  I would post a link to my ebird
> checklist, but for some reason, Photobucket will not load.
> Oh, yes, and one Pacific Loon, and one probable Pacific Loon on Findlay
> Reservoir #1.
> Will create link to pics as soon as am able
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeClearcuts
From: "Stierhoff, Elayna M." <EMStierhoff AT COLUMBUS.GOV>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 07:16:24 -0400
I agree with Rob. As a land manager, one of the hardest things to do is try to 
win the war against invasive plants. And we are not winning even though we(just 
my Department) spend hundreds of thousands of dollar a year to try. They spread 
at such an alarming rate and totally change our ecosystem, at this point we can 
only win small areas with constant vigilance and removal. Large areas are 
beyond us. These areas cut are ripe for the spread and takeover of invasive 
plants. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of rob 
thorn 

Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 9:53 PM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: Re: [Ohio-birds] ShawneeClearcuts

I'd like to point out that my original posting was as much about the lack of 
replanting as the original clearcutting. No disrespect to the Rodewalds, but 
most responsible forestry now involves smaller clear cuts and extensive 
replanting. Sustainable forestry like this is even practised by many private 
timber firms now, and I have no problems with that approach. I saw little of 
that going on at Shawnee, however. Clear-cutting of that size & intensity on 
those slopes is little more than industrial forestry, designed to maximize 
timber harvest in the minimal amount of time. This extensive fragmentation of 
the forest flies in the face of many, many studies emphasizing the value of 
large, contiguous forest blocks for healthy forest bird populations. The forest 
cuts could have been smaller & spread over a wider area, but the decisions look 
like they were made on the basis of harvest economics, not forest science, 
which will leave us a diminished forest, for humans & birds, for many 
generations. 


To suggest that this type of clear-cutting introduces new 'scarce' habitat is 
dis-ingenious at best. There's no shortage of scrub habitat outside of the 
State Forest, and even in the Forest where ice-falls were cleared several years 
ago. What is in short supply is old growth oak-hickory forest. If the companies 
and the state were so concerned about this habitat, I would expect to see 
replanting of oak & hickory saplings or nuts to facilitate recovery of the 
habitat. Without this and other re-planting measures, the bare slopes are 
likely to become either an eroded wasteland or a scrub of ashes & invasive 
species, steps that will slow or stop the succession to mature natural forest. 
I recall a comment about oak caterpillars being excellent bird food. I doubt 
the same can be said for emerald ash borers or the few insects that feed on 
honeysuckle, ailanthus, callery pear, & pauwlonia. Natural succession is 
difficult enough on these thin soils, but with the new added complication of 
invasives, it's probably impossible without human management. By not managing 
the reforestation, the state & its contractors have demonstrated, in the 
clearest way possible, that they aren't thinking about the long-term 
environmental health of the area. That should concern all of us. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Purple finches - Hocking County.
From: James E Fry <jamesfry2 AT JUNO.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 22:12:35 -0400
There were four Purple Finches at the feeder at my home here in northwest
Hocking County today(April 13). There was also a Ruby-crowned Kinglet in
the front yard.
Jim Fry

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeClearcuts
From: rob thorn <robthorn AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 21:53:14 -0400
I'd like to point out that my original posting was as much about the lack of 
replanting as the original clearcutting. No disrespect to the Rodewalds, but 
most responsible forestry now involves smaller clear cuts and extensive 
replanting. Sustainable forestry like this is even practised by many private 
timber firms now, and I have no problems with that approach. I saw little of 
that going on at Shawnee, however. Clear-cutting of that size & intensity on 
those slopes is little more than industrial forestry, designed to maximize 
timber harvest in the minimal amount of time. This extensive fragmentation of 
the forest flies in the face of many, many studies emphasizing the value of 
large, contiguous forest blocks for healthy forest bird populations. The forest 
cuts could have been smaller & spread over a wider area, but the decisions look 
like they were made on the basis of harvest economics, not forest science, 
which will leave us a diminished forest, for humans & birds, for many 
generations. 


To suggest that this type of clear-cutting introduces new 'scarce' habitat is 
dis-ingenious at best. There's no shortage of scrub habitat outside of the 
State Forest, and even in the Forest where ice-falls were cleared several years 
ago. What is in short supply is old growth oak-hickory forest. If the companies 
and the state were so concerned about this habitat, I would expect to see 
replanting of oak & hickory saplings or nuts to facilitate recovery of the 
habitat. Without this and other re-planting measures, the bare slopes are 
likely to become either an eroded wasteland or a scrub of ashes & invasive 
species, steps that will slow or stop the succession to mature natural forest. 
I recall a comment about oak caterpillars being excellent bird food. I doubt 
the same can be said for emerald ash borers or the few insects that feed on 
honeysuckle, ailanthus, callery pear, & pauwlonia. Natural succession is 
difficult enough on these thin soils, but with the new added complication of 
invasives, it's probably impossible without human management. By not managing 
the reforestation, the state & its contractors have demonstrated, in the 
clearest way possible, that they aren't thinking about the long-term 
environmental health of the area. That should concern all of us. 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Snowy Plover no, Piping Plover yes, Findlay Reservoirs
From: Robert Sams <bcchcach AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 20:48:03 -0400
Looking at my pics, I made a dumb goof on leg color.  Reddish pink legs and
color on bill = Piping Plover.  I would post a link to my ebird checklist,
but for some reason, Photobucket will not load.
Oh, yes, and one Pacific Loon, and one probable Pacific Loon on Findlay
Reservoir #1.
Will create link to pics as soon as am able

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Robert Powers <0000018dcaea74b2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 20:35:07 -0400
Isn't there a much simpler way to maintain these valuable "early
succession" habitats?

Why not simply re-cut the older "early succession" habitats once they reach
 7 to 10 years of age? No need to cut those old trees.  So much cheaper  &
easier (and less manpower) to use a brush hog than a chain saw.

Actually the Electric Power Companies already do this along their
high-voltage right-of ways.  So why aren't they listed as  birding hot spots?
Sounds like an area for future research.

  Bob Powers





In a message dated 4/12/2015 9:49:32 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
waltera4471 AT GMAIL.COM writes:

There is  no doubt that seeing a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring.  I,
also,  used to believe that they were environmentally devasting but have
changed my  opinion for 3 main reasons:

1.  Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU  and now at Cornell Ornithology Lab,
is an amazingly good birder and someone  whose opinion I deeply respect.  A
few years ago she wrote an excellent  report titled "Managing Forest Birds in
Southeast Ohio: A Guide for Land  Managers" which was based on years of
research.  I don't know if this  listserv will allow hotlinks to be pasted or
not but I'll try:

http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf

If  the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title.

In  brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have
fared  fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and
grassland  dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part due to
habitat  loss.  A very surprising finding of the study was that even mature
forest  specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers) are drawn to early
successional habitat right after fledging -- probably because of the dense
cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and insects).

Early  successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6 years
before it  has matured too much to provide the attraction to early
successional habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted chat)) 
so it 

must be  constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet.

Amanda's guide  gives specific recommendations on the sizes and placement
of the  clearcuts.  The most value comes from them being pretty large and
close  together.

2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a  clearcut;
specifically there are some species of trees that not only thrive on 
disturbance, they 

rely on it.  Many species of oak fall into that  category -- they will not
regenerate in great numbers without serious  disturbance.  Historically it
was frequent spring fires but a clearcut is  a good alternative.  Which
brings me to the second person whose opinion I  deeply respect:  Jim McCormac.
His PowerPoint on the importance of  forest caterpillars to the health of
bird populations is amazing.  Oak  trees are incredibly important "caterpillar
factories" so we want to be sure  we've got a steady supply of oaks
up-and-coming.

3. My own personal  experience with driving past a clearcut on the way to
work.  It looked  like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion pretty
much was the same as  yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against that?".  But
within 2 years it  had probably the prettiest fall foliage that I've seen --
the trees had  sprouted back so thickly from the stumps that you couldn't
have walked through  the place.  The density of the foliage made the intensity
of the colors  incredible.  Now, 2 decades later, the early successional
aspect is long  gone but it is still a nice young forest.  Since then I've
learned the  first 2 points above that I didn't know then.


A nice quote from  Amanda's publication is:  No matter how a forest is
managed, whether  actively or passively, certain species will be favored and
others discouraged.  The best strategy depends upon the management goal.  State
forests offer  a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest management
with timelines over a  century and create habitat that is in significant
decline throughout the  Appalachian area.  My opinion about clearcuts has
definitely changed now  that I understand the place they have in the ecosystem.
Humans too often  want to keep things "status quo" whereas wildlife has evolved
under realms of  disturbance and we do a disservice to the wildlife by not
providing  disturbances.

Alan  Walter

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds  mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider  joining our Society, at
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks  to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or  leave the list, or change your options,  at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions  or comments about the list to:  listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Blendon Woods Metro Park Columbus
From: Bob and Elaine McNulty <bob.mcn AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:43:31 -0400
Pine Warblers (Lake trail)
yellow rumped warblers
Broad winged hawk

Bob McNulty

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Orioles and Tanagers
From: Dillon Nott <dnott621 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 16:42:15 -0700
I was looking at my huge Sliver Maple tree in our front yard, then looked
at the 3 Oriole nests from 2 years ago and last year.
2 years ago, we had 1 pair with a fledgling hoping around the huge tree,
and eventually climbing toward the top, but I still fear the worst, even if
that momma was very protective. Now looking at them, I had a dumb moment
and forgot when Orioles return to ohio. Don't quote me, but the earliest
I've seen Orioles was around May. Then I thought about the beautiful Summer
& Scarlet Tanagers. The only Tanager I've ever seen was a bright Male
Summer Tanager last summer at Battelle Metro at a picnic area.

So when Do both of them return? While everyone's mind set on returning
Warblers, I'm sitting here waiting on Orioles and Tanagers :)

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Findlay plover
From: H Thomas Bartlett <hthomas.bartlett AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:39:36 -0400
Bob is reviewing his photos and says he is seeing color in the bill and
lags.  This would rule out Snowy Plover but not Piping.  Need more photos
and viewers.  The possibility of something else still exists.

Tom

--
H. Thomas Bartlett
Tiffin, Ohio
hthomas.bartlett AT gmail.com

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Bay Village garden birds
From: Dave Lewis <loopyonetwo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:27:04 -0400
We had two Ruby-crowned Kinglets today...along with American Tree Sparrow, 
White-throated, Chipping and Song Sparrows too, House Finch, Goldfinch, Downy & 
Red-bellied WPs, Northern Flicker, Mourning Dove, Grackle, Dark-eyed Junco, 
Northern Cardinal and American Robins. 

Sunday we had a bald eagle circling over our home...proper gardening and no 
chemicals! 


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Saw my 1st ruby crown of year at holden Arb.
From: Laura Peskin <thenaturegurl AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:17:22 -0400
Saw a female ruby crowned kinglet at holden arboretum, lake county today.
Near foster pond on woodland trail.  Not far from shelter hs.

Didn't see any birds by Pierson creek which is a hemlock ravine.  Awfully
hot down there today.  Holden is a trip.  Part of the Pierson creek "trail"
is the creek !!  Luckily a warm day, but by good fortune managed to keep
feet dry anyways.

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Possible Snowy Plover - Findlay Reservoir, Hancock County
From: H Thomas Bartlett <hthomas.bartlett AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 19:08:42 -0400
Just got a call from Bob Sams.  He is currently at the Findlay
Reservoir (Hancock County) on the middle dike near the corner.  He
says he has a Snowy Plover of which he has taken numerous photos.  He
was there checking on a reported Pacific Loon.  The plover has been
very cooperative and is with a large group of Killdeer on the dike.  A
jogger ran by it while he was photographing the bird and it simply ran
to the other side of the dike.

The loon was reported on the smaller reservoir.

Tom
--
H. Thomas Bartlett
Tiffin, Ohio
hthomas.bartlett AT gmail.com

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Bob Hinkle <bob AT 10SQUIRRELS.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 16:36:51 -0400
Research from Lisa Pettit, among others, indicates that greater "edge"
decreases songbird diversity, in part due to cowbird parisitation and in
part due to preferred nesting distances from "edge" by forest
songbirds.  Patch cutting is perhaps one of the worst "management"
practices for songbirds as it increases the amount of edge almost
exponentially.

Bob Hinkle
Solon, OH



On 4/13/2015 1:19 PM, Brad Perkins wrote:
> I recently had an ODNR Division of Wildlife employee complain to me about the 
amount of effort and time it took to get timber harvests, including clearcuts, 
approved on ODNR Division of Wildlife properties. His professional opinion is 
that a whole tree chipping contractor, doing a series of patch (5 to 20 acres 
in size) clearcuts, in one week can do more to enhance wildlife(including game 
and non-game species of birds) numbers and diversity, than he would be able to 
do in his entire career using other wildlife habitat enhancement methods. I 
have had first hand experience with several of these projects, and am very 
impressed with the results, both for the timber regrowth and for the 
improvement in wildlife habitat and diversity. 

>
> Brad Perkins
>
> Nashport, Ohio
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of Robert 
Hinkle 

> Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 12:49 PM
> To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
> Subject: Re: [Ohio-birds] ShawneeForest clearcuts
>
> I believe that a major issue of eastern clear cuts is that the "old forest" 
species are replaced with young successional species which are NOT the same as 
the old successional species they replaced after clear cut? Red maples may have 
pretty fall leaves, but they aren't sugar maples, tulip trees, American beech 
and a myriad of other old forest successional species whose complex 
interrelationships are little understood. The sole goal of these clear cuts is 
to obtain VERY scarce old forest hardwood timber and to hell with whatever 
depended upon them. It will take another two hundred years or more before 
anything like the old forest comes again, and even that depends on climate. 

>
> Bob Hinkle
> Solon, Ohio
>
>
> On 4/12/15 9:49 PM, Alan Walter wrote:
>> There is no doubt that seeing a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring. I, 
also, used to believe that they were environmentally devasting but have changed 
my opinion for 3 main reasons: 

>>
>> 1. Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU and now at Cornell Ornithology Lab, is 
an amazingly good birder and someone whose opinion I deeply respect. A few 
years ago she wrote an excellent report titled "Managing Forest Birds in 
Southeast Ohio: A Guide for Land Managers" which was based on years of 
research. I don't know if this listserv will allow hotlinks to be pasted or not 
but I'll try: 

>>
>> http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf
>>
>> If the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title.
>>
>> In brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have fared 
fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and grassland 
dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part due to habitat 
loss. A very surprising finding of the study was that even mature forest 
specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers) are drawn to early 
successional habitat right after fledging -- probably because of the dense 
cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and insects). 

>>
>> Early successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6 years 
before it has matured too much to provide the attraction to early successional 
habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted chat)) so it must 
be constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet. 

>>
>> Amanda's guide gives specific recommendations on the sizes and placement of 
the clearcuts. The most value comes from them being pretty large and close 
together. 

>>
>> 2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a clearcut; specifically 
there are some species of trees that not only thrive on disturbance, they rely 
on it. Many species of oak fall into that category -- they will not regenerate 
in great numbers without serious disturbance. Historically it was frequent 
spring fires but a clearcut is a good alternative. Which brings me to the 
second person whose opinion I deeply respect: Jim McCormac. His PowerPoint on 
the importance of forest caterpillars to the health of bird populations is 
amazing. Oak trees are incredibly important "caterpillar factories" so we want 
to be sure we've got a steady supply of oaks up-and-coming. 

>>
>> 3. My own personal experience with driving past a clearcut on the way to 
work. It looked like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion pretty much 
was the same as yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against that?". But within 2 
years it had probably the prettiest fall foliage that I've seen -- the trees 
had sprouted back so thickly from the stumps that you couldn't have walked 
through the place. The density of the foliage made the intensity of the colors 
incredible. Now, 2 decades later, the early successional aspect is long gone 
but it is still a nice young forest. Since then I've learned the first 2 points 
above that I didn't know then. 

>>
>>
>> A nice quote from Amanda's publication is: No matter how a forest is 
managed, whether actively or passively, certain species will be favored and 
others discouraged. The best strategy depends upon the management goal. State 
forests offer a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest management with 
timelines over a century and create habitat that is in significant decline 
throughout the Appalachian area. My opinion about clearcuts has definitely 
changed now that I understand the place they have in the ecosystem. Humans too 
often want to keep things "status quo" whereas wildlife has evolved under 
realms of disturbance and we do a disservice to the wildlife by not providing 
disturbances. 

>>
>> Alan Walter
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>
>> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
>> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

>> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>>
>>
>> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
>> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
>> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Cheryl Harner <cheryl.harner AT FLORA-QUEST.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 13:05:00 -0500
This thread is probably dangerously close to being inappropriate for this 
listserv.  


However, speaking to bird conservation alone, Ohio has no shortage of edge or 
shrubby habitat. 

The rarest wooded habitat in Ohio is Old Growth. It would benefit many 
endangered and migratory species to reduce timbering in our public lands. 


Ohio has no shortage of birds which benefit from shrubby habitats, like 
Catbirds or Northern Cardinals. 


Cheryl Harner 
OOS Conservation 




Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Brad Perkins
Date:04/13/2015 12:19 (GMT-06:00)
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: Re: [Ohio-birds] ShawneeForest clearcuts
I recently had an ODNR Division of Wildlife employee complain to me about the amount of effort and time it took to get timber harvests, including clearcuts, approved on ODNR Division of Wildlife properties. His professional opinion is that a whole tree chipping contractor, doing a series of patch (5 to 20 acres in size) clearcuts, in one week can do more to enhance wildlife(including game and non-game species of birds) numbers and diversity, than he would be able to do in his entire career using other wildlife habitat enhancement methods. I have had first hand experience with several of these projects, and am very impressed with the results, both for the timber regrowth and for the improvement in wildlife habitat and diversity. Brad Perkins Nashport, Ohio -----Original Message----- From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of Robert Hinkle Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 12:49 PM To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU Subject: Re: [Ohio-birds] ShawneeForest clearcuts I believe that a major issue of eastern clear cuts is that the "old forest" species are replaced with young successional species which are NOT the same as the old successional species they replaced after clear cut? Red maples may have pretty fall leaves, but they aren't sugar maples, tulip trees, American beech and a myriad of other old forest successional species whose complex interrelationships are little understood. The sole goal of these clear cuts is to obtain VERY scarce old forest hardwood timber and to hell with whatever depended upon them. It will take another two hundred years or more before anything like the old forest comes again, and even that depends on climate. Bob Hinkle Solon, Ohio On 4/12/15 9:49 PM, Alan Walter wrote: > There is no doubt that seeing a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring. I, also, used to believe that they were environmentally devasting but have changed my opinion for 3 main reasons: > > 1. Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU and now at Cornell Ornithology Lab, is an amazingly good birder and someone whose opinion I deeply respect. A few years ago she wrote an excellent report titled "Managing Forest Birds in Southeast Ohio: A Guide for Land Managers" which was based on years of research. I don't know if this listserv will allow hotlinks to be pasted or not but I'll try: > > http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf > > If the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title. > > In brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have fared fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and grassland dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part due to habitat loss. A very surprising finding of the study was that even mature forest specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers) are drawn to early successional habitat right after fledging -- probably because of the dense cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and insects). > > Early successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6 years before it has matured too much to provide the attraction to early successional habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted chat)) so it must be constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet. > > Amanda's guide gives specific recommendations on the sizes and placement of the clearcuts. The most value comes from them being pretty large and close together. > > 2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a clearcut; specifically there are some species of trees that not only thrive on disturbance, they rely on it. Many species of oak fall into that category -- they will not regenerate in great numbers without serious disturbance. Historically it was frequent spring fires but a clearcut is a good alternative. Which brings me to the second person whose opinion I deeply respect: Jim McCormac. His PowerPoint on the importance of forest caterpillars to the health of bird populations is amazing. Oak trees are incredibly important "caterpillar factories" so we want to be sure we've got a steady supply of oaks up-and-coming. > > 3. My own personal experience with driving past a clearcut on the way to work. It looked like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion pretty much was the same as yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against that?". But within 2 years it had probably the prettiest fall foliage that I've seen -- the trees had sprouted back so thickly from the stumps that you couldn't have walked through the place. The density of the foliage made the intensity of the colors incredible. Now, 2 decades later, the early successional aspect is long gone but it is still a nice young forest. Since then I've learned the first 2 points above that I didn't know then. > > > A nice quote from Amanda's publication is: No matter how a forest is managed, whether actively or passively, certain species will be favored and others discouraged. The best strategy depends upon the management goal. State forests offer a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest management with timelines over a century and create habitat that is in significant decline throughout the Appalachian area. My opinion about clearcuts has definitely changed now that I understand the place they have in the ecosystem. Humans too often want to keep things "status quo" whereas wildlife has evolved under realms of disturbance and we do a disservice to the wildlife by not providing disturbances. > > Alan Walter > > ______________________________________________________________________ > > Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society. > Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. > Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list. > > > You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at: > listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS > Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org > ______________________________________________________________________ Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society. Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list. You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at: listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org ______________________________________________________________________ Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society. Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list. You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at: listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org ______________________________________________________________________ Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society. Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list. You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at: listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Brad Perkins <bperkin2 AT ROCKTENN.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 17:19:13 +0000
I recently had an ODNR Division of Wildlife employee complain to me about the 
amount of effort and time it took to get timber harvests, including clearcuts, 
approved on ODNR Division of Wildlife properties. His professional opinion is 
that a whole tree chipping contractor, doing a series of patch (5 to 20 acres 
in size) clearcuts, in one week can do more to enhance wildlife(including game 
and non-game species of birds) numbers and diversity, than he would be able to 
do in his entire career using other wildlife habitat enhancement methods. I 
have had first hand experience with several of these projects, and am very 
impressed with the results, both for the timber regrowth and for the 
improvement in wildlife habitat and diversity. 


Brad Perkins

Nashport, Ohio

-----Original Message-----
From: Ohio birds [mailto:OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU] On Behalf Of Robert 
Hinkle 

Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 12:49 PM
To: OHIO-BIRDS AT LISTSERV.MIAMIOH.EDU
Subject: Re: [Ohio-birds] ShawneeForest clearcuts

I believe that a major issue of eastern clear cuts is that the "old forest" 
species are replaced with young successional species which are NOT the same as 
the old successional species they replaced after clear cut? Red maples may have 
pretty fall leaves, but they aren't sugar maples, tulip trees, American beech 
and a myriad of other old forest successional species whose complex 
interrelationships are little understood. The sole goal of these clear cuts is 
to obtain VERY scarce old forest hardwood timber and to hell with whatever 
depended upon them. It will take another two hundred years or more before 
anything like the old forest comes again, and even that depends on climate. 


Bob Hinkle
Solon, Ohio


On 4/12/15 9:49 PM, Alan Walter wrote:
> There is no doubt that seeing a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring. I, also, 
used to believe that they were environmentally devasting but have changed my 
opinion for 3 main reasons: 

>
> 1. Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU and now at Cornell Ornithology Lab, is an 
amazingly good birder and someone whose opinion I deeply respect. A few years 
ago she wrote an excellent report titled "Managing Forest Birds in Southeast 
Ohio: A Guide for Land Managers" which was based on years of research. I don't 
know if this listserv will allow hotlinks to be pasted or not but I'll try: 

>
> http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf
>
> If the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title.
>
> In brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have fared 
fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and grassland 
dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part due to habitat 
loss. A very surprising finding of the study was that even mature forest 
specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers) are drawn to early 
successional habitat right after fledging -- probably because of the dense 
cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and insects). 

>
> Early successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6 years 
before it has matured too much to provide the attraction to early successional 
habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted chat)) so it must 
be constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet. 

>
> Amanda's guide gives specific recommendations on the sizes and placement of 
the clearcuts. The most value comes from them being pretty large and close 
together. 

>
> 2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a clearcut; specifically 
there are some species of trees that not only thrive on disturbance, they rely 
on it. Many species of oak fall into that category -- they will not regenerate 
in great numbers without serious disturbance. Historically it was frequent 
spring fires but a clearcut is a good alternative. Which brings me to the 
second person whose opinion I deeply respect: Jim McCormac. His PowerPoint on 
the importance of forest caterpillars to the health of bird populations is 
amazing. Oak trees are incredibly important "caterpillar factories" so we want 
to be sure we've got a steady supply of oaks up-and-coming. 

>
> 3. My own personal experience with driving past a clearcut on the way to 
work. It looked like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion pretty much 
was the same as yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against that?". But within 2 
years it had probably the prettiest fall foliage that I've seen -- the trees 
had sprouted back so thickly from the stumps that you couldn't have walked 
through the place. The density of the foliage made the intensity of the colors 
incredible. Now, 2 decades later, the early successional aspect is long gone 
but it is still a nice young forest. Since then I've learned the first 2 points 
above that I didn't know then. 

>
>
> A nice quote from Amanda's publication is: No matter how a forest is managed, 
whether actively or passively, certain species will be favored and others 
discouraged. The best strategy depends upon the management goal. State forests 
offer a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest management with timelines 
over a century and create habitat that is in significant decline throughout the 
Appalachian area. My opinion about clearcuts has definitely changed now that I 
understand the place they have in the ecosystem. Humans too often want to keep 
things "status quo" whereas wildlife has evolved under realms of disturbance 
and we do a disservice to the wildlife by not providing disturbances. 

>
> Alan Walter
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org








Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Robert Evans <benbovas AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 13:18:52 -0400
As a geologist, and as a birder I would like to add my two cents worth to
this discussion. A very important factor, one usually completely ignored by
foresters and wildlife managers alike, (at least the ones I have talked to)
is the soil and geology of the areas considered for clear cutting. The soil
chemistry and parent material (in this case the bedrock from which the soil
is derived) varies rather broadly in areas of the Shawnee State Forest.

Another factor in the discussion, unfortunately, is resources and jobs in
an area that is essentially Appalachia without coal.

Of particular concern to me are the steep slopes represented by the Ohio
Shale Formation, a black Devonian shale that incidentally is the
surface-correlative formation as the now famous or notorious Marcellus
Shale, that of fracking note. This black, carbonaceous shale makes for very
poor soil that is very slow to recover when disturbed. It is at worst
poisonous or at best sterile, and it takes a very long time to establish
anything remotely resembling fertile ground on it.

I cut my professional geological teeth on a field study of the black shale
(potentially oil shale) of this formation in Scioto, Adams, Pike, Highland,
and Ross Counties. I did this for the now-defunct Ohio Department of
Energy. In doing so I spent the summer of 1981 driving around the
backroads, finding the precise locations of water wells for which the
Division of Water had stratigraphic records. Drillers are supposed to
submit such reports with each and every well drilled, and when potentially
interesting strata are encountered these records can serve as the data for
reconstructing the bedrock geology of an area, basically a technique for
find "virtual outcrops" in an area where actual outcrops are scarce.

Locating water wells entailed talking to the locals. So 27-year-old Bob
Evans also conducted, by default, a social survey of the same areas. As I
stated, it is Appalachia without coal. One fellow building a garage
remarked, "If you don't have a trade, you are **** out of luck! In fact,
even if you do have a trade it is hard to find work." And so there is the
timber industry. Trees are one of the only local resources, thus one of the
only local sources of money and jobs.

Saying that, this is not terribly different than issues we birders have
with timbering the rainforests of the world, or bad agriculture, or any
number of similar topics. Sometimes, forestry is practiced in a way that is
"renewable" or at least produces a result that in a few years resembles a
"natural" landscape again. Sometimes, such as when clearcutting is
practiced on soil that has a nearly sterile parent material, it can result
in damage that could take a century to recover to a reasonably "natural"
state. The men cutting the trees don't know or think about the bedrock
under the dirt. The companies cutting the trees don't care to know. There
is a big difference between the slopes near the Scioto River in the central
sections of Scioto and Pike Counties and the slopes in the western parts of
those counties and further west in Adams and Highland.

I have not been back to this part of the state in twenty years except for
brief day-trips to Serpent Mound. And I have not studied it in detail or
known it intimately for over thirty. My geological work occurred at a time
in my life between my boyhood interest in birds and when I took up
"birding" (ie. started keeping lists) when I turned 40 in 1994. But I
remember essentially barren slopes that had been clear cut more than ten
years previously, and then looked like badlands. And I remember the birds,
families of turkeys on Bracken Ridge, vultures sunning themselves in the
morning, a phoebe singing at my motel in Friendship, and the barred owl
that startled me in broad daylight in the forest along Lower Twin Creek. I
saw the owl a half hour after I retreated from a rattlesnake, a completely
non-aggressive rattler, but one from which I prudently decided to retreat.
It was coiled on a rock in the shade along the creek on a very hot
afternoon, and neither of us wanted much to do with the other.

It was wild country.

Bob Evans
Geologist, etc.
Hopewell Township, Muskingum County




On Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 8:19 AM, Bill Whan  wrote:

> Yes, it is sad to imagine the state of the forests before we arrived to
> improve them.  Give me a break....
> Bill Whan
> Columbus
>
> On 4/12/2015 9:49 PM, Alan Walter wrote:> There is no doubt that seeing
>
> a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring.  I, also, used to believe that
> they were environmentally devasting but have changed my opinion for 3
> main reasons:
> >
> > 1.  Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU and now at Cornell Ornithology
> Lab, is an amazingly good birder and someone whose opinion I deeply
> respect.  A few years ago she wrote an excellent report titled "Managing
> Forest Birds in Southeast Ohio: A Guide for Land Managers" which was
> based on years of research.  I don't know if this listserv will allow
> hotlinks to be pasted or not but I'll try:
> >
> > http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf
> >
> > If the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title.
> >
> > In brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have
> fared fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and
> grassland dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part
> due to habitat loss.  A very surprising finding of the study was that
> even mature forest specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers)
> are drawn to early successional habitat right after fledging -- probably
> because of the dense cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and
> insects).
> >
> > Early successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6
> years before it has matured too much to provide the attraction to early
> successional habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted
> chat)) so it must be constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet.
> >
> > Amanda's guide gives specific recommendations on the sizes and
> placement of the clearcuts.  The most value comes from them being pretty
> large and close together.
> >
> > 2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a clearcut;
> specifically there are some species of trees that not only thrive on
> disturbance, they rely on it.  Many species of oak fall into that
> category -- they will not regenerate in great numbers without serious
> disturbance.  Historically it was frequent spring fires but a clearcut
> is a good alternative.  Which brings me to the second person whose
> opinion I deeply respect:  Jim McCormac.  His PowerPoint on the
> importance of forest caterpillars to the health of bird populations is
> amazing.  Oak trees are incredibly important "caterpillar factories" so
> we want to be sure we've got a steady supply of oaks up-and-coming.
> >
> > 3. My own personal experience with driving past a clearcut on the way
> to work.  It looked like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion
> pretty much was the same as yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against
> that?".  But within 2 years it had probably the prettiest fall foliage
> that I've seen -- the trees had sprouted back so thickly from the stumps
> that you couldn't have walked through the place.  The density of the
> foliage made the intensity of the colors incredible.  Now, 2 decades
> later, the early successional aspect is long gone but it is still a nice
> young forest.  Since then I've learned the first 2 points above that I
> didn't know then.
> >
> >
> > A nice quote from Amanda's publication is:  No matter how a forest is
> managed, whether actively or passively, certain species will be favored
> and others discouraged. The best strategy depends upon the management
> goal.  State forests offer a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest
> management with timelines over a century and create habitat that is in
> significant decline throughout the Appalachian area.  My opinion about
> clearcuts has definitely changed now that I understand the place they
> have in the ecosystem.  Humans too often want to keep things "status
> quo" whereas wildlife has evolved under realms of disturbance and we do
> a disservice to the wildlife by not providing disturbances.
> >
> > Alan Walter
>
> On 4/12/2015 9:49 PM, Alan Walter wrote:
>
>> There is no doubt that seeing a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring.  I,
>> also, used to believe that they were environmentally devasting but have
>> changed my opinion for 3 main reasons:
>>
>> 1.  Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU and now at Cornell Ornithology Lab,
>> is an amazingly good birder and someone whose opinion I deeply respect.  A
>> few years ago she wrote an excellent report titled "Managing Forest Birds
>> in Southeast Ohio: A Guide for Land Managers" which was based on years of
>> research.  I don't know if this listserv will allow hotlinks to be pasted
>> or not but I'll try:
>>
>> http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf
>>
>> If the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title.
>>
>> In brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have
>> fared fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and
>> grassland dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part due
>> to habitat loss.  A very surprising finding of the study was that even
>> mature forest specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers) are
>> drawn to early successional habitat right after fledging -- probably
>> because of the dense cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and
>> insects).
>>
>> Early successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6 years
>> before it has matured too much to provide the attraction to early
>> successional habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted
>> chat)) so it must be constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet.
>>
>> Amanda's guide gives specific recommendations on the sizes and placement
>> of the clearcuts.  The most value comes from them being pretty large and
>> close together.
>>
>> 2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a clearcut;
>> specifically there are some species of trees that not only thrive on
>> disturbance, they rely on it.  Many species of oak fall into that category
>> -- they will not regenerate in great numbers without serious disturbance.
>> Historically it was frequent spring fires but a clearcut is a good
>> alternative.  Which brings me to the second person whose opinion I deeply
>> respect:  Jim McCormac.  His PowerPoint on the importance of forest
>> caterpillars to the health of bird populations is amazing.  Oak trees are
>> incredibly important "caterpillar factories" so we want to be sure we've
>> got a steady supply of oaks up-and-coming.
>>
>> 3. My own personal experience with driving past a clearcut on the way to
>> work.  It looked like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion pretty
>> much was the same as yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against that?".  But
>> within 2 years it had probably the prettiest fall foliage that I've seen --
>> the trees had sprouted back so thickly from the stumps that you couldn't
>> have walked through the place.  The density of the foliage made the
>> intensity of the colors incredible.  Now, 2 decades later, the early
>> successional aspect is long gone but it is still a nice young forest.
>> Since then I've learned the first 2 points above that I didn't know then.
>>
>>
>> A nice quote from Amanda's publication is:  No matter how a forest is
>> managed, whether actively or passively, certain species will be favored and
>> others discouraged. The best strategy depends upon the management goal.
>> State forests offer a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest
>> management with timelines over a century and create habitat that is in
>> significant decline throughout the Appalachian area.  My opinion about
>> clearcuts has definitely changed now that I understand the place they have
>> in the ecosystem.  Humans too often want to keep things "status quo"
>> whereas wildlife has evolved under realms of disturbance and we do a
>> disservice to the wildlife by not providing disturbances.
>>
>> Alan Walter
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>>
>> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
>> Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/
>> membership.php.
>> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>>
>>
>> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
>> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
>> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>>
>>
>>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/
> membership.php.
> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Re: ShawneeForest clearcuts
From: Robert Hinkle <bob AT 10SQUIRRELS.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 12:49:07 -0400
I believe that a major issue of eastern clear cuts is that the "old
forest" species are replaced with young successional species which are
NOT the same as the old successional species they replaced after clear
cut?  Red maples may have pretty fall leaves, but they aren't sugar
maples, tulip trees, American beech and a myriad of other old forest
successional species whose complex interrelationships are little
understood.  The sole goal of these clear cuts is to obtain VERY scarce
old forest hardwood timber  and to hell with whatever depended upon
them.  It will take another two hundred years or more before anything
like the old forest comes again, and even that depends on climate.

Bob Hinkle
Solon, Ohio


On 4/12/15 9:49 PM, Alan Walter wrote:
> There is no doubt that seeing a fresh clearcut is extremely jarring. I, also, 
used to believe that they were environmentally devasting but have changed my 
opinion for 3 main reasons: 

>
> 1. Amanda Rodewald, formerly of OSU and now at Cornell Ornithology Lab, is an 
amazingly good birder and someone whose opinion I deeply respect. A few years 
ago she wrote an excellent report titled "Managing Forest Birds in Southeast 
Ohio: A Guide for Land Managers" which was based on years of research. I don't 
know if this listserv will allow hotlinks to be pasted or not but I'll try: 

>
> http://www.obcinet.org/committees/ForestManagement_web.pdf
>
> If the link didn't work, it can be found by Googling the above title.
>
> In brief, the report states that woodland breeding birds in Ohio have fared 
fairly well in the last 50 years, whereas early successional and grassland 
dwelling birds have declined significantly, in no small part due to habitat 
loss. A very surprising finding of the study was that even mature forest 
specialists (e.g., wood thrush and scarlet tanagers) are drawn to early 
successional habitat right after fledging -- probably because of the dense 
cover and abundant food (berries on brambles and insects). 

>
> Early successional habitat is AMAZINGLY short-lived (only about 6 years 
before it has matured too much to provide the attraction to early successional 
habitat specialists (e.g., indigo buntings, yellow-breasted chat)) so it must 
be constantly re-disturbed to keep being a bird magnet. 

>
> Amanda's guide gives specific recommendations on the sizes and placement of 
the clearcuts. The most value comes from them being pretty large and close 
together. 

>
> 2. There is a sound silvicultural reason for doing a clearcut; specifically 
there are some species of trees that not only thrive on disturbance, they rely 
on it. Many species of oak fall into that category -- they will not regenerate 
in great numbers without serious disturbance. Historically it was frequent 
spring fires but a clearcut is a good alternative. Which brings me to the 
second person whose opinion I deeply respect: Jim McCormac. His PowerPoint on 
the importance of forest caterpillars to the health of bird populations is 
amazing. Oak trees are incredibly important "caterpillar factories" so we want 
to be sure we've got a steady supply of oaks up-and-coming. 

>
> 3. My own personal experience with driving past a clearcut on the way to 
work. It looked like Hiroshima about 25 years ago and my opinion pretty much 
was the same as yours..."Shouldn't there be a law against that?". But within 2 
years it had probably the prettiest fall foliage that I've seen -- the trees 
had sprouted back so thickly from the stumps that you couldn't have walked 
through the place. The density of the foliage made the intensity of the colors 
incredible. Now, 2 decades later, the early successional aspect is long gone 
but it is still a nice young forest. Since then I've learned the first 2 points 
above that I didn't know then. 

>
>
> A nice quote from Amanda's publication is: No matter how a forest is managed, 
whether actively or passively, certain species will be favored and others 
discouraged. The best strategy depends upon the management goal. State forests 
offer a unique opportunity to do coordinated forest management with timelines 
over a century and create habitat that is in significant decline throughout the 
Appalachian area. My opinion about clearcuts has definitely changed now that I 
understand the place they have in the ecosystem. Humans too often want to keep 
things "status quo" whereas wildlife has evolved under realms of disturbance 
and we do a disservice to the wildlife by not providing disturbances. 

>
> Alan Walter
>
> ______________________________________________________________________
>
> Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
> Please consider joining our Society, at 
www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php. 

> Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.
>
>
> You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
> listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
> Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
>

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Upcoming talk from birder and author Kent Nelson
From: "Boutis, Nick" <nboutis AT GLENHELEN.ORG>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 12:34:26 -0400
Hi folks,

Next Tuesday at Glen Helen, we’re going to be hosting noted birder and
short story author Kent Nelson. Kent, whose North American bird list stands
at 757 species, recently won the coveted Drue Heinz Award for a collection
of short fiction titled “The Spirit Bird.” His talk, sponsored by The
Antioch Review, is free and open to the public. He’ll be reading from his
new collection and talking about his birding experiences. Join us April
21st, 7pm, at the Vernet Ecological Center, 405 Corry St in Yellow Springs.

Regards, Nick Boutis
[image: Glen Helen Ecology Institute] Nick Boutis
 | Executive Director
Glen Helen Ecology Institute | 405 Corry St. | Yellow Springs, OH 45387
Antioch's Natural Sanctuary | Outdoor Classroom | Living Laboratory
Telephone: 937-769-1902 | Mobile: 937-286-6884
[image: WebsiteGB]    [image: email]
    [image: Vcard Save Contact]
   [image:
View map]

 

   [image: Facebook button]   [image:
Twitter button] 

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Ducks at Kuehnle, Green Darner on South Bass
From: Lisa Brohl <lkbrohl AT THIRDPLANET.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 12:31:53 -0400
Yesterday I got a chance to bird on Middle Bass Island. There were 30 ring 
necked ducks, 6 wood ducks, 2 coots, a blue-winged teal, and a horned grebe at 
the Kuehnle State Wildlife Area with lots of red-breasted mergansers, common 
goldeneyes, bufflehead, and horned grebes just offshore. Bonapartes gulls and 
kingfishers both there and at the MB State Park marina. A walk at the MBI East 
Point Preserve produced a hermit thrush. Turkey vultures, red-winged blackbirds 
and tree swallows everywhere on islands. 


Saw my First purple martin and barn swallow of year at the Scheeff East Point 
Preserve on Saturday putting up gourds with Paula Ziebarth. Also saw my first 
green darner dragonfly of the year on South Bass Island (my favorite sign of 
spring!) that day while in the vineyard. A big day for migrating raptors that 
day too with turkey vultures, red-winged hawks, cooper's hawks, bald eagles, 
and a northern harrier. 


Lisa Brohlf

______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org
Subject: Fish Crows, Lake Erie Bluffs, 4/13
From: John Pogacnik <jpogacnik AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 10:39:09 -0400
Four fish crows flew by heading east at the Lake Erie Bluffs. They were pretty 
vocal. Also of note this morning was northern shrike, 2 sandhill cranes, and a 
couple rough-legged hawks. There is a small hawk flight so far this morning. 


For directions see lakemetroparks.com.

John Pogacnik


Sent by Mailwise – Your emails, with style.:)


______________________________________________________________________

Ohio-birds mailing list, a service of the Ohio Ornithological Society.
Please consider joining our Society, at www.ohiobirds.org/site/membership.php.
Our thanks to Miami University for hosting this mailing list.


You can join or leave the list, or change your options, at:
listserv.miamioh.edu/scripts/wa.exe?LIST=OHIO-BIRDS
Send questions or comments about the list to: listowner AT ohiobirds.org