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Updated on Friday, August 22 at 08:47 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hook-billed Vanga,©Jan Wilczur

23 Aug Re: Lyside Sulphur ["Keith Wolfe bflyearlystages AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Aug Lyside Sulphur ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Aug Tijuana River, San Diego Co. ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Aug Great Southern White (Ascia monuste) in Patagonia: 17 Aug 2014 ["'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Aug Another WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos chlorinde) south of Patagonia Lake ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Aug Hammock Skipper ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Aug Kern River Valley, Kern County, CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Aug Re: Hammock Skippers reach California ["Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Aug Re: Hammock Skippers reach California ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Aug Hammock Skippers reach California ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
9 Aug Scissors Crossing, San Diego ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
04 Aug SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics, cont. ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
04 Aug SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug RE: Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today ["'Todd Stout' todd AT raisingbutterflies.org [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug Lysides & Cloudless Sulphurs in SE AZ ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug Anteos clorinde: White angled-sulphur south of Patagonia Lake ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
03 Aug SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Aug Anteos clorinde: 2 August, Ash Canyon, Cochise Co, AZ ["'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Aug Miguelito Canyon, Santa Barbara County, CA ["'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" ]
31 Jul RE: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Re: lyside sulphur ["Kim Garwood kimgrwd AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Lone Pine-Lubken Canyon-Whitney Portal ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Re: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year ["Art Douglas pop_art AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Bridgeport Canyon ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Warren Creek 9000', Mono County, CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Heather Blues & American Coppers ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul lyside sulphur ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Little Walker River to Obsidian Camp ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Salvaging day 2 after the Whites. ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Jul White Mts. again ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Jul New butterfly count set for Scottsdale AZ ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jul Anteos chlorinde in lower Carr Canyon ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jul SE AZ: Santa Rita Mts Summer Butterfly Count ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jul Santa Barbara County, CA ["'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jul White Mtns (AZ) Butterflies: July 24-25, 2014 ["Diane Touret dctouret AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]
25 Jul Re: Lyside Sulphur ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
23 Jul Patagonia (AZ) Butterfly Bonanza - Tues. July 22 ["Diane Touret dctouret AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]
20 Jul Polyginus leo in Carr Canyon ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
20 Jul Re: Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
19 Jul Re: Black witch ["Pete Spino petespino8 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
19 Jul Re: Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon ["Kim Garwood kimgrwd AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" ]
19 Jul Black witch ["Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" ]
19 Jul Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Jul Looking at spread specimens ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Jul Tehachapi Pine Whites ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
15 Jul White Mts. 10-12 mi. N Schulman Grove ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
15 Jul Glass Mtn., Sawmill Mdw., Mono Co., CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Jul FW: Fresno Dome 7/11/14 ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Jul Silver Creek Cyn., White Mts., CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Jul South Fork Bishop Creek 8300-9000' CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Jul White Mts. near Narrows, CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Jul Sunrise Highway, San Diego County ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Jul Cazba.org Field Trip to East Clear Creek, Coconino County, AZ 12 July 2014 ["kurtrad AT mexicobirding.com [SoWestLep]" ]
8 Jul Tehachapi Mtn. Park ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
8 Jul Southern AZ Monsoon Rains ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Jul 2014 SE Arizona Butterfly Counts ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
8 Jul SE AZ: Summer Santa Rita Mts Butterfly Count ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
5 Jul Lake Cuyamaca, San Diego ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Jul Re: Ebutterfly ["Elizabeth Long elizabeth.c.long AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Jul Tehachapi Mtn. Park ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Jun RE: Sherman Pass butterfly count ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Jun Sherman Pass butterfly count ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jun Greenhorn Mts. ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jun Butterfly data from Grand Canyon National Park ["Robb Hannawacker hannawacker AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jun Ebutterfly ["Richard Carlson rccarl AT pacbell.net [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Jun New Species of Moth Described in Great Smocky Mts. ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
27 Jun ebutterfly ["'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" ]
26 Jun Kernville to Sherman Pass, CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
26 Jun New Version of eButterfly up and ready! ["Katy Prudic klprudic AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
25 Jun Databases for California ["'Norbert Kondla' nkondla AT telus.net [SoWestLep]" ]
25 Jun Databases for California ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
24 Jun Corrections in Season Summary: ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Jun Dry San Diego ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
20 Jun RE: Fresno Dome area, California: ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]

Subject: Re: Lyside Sulphur
From: "Keith Wolfe bflyearlystages AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 01:18:59 +0000 (UTC)
Jim, I'm not surprised. I reared Kricogonia lyside twice (Arizona, September 
2003; Texas, October 2004), and though my rearing notes have no mention of 
larval nests, there is this observation regarding AZ chrysalises: 



"Four pupae were whitish green (2) or grayish brown (2), one of the latter 
inside a well-constructed shelter of leaves silked together." 



Blue skies,


Keith


From: JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep] 
To: DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com, SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:25:56 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: [SoWestLep] Lyside Sulphur


Lepsters,


Yesterday I had a female Lyside Sulphur ovipositing on both guayacan plants in 
my front yard. This is a month after the first influx individuals which is no 
big deal but upon closer inspection this morning I found the larger of the two 
plants loaded with Lyside caterpillars indicating oviposition from about a week 
or so ago probably by a different female. 



I have had Lysides attack my plants before and I have taken photos and watched 
the larvae grow but I've never observed nest making by the larvae. Has anyone 
else out there ever observed this? I can't believe I've never seen this before! 
Must have missed it. There are at least a half dozen last or next to last 
instars in leaf nests on the plant. 



This is butterfly # 42 for the yard this year which is only significant when 
compared to last year's final total which was 42 and it's only August 22! I 
would need 21 more to reach the number of butterflies in the yard for 2012. The 
yard is currently averaging about 15 species per day. It's not bad but not 
great either since I have had daily averages in the high twenties in previous 
Augusts. 



I am hosting an open yard next Saturday for SEABA members thus the lengthy 
post. 



Jim B


------------------------------------
Posted by: Keith Wolfe 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Lyside Sulphur
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 14:25:56 -0400 (EDT)
Lepsters,
 
Yesterday I had a female Lyside Sulphur ovipositing on both guayacan plants 
 in my front yard. This is a month after the first influx individuals which 
is no  big deal but upon closer inspection this morning I found the larger 
of the two  plants loaded with Lyside caterpillars indicating oviposition 
from about a week  or so ago probably by a different female. 
 
I have had Lysides attack my plants before and I have taken photos and  
watched the larvae grow but I've never observed nest making by the larvae. Has 

anyone else out there ever observed this? I can't believe I've never seen  
this before! Must have missed it. There are at least a half dozen last or 
next  to last instars in leaf nests on the plant.
 
This is butterfly # 42 for the yard this year which is only significant  
when compared to last year's final total which was 42 and it's only August  
22! I would need 21 more to reach the number of butterflies in the yard for  
2012. The yard is currently averaging about 15 species per day. It's not bad 
but  not great either since I have had daily averages in the high twenties 
in  previous Augusts.
 
I am hosting an open yard next Saturday for SEABA members thus the lengthy  
post.
 
  Jim B
Subject: Tijuana River, San Diego Co.
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 20:28:53 -0700
Hello,

I was at the Bird and Butterfly Garden near Tijuana River yesterday.
Lots of swallowtails.

Skipper - did not id.  Probably Fiery Skipper or Umber Skipper.  Worn out.
Westen Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) - many females.  About 20 of them.
Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) - 5-6
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) - 4-5.  Only on Lantana.
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) - common
Powell's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini powelli) - 2 females

If you want to see swallowtails, this is good place right now.  Many and fresh.

Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Great Southern White (Ascia monuste) in Patagonia: 17 Aug 2014
From: "'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:50:03 -0700
Dear Lepsters,

 

Dont know if this has been reported already. Sorry if a dupe. 

 

Today I found a rather fresh-looking Great Southern White nectaring on
lantana in front of the Patagonia, AZ post office. It was photographed by my
birding clients.

 

Best to all,

RAB

 

 

Robert A. Behrstock

10359 S. Thicket Pl. 

Hereford, AZ 85615

Phone:  (520) 378-3262

Cell: (520) 732-4784

N31 22' 49.75"  W110 13' 41.08",  5,012' elev. 

Please visit my website:  
http://www.naturewideimages.com/

Birdlife of Houston, Galveston, and the Upper Texas Coast

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Birdlife-of-Houston-Galveston-and-the-Upper
-Texa,356.aspx

Finding Birds on the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Finding-Birds-on-the-Great-Texas-Coastal-Bi
rding-T,709.aspx

Dragonflies & Damselflies of the Southwest

 
http://www.rionuevo.com/book.php?book_isbn=9781933855141 

 

 
Subject: Another WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos chlorinde) south of Patagonia Lake
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 16:41:35 -0700
Earlier this month I documented WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos chlorinde) in my 
yard (on a hilltop about 3 miles south of Patagonia Lake) on two different 
days. On Aug 14th and again today I had one again stop briefly in my yard (on a 
hilltop about 3 miles south of Patagonia Lake). Each has spent just a few 
minutes or less at flowers, then moved on to the north. So apparently they are 
still moving. 



Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ 85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Hammock Skipper
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 12:16:21 -0400 (EDT)
Lepheads,
 
Had a Hammock Skipper in the yard yesterday morning for about 40 minutes.  
Choice of nectar was plain old lantana of the gold variety. Yard activity is 
 finally improving with twenty species seen over the past three days. I'm 
near  Sabino Canyon in Tucson, AZ. 
 
My area and lower Sabino Canyon has not had that much rain this summer. My  
yard has received just under three inches since July 1 start of  the 
monsoon.
 
Jim B
Subject: Kern River Valley, Kern County, CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 22:08:43 -0700
These butterflies from the Kern River Valley (Hanning Flat, Weldon, Onyx),
Kern County, CA 13 August 2014.  There were recent summer rains, Alkali
Mallow was in much improved leaf condtion and some was in full bloom.  Some
Atriplex canescens was also in improved condition at Weldon and Onyx.  No
late summer-fall composites were yet in bloom.

 

White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)

Common Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)-both occur at Hanning Flat-saw
about a dozen Pyrgus.

Sandhill Skipper (Polites sonora): 1 on Heliotrophe in the Audubon Preserve.

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-common all sites

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)- several, especially at Hanning Flat.

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)-2 at Hanning Flat

Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-20+ several localities

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) at Weldon

San Emigdio Blue (Plebejus emigdionis): 8 males at Weldon; 2 males at Onyx.

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-1 at Weldon

Queen (Danaus gilippus): 3 on Heliotrophe on Audbon Preserve.

 

Goals were to try and find strays of the Hammock Skipper, find a population
of Mallow Scrub Hairstreaks at Hanning Flat and monitor the occurrence of
San Emigdio Blues at the two sites checked.  Recent summer rains are not
likely to trigger a large emigdionis flight and many seen were showing wear.
It is possible Strymon istapa may be between broods if it occurs here as
more than a stray.  The larval host was abundant at Hanning Flat.  There was
lots of narrow leaf milkweed available for use by Danaids in the Weldon area
in pastures and ravines along the roads.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Re: Hammock Skippers reach California
From: "Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 11:17:40 -0700
Since I'm in Orange County, I'd like to know where/when it was found.

-Bob Allen
bugbob AT mac.com
Author, Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains

Sent from my iPhone 5S

> On Aug 12, 2014, at 6:50 AM, "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> Wouldn't it be cool to know where it came from? My thoughts are hundreds of 
miles to the south. 

>  
> Just curious,  Jim B
>  
> In a message dated 8/11/2014 10:00:54 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, 
SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com writes: 

>  
> Everyone:
> 
> I just verified a photo of a Hammock Skipper in Orange County seen today. So 
here is a chance to find an exotic tropical skipper in California now. But 
these are limited time offers! Happy hunting! 

> 
> 
> Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
> kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Hammock Skippers reach California
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 09:50:24 -0400 (EDT)
Wouldn't it be cool to know where it came from? My thoughts are hundreds of 
 miles to the south.
 
Just curious,  Jim B
 
 
In a message dated 8/11/2014 10:00:54 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,  
SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com writes:

 
 
 
 
Everyone: 
I just verified a  photo of a Hammock Skipper in  I jus    seen today. 
 So here is a chance to find an exotic tropical skipper in  So here i now. 
But these are limited time offers!   Happy hunting! 
Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
_kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com_ (mailto:kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com)  or 
_flutterflies93306 AT att.net_ (mailto:flutterflies93306 AT att.net)   




Subject: Hammock Skippers reach California
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 22:00:48 -0700
Everyone:

   I just verified a photo of a Hammock Skipper in Orange County seen today.
So here is a chance to find an exotic tropical skipper in California now.
But these are limited time offers!  Happy hunting!

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Scissors Crossing, San Diego
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 23:47:21 -0700
All,

After seeing good amount of rain last week, I decided to head out to the desert 
today. 

Scissors Crossing had good amount of flowers, mainly thistles and heliotropes.

Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala eufala)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme) - fairly common even in higher altitude and 
cities. 

California Dogface (Zerene eurydice)
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)
Edward's Blue (Echiargus ceraunus gyas)
Palmer's Metalmark (Apodemia palmerii)
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)
Monarch (Danaus plexippus plexippus)
Striated Queen (Danaus gilippus thersippus)

Plum Canyon was dead dry, but I see Ocotillo were turning bright green, and 
also saw water puddles. 

May be we will have a nice fall flight.

If Colorado Desert received good amount of rain, another Painted Lady outburst 
may occur again? 


Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics, cont.
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 15:48:05 -0700
Here's the ventral.
 

 Ken
 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14827030881/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14827030881/ 


 

 

 

Subject: SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 15:43:38 -0700
With Debbie Sebesta's permission, and for the sake of documentation, I've 
uploaded a couple pictures of the Broad-banded Swallowtail to my flickr site 
(see links below). 

 

 Ken Kertell
 Tucson
 

 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14829744102/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14829744102/ 


 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14827030881/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14829744102/ 


 

Subject: RE: Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today
From: "'Todd Stout' todd AT raisingbutterflies.org [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 14:13:24 -0600
Very nice!!  I'd love to rear those some day!  :)

 

Thx, Todd

 

Todd L. Stout 
Raising Butterflies 
http://www.raisingbutterflies.org/about-me/ 
http://www.facebook.com/Raising.Butterflies 
  todd AT raisingbutterflies.org
801-326-4683 

  _____  

From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]
Sent: Monday, August 04, 2014 12:59 PM
To: SoWestLep
Subject: [SoWestLep] Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde)
today

 

  

A different WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) passed through my yard
south of Patagonia Lake, Santa Cruz Co, AZ at 1120 today. This is a
different bug than yesterdays sighting.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/14827328214/

 

 

Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ  85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
 www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan


Subject: Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:59:15 -0700
A different WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) passed through my yard south 
of Patagonia Lake, Santa Cruz Co, AZ at 1120 today. This is a different bug 
than yesterdays sighting. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/14827328214/



Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ 85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Lysides & Cloudless Sulphurs in SE AZ
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 13:35:53 +0000
Yesterday (Sunday 8/3/14) as I drove back to Tucson from Phoenix via Florence 
there were both Lysides & Cloudless Sulphurs flying across the highway 
constantly from 9:30 am to 11:30 am. 



Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Anteos clorinde: White angled-sulphur south of Patagonia Lake
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 06:31:06 -0700
Another White angled-sulphur yesterday (3 Aug). In my yard on a hilltop on 
Circulo Montana Road, south of Patagonia Lake. It nectared on yellow verbena, 
bird of paradise and oleander, then apparently moved on. Four photos start at: 




https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/14798651596/



Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ 85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Aug 2014 16:23:20 -0700
Yesterday (2 August), Debbie Sebesta identified a Broad-banded Swallowtail 
(Heraclides astyalus bajaensis) in her Patagonia garden and forwarded to me a 
couple nice photos. Thanks, Debbie. 

  
 Ken Kertell
 Tucson
  
 

Subject: Anteos clorinde: 2 August, Ash Canyon, Cochise Co, AZ
From: "'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 08:03:42 -0700
Dear Lepsters,

 

During yesterdays Ramsey Canyon butterfly count, we found a White
Angled-Sulphur (Anteos clorinde) in the yard - the third or fourth here in
10 years. Also of interest was a Many-spotted Skipperling (Piruna aea), and
Elissa Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes elissa), which was butterfly # 115 for
the yard.

 

Best,

RAB

 

 

Robert A. Behrstock

10359 S. Thicket Pl. 

Hereford, AZ 85615

Phone:  (520) 378-3262

Cell: (520) 732-4784

N31 22' 49.75"  W110 13' 41.08",  5,012' elev. 

Please visit my website:  
http://www.naturewideimages.com/

Birdlife of Houston, Galveston, and the Upper Texas Coast

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Birdlife-of-Houston-Galveston-and-the-Upper
-Texa,356.aspx

Finding Birds on the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Finding-Birds-on-the-Great-Texas-Coastal-Bi
rding-T,709.aspx

Dragonflies & Damselflies of the Southwest

 
http://www.rionuevo.com/book.php?book_isbn=9781933855141 

 

 
Subject: Miguelito Canyon, Santa Barbara County, CA
From: "'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 01:05:41 +0000
All,

Checking this area out yielded a single Field and three Mylitta Crescents, as 
well as the usual riparian species like Lorquin's Admiral and W. Tiger 
Swallowtail. 


Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

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Posted by: "Lethaby, Nick" 
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Subject: RE: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 22:11:35 -0700
Thanks Art!

   I now seem to recall such a sign as well.  The landowner told me the
curve below is named Rattlesnake Bend or some such name. Other animals in
the region besides the rattler at Mono Lake I saw were deer and coyotes and
lots of bunny rabbits, maybe the cause of the rattlers.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

  _____  

 

Subject: Re: [SoWestLep] Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year

 

Ken,

 

Some years ago, my brother and sister-in-law parked along 395 not far south
of Devil's Gate Pass to look for butterflies.  There was actually a sign up
that warned of rattlesnakes in the area.  Sure enough, that afternoon they
saw four of them, one of which slithered underneath their car after my
sister-in-law had retreated into it.

 

Art Douglas

 

On Wednesday, July 30, 2014 7:16 AM, "'Kenneth Davenport'
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" 
wrote:

 

  

Everyone:

   I envy folks like Robert Michael Pyle (or Kenn Kaufman with birds) who
can spend an entire Season traveling to find and experience as many
butterflies as they can.  Best I could do was take a whole week affected by
summer rains in Yosemite and the Great Basin .  On July 25th I had maybe the
best overall day of the trip but would have to deal with private land issues
and dangers that accompany butterfly collectors or watchers.  Ranchers gave
me permission as I worked areas outside of fences or watched me from their
vehicles while checking about me with their bosses.  One landowner gave me
some unsettling news from his land near Devil's Gate Pass : You can use my
land to look for butterflies but just be aware I have rattlesnakes on my
land, just ran into one yesterday!  I had left my snake boots at home, had
my chaps in the car but failed to put them on, only to have a close
encounter with one on the day of the Yosemite Butterfly Count.

 

Bridgeport, Mono County , CA , July 25, 2014.

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora loninqua)-a few

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Ruddy Copper (Lycaena rubidus monachensis)

Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria)-1

Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)

Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala walkerensis)-100+, maybe many seen
multiple times

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

 

   Two folks came out to see what I was doing walking along the fence line
just on the edges of town.  They told me no Monarchs had yet been seen in
Bridgeport this year and were concerned by declining numbers as told on TV.
Some Monarchs were seen there shortly after they left and later on with
other noted observers.  Other locations covered separately.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org/
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 



 
Subject: Re: lyside sulphur
From: "Kim Garwood kimgrwd AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 10:06:36 -0700
I've had them in my yard at the base of the Mt. Lemmon road, NE Tucson.
kim

On 7/30/2014 9:45 AM, JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep] wrote:
>
> Had a Lyside Sulphur in the Tucson foothills yesterday so they've made 
> it at least that far to the NE.
> Cloudless Sulphur females really hitting my yard Senna hard this 
> morning, A whole lot of egg laying goin' on.
> Jim B
>
> 
Subject: Lone Pine-Lubken Canyon-Whitney Portal
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 22:03:19 -0700
Everyone:

   By waiting overnight to get adequate sleep, I was able to free up 3 hours
time on the return trip home from Yosemite to sample some collecting spots
in the Lone Pine area in Lubken Canyon and Whitney Portal.  I had to be home
that evening for a meeting.  Better than making a round trip later with $4+
a gallon gas.  The butterfly activity was good even in the Mojave Desert in
late July.  Lone Pine has a railroad in the recent Godzilla movie but there
never was a cross Sierra railroad there.  Run a train over Mt. Whitney at an
allowable upgrade?  No way.  Lone Pine is in Inyo County, CA and where many
Westerns were filmed.  It also has many choice species of butterflies.
There was a railroad into the Owens Valley over 44 years ago. 

 

List for Lubken Canyon, Inyo County, CA 29 July 2014

Yuma Skipper (Ochlodes yuma yuma)-2, 1 collected

Alkali Skipper (Pseudocopaeodes eunus flava)-2, both collected.

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-several

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)

Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-common

Queen (Danaus gilippus thersippus): 12-14 mostly fresh.

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)- saw 12-14

Both the last 2 species were also seen in Olancha the same day, 24 miles to
the south.

 

List for Whitney Portal, Inyo County, CA 29 July 2014

Checkered White 

Pine White (Neophasia menapia menapia): Saw about 10, collected 6 at
flowers.

California Hairstreak (Satyrium californica cygnus)-saw about 5, collected 3
better ones as vouchers.

Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium subaridum)-1

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-1

Cythera Metalmark (Apodemia mormo cythera)-20+, the type locality for
cythera

   While not seen on this day, this is a locality for California Sisters in
Inyo County.  Desert and many Upper Sonoran butterflies seem to have
finished their yearly flights.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Re: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year
From: "Art Douglas pop_art AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:13:19 -0700
Ken,

Some years ago, my brother and sister-in-law parked along 395 not far south of 
Devil's Gate Pass to look for butterflies.  There was actually a sign up that 
warned of rattlesnakes in the area.  Sure enough, that afternoon they saw four 
of them, one of which slithered underneath their car after my sister-in-law had 
retreated into it. 


Art Douglas 


On Wednesday, July 30, 2014 7:16 AM, "'Kenneth Davenport' 
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]"  
wrote: 

  


  
Everyone: 
   I envy folks like Robert Michael Pyle (or Kenn
Kaufman with birds) who can spend an entire Season traveling to find and
experience as many butterflies as they can.  Best I could do was take a
whole week affected by summer rains in Yosemite and the Great Basin .  On July 
25th I had maybe the best overall day of the 

trip but would have to deal with private land issues and dangers that accompany
butterfly collectors or watchers.  Ranchers gave me permission as I worked
areas outside of fences or watched me from their vehicles while checking about
me with their bosses.  One landowner gave me some unsettling news from his
land near Devil's Gate  Pass : You can use my land
to look for butterflies but just be aware I have rattlesnakes on my land, just
ran into one yesterday!  I had left my snake boots at home, had my chaps
in the car but failed to put them on, only to have a close encounter with one
on the day of the Yosemite Butterfly Count. 
  
Bridgeport, Mono County , CA ,
July 25, 2014. 
Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora loninqua)-a few 
Checkered White (Pontia protodice) 
Ruddy Copper (Lycaena rubidus monachensis) 
Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides) 
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria)-1 
Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa) 
Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala walkerensis)-100+, maybe
many seen multiple times 
Monarch (Danaus plexippus) 
  
   Two folks came out to see what I was doing
walking along the fence line just on the edges of town.  They told me no
Monarchs had yet been seen in Bridgeport 
this year and were concerned by declining numbers as told on TV.  Some
Monarchs were seen there shortly after they left and later on with other noted
observers.  Other locations covered separately. 
  
Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org/
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" ©
1999 
    
 
Subject: Bridgeport Canyon
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 17:11:29 -0700
Everyone:

   Liam O'Brien and I visited Bridgeport Canyon in the Bodie Hills (July 27,
2014) that connect the area between two different roads to Bodie, the
closest to Mono Lake via Hwy. 167, turn left on Cottonwood Canyon Rd. till T
intersection and instead of turning R going to Bodie, go L a quarter mile or
so and take the dirt road running north.  This road quickly borders willows
and the habitats will change as one goes further north, eventually running
into riparian habitat.  Butterfly species change as one travels north.
Weidemeyer's and Lorquin's Admirals both co-occur and hybrids can occur soon
after the road begins as do Nokomis Fritillaries and so do Nevada and Zerene
Fritillaries, Ochre Ringlets and even Riding's Satyr to the north, at least
the latter in June.

   Species encountered 9 AM to 11:30 AM:

Large White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Becker's White (Pontia beckerii): several fresh ones of both sexes.

Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice eriphyle)-1 seen

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Nevada Tailed Copper (Lycaena arota virginiensis)-very common on blooming
sagebrush

Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus megapallidum): frequent on sagebrush
blossoms near willows.

Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii)-common

Nokomis Fritillary (Speyeria nokomis apacheana): 3 sightings of males; just
emerging.  Found here commonly in early September 2009, both sexes on
rabbitbrush.  Strangely, there is no running stream!

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene malcolmi): several

Nevada Fritillary (Speyeria callippe nevadensis)-very common in June.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella vallis)

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies): one seen.  Collected
on form "fridayi"=hybrid L. lorquini X weidemeyerii in which lorquini form
dominates.

Weidemeyer's Admiral (Limenitis weidemeyerii latifascia): several seen
perching on willows and patrolling the road.

Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus): a few found among much
more common Cercyonis oetus.

Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus): very abundant

 

   We went only about 4 miles into the canyon.  Other species likely to be
encountered had we gone further:  Polites sonora longinqua, Apodemia mormo
mormo, Colias alexandra edwardsii, Lycaena rubidus, Plebejus saepiolus
rufescens, Satyrium californica cygnus, Phyciodes mylitta, Polygonia
satyrus, Coenonympha ochracea mono.  Species in June include Chlosyne
acastus acastus and Neominois ridingsii pallidus.  Many other species occur
as one goes up the Bodie Rd. in June or July (check Murphy Springs for
Aglais milberti and nokomis), Satyrium semiluna, Plebejus fridayi, Plebejus
shasta calchas, Hesperia uncas giuliani, Euchloe lotta, Plebejus lupini
goodpasturei and others.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Warren Creek 9000', Mono County, CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:59:01 -0700
Everyone:

   While I have been in Warren Creek and Canyon 9000', Mono County many
times before, I had multiple reasons to go there.  One is that Friday's Blue
occurs there, given species status in 2004 and I needed a few more specimens
for comparisons with populations at Bishop Creek, the Bodie Hills and the
White Mts. (John Emmel feels those 3 populations may be a high elevation
Melissa Blue). Another is that I am accumulating material of high elevation
Speyeria mormonia mormonia to compare with other segregates in the southern
Sierra Nevada (formerly known as arge) and those on the west slope at
moderate lower elevations.

   In addition this location is good for butterfly counts and it would give
Robert Michael Pyle to see Friday's Blue for the first time. Then the plan
was to visit Hudsonian Forest for Pyle to find Mariposa Coppers for an
upcoming revision of the species.  Clouds and rain ended the 2nd option and
delayed butterfly activity on July 28th.  Liam O'Brien was with me there on
July 26th.  Both lists for the two days are combined here.

 

Warren Creek List:

 

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora, subspecies might be sonora X longinqua)

Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh)

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Blue Copper (Lycaena heteronea austin sympatric with L. h. submaculata on
different hosts).  Former on Eriogonum nudum, the first on umbellatum
complex.  Common, hard to differentiate in the field.

Ruddy Copper (L. rubidus monachensis).

Edith's Copper (Lycaena editha editha): Ironically, one can see the White
Mts. from the Tioga Pass Rd. where nominate editha is represented by another
subspecies: vurali!

Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii)

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides fulla)

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus aehaja)

Friday's Blue (Plebejus fridayi).  The name "fridayi" was originally applied
to "melissa" from Mammoth Lakes and the entity is not known if or how it
applies from there today.  If the name "fridayi" does prove to apply to a
"high elevation melissa" subspecies, then a new name would be necessary.
Chermock's paper and original description were not well done.

Sierra Nevada Arctic Blue (Agriades podarce cilla): Male seen on 26th,
female netted and vouchered on the count July 28th.

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene malcolmi): common both days, surprising
so near Tioga Pass.

Great Basin or Egleis Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia); several collected for study.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella: montana X vallis?)-common.  The
subspecies at Tioga Pass is montana; vallis is at Mono Lake.

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies) including hybrid L.
weidemeyerii X lorquini photographed by Liam and collected by me at this
unusual locality.  Nominate lorquini is in the Tioga Pass area.  Other
hybrids photographed or collected at Mono Lake Park and Bridgeport Canyon
where both lorquini and weidemeyerri were sympatric and synchronic.

 

Lundy Lake, Mono County, CA, July 26, 2014

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides omnigena)

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)

Behr's Hairstreak

Boisduval's Blue (still ssp. fulla)

Friday's Blue (saw 4 males, collected 3 males at mud by Dam)  Low elevation
for fridayi.

 

Mono Lake, Mono Co., CA, July 26, 2014 (Scientific names only used if new
for day). Includes some added July 28th while with Robert M. Pyle and Karn
Amstutz.

Western Branded Skipper

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora longinqua)

Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)

Checkered White

Western White (Pontia occidentalis occidentalis)-3

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus megapallidum) Can be tailed or lack
them.

Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)

Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa inyoensis) 1/3 rd smaller than fridayi, more
prominent orange up forewing and more pointed and less rounded wing shape
than fridayi.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella vallis)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria).

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies and hybrid in which
lorquini phenotype in female predominated.  One seen at Barbeque July 25th.
At least another seen on 26th.

Weidemeyer's Admiral (Limenitis weidemeyerii latifascia): in Mono Lake
County Park

 

Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus): common in sagebrush
outside the park.  Some confused a photographed female of this entity with
Cercyonis pegala found a few miles north during the count.  Females of
Cercyonis pegala walkerensis tend to have more nondescript hindwing markings
below while males can be more detailed.  In making determinations one must
consider what geographical subspecies are involved.  In this case, ssp.
walkerensis can more closely resemble C. sthenele silvestris, noted for a
non-descript pattern.  Lines on the HW of walkerensis females can be
prominent but different.  C. sthenele paulus is large and prominently marked
and can resemble pegala populations elsewhere.

 

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-at least a couple.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Heather Blues & American Coppers
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 11:24:16 -0700
Everyone:   This trek involved a climb up the Dana Plateau for 2 of the most
hard to find or reach butterflies in the Yosemite area, outside the Park and
there was going to be collecting and photography.  While collecting
Wood-Nymphs (3 species were seen near there that day) at Bridgeport the day
before, Liam O'Brien joined us as the day was winding down. Liam planned to
climb the Mt. Dana spot with me Sunday AM (changed to saturday as an option
to Pyle and advantages to Liam and myself)) to see the elusive Heather Blues
and it was also a way to enable Robert Michael Pyle the opportunity to join
us to see a butterfly he want to see for the first time.  But alas, he had
to prepare his future presentation for Sunday afternoon and chose not to go.


   Pyle in his Sunday afternoon Naturalist Presentation Sunday afternoon at
the Parson's lodge would let the entire attendance know that folks into
serious butterfly watching or collecting activities were not wimps as many
people believe.  Many butterflies live in areas hard to reach and dangerous
and Pyle shared the recent discovery of the Heather Blue which fascinated
the audience. Close and recent collecting had revealed there were 2 species
of Arctic Blues in Yosemite: The Sierra Nevada Blue (Agriades podarce) in
alpine meadows with the "Shooting Star" host and the Heather Blue named in
1998, similar but different looking but living often on more difficult and
hard to reach terrain with the White Heather host growing on moist rock with
the host..  Pyle did not know yet even during his presentation how
difficult, accessible up avalanche slopes, boulders or the dangers of
falling down a rock wall or falling among a pile of boulders and he would
fail to see them unless he found some Tuesday.  Jeffrey Glassberg while with
me last year on this climb to photograph Heather Blue did an incredible job
taking his big camera with him.  I used my net as a walking stick then and
allowed others to photograph them while limiting my net to other species.

   The hike upwards went well but only a few blues seen on the way up (not
Heather Blues).  But once we got there we found both Heather Blues and
American Coppers (Lycaena phlaeas shieldsi), but winds and poor footing made
both photos and netting difficult.  There were 3 of us, Chris T. (Tenny?
Tenney? Teany? (don't know how he spells his last name) from Monterey
County, CA.  Those 2 focused on Heather Blues while I went higher for
American Coppers, several times having major problems with hazardous footing
and the heavy cutting winds with only calm enough for butterflies on the
windward size of giant boulders or rock faces.  Before long both of them
were ready to leave and originally I thought that was because of other plans
to sample Warren Creek and nearby Hudsonian Forest.

   There were other reasons: Liam called the hike up a "DEATH MARCH" and the
dangers of the location in terms of safety were a concern.  There were also
risks for too much sun that could cause skin cancer and Chris had other
personal needs related to his family.  Figuring I would do this again Monday
on the Yosemite Count I started descending well behind the others.  While
coming down I was saddened I had netted only 1 of 3 American Coppers but
notice a huge rocky wall and waterfall area which allowed growth of what I
believed to be the host and shelter from the wind.  Sure enough, I saw an
American Copper about the size of an Edith's Checkerspot and netted it off a
flower.  Chris had gotten one higher up early and Liam got a photograph of a
worn one.  All of us had 2 or 3 Heather Blues we needed and collected.  It
would turn out Brian and others would make that quest on count day which
turned up 45 individuals.  Rain Saturday apparently triggered an emergence
of them.

Butterflies encountered N facing Dana Plateau, Mono County, CA outside the
National Park July 26th.

 

Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh)-5

American Copper -5

Lustrous Copper (Lycaena cupreus lapidicola): One fresh male, fighting an
American Copper in sheltered spot near the stream

Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini alpicola)-3 or 4

Shasta Blue (Plebejus shasta shasta)- 10 or so, over 50 on the count 2 days
later.

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus aehaja)

 

Below Ellery Lake Dam:

Mexican Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana nevada)-3

Ruddy Copper (Lycaena rubidus monachensis)-6

Unidentified Euphilotes by Chris: probably Dotted Blue (E. enoptes enoptes).

 

There were no (Sierra Skippers ( Hesperia miriamae), Sierra Nevada
Parnassians (Parnassius behrii), or Whitney's Checkerspot (Chlosyne
whitneyi) seen on this day or on count day, but those were up there in the
2013 County.  The popular name "Rockslide Checkerspot" is better applied to
Chlosyne damoetas of the Rocky Mts. states.  DNA shows the two are separate
species.  Two Parnassius behrii would be found elsewhere on the count, but
rains would stop near all collecting by noon.

 

   Chris left for personal business at this point and Liam would leave an
hour later because of exhaustion.  But it would be off for an hour at Warren
Creek at 9000' down the Tioga Road.  This will be treated separately.  

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: lyside sulphur
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 12:45:50 -0400
Had a Lyside Sulphur in the Tucson foothills yesterday so they've made it  
at least that far to the NE.
 
Cloudless Sulphur females really hitting my yard Senna hard this morning, A 
 whole lot of egg laying goin' on.
 
Jim B
Subject: Little Walker River to Obsidian Camp
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 07:58:25 -0700
Everyone:

   I covered a dirt road (Little Walker River Rd. off Hwy. 395 to beyond
Obsidian Campground), Mono County, CA. July 25, 2014. Some interesting
butterflies here:

 

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora longinqua)

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Blue Copper (Lycaena heteronea austin)

Ruddy Copper (Lycaena rubidus monachensis)

Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii)

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides fulla)

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)

Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene malcolmi)

Nevada Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe nevadensis)-none on this road
but common off Hwy. 395 just upgrade to the south.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella vallis)

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini)

Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus)-very common

Ochre Ringlet (Coenonympha (tullia) ochracea mono)- several seen in wet
meadows.

 

Devils Gate Pass, 8-10 miles N of Bridgeport, Mono County, CA.  July 25,
2014.  Scientific names as above in most cases.

Sonora Skipper

Western Branded Skipper

Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)

Checkered White

Western White (Pontia occidentalis occidentalis)

Becker's White (Pontia beckerii): in good shape in both sexes and in some
numbers.

Pine White (Neophasia menapia menapia): four taken in elevated wetland
pasture about a block away from pines.  Nectaring on yellow flowers.

Orange Sulphur

Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice): occasional

Nevada Tailed Copper (Lycaena arota virginiensis): common on flowers in wet
ravines.

Blue Copper (Lycaena heteronea austin)

Ruddy Copper

Behr's Hairstreak

Great Basin California Hairstreak  (Satyrium californica cygnus)-several

Boisduval's Blue

Greenish Blue

Nokomis Fritillary (Speyeria nokomis apacheana): one male taken on the land
with the rattlesnakes!  

Zerene Fritillary

Callippe Fritillary

Egleis or Great Basin Fritillary

Field Crescent (still ssp. vallis)

Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)

Painted Lady

Lorquin's Admiral

Small Wood-Nymph 

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

 

   So I had my BIG Week day and was loading my net into the car when an
passing motorist noted my net and stopped to see who I was, unrecognizable
in my wide brim hat and glasses.  He had thought I might be some guy named
John Lane.  And now it was a meeting on the Mariposa Road back to Bridgeport
where Robert Michael Pyle and I would strive to get Mr. Pyle 2 new lifers:
Cercyonis pegala walkerensis in Bridgeport (he took 3 pairs) and the Great
Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus), the latter achieved at Green
Canyon Rd. S of Bridgeport as things shut down for the day.

   It was also the evening of the BIG BARBEQUE at Mono Lake Park.  Robert
Michael Pyle would be making the Centennial Naturalist Talk at Tuolumne
Meadows at Parsons Lodge in Tuolumne Meadows Sunday and both of us would be
co-leading a butterfly count group that coming Monday. Bob wanted me to show
him the Mariposa Copper spot. It would be our mutual love of Cercyonis
Wood-Nymphs that would cause me to nearly step on what appeared to be a
rattlesnake near Mono Lake on the count.  The snake had the right pattern
and pit viper head shape but lacked rattles.  The snake immediate slithered
in panic into its grassy den in deep marsh grass, now dry because of the
drought.  I decided it was getting too dangerous and decided along with the
rain issue it was time to quit.  I think I would rather see Yosemite Tree
Frogs than snakes!

 

    Ken Davenport feels the same way about snakes as Indiana Jones!

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 07:16:09 -0700
Everyone:

   I envy folks like Robert Michael Pyle (or Kenn Kaufman with birds) who
can spend an entire Season traveling to find and experience as many
butterflies as they can.  Best I could do was take a whole week affected by
summer rains in Yosemite and the Great Basin.  On July 25th I had maybe the
best overall day of the trip but would have to deal with private land issues
and dangers that accompany butterfly collectors or watchers.  Ranchers gave
me permission as I worked areas outside of fences or watched me from their
vehicles while checking about me with their bosses.  One landowner gave me
some unsettling news from his land near Devil's Gate Pass: You can use my
land to look for butterflies but just be aware I have rattlesnakes on my
land, just ran into one yesterday!  I had left my snake boots at home, had
my chaps in the car but failed to put them on, only to have a close
encounter with one on the day of the Yosemite Butterfly Count.

 

Bridgeport, Mono County, CA, July 25, 2014.

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora loninqua)-a few

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Ruddy Copper (Lycaena rubidus monachensis)

Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria)-1

Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)

Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala walkerensis)-100+, maybe many seen
multiple times

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

 

   Two folks came out to see what I was doing walking along the fence line
just on the edges of town.  They told me no Monarchs had yet been seen in
Bridgeport this year and were concerned by declining numbers as told on TV.
Some Monarchs were seen there shortly after they left and later on with
other noted observers.  Other locations covered separately.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Salvaging day 2 after the Whites.
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 06:47:36 -0700
Everyone:

   Problems hit after collecting the Whites before I could get back down
into the Owens Valley.  I had a flat tire but failed to realize that because
of the rough dirt roads.  I pulled over to a Vista Point and tried to change
the tire but could not get off 2 of the 5 lug nuts that had melted,
apparently as a result of an overzealous lug nut installation when the tires
were last put on.  But a group of 4 of Russians (two young couples) saw my
dilemma and helped...but I was going to have to descend a lengthy steep
grade with 3 and 1/2 lug nuts with Warning Lights on and then find a garage
in Bishop the next day which would tie me up till 11:15 AM the next day.  It
would take well over an hour to get to the following locations which had to
be time limited:

 

Bishop, Inyo County while waiting for car repair July 24th:  Danaus gilippus
thersippus-1)

 

Sawmill Meadow near Glass Mtn., Mono County, CA (July 24, 2014)

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice)-1 male collected.

Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii)- common along USFS roads, not in meadow.

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)

Sierra Nevada Arctic Blue (Agriades podarce)

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides fulla)

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia obsidiana): scarce, drought, declining?
Few seen.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella blend between vallis and undescribed
black population)

Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)

Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies)

Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus)

 

McGee Canyon Rd., Mono County, CA, July 24, 2014:

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)

Checkered White (P. protodice)

Becker's White (Pontia beckerii)-2 nice ones, collected nice female.

Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii)

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)

Pale Blue (Euphilotes pallescens-blend zone)-only saw 2, collected one
female.  Common here in early August 2004.

Cythera Metalmark (Apodemia mormo cythera)-1; both these and black mormo
were somewhat common here 10 years earlier in August 2004.

Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus)- several

Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus)-relatively scarce

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: White Mts. again
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 22:04:21 -0700
Everyone:

   I returned to the White Mts. of Mono County, California on July 23rd,
2014, 11 days after the previous visit.  It turn out I had one male Hesperia
miriamae after from July 12th all with others not yet spread expected not to
be miriamae.  Number of species were generally present in much less numbers
and absent in some cases.  Two localities visited included Poison Creek
Ravine and Sheep Mtn. including the summit USGSmarker at 12,497' for Sheep
Marker.  Wind gusts at the top were probably in excess of 30 mph and I
rarely could seal my net backs after a swing so little up the was
successfully netted.  The list:

Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communus)-3

 

White Mtn. Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti albomontana): with it being
windy and cool, these would not fly up in my net bag and I failed to catch
any.  Saw 5

 

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)

 

Sierra Skipper (Hesperia miriamae longaevicola): the only one Hesperia I
caught on the very summit. is probably not the rare one.

 

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-6

Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice)-3 seen, 1 male collected.

Queen Alexander Sulphur (C. alexandra edwardsii)-1 seen

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-2

 

Edith's Copper (Lycaena editha vurali)-20, finally collected 7 females.

Friday's Blue (Plebejus fridayi)-1 seen lower levels above 11,500'

Boisduval's Blue (P. icarioides albihalos)-20

Shasta Blue (P. shasta calchas)-50

Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)-1

Greenish Blue (P. saepiolus albamontana)-100

Lupine Blue (P. lupini alpicola) 2 seen, one collected

Wheeler's Checkerspot (Euphydryas anicia wheeleri): one thought seen at
about 11, 700', others all gone, none in ravine.

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)-2

Small or Dark Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus)-60

Riding's Satyr (Neominois ridingsii pallidus): much less common in ravine;
but much more common on Sheep Mtn.-70

 

Ken Davenport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edith's Copper (Lycaena editha vurali): 20; but finally found females; took
7 of those.

Friday's Blue (Plebejus fridayi): one male seen lower slope Sheep Mtn.

Shasta Blue (Plebejus shasta calchas): 50

Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini alpicola; saw 2, caught 1

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides albihalos)-20

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: New butterfly count set for Scottsdale AZ
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 19:46:53 +0000
McDowell Mountain Conservancy in Scottsdale, AZ will hold their first annual 
butterfly count on September 20, 2014. All are welcome to join this count. 
Please go to www.mcdowellsonoran.org for more information. 



Sent on behalf of Michael Schillingburg by Mary Klinkel, Tucson, AZ




Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Anteos chlorinde in lower Carr Canyon
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:10:20 -0700
We just had a White-angled Sulphur fly through our back yard.
We had a good rain last night – 1.75” – so things look promising for the 
Ramsey Canyon Count on Saturday. 


Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/
Subject: SE AZ: Santa Rita Mts Summer Butterfly Count
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:49:10 +0000
The fourth annual Summer Santa Rita Mts Butterfly Count was held Sunday 7/27/14 
with 11 excellent counters. Canyons covered were on the west side of the range, 
including Box, Florida, Madera & Montosa. Monsoon influx species have begun to 
arrive in SE AZ, and highlights included streaming Cloudless Sulphurs (Phoebis 
sennae), several Lyside Sulphurs (Kricogonia lyside) and a new all-time high 
count of 58 species. Eight new species for this count were recorded (White 
Angled-sulphur, AZ Hairstreak, Queen, Variegated Fritillary, Tropical Buckeye, 
Red Admiral, Juvenal’s Duskywing and Pahaska Skipper). Thank you to 
participants, and don’t miss the Fall Santa Rita Mts count on Sunday 9/28/14! 
List follows. Mary Klinkel, compiler (Tucson, AZ) 



Pipevine Swallowtail  (Battus philenor)  42

Black Swallowtail  (Papilio polyxenes)  1

Two-tailed Swallowtail  (Papilio multicaudata)  42

Giant Swallowtail  (Papilio cresphontes)  3


Checkered White  (Pontia protodice)  1

Orange Sulphur  (Colias eurytheme)  2

Southern Dogface  (Zerene cesonia)  8

White Angled-sulphur  (Anteos clorinde)  4

Cloudless Sulphur  (Phoebis sennae)  190

Lyside Sulphur  (Kricogonia lyside)  4

Mexican Yellow (Eurema Mexicana)  11

Sleepy Orange  (Abais nicippe)  14

Dainty Sulphur  (Nathalis iole)  1


“Siva” Juniper Hairstreak  (Callophrys gryneus siva)  22

Gray Hairstreak  (Strymon melinus)  3

AZ Hairstreak  (Erora quaderna)  2

Marine Blue  (Leptotes marina)  50

Ceraunus Blue  (Hemiargus ceraunus)  4

Reakirt’s Blue  (Echinargus isola)  1


Fatal Metalmark  (Calephelis nemesis)  1

Palmer’s Metalmark  (Apodemia palmerii)  2


American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)  6

Variegated Fritillary  (Euptoieta Claudia)  3

Gulf Fritillary  (Agraulis vanillae)  3

Bordered Patch  (Chlosyne lacinia)  121

Elf  (Microtia elva)  7

Tiny Checkerspot  (Dymasia dymas)  139

Elada Checkerspot (Texola elada)  44

Texan Crescent  (Anthanassa texana)  1

Tropical Buckeye  (Junonia genoveva)  1

Common Buckeye  (Junonia coenia)  1

Mourning Cloak  (Nymphalis antiopa)  1

Red Admiral  (Vanessa atalanta)  1

Painted Lady  (Vanessa cardui)  8

Red-spotted Purple  (Limenitis arthemis)  4

AZ Sister  (Adelpha eulalia)  10

Hackberry Emperor  (Asterocampa celtis)  4

Empress Leilia  (Asterocampa leilia)  15

Nabokov’s Satyr  (Cyllopsis pyracmon)  1

Red Satyr  (Megisto rubricata)  19

Queen  (Danaus gilippis)  8


AZ Skipper  (Codatractus arizonensis)  23

Golden-banded Skipper (Autochton cellus)  35

Northern Cloudywing  (Thorybes pylades)  78

Drusius Cloudywing  (Thorybes drusius)  1

Acacia Skipper  (Cogia hippalus)  19

Golden-headed Scallopwing  (Staphylus ceos)  53

AZ Powdered-skipper  (Systasea zampa)  1

Juvenal’s Duskywing  (Erynnis juvenalis)  5

Common Streaky-skipper (Celotes nessus)  7

Common Sootywing  (Pholisora Catullus)  5

Orange Skipperling  (Copaeodes aurantiaca)  8

Pahaska Skipper (Hesperia pahaska)  1

Bronze Roadside-skipper (Amblyscirtes aenus)  12

Elissa Roadside-skipper (A. elissa) 6

Slaty Roadside-skipper (A. nereus)  3

Nysa Roadside-skipper (A. nysa)  3

Dotted Roadside-skipper (A. eos)  2



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Santa Barbara County, CA
From: "'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:15:46 +0000
All:

Last Tuesday (July 22) I spent some hours along the upper reaches of the Santa 
Ynez River (between Gibraltar Resevoir and Jameson Lake). This is a relatively 
unspoilt area. Despite buckwheats blooming in profusion, I had relatively few 
butterflies. There are lots of Checkered Whites around locally now and I saw 
40+ in this area. A few California Dogfaces were present in mesic areas where 
the river was still flowing, along with Cabbage Whites. Other species seen 
included Pale and W. Tiger Swallowtails, Lorquin's Admiral, California Sister, 
Common Buckeye, Marine Blue, Gray and Hedgerow (and probably Mountain Mahogany) 
Hairstreaks, and a couple of Funereal/Mournful Duskywings. Was very surprised 
to see no metalmarks. 


On Sunday, I hiked to Montecito Peak from E. Camino Cielo. This peak looks very 
good for hilltoppers. At the peak and along the trail from the Camino Cielo, I 
saw Anise and Pale Swallowtails, American Lady, Checkered White, Hedgerow and 
Mountain Mahogany Hairstreaks (one or two looked possibly like Goldhunter's but 
couldn't see the uppersides and fading made it tricky to be sure), Mournful 
Duskywings, and eventually a cythera? Metalmark. I guess this last one is just 
emerging. 


All very humdrum. I am hoping for some rain this winter ...

Nick Lethaby
office: +1 805 562 5106
mobile: +1 805 284 6200
e-mail: nlethaby AT ti.com
Subject: White Mtns (AZ) Butterflies: July 24-25, 2014
From: "Diane Touret dctouret AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 03:10:34 -0700
Pleasant weather and no rain. Drier than normal conditions for this time 
of year.

Sites visited:
Lee Valley Reservoir
Trail 95 meadow (high elevation meadow along East Fork of the Little 
Colorado River)
Stops along AZ273 between Crescent Lake and AZ260
Riparian area along the road to South Fork (off of AZ260 west of Eagar)
Squirrel Spring area off of AZ373 near Greer
Coronado Trail (US191) between Alpine and Upper Juan Miller turn-off

Butterflies:
Two-tailed Swallowtail
?Pipevine Swallowtail (quick fly-by while driving/ female Black also 
possible)
Margined White
Checkered White
Pine White
Orange Sulphur
Dainty Sulphur
White Mtns Ruddy Copper
Great Purple Hairstreak
Canyon Bramble Hairstreak
Gray Hairstreak
Western Tailed-Blue
Marine Blue
Reakirt's Blue
Spring Azure
Acmon Blue
Melissa Blue
Nais Metalmark
Variegated Fritillary
?Aphrodite Fritillary (hard to distinguish from local subspecies of 
Atlantis)
White Mtns Atlantis Fritillary
Mormon Fritillary
Field Crescent
Bordered Patch
Arachne Checkerspot
Variable Checkerspot
Zephyr Hoary Comma
Milbert's Tortoiseshell
American Lady
Painted Lady
Common Buckeye
Weidemeyer's Admiral
Arizona Sister
Monarch
Small Wood-Nymph
Golden-banded Skipper
Northern Cloudywing  (hundreds along Coronado Trail south of Blue Vista)
Pacuvius Duskywing
Afranius Duskywing  (caught by a crab spider/ still alive when I rescued it)
Common Checkered-Skipper
Four-spotted Skipperling
Orange Skipperling
Garita Skipperling
Edward's Skipperling
Taxiles Skipper
Large Roadside-Skipper
Bronze Roadside-Skipper
Cassus Roadside-Skipper
Orange-headed Roadside-Skipper

Diane Touret   (Tucson, AZ)











------------------------------------
Posted by: Diane Touret 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Re: Lyside Sulphur
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 22:17:46 -0400 (EDT)
Lepsters,
 
I can confirm the influx madness.
 
My group and I started at the Patagonia Butterfly garden with a Dorantes  
Longtail and a Clouded Skipper (L accius) this morning. Moved on to the  
Patagonia rest stop for an Elf which took us about 35 minutes before locating a 

fresh one. On to Ruby Road where some kidneywoods were attracting many 
skippers  like Bill said. Among them was a fresh Hammock Skipper and a fresh 
Sonoran  Metalmark. As we approached Sycamore Cyn., we began to see Lyside 
Sulphurs  (three in all). In Sycamore Cyn we had a single White Angled Sulphur 
followed by  another on our way out nectaring at a couple of Bouvardia bushes 
in full  bloom. We also had our first American Snout on our eight day trip 
and it's tough  to say whether it's influx or home grown. I say influx but 
we'll leave it at  that. Cloudless Sulphurs were definitely more numerous 
today than  Wednesday.
 
Skippers are also very good SE of Patagonia. Try the Red Mountain road seep 
 4.5 miles south in the morning. We had a number of Mysie Cloudywings 
(Valeriana  Skippers) along with the who's who of SE Arizona skippers. For our 
trip which  included a few days in the White Mountains we managed eleven of 
twelve roadside  skippers for the state. Simius is not a roadside skipper but 
a grassland skipper  and we did not find any in the White's. Most all were 
fresh. 
 
For the trip we had 116 species. Not bad for a droughty state. The White's, 
 with a few exceptions, were the worst I've ever experienced going back to  
1975.
 
Good hunting,  Jim Brock
 
 
In a message dated 7/25/2014 6:51:48 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,  
fred.heath43 AT gmail.com writes:

 
Nice  pictures, Bill. Again where were you, somewhere near Sycamore Canyon? 
  
I  noticed a number of Lysides on my way to the Desert Museum and there 
were  several at the Desert Museum as well. My biggest surprise was at 8:00 AM 
when  I stumbled on a Dingy Purplewing  (Eunica monima) puddling on the  
pavement near the box turtle. I had decided not to lug my camera out on the  
museum grounds, and so I had postpone my interpretation of prairie dogs and  
hurry back to my car get my camera. When I came back the purplewing was  
nowhere to be found, although there was a Clark’s Spiny Lizard looking  
satisfied on the spot. This wasn’t my only surprise. On my way driving in 
early in 

the morning aside from the Lysides and Cloudless Sulphurs, I noticed  a 
white butterfly which appeared quite large and White-angled Sulphur went  
through my mind. However I just figured it was my overactive imagination. Just 

before noon at the museum I saw another butterfly which looked large and  
white, but again the look was brief. After lunch on my way to interpret  
rattlesnakes, I decided to check out the butterfly garden and noticed a 
butterfly 

flying high in the back which I was able to confirm as a  White-angled 
Sulphur. It finally landed high up in a Desert Willow to nectar on a flower. I 

managed to snap a single picture which, although lousy, clearly  confirms my 
ID. 
I am so excited about the emergence and influx of butterflies in the last 
few  days, I can hardly wait to do the Portal and Santa Rita counts over the 
next  couple of days.  
Thanks again for all the great photos. 
-----Best  regards, Fred      
From: William Beck  [mailto:billbeck001 AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 4:30  PM
To: Fred Heath; JimJoanJoy AT aol.com;  raberg2 AT q.com
Subject: Lyside Sulphur 
 


Subject: Patagonia (AZ) Butterfly Bonanza - Tues. July 22
From: "Diane Touret dctouret AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 04:34:35 -0700
After several weeks of disappointing success at finding butterflies in 
SE AZ, I finally hit the jackpot yesterday when I drove from Tucson to 
Patagonia, AZ!    Diane Touret (Tucson)

Sites visited:
Anza Trail north of Clark's Crossing (Tubac) - mostly for birds
Patagonia Roadside Rest (6 miles S of Patagonia on AZ82)
FS4969 off of Harshaw Rd (FR58) east of Patagonia - overcast but very warm
Culvert at the corner of Harshaw Rd and the San Rafael Valley Rd - 
overcast but very warm
Patagonia Butterfly Garden

Butterflies:
Pipevine Swallowtail
Two-tailed Swallowtail
Southern Dogface
Mexican Yellow
Cloudless Sulphur
Marine Blue
Ceraunus Blue
Reakirt's Blue
Fatal Metalmark  (Anza Trail)
Arizona Metalmark
Texan Crescent
!ELF   (2 at the Roadside Rest - photo)
Tiny Checkerspot
Elada Checkerspot
Painted Lady
Viceroy (Anza Trail)
Queen
Desert Cloudywing
!VALERIANA SKIPPER   (one or more at FS4969 and one in the culvert at 
the Harshaw Rd corner - several photos)
Acacia Skipper
Northern Cloudywing
Drusius Cloudywing
Golden-headed Scallopwing
Common Sootywing
Fiery Skipper
Orange Skipperling
Large Roadside-Skipper
Bronze Roadside-Skipper
Elissa Roadside-Skipper
Slaty Roadside-Skipper
Dotted Roadside-Skipper








------------------------------------
Posted by: Diane Touret 
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Subject: Polyginus leo in Carr Canyon
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:19:15 -0700
This afternoon we had a Hammock Skipper nectaring on Buddleia marubifolia in 
our yard in lower Carr Canyon (can’t guarantee that spelling is correct ) 


Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Hank Brodkin" 
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Subject: Re: Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 03:13:15 -0700
Diane:
Sorry.  Of course I meant Ceraunus Blue.

Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/


From: Diane Touret 
Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2014 3:16 PM
To: Hank Brodkin 
Subject: Re: [SoWestLep] Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon

Hank - did you really mean Cassius Blue? I didn't realize that they could be 
found in SE AZ. 


Diane Touret  (Tucson, AZ)




On 7/19/2014 10:47 AM, 'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep] wrote:

    
 We have had a fair monsoon down here starting on July 2, though there seems to 
be a little lull now. However things are starting to green up and the number of 
lep species is increasing. 

 We had a Black Witch on our porch this morning and Alypiodes bimaculata 
forester moths are out. We have seen a couple of the first northward moving 
Cloudless Sulphurs. A number of Golden-headed Scallopwings and a worn probable 
Bronze Roadside were nectaring on a bank of Rosemary. A few Queens and one 
Monarch passed through our yard. Zela Metal marks, Sleepy Orange, Pipevine 
Swallowtail, Red-spotted Admiral, American Lady, and Cassius Blue round out the 
species list for the past couple of days. 

  More rain is expected, mostly the usual monsoon scattered thunder showers.

  Hank Brodkin 
  Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
  31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
  hbrodkin AT cox.net
  "Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
  "Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
  http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/

  
Subject: Re: Black witch
From: "Pete Spino petespino8 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 22:21:23 -0700
It's great to see that a Black Witch appeared in two different posts
today. Make that three...

I also found a nice Black Witch at my daughter's preschool event
last week in Poway, CA. I was even fortunate to be able to catch it
and show it to the kids and some parents before releasing it.
Needless to say, all the excitement unfortunately trumped the 
actual event itself for a short time. My wife wasn't too thrilled but
my daughter was really into it and enjoyed telling everybody
that her daddy, "just caught a huge gi-normous moth." 

Gi-normous indeed!

Pete Spino
San Diego
 



------------------------------------
Posted by: Pete Spino 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Re: Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon
From: "Kim Garwood kimgrwd AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 12:36:08 -0600
Thanks for the monsoon update, hope there's more rain around Tucson than 
last year. I'm heading to Tucson for the summer/fall, will arrive July 23.
kim


On 7/19/2014 11:47 AM, 'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep] wrote:
>
> We have had a fair monsoon down here starting on July 2, though there 
> seems to be a little lull now.  However things are starting to green 
> up and the number of lep species is increasing.
> We had a Black Witch on our porch this morning and Alypiodes 
> bimaculata  forester moths are out.  We have seen a couple of the 
> first northward moving Cloudless Sulphurs.  A number of Golden-headed 
> Scallopwings and a worn probable Bronze Roadside were nectaring on a 
> bank of Rosemary.  A few Queens and one Monarch passed through our 
> yard.  Zela Metal marks, Sleepy Orange, Pipevine Swallowtail, 
> Red-spotted Admiral, American Lady, and Cassius Blue round out the 
> species list for the past couple of days.
> More rain is expected, mostly the usual monsoon scattered thunder showers.
> Hank Brodkin
> Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
> 31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
> hbrodkin AT cox.net
> "Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
> "Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
> http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/
> 

Subject: Black witch
From: "Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 11:34:33 -0700
Last Wednesday, a coworker found a black witch moth at a gas station in Garden 
Grove, CA, not far from Disneyland. 'Tis the season! 


-Bob Allen
bugbob AT mac.com
Author, Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains

Sent from my iPhone 5S
Subject: Monsoon Sightings in Carr Canyon
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 10:47:44 -0700
We have had a fair monsoon down here starting on July 2, though there seems to 
be a little lull now. However things are starting to green up and the number of 
lep species is increasing. 

We had a Black Witch on our porch this morning and Alypiodes bimaculata 
forester moths are out. We have seen a couple of the first northward moving 
Cloudless Sulphurs. A number of Golden-headed Scallopwings and a worn probable 
Bronze Roadside were nectaring on a bank of Rosemary. A few Queens and one 
Monarch passed through our yard. Zela Metal marks, Sleepy Orange, Pipevine 
Swallowtail, Red-spotted Admiral, American Lady, and Cassius Blue round out the 
species list for the past couple of days. 

More rain is expected, mostly the usual monsoon scattered thunder showers.

Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/
Subject: Looking at spread specimens
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 22:11:20 -0700
Everyone:

   Trying to get a definite ID on all my collected butterflies is preferred
but not always possible because of difficulty factors, chances of
loss-especially when it is windy, chances of damage to the specimen, time
limitations and the desire to release living individuals unneeded for the
collection specimens.  Anyway, some comments on specimens I spread from my
recent trip to the White Mts. near Bishop, CA and the south Fork of Bishop
on the other side of Bishop Creek in the Sierra:

 

(1) Central Blue (Euphilotes centralis hadrochilus): I mentioned broad black
borders in the blue males and it was males I had best represented when I
made my 1999 collection.  This time I got better representation for females
and these are distinctive too, with a very prominent thick but not very wide
orange aurora on the hindwings.  The taxonomy of this entity is
controversial: it could be a battoides, a glaucon or something else based on
unpublished work.

 

(2) Miriams or Sierra Skipper vs. Uncas Skipper.  The largest female from
Poison Creek Wash is a very definite H. uncas macswaini.  The other two are
dead ringers for Hesperia miriamae on the dorsal side, but look like uncas
below.  This is an example of why photos of only one side in skippers are
often inadvisable for an "expert" to ID without having both views.

 

(3) Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice): Taking only a photo of this
butterfly in living condition or a superficial viewing in my hand missed
important details and it may be another species...maybe Queen Alexandra's
Sulphur. maybe an extreme Orange Sulphur though I doubt the latter based on
its behavior in the wild.  What was not apparent earlier is more green than
originally appeared but not only on the HW, but the upper FW as well.  The
parts I could not see in the field without risking loss of specimen in the
wind or risking damage by loss of scaling?  This is a male BUT the lower FW
is predominately WHITE and the upper HW above also has a fairly large area
of white scales.  This will be one for Jim Brock to look at in a future
visit.

 

(4) Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies): Some wonder why I
post subspecies names and part of that is that I track subspecies ranges and
areas of contact across their ranges...to see where this species grades from
subspecies powelli in southern California into nominate lorquini in the
Sierras and subspecies pallidafacies in the Death Valley area.  But also,
many of you out there are as interested in subspecies as species.  The
Bishop regional trip was by far the best pallidafacies trip taken ever as I
not only found them at many of the locations I went to, but they were in
very fresh condition allowing me to obtain a better series and more
material.  I think I only had one lorquini ever along the SF of Bishop Creek
before on the east side of the Sierra.  But they were common higher up at
Table Mtn. Flat where I had never seriously worked in previous years.
Several things I am learning: The nominate lorquini in the Sierra shows
extensive influence from powelli in the south and the pallidafacies
phenotype shows tendencies to Sierra lorquini but the orange underside,
wider bands and more pallid coloration below shows pallidafacies goes up the
eastern Sierra in the Owens Valley area up to about 9000'.  Down the road,
specialists may have to redefine the ranges of these subspecies.

 

(5) Sierra Nevada Blues (Agriades podarce): Are those known from west of the
Sierra Crest in the central Sierra the same as those east of it?  I have yet
to spread much of that material (that from Bishop Creek is) but they differ.
Whatever the answer is, the species is the same so far as I know.  But new
insight into differences can help us to find out if an endangered species
(another one I'm thinking of, not podarce) is really endangered, is the
known range correct? and what protection is really warranted?  To me
personally, identifying to species alone leaves too much unanswered and
unseen.  Seeing hundreds of Sierra Nevada Blues flying in a meadow east of
the Sierras blew my mind.  I had seen them at that site before, but believed
those were a much smaller population.

 

   Just another point: Surveys that are used to ascertain the relative
health of our butterfly populations are heavily prone to wrong conclusions
based on varying weather conditions, fluctuations of population growth or
shrinking and the competence, incompetence or timing of the survey.  Since
most butterflies live only 9-16 days, just being off a few days in guessing
peak flights can cause one to reach dramatic wrong conclusions.  Schulman
Grove off the White Mtn. Road was totally dead when I checked it July 9th, a
very dry year.  The peak flight there is only about 2 weeks earlier there in
a normal year.  You saw how much better butterflies were 10 miles further
north from my post at only about 600 or 700' higher 3 days later.  Thunder
storms (common in the Whites) are also highly localized and where it rains
butterflies may fly and just the opposite across the street.

 

   Often folks want guarantees and exact dates to hit the butterfly of their
dreams in the field.  Every trip out there is one in which we all hope to do
well.  But often we missed the right time or in many cases, western
butterflies may only have a partial flight or delay emergence for the next
year or years from now.  I missed seeing any indras on my last Bishop trip.
Robert Michael Pyle and I should both be in Yosemite for the butterfly count
later this month on the last Monday of July (Lembert's Dome 8:30 AM)...maybe
we'll see some then.  Let me know if any of you need contacts.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Tehachapi Pine Whites
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 21:11:50 -0700
Everyone:

   While Dale Halbritter successfully found 3 Pine Whites (Neophasia menapia
tehachapina) at Tehachapi Mtn. Park in Kern County earlier this month, I
spent 3 trips of varying length (3, 5 and 3 hours) without finding any in
places where I have found these in the past.  These have been wanted in
checking DNA samples since reports that cryptic species may be hidden in our
Pine White.  I don't have any opinions about that, but I know that folks
wanting "guaranteed places" for that species are not likely to be successful
in my part of the world.  I have my personal series already from the past,
but those are too old for DNA work, nor to be honest...would I be willing to
part with them.

   Anyway, some butterflies seen were new today for the season at Tehachapi
Mtn. Park and the huge California Sister outbreak 9 days ago or so is over.
They must be high on the local bird food chain.  Today's list:

 

Large White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-3

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)-5

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado-late summer segregate)-5

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)-1

 

Two-Tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata pusillus):3 nice males seen-one
small; one medium and one very large and all appeared to be in good shape.
Obviously, this long "extirpated" colony is doing better, though not yet in
former 1970's numbers.

 

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-15 numbers on the decline.

Becker's White (Pontia beckerii): 1 very fresh female which I did collect.

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-8

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides)-15; becoming much less common but some
still fresh

Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum)-1

Thicket Hairstreak (Callophrys spinetorum): one seen flying across the road
just up from the park entrance.  The upperside coloration was plainly
visible.

Western Azure (Celastrina echo)-4

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-12

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta)-3

Buckeye (Junonia coenia)-3

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-15

Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele)-3

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-20  This was a mix of worn and fresh individuals.
Monarchs routinely spend time here in the late summer in fall to take
advantage of abundant milkweed and water (less so this year).

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: White Mts. 10-12 mi. N Schulman Grove
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 15:45:29 -0700
Everyone:

   July 12th finally saw a nearly cloud free day and is was my day to try
high elevation collecting in the White Mts. E side of the Owens Valley on
Mt. Campito at an elevation near 11,500' but an error on my part probably
lead me to Sheep Mtn. instead at an even higher elevation of 12,497'.  By
the real Mt. Campito I saw the Campito Meadows and immediately recognized it
as a spot (Poison Creek ravine) for good butterflies on past trips there in
1998 and 2004 and only ten years overdue to try again.

   So here is what I saw pending future spreading of skippers.

 

Campito Meadows area, Poison Creek ravine or canyon.  Approx. 10,600' or so.
Mono County, CA.

(1) Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)-2, at this elev., not likely to be
P. albescens.

(2) Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti albamontana)-6

(3) Uncas Skipper (Hesperia uncas macswaini)-2-4, pending positive ID, now
in relaxer

(4) Miriam's or Sierra Skipper (Hesperia miriamae longaevicola)- some of the
above may be miriamae and I am sure I did see at least one definite example.
I am sure females don't always stay high on those peaks.  Positive ID
pending.

(5) Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)-1

(6) Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-20

(7) Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice)-2  (one was collected and in relaxer
pending definite ID, maybe new for White Mts.)

(8) Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-6 to 8

(9) Queen Alexandra Sulphur (Colias alexandra edwardsii)- 2 seen, both males
none captured.

(10) Lustrous Copper (Lycaena cupreus lapidicola)-6 to 8

(11) Edith's Copper (Lycaena editha vurali)- 60+

(12) Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)-2, one vouchered.

(13) Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus albomontanus)-200+

(14) Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides albihalos)-200+

(15) Nevada Arrowhead Blue (Glaucopsyche piasus nevada)-10

(16) Shasta Blue (Plebejus shasta calchas)-50+

(17) Wheeler's Anicia Checkerspot (Euphydryas anicia wheeleri)-6 to 8

(18) Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): 6

(19) Zephyr Anglewing AKA Hoary Comma (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)-2, seen
only after 4:15 PM in a sagebrush-grassland habitat without trees.  There
must have been Ribes growing in the washes.

(20) Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus)-80+  some were so large they
may have included flyup Cercyonis sthenele paulus.

(21) Riding's Satyr (Neominois ridingsii pallidus)-200+  These like short
sagebrush-grassland habitats with lots of flowers.

 

Moth of interest.  One of the Sheep moths present looked like black and
white indra flying around at mid-day.  I collected two out of interest.

 

Sheep Mtn. ridge 12,497' and somewhat lower, access by rocky chute in white
rock strata.  Mono County:

(1) White Mts. Mexican Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana blanco)-2 collected,
another seen

(2) Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti albamontana)-4 to 6.  I saw one on
the summit ridge but all were over 11,500'.

(3) Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)-20+

(4) Miriam's or Sierra Skipper (H. miriamae longaevicola)-4 ?  everything I
captured seem to be the wrong species.  Those I got good looks at evaded the
net.

(5) Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-10 hilltopping at 12,400', don't they
know it is the Western Whites that are supposed to do that?  I went to that
much trouble for these?

(6) Western White (Pontia occidentalis occidentalis)- the one that mattered
I caught at the top.

(7) Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)-as you may recall I saw but failed to
collect two of these last month in Silver Creek Canyon in Inyo County also
in the Whites.  I found this one coming down the white rocky chute at close
to 12,000' and did not miss this one.

(8) Lustrous Copper (Lycaena cupreus lapidicola)-2 in same rocky chute

(9) Edith's Copper (L. editha vurali)-2 in rocky chute, 1 near the summit of
Sheep Mtn.

(10) Shasta Blue (P. shasta calchas)-30+

(11) Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini near alpicola)-4-6

(12) Greenish Blue (P. saepiolus albomontana)-30+

(13) Boisduval's Blue (P. icarioides albihalos)-10+

(14) Wheeler's Checkerspot (Euphydryas anicia wheeleri)-common in the white
rocky chute patrolling the dry streambed and 2 were even seen on the summit
ridge at 12,400' where I collected a perfect large female.

(15) Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus)-4, dropped out at about
11,500'

 

Added Notes:  I saw Monarchs coming up the Westgard Pass between the Owens
River and the lower canyon.  Odd: Of all the Edith's Coppers seen on this
day, NONE were females!  Because blues were so distracting to separate and
put in glassine envelopes only to have a real rarity come and be unprepared,
I may never finish my series of P. shasta calchas.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Glass Mtn., Sawmill Mdw., Mono Co., CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 14:44:43 -0700
Everyone:

   On July 11th both the east slope Sierra Nevada and White Mts. (even the
north facing slope in Queen Canyon in Esmeralda County, Nevada) were
hopelessly covered by clouds.  I chose to go north from Bishop to Benton and
then head NW up Hwy. 120 to a volcano over 11,000' named Glass Mtn. with
Sawmill Meadow at 9200', the type locality for the Glass Mountain Mormon
Fritillary, recently described and named in 1998.  Also of interest was the
McGee Canyon Rd. known for the Pale Blue (Euphilotes pallescens) and other
choice species that occur there in June.

 Species observed or collected:  All Sawmill Meadow unless otherwise
indicated.

(1) Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius)-2

(2) Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)-1 McGee Canyon Rd.

(3) Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)-1

(4) Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus): 3

(5) Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-15, one heavily marked like P.
occidentalis above, but not below.

(6) Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-6

(7) Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii)-5 McGee Cyn Rd. 8500'

(8) Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-1 at Rovana, Inyo Co.; a few in Sawmill
Meadow

(9) Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-6

(10) Glaucon Blue (Euphilotes glaucon)-2 BUT these are not yet spread.
Collected material from McGee Canyon Rd. seem mostly glaucon but some
specimens taken resemble E. ancilla shieldsi but have not been checked
genitalically.  These 2 were taken at about 8500'.

(11) Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides fulla)-100+, many very large

(12) Goodpasture's Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini goodpasturei)-1 collected on
E. umbellatum with the 2 Euphilotes.  McGee Cyn. Rd. 8500'

(13) Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus): 30

(14) Sierra Nevada Arctic Blue (Agriades podarce: east of Sierra
Nevada)-300+

(15) Glass Mtn. Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia obsidiana)-2, the new
EARLY flight date for this subspecies.

(16) Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella)-unnamed black eastern Sierra
segregate-15 or so.

(17) Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)-6

(18) West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella)-1

(19) Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)-1

(20) Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies)-12-14-very fresh
perching on small pine tree crowns in meadows.

(21) Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus)-4

 

Other butterflies seen on return route to Bishop:

(22) Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)-1 near Paradise in Mono/Inyo
Co. line area

(23) Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)-1 Lower Rock Creek (Dog Bane
was shot) Mono Co.

(24) Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium subaridum)-Swall Meadow on
dogbane-Mono Co.

(25) Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus megapallidum)-1 Swall Meadow on
dogbane-Mono Co.

(26) Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-2 in limited time in Round Valley, Inyo Co.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: FW: Fresno Dome 7/11/14
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:42:12 -0700
Everyone:

   Steve Randall went to Fresno Dome last Friday while I was collecting in
Mono County.  He arrived late in the morning so that must have stressed him
time wise.  Fresno Dome is best done with 2 days to work with.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

  _____  

 

Subject: Re: Fresno Dome 7/11/14

 

Ken,

     I visited Fresno Dome by myself on Friday.  Got a late start because of
work obligations, and didn't arrive until 11:30 a.m.  My objectives for this
trip were: 1) Look for S. cybele leto.  None were seen in any of the meadows
visited.  2)  Look for Pine Whites at Big Sandy Camp.  None were seen -- in
fact, no Pierids (except for one Orange Sulfur) were seen the entire day.
3) Add to my collection of Edith's Coppers.  This was achieved -- caught
several nice females in addition to males.  Best place of the day was Big
Sandy Camp, on that sandy hill south of the camp near that little tiny
stream where we saw the "Gorgon Copper" female last year.  I now believe
that was probably an Edith's Copper female, as the ones I caught there on
this trip look a lot like Gorgons on the dorsal surface with lots of light
patches, but clearly Edith's on the underside.

 

A list of butterflies found: (feel free to delete the paragraph above, tack
on an "Everyone", and send to Desertleps group and SoWestLep group if you
think it important and trust my ID's)

 

1.  Sonoran Skipper (Polites sonora sonora):  (100) Common in all the
meadows I visited.

 

2.  Common Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis): One seen at Kelty Meadow.

 

3.  Clodius Parnassian (Parnassius clodius baldur): Two seen at Fresno Dome
Trailhead Meadow, one vouchered.

 

4.  Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus): (4) One vouchered at Kelty
Meadow.

 

5.  Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon): (2)

 

6.  Orange Sulfur (Colias eurytheme): One vouchered at Fresno Dome trailhead
meadow.

 

7.  Edith's Copper (Lycaena editha editha): (8) One nice female at Fresno
Dome Camp, the rest at Big Sandy Camp and along the Jackson Rd.

 

8.  Western Azure (Celestrina echo echo): (3-4) One vouchered at Kelty
Meadow, others seen at Fresno Dome Camp and Fresno Dome Trailhead Meadow.

 

9.  Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icaroides icaroides): (8-10) Most seen at
Fresno Dome Trailhead Meadow

 

10:  Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus aehaja): (40-50) Still common in the
Fresno Dome Trailhead Meadow, but lower numbers than we encountered on June
19 -- some still appeared very fresh.

 

11.  Anna Blue (Plebejus anna anna): (5-6)  I ran into a colony of these in
a small meadow along the Jackson Rd. where we stopped last year.  The males
were tricky with the orange a bit faint, but caught one female where there
was no doubt with orange margins dorsally tip to stern.

 

12.  Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini apicola): (1) Blew the catch for the
voucher -- looked too large for an Acmon, but it is possible it was that
species.

 

13.  Hydaspe Fritillary (Speyeria hydaspe viridicornis): (30-40)  This was
the dominant species at Kelty Meadow and at the Fresno Dome Trailhead
Meadow.  Took several vouchers, too small and dark for S. zerene. 

 

14.  Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia):  (2)  Very fresh, took
one voucher at Fresno Dome Trailhead Meadow.

 

15.  Western Meadow Fritillary (Boloria epithore sierra): (40-50)  Still
very common at Fresno Dome Camp, and especially at Fresno Dome Trailhead
meadow, and some still were quite fresh.

 

16.  Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta):  (1) Taken as voucher at
Kelty Meadow.

 

17.  Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus): (1) Taken late in the
afternoon at the sandy area south of Big Sandy Camp.  Very worn, definitely
a straggler from the over-wintering population.

 

18.  Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): One seen late in the day at the Jackson
Rd. meadow.  Very fresh.

 

19.  California Sister (Adelpha californica): (8)  Seen at all locations.

 

20. Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini lorquini): (5-6) Worn individuals
seen at Kelty Meadow and Fresno Dome Trailhead Meadow around willows.

 

21. Monarch (Danaus plexippus): (5-6)  Not found on our list on June 19,
seen at Kelty Meadow, Fresno Dome Camp, and Fresno Dome Trailhead Meadow.

 

Added Notes: One big distraction for the day was the presence of the
day-flying Sierra Pericopid, Gnophaela latipennis (Family: Erebidae).  I've
got 30-40 written down, but may have been hundreds.  All locations except
for Big Sandy Camp and Jackson Rd.  Being alone and rushed most of the day,
I probably missed some species that would have been picked up by another
person.  Did not see anything resembling a Cloudywing, although 5 species
were seen on June 19.  No C. palla altasierra or C. hoffmanni hoffmanni
seen, anything orange always seemed to turn out B. epithore sierra.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Steve
Subject: Silver Creek Cyn., White Mts., CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:50:26 -0700
Everyone:

   I surveyed the White Mts. in Silver Creek Canyon east of Bishop and Laws,
Inyo County, CA on the afternoon of July 10, 2014 after the SF of Bishop
Creek clouded up.  The higher White Mts. were also very clouded up but
clouds were coming and going lower down on the west slope where I was.
Butterflies found with some comments:

(1) Northern White or Large White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)

(2) Checkered Skipper complex (Pyrgus communis or albescens)

(3) Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)

(4) Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)

(5) Two-Tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata); Saw what appeared to be
this species but unable to confirm with an actual capture.

(6) Becker's White (Pontia beckerii): confirmed individual vouchered at
lower stream crossing

(7) Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

(8) Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-only 1

(9) Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

(10) Tailed Copper (Lycaena arota ssp. undetermined): Three males collected
at upper creek crossing. The first records of this species I could find in
this mountain range.  I have taken nominate arota across the Owens Valley in
the Sierra in Pine Creek Canyon.  Subspecies can differ in the Whites.  It
may be virginiensis, found in the Mono Lake-Bridgeport area in Mono County.

(11) Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii)

(12) Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum): only one seen at
creek crossing.

(13) Thicket Hairstreak (Callophrys spinetorum): Took 4 at upper creek
crossing.

(14) Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-common

(15) Desert Azure (Celastrina echo cinerea)

(16) Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus)-several

(17) Monarch (Danaus plexippus) saw a half dozen or so, worn to fresh.

(18) Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies)-common

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: South Fork Bishop Creek 8300-9000' CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 17:23:42 -0700
Everyone:

   I spent the early morning (8:10-11 AM) of July 10th and most of the day
(9 AM-3 PM) on July 13th collecting or surveying butterfly locations with
most time working on streamside areas along the creek or in flatland wet
spots and browning meadows.  Clouds ended collecting early on July 10th in
the eastern Sierra and I traveled across the Owens Valley to survey Silver
Creek Canyon in the White Mts. from 12 to 3 PM when clouds ended the day
there early as well.

   I have been collecting the Bishop Creek Lodge area (SF of Bishop Creek
8300') since 1979.  It is no longer very good for leps for several reasons:
The sagebrush areas have become too tall and climaxed, too much development
for campgrounds and private homes.  Most of my efforts this trip was the
area around Table Mtn. Camp (meadows and wet meadows) and the fishing area
just up from there.  Lots of blues and other butterflies visit wet spots
along the creekbed.  I went to Willow Creek Camp meadow for Sierra Nevada
Blues (Agriades podarce).

   Many years ago, I collected a couple of Shasta Blues in that area and
have always wondered if that was real or due to mislabeling on my part.  On
the later date I collected 5 Plebejus shasta along the fishing trail
wetspots.  They are awesome, twice the size of shasta found higher up along
the Sierra Crest or in the White Mts.

   Butterfly species seen or collected July 10 and 13, 2014:

(1) Propertius Duskywing (Erynnis propertius): 2 rags caught and released to
ID on the 13th above Table Mtn. Camp.

(2) Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius) sparingly netted (most released)
from SF Bishop Creek along river 8300-9000'.  Most worn.

(3) Mexican Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana nevada): 1 seen at flower at 9000'

(4) Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis): uncommon

(5) Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho): uncommon

(6) Nevada Skipper (Hesperia nevada sierra)-only one, wet meadow near Table
Mtn. Camp across Bishop Creek.

(7) Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh)-scarce

(8) Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora sonora): same meadow with H. nevada.

(9) Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)-2 on July 13th along the creek or
at mud along the wet edges.  One stayed put for 3 hours!

(10) Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)- common

(11) Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-scarce.

(12) Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

(13) Edith's Copper (Lycaena editha): Saw 3, collected one...all at about
9000'

(14) Lustrous Copper (Lycaena cupreus lapidicola). Saw 3 on July 13th at the
flat open area with fisherman trails.  Very scarce in this region.

(15) Blue Copper (Lycaena heteronea austin):  One at Bishop Creek Lodge and
3 or 4 at the flat area upstream from Table Mtn. Camp.  All went to mud with
all the other "blues" on July 13th.  Few blues went to mud on the 10th...too
cool and overcast.

(16) Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii): dry areas with the host.

(17) Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)-1

(18) Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)

(19) Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola): One at a wet spot at 9000'

(20) Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-several

(21) Arrowhead Blue (Glaucopsyche piasus excubitus) Several (most were worn)
at 9000' wet spots along the creek.

(22) Friday's Blue (Plebejus fridayi): common but hidden among the more
common icarioides at mud at 9000'.  John Emmel believes these are a high
elevation P. melissa with the real fridayi higher up on the Sierra Crest.

(23) Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa inyoensis)-some flyups from lower levels
did appear to be present with the larger "fridayi."

(24) Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides eosierra):  Hundreds at mud.
especially at 9000'

(25) Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-scarce

(26) Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini near chlorina)-scarce-common most years

(27) Shasta Blue (Plebejus shasta calchas).  Collected 5.  These were easily
overlooked at puddle parties along Bishop Creek at the large flat for
fisherman.  At 9000', these were not in the usual rocky subalpine cushion
plant habitat at all.  The day before, I was seeing them above timberline in
a sagebrush ravine at about 11,000' and on a rocky peak in the White Mts. at
12,500'.  I did not collect many shasta then needed for my collection for
reasons to become apparent when I post that day's activities.

(28) Sierra Nevada Arctic Blue (Agriades podarce-east slope Sierra): Willow
Creek Camp Meadow, common July 13th, not sampled on 10th.

(29) Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus aehaja)-several sites but not real
common.

(30) Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella)-black eastern Sierra Nevada
segregate seen near Bishop Creek Lodge 8300' and meadows near Table Mtn.
Camp.  Not at other sites at the Fisherman's Flat or Willow Camp Meadow.

(31) Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)- singletons Bishop Crk. Lodge and
Willow Camp Meadow.

(32) Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): scarce

(33) Green Comma (Polygonia faunus rusticus): one seen on branch across the
river while on fisherman's trail on the flat at 9000' in densely wooded area
on the 10th.  I returned on the 13th hoping for a specimen but all Polygonia
taken or seen on the 13th were the following:

(34) Zephyr Anglewing AKA Hoary Comma (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)

(35) Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini pallidafacies): common at the
fisherman's trail area along Bishop Creek at 9000', higher than that they
appear to grade into nominate lorquini (Willow Camp meadow).  I will be
comparing these with others from the White Mts. and Glass Mtn. taken this
trip.

(36) Small Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis oetus oetus) common.  Some may have been C.
sthenele paulus.  Not sampled well.  I took 2 oetus.

(37): Monarch (Danaus plexippus): several seen from 8300' to 9200'.  Where
do Monarchs go in the summer season?  Higher areas with abundant water and
flowers below Hudsonian Zone.

(38) Queen (Danaus gilippus thersippus):  Not in this area, but seen on this
morning crossing Hwy. 395 at 4000' between Big Pine and Bishop at the
Collins Rd.

 

Not seen were Riding's Satyr near Bishop Creek Lodge but I did not search
sagebrush habitats much.  Also conspicuous by their absence were Mylitta
Crescents, Chalcedon Checkerspots, several Nymphalids and Becker's White.
No Indra Swallowtails.  No Ivallda Arctics?  Don't laugh, I've seen them in
numbers near the Lodge at 8300' in early July 1979 and caught a couple
(likely now in the LACM).  Posted Private property at Aspendall kept me from
searching for Euphydryas editha there.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: White Mts. near Narrows, CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 06:17:44 -0700
Everyone:

   I took a 5 day trip to the Bishop area (Inyo and Mono Counties,
California) and had cloudy conditions for the first 4 days.  This trip is an
example in why I rarely stick to an itinerary as I often had to change plans
of collecting in the Sierras some mornings and go into the Whites later on
in same morning or afternoons due to cloud build ups.  My plans for day 1
were to collect the White Mts. Divide above 10,000' but quick cloud build up
and even rain ended those plans quickly.

 

Only 12 species were found at these two locations in the White Mts on July
9, 2014.

 

White Mtn. Rd. 3.5 miles or so North of Schulman Grove (Bristlecone Pines)
along edge of road and hillside:

1.  High elevation Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa) larger than subspecies
inyoensis in the Owens Valley) or Friday's Blue (Plebejus fridayi).  The
correct name to use depends on ones view of what Friday's Blue is and
whether or not it occurs in the White Mts.  The Anna Blue has been
recognized and published as occurring in that mountain range but John Emmel
believes such records were misidentified and actually represent the high
elevation melissa in that range.  Whatever the "correct" name turns out to
be...I collected 6 or 7, much needed to compare with fridayi or to represent
that milissa segregate should they be that.  Both fridayi and the high
elevation use the same larval host: Astragalus whitneyi.

2. Boisduval's'Blue (Plebejus icarioides albihalos): a very large and
distinctively marked White Mts. endemic.-1

 

Westgard Pass and the Narrows:  (Usually sunny or intermittent clouds)

 

3. Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)

4. White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)-both checkered skippers have
been genitalicaaly confirmed below the Narrows from the side canyon I was in
and these Pyrgus regardless of what these were ...were common.

5. Large White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-common only after 2 PM

6. Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado idaho)- saw 6-10

7. Becker's White (Pontia beckerii)-2 (one vouchered)

8. Behr's Hairstreak (Satyrium behrii behrii): Common above and below
Narrows, more common above it. Also found near old entrance to Bristlecone
Pines White Mts. Rd.  Saw 20 or so.

9. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)-2

10. Western Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-1 in wash below Narrows.

 

11. THE CENTRAL BLUE (Euphilotes centralis hadrochilus).  This is one of the
most distinctive members of the Euphilotes genus, distinguished by very
large size in many cases and very wide black borders in the males using
yellow flowered Eriogonum umbellatum as a host, but not found away from the
Narrows area at Westgard Pass or up the grade to Schulman Grove in limited
searches.  I also found zero in the likely looking canyon below the Narrows
which had a white flowered buckwheat.  Trying my old colony site above the
Narrows, I was surprised to find the colony site has grown markedly since my
1999 visit to this range for it.  A close search of the host found adults
and few males were left.  Females were more frequently seen.  As the day
ended, adults were coming to blooming host plants right along the road above
the Narrows.  Others were found up the canyon on the south-southwest
climbing canyon.  Elusive and hard to approach.  Thirty or more seen in 1
1/2 hours.

   This is NOT the same biological species as Bauer's Blue (Euphilotes
baueri) which flies in this area 2 months before centralis begins its flight
and has another larval host.

 

12. Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele paulus): Common to very
common in side canyons and washes. 60+ seen.

 

   So a trip to the Whites at the Narrows in July can find more butterflies
(but not the same desirable species) than a trip in May.  It was obvious
there have been recent rains there and the plants seemed to be relatively
well watered at the Narrows, less so lower down closer to Big Pine or
elsewhere higher up.  Thunderstorms lead to localized watering of the flora
and what eats on them.  Note John Emmel and others describing hadrochilus
point out that it is of narrow range: replaced by Euphilotes ancilla in much
of the Whites (CA-NV Range) and by other Euphilotes species to the south in
the Inyo Mts.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Sunrise Highway, San Diego County
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 23:24:38 -0700
All,

Sunrise Highway, near town of Mt. Laguna - July 12 (Sat)
Flowers seems to be doing well.  I do not see any moisture though...

Afranius Duskywing (Erynnis afranius)
White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)
Orange Skipperling (Copaeodes aurantiaca)
Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)
Harford's Sulphur (Colias harfordii)
Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak (Satyrium tetra)
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)
Edwards' Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus gyas)
Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)
Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)
Semiramis Fritillary (Speyeria coronis semiramis)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
..I bet there were more, such as California Sister, but no time to wonder far 
from the road this time. 


At home in San Diego, near Poway.
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus) - laying eggs on lawn.
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) - Laying egg on mandarin orange tree
Southwestern Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae marcellina)
Common Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudica) - laying eggs on hibiscus
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)
Edwards' Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus gyas)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata) - laying eggs on passion flower

Koji

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Cazba.org Field Trip to East Clear Creek, Coconino County, AZ 12 July 2014
From: "kurtrad AT mexicobirding.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 13 Jul 2014 11:56:42 -0700
It was a good CAZBA.org Field Trip to east Clear Creek with great sunny weather 
and a decent number of butterflies. Despite the great sunny weather, the 
butterfly diversity was low. Target species for East Clear Creek are Northern 
Crescent and Long Dash. We managed to see two Northern Crescents, but dipped on 
the Long Dash. The highlight of the day for me was seeing Arizona Treefrog 
(Hyla wrightorum) a frog I had only seen once previously! 

 

 Butterflies:
 Orange Sulphur  (Colias eurytheme)         
Queen Alexandra's Sulphur (Colias alexandra)           
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)            
Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus)           
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)             
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)             
Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon)            
Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)            
Weidemeyer's Admiral (Limenitis weidemeyerii)      
Atlantis Fritillary (Speyeria atlantis)           
Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)           
Northern Crescent (Phyciodes cocyta)            
'Arizona' Silver-spotted Skipper  ( Epargyreus clarus)           
Pahaska Skipper (Hesperia pahaska)            
Tawny-edged Skipper (Polites themistocles)        
Taxiles Skipper (Poanes taxiles)             
 
Thanks to everyone for the great companionship and making the trek such a 
success. 

 

 Cindy’s Treefrog photo here: http://www.birdingthecloud.com/Photos.aspx 
http://www.birdingthecloud.com/Photos.aspx 

 

 Kurt Radamaker
Subject: Tehachapi Mtn. Park
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 19:52:50 -0700
Everyone:

   I returned to Tehachapi Mtn. Park, Kern County, California today on July
8th, 2014 after hearing from Dale Halbritter that he had observed 20
Tehachapi Pine Whites there yesterday and had collected a male and two
females.  I have not found them in the past 7 years and unlike Dale, I never
even saw one sure individual, but may have seen one.  This time I was there
10:10 AM to 3:10 PM and found the following (5 days after my last report):

 

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)-1

Large or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-7

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)-1, a stray

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)-8

 

Two-Tailed Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata pusillus)-4.  I collected
one very nice small male (3 1/4" wingspread with two small nicks out of each
forewing but otherwise in perfect condition with intact swallowtails, hard
to do with this species in California.  Best seen in early morning when they
are closer to the ground.

 

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-1 in Water Canyon below the Park

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-50 or more.

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-12

 

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides xanthoides)-40+ half worn; half in good
shape.  Males commoner by 3:1 ratio.

 

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus corcorani): 1 nice female seen.

Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum): 4, all after 2:40 PM.

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)-1

Echo Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-8

Western Tailed Blue (Cupido amyntula amyntula)-2

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon): 60

Macaria Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe macaria)-4

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-4

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)-2

Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)-2

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini powelli)-2

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-70+

Great Basin Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele)-10 or 12

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-4

   

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Southern AZ Monsoon Rains
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 06:37:24 -0700
U of A sponsors the Rain Log site into which local residents enter daily 
readings from their rain gauges. Anyone can access the daily, weekly or monthly 
results of these reports laid over a Google Map. Click on: 
http://rainlog.org/usprn/html/main/maps.jsp . This will reveal a map with the 
previous day’s measurements in many locations. To the right of the map are 
settings for specific sections of the state and measurements by date. This will 
give those curious about our rains a good idea about what is happening. 

Those locals who wish to participate actively in the Rain Log program are 
welcome to do so. 

Cheers!

Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/
  .
Subject: 2014 SE Arizona Butterfly Counts
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 21:30:10 -0700
With the monsoon rains in full swing, the five upcoming SE AZ butterfly
counts over the next few weekends (beginning on Saturday July 19) should
provide lots of butterfly excitement. 

                Last year the Ramsey Canyon and Patagonia counts with 85 and
80 species respectively were number two and three in the nation. In
addition, Ramsey Canyon had the highest counts in the nation  for 24 species
(including 6 species which were found on no other counts), while Patagonia
recorded 22 high counts (with 4 being unique to that count). The Sabino
Canyon  and Santa Rita counts each had high counts for 3 species with the 13
Elf found on the Santa Rita count being the first time this species was ever
recorded on a summer count. 

                Below is a listing of these 5 counts with meeting time and
place information. Beginners are always welcome. There is a $3 count fee for
each participant. Note all the counts except Portal have a compilation
dinner at the end of the day at a local eatery. Compiler contact info is
provided for each count. If you have any questions or would like to request
particular areas in which to count please contact the compiler directly.  

 

Sabino Canyon: Saturday July 19, meet at 6:30 AM at Sabino Canyon Visitor
Center, compiler Karen Nickey  520-326-2070


Portal: Saturday July 26, 8:00 AM  at Forest Service Visitors Center west of
the Portal Store, compiler Fred Heath fred.heath43 AT gmail.com  

Santa Rita Mts. Summer: Sunday July 27, 7:30 AM, outside of McDonald's at
Continental Road exit (Exit 63) of I-19 in Green Valley, compiler Mary
Klinkel munchita AT msn.com  

Ramsey Canyon: Saturday August 2 6:00 AM meeting in Sierra Vista (place
TBA), compiler Doug Danforth danforthdg AT aol.com  

Patagonia: Saturday August 9, 6:00 AM, the Gathering Grounds (restaurant) in
Patagonia, compiler Rich Bailowitz raberg2 AT q.com 

 

 
Subject: SE AZ: Summer Santa Rita Mts Butterfly Count
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 03:34:44 +0000
Fourth annual Summer Santa Rita Mts Butterfly Count will be held Sunday, July 
27, 2014. Everyone is welcome to join the fun as we visit this Sky Island 
mountain range near the AZ-MX border. 


 

Meet at 7:30 a.m. at McDonalds/Safeway parking area on Continental Road 1/4 
mile east of I-19 in Green Valley, AZ unless you have made prior arrangements 
with compiler Mary Klinkel Munchita AT msn.com 520 615 0969 or 520 275 0163 cell. 


 

This is an official North American Butterfly Association (NABA) count and each 
participant is requested to pay $3 for compilation expenses, collected by the 
compiler and sent to NABA. We also have a compilation dinner for all who wish 
to attend at their own expense. We will meet at 5pm (unless we get rained out, 
then we’ll meet earlier) at Florentino’sMexican restaurant, 100 W. Duval 
Mine Road (1/4 mile west of I-19) in Sahuarita. 



 

Even if you only have one hour we appreciate your help with this count. Thank 
you! 



Mary Klinkel, Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Lake Cuyamaca, San Diego
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2014 15:40:25 -0700
Hi All,

Went to Lake Cuyamaca today.
From yesterday, I started to notice thunderclouds over the mountains. This is 
good. Hope they drop some water on the mountains. 


Afranius Duskywing (Erynnis afranius) - common
White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens) - 2
Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon) - nice big female nectaring
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)
Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides) - common
Desert Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum) - 1 female
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) - common
Edwards' Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus gyas) - 5
Orange Margined Blue (Plebejus melissa paradoxa) - common
Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) - 5
Monarch (Danaus plexippus plexippus) - 2 hanging around Milkweed
Gray Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea) - 1 fresh
Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta) - fresh 4

by 11am, thunderclouds started to form above my head, so I retreated back home.

Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Re: Ebutterfly
From: "Elizabeth Long elizabeth.c.long AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2014 11:39:17 -0700
As an eButterfly user I can attest to its usefulness.  If there are
concerns about sensitive species/rarities, there is an option to make the
observation non-public.   I believe that listed species automatically get
treated differently by the system, and the locality information in that
case gets "fuzzed out" to something like a 10km radius.


Cheers,
Elizabeth Long
Prescott, AZ




On Sat, Jun 28, 2014 at 7:41 AM, Richard Carlson rccarl AT pacbell.net

[SoWestLep]  wrote:


>
>
> Nick is correct, local review a good idea. I'm enthused about ebutterfly
> but my wife reminded me to not report rarities: too many over-enthusiastic
> collectors out there to risk losing a colony.
>
> Richard Carlson
> Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
> Part-time Economist
> Tucson, AZ
> Lake Tahoe, CA
> Kirkland, WA
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
Subject: Tehachapi Mtn. Park
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Jul 2014 21:04:19 -0700
Everyone:

   I was able to spend 4 hours at Tehachapi Mtn. Park, Kern County,
California today (July 3, 11:50AM-3:30 PM), limited by life's circumstances.

 

Finds during the 4 hours:

 

Large White or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-6

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora sonora): the first I've seen here in about 40
years and only the 2nd ever!

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)-6

 

Two-Tailed Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata pusillus)-2 in Antelope
Canyon in the first hour, both nice fresh males...nice to see after many
years of absence in this location.

 

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-30

Becker's White (Pontia beckerii)-1

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-10 (including Water Canyon)

 

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides xanthoides)-25 and most in good condition.
60 % were males-40% females.  Because there are taxonomic issues within this
species I collected 8 of them including 3 females  Those we saw on the
Sherman Pass Rd. at higher and lower elevations last Sunday were "rags".

 

Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-6

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-2

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-30

 

Macaria Fritillary (Speyeria callippe macaria)-7

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-5

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini powelli)-4 or 5

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-20

Great Basin Wood-nymph (Cercyonis sthenele with both behrii and silvestris
phenotypes)-20 but very hard to capture (took 3) in the tall grass and
difficult terrain.

California Ringlet (Coenonympha california california.

 

Added Notes: Apparently too early for Pine Whites, Golden Hairstreaks and
Sylvan Hairstreaks.  No Monarchs were seen despite milkweeds all over the
place.  There was no water up the trail and ravine above Oak Flat.  No Satyr
Anglewings seen but I had to depart early.  The host for Western Tailed
Blues was common but fried and the butterfly has apparently ended its
flight.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: RE: Sherman Pass butterfly count
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2014 23:23:06 -0700
Bob and all:

   I left out one species in my report:

 

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-14 but there may have been as many as 20 or more.

Comments: Many were seen in the morning at several locations but things
became very interesting at the Alder Creek Crossing (6800') of the Sherman
Pass Rd. between 4 and 5 PM.  Especially at about 4:30 PM it appeared that
Monarchs were all over the place as adults patrolled up and down the canyon
and stream (multiple sightings of some individuals was evident) but
sightings were made throughout the day at several sites including outside
the count circle.  Lots of milkweeds were evident along the Sierra Hwy.
along the Kern River and at places off the Sherman Pass area.  Last Thursday
(june 25th), I only saw maybe 2 Monarchs at Limestone Camp.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; Fred Heath; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com;
Stephen A Randall; Bob Barnes
Subject: Sherman Pass butterfly count

 

Everyone:  The Sherman Pass Butterfly Count is actually part of the Sequoia
National Monument Count though the Sherman Pass area in NOT in the National
Monument.  This report is going  to Bob Barnes to combine with the report
with his car group (Bob and Alison Sheehey).  My car group included Kim
Kuska and Stephen Randall.  The upper Kern River and Sherman Pass are in
Tulare County north of Kernville.  A scouting report done June 27th found 40
species but conditions were very windy and conditions were often cloudy on
that day.  Weather was better today with very few clouds and relatively
little wing except at the rocky outcrop at 9000' west below Sherman Pass.
Today, with 3 of us and better conditions, we had 60 species in our car
group.

 

Butterflies seen or collected with some comments:

 

Clodius Parnassian (Parnassius clodius baldur)-9.  Much more general in
occurrence this time.

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)-3

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)-6

Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon): 19

 

Two-Tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata pusillus): A nice female
patrolling the cliff above the road below the area nearing Limestone Camp.
A species rarely seen in this region.-1

 

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-30

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-1

Large Marble (Euchloe ausonides transmontana)-6

Pearly or California Marble (Euchloe hyantis hyantis)-2

Gray Marble (Anthocharis lanceolata lanceolata)-2

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-14

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides xanthoides)-9

California Hairstreak (Satyrium californica californica)-6

Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum)-3

 

Gold-Huner's Hairstreak (Satyrium auretorum auretorum X spadix)-3 south of
Limestone Camp as were all the other Satyrium hairstreaks.

 

Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak (Satyrium tetra)-50

Hedgerow Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium)-27

Brown Elfin (Callophrys augustinus iroides)-2

Western Pine Elfin (Callophrys eryphon eryphon)-1

 

Bramble Hairstreak (Callophrys dumetorum)-1, very LATE for this species.
Taken at Alder Creek 6800' by Stephen Randall.

 

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus): 3

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-3, probably more

Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)-1 (Calkin's Flat by Stephen Randall.)

Western "Spring" Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-45  Celastrina ladon to NABA

Western Square Dotted Blue (Euphilotes glaucon comstocki)-8  E. battoides in
NABA list.

Bernardino Dotted Blue (Euphilotes bernardino): E. battoides ssp. in NABA
list-3

Pacific Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes tildeni)-1

Arrowhead Blue (Glaucopsyche piasus piasus)-1

Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa)-30

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)-40

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides icarioides X evius)-30

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon acmon)-20

 

Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini monticola and chlorina)-10.  A specimen I
believe was a Veined Blue (Plebejus neurona) is a very large female with
orange up the forewings above and looks like a Veined Blue except for blue
overscaling.  This is form "carolyna."

 

Sierra Navada "Arctic" Blue (Agriades podarce cilla)-6

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola)-10

Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe macaria)-20

Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)-16

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia)-45

Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla)-27

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella AKA campestris)-35

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-20

Edith's Checkerspot (Euphydryas editha similar to both augustina and
aurilacus)-5 at 8900'

Hoary or Zephyr Comma (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)-4

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)-6

West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella)-1

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)-2

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini near lorquini)-4

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-10

Common Ringlet AKA California Ringlet (Coenonympha "tullia" california-2

Silver-Spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus californicus)-9

Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades indistinctus)-12

Mexican Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana nevada)-6

Pacuvius Duskywing (Erynnis pacuvius lilius)-6

Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius)-10

White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)-1 at Fairview, ID pending
genitalic confirmation of this male)

Northern or Large White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-4

Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh)-2

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora sonora): 26

Rural Skipper (Polites agricola nemorum)-3  An individual female I thought
was O. sylvanoides is likely this skipper.-3

 

Bob: Please forward to Alison and Kim, Thank You.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 

 
Subject: Sherman Pass butterfly count
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2014 23:10:45 -0700
Everyone:  The Sherman Pass Butterfly Count is actually part of the Sequoia
National Monument Count though the Sherman Pass area in NOT in the National
Monument.  This report is going  to Bob Barnes to combine with the report
with his car group (Bob and Alison Sheehey).  My car group included Kim
Kuska and Stephen Randall.  The upper Kern River and Sherman Pass are in
Tulare County north of Kernville.  A scouting report done June 27th found 40
species but conditions were very windy and conditions were often cloudy on
that day.  Weather was better today with very few clouds and relatively
little wing except at the rocky outcrop at 9000' west below Sherman Pass.
Today, with 3 of us and better conditions, we had 60 species in our car
group.

 

Butterflies seen or collected with some comments:

 

Clodius Parnassian (Parnassius clodius baldur)-9.  Much more general in
occurrence this time.

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)-3

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)-6

Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon): 19

 

Two-Tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata pusillus): A nice female
patrolling the cliff above the road below the area nearing Limestone Camp.
A species rarely seen in this region.-1

 

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-30

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-1

Large Marble (Euchloe ausonides transmontana)-6

Pearly or California Marble (Euchloe hyantis hyantis)-2

Gray Marble (Anthocharis lanceolata lanceolata)-2

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-14

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides xanthoides)-9

California Hairstreak (Satyrium californica californica)-6

Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum)-3

 

Gold-Huner's Hairstreak (Satyrium auretorum auretorum X spadix)-3 south of
Limestone Camp as were all the other Satyrium hairstreaks.

 

Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak (Satyrium tetra)-50

Hedgerow Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium)-27

Brown Elfin (Callophrys augustinus iroides)-2

Western Pine Elfin (Callophrys eryphon eryphon)-1

 

Bramble Hairstreak (Callophrys dumetorum)-1, very LATE for this species.
Taken at Alder Creek 6800' by Stephen Randall.

 

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus): 3

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-3, probably more

Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola)-1 (Calkin's Flat by Stephen Randall.)

Western "Spring" Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-45  Celastrina ladon to NABA

Western Square Dotted Blue (Euphilotes glaucon comstocki)-8  E. battoides in
NABA list.

Bernardino Dotted Blue (Euphilotes bernardino): E. battoides ssp. in NABA
list-3

Pacific Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes tildeni)-1

Arrowhead Blue (Glaucopsyche piasus piasus)-1

Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa)-30

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)-40

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides icarioides X evius)-30

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon acmon)-20

 

Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini monticola and chlorina)-10.  A specimen I
believe was a Veined Blue (Plebejus neurona) is a very large female with
orange up the forewings above and looks like a Veined Blue except for blue
overscaling.  This is form "carolyna."

 

Sierra Navada "Arctic" Blue (Agriades podarce cilla)-6

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola)-10

Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe macaria)-20

Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)-16

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia)-45

Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla)-27

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella AKA campestris)-35

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-20

Edith's Checkerspot (Euphydryas editha similar to both augustina and
aurilacus)-5 at 8900'

Hoary or Zephyr Comma (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)-4

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)-6

West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella)-1

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)-2

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini near lorquini)-4

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-10

Common Ringlet AKA California Ringlet (Coenonympha "tullia" california-2

Silver-Spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus californicus)-9

Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades indistinctus)-12

Mexican Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana nevada)-6

Pacuvius Duskywing (Erynnis pacuvius lilius)-6

Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius)-10

White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)-1 at Fairview, ID pending
genitalic confirmation of this male)

Northern or Large White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-4

Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh)-2

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora sonora): 26

Rural Skipper (Polites agricola nemorum)-3  An individual female I thought
was O. sylvanoides is likely this skipper.-3

 

Bob: Please forward to Alison and Kim, Thank You.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Greenhorn Mts.
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 22:30:42 -0700
Everyone:

   Today was the Greenhorn Mts. (including Kernville & Wofford Heights)
butterfly count including two groups (1) Bob Barnes and Alison Sheehey and
(2) Kim Kuska, Steve Randall and myself.  My car group had 42 species and I
think the total count was 44 species, not bad considering the poor turnout
for the count, a recent forest fire that burned the Old State Rd. area badly
in the past 2 weeks and the obvious drought.  Like Sherman Pass, most
butterfly species normally found this time of the year were either gone or
well ahead of their normal flight periods.  Butterflies found and some
comments:

 

Silver-Spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus californicus): 

Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades indistinctus)

Propertius Duskywing (Erynnis propertius)

Dyar's Duskywing (Erynnis pacuvius lilius)

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)

Checkered Skipper (probably Pyrgus communis, found above 7000'

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)-at Kernville

Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh)

Sonoran Skipper (Polites sonora sonora)

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)

Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon)

 

Two-Tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata pusillus) While at Cedar Creek
and preparing to go, I noted a Two-Tailed Swallowtal heading down towards
and, it took an "L" turn right at us and Steve Randall netted it right at my
car.  Possibly the first record for Cedar Creek in over 30 years.  Colonies
move around.

 

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides)

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus): a nice female at Tiger Flat, over
7000' elevation.

Golden Hairstreak (Habrodais grunus grunus)-Cedar Creek-few observed, one
collected by Kim Kuska.

Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium chalcis)

Nelson's Hairstreak (Callophrys nelsoni nelsoni)

Western Brown Elfin (Callophrys augustinus iroides)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)

Western Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-common in vacant lot in Kernville.

Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo)

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides near evius)

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)

Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini)-both chlorina and monticola occur near here.

Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe laurina)

Hydaspe Fritillary (Speyeria hydaspe viridicornis)

Western Meadow Fritillary AKA Pacific Fritillary (Boloria epithore
sierra)-only 3, ending flight very early, probably common near Tobias Peak
still.

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella AKA campestris)

Milbert's Tortoiseshell (Aglais milberti subpallida)-1 near top of ski lift
at Shirley Meadows.

Hoary Comma or Zephyr Anglewing  (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini near lorquini)

California Sister (Adelpha californica)

California Ringlet (Coenonympha (tullia) california calfornia

Monarch (Danaus plexippus plexippus)

Queen (Danaus gilippus thersippus)-Kernville.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Butterfly data from Grand Canyon National Park
From: "Robb Hannawacker hannawacker AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 20:26:29 -0700
I'm a ranger naturalist at Grand Canyon National Park.  Our first
annual butterfly count will be September 6, 2014.  Please contact me
with interest in joining.


We haven't had much entomology/invertebrate research within the park
from what I gather from records.  Voucher specimens were collected
from the park especially from the 1940s and 1950s under the Chief
Naturalist Louis Schellbach.  I have photographed many of the
specimens of that era, and some poached specimens confiscated for
evidence from the late 1980s.  If you would like to review or use
these photos with collection data and museum catalog numbers, you are
welcome to check out my flickr account:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/39422575 AT N02/sets/72157645333882816/


To see the collection in person, contact Grand Canyon's Museum
Collections at 928-638-7769 to schedule an appointment.


In addition, all photos I've posted on flickr can be used for
promoting conservation.


Larry Stevens of the Museum of Northern University has done
invertebrate work within Grand Canyon over the more recent years.
I've taken his data and our museum collections data and composed a
species list for butterfly count purposes.  If any taxonomist see any
dubious mistakes, please contact me...


Robb Hannawacker
Park Ranger Naturalist
Grand Canyon National Park
PO Box 129
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023
(982) 638-7663


GRCA Butterfly List (125 species)
Compiled by Robb Hannawacker

From GRCA Museum Collections and
Museum of Northern Arizona voucher specimens
Names based off of J. Glassberg 2012
June 14, 2014


Papilionidae (Swallowtails)


Pipevine Swallowtail, Battus philenor
Western Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio rutulus
Two-tailed Swallowtail, Papilio multicaudata
Baird’s Swallowtail, Papilio machaon bairdii
Black Swallowtail, Papilio polyxenes coloro
Anise Swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon
Kaibab Swallowtail, Papilio indra kaibabensis


Pieridae (Whites, Sulphurs & marble-wings)


Sara Orange-tip, Anthocharis sara inghami
Southern Dogface, Zerene cesonia
Common Sulphur, Colias philodice
Orange Sulphur, Colias eurytheme
Sleepy Orange, Eurema nicippe
Mexican Yellow, Eurema mexicana
Dainty Sulphur, Nathalis iole
Pine White, Neophasia menapia
Cloudless Sulphur, Phoebis sennae
Spring White, Pontia sisymbrii
Western White, Pontia occidentalis
Checkered White, Pontia protodice protodice
Becker’s White, Pontia beckerii


Riodinidae, Metalmarks


Mormon Metalmark, Apodemia mormo
Palmer’s Metalmark, Apodemia palmeri
Fatal Metalmark, Calephelis nemesis
Zela Metalmark, Emesis zela


Lycaenidae, Blues, Coppers, Hairstreaks


Arctic Blue, Agriades glandon rustica
Great Purple Hairstreak, Atlides halesus
Western Pygmy Blue, Brephidium exilis
Juniper Hairstreak, Callophrys gryneus siva
Thicket Hairstreak, Callophrys spinetorum
Bramble Hairstreak, Callophrys affinis apama
Western Pine Elfin, Callophrys eryphon
Echo Blue, Celastrina argiolus echo
Arizona Blue, Celastrina argiolus cinerea
Square-spotted Blue, Euphilotes battoides
Western Tailed-Blue, Everes amyntula herri
‘Oro’ Silvery Blue, Glaucopsyche lygdamus oro
Ceraunus Blue, Hemiargus ceraunus gyas
Reakirt's Blue, Hemiargus isola
Colorado Hairstreak Butterfly, Hypaurotis crysalus crysalus
Marine Blue, Leptotes marina
Tailed Copper, Lycaena  arota schellbachi
Blue Copper, Lycaena heteronea gravenotata
Melissa Blue, Lycaeides Melissa
Acmon Blue, Plebejus acmon
Boisduval's Blue, Plebejus icarioides lycea

Lupine Blue, Plebejus lupini
Greenish Blue, Plebejus  saepiolus gertschi
Behr's Hairstreak, Satyrium behrii
Ilavia Hairstreak, Satyrium ilavia
Hedgerow Hairstreak, Satyrium saepium saepium
Gray Hairstreak, Strymon melinus


Nymphalidae, Brush-footed Butterflies


Arizona Sister, Adelpha bredowii eulalia
Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia
Hackberry Emperor, Asterocampa celtis
Great Basin Wood-nymph, Cercyonis sthenele masoni
Small Wood-Nymph, Cercyonis oetus phocus
Mead's Wood-Nymph, Cercyonis meadii damei
Sagebrush Checkerspot, Chlosyne acastus neumoegeni
Leanira Checkerspot, Chlosyne leanira
Fulvia Checkerspot, Chlosyne fulvia
California Patch, Chlosyne californica
Grand Canyon Ringlet, Coenonympa ochracea furcae
Canyonland Gemmed-Satyr, Cyllopsis pertepida dorothea
Queen, Danaus gilippus strigosus
Monarch, Danaus plexippus
Edith’s Checkerspot, Euphydryas editha
‘Anicia’ Variable Checkerspot, Euphydryas chalcedona anicia
Variegated Fritillary, Euptoieta Claudia
"Dark" Tropical Buckeye, Junonia genoveva nigrosuffusa
Common Buckeye, Junonia coenia
American Snout, Libytheana carinenta
Arizona Viceroy, Limenitis archippus obsoleta
Arizona Red-spotted Purple, Limenitis arthemis arizonensis
Weidemeyer's Admiral, Limenitis weidemeyerii angustifascia
Riding’s Satyr, Neominois ridingsii dionysus
Mourning Cloak, Nymphalis antiopa
California Tortoiseshell, Nymphalis californica
Mylitta Crescent, Phyciodes mylitta arizonensis
Field Crescent, Phyciodes campestris
Pallid Crescentspot, Phyciodes pallida
Pearl Crescent, Phyciodes tharos pascoensis
Barne's Canyon Crescent, Phyciodes batesii anasazi
Dotted Checkerspot, Poladryas minuta
Arachne Checkerspot, Poladryas arachne
Satyr Comma, Polygonia satyrus
Hoary Comma, Polygonia gracilis zephyrus
West Coast Lady, Vanessa Annabella
Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta
Painted Lady, Vanessa cardui
American Lady, Vanessa virginiensis
‘Southwestern’ Atlantis Fritillary, Speyeria atlantis nausicaa
Chitone Fritillary, Speyeria hesperis chitone
‘White Mountains’ Aphrodite Fritillary, Speyeria Aphrodite byblis
Schellbach's Fritillary, Speyeria hesperis schellbachii


Hesperiidae, Skippers


Mojave Giant-Skipper, Agathymus alliae
Python Skipper, Atrytonopsis python
Viereck’s Skipper, Atrytonopsis vierecki
Acacia Skipper, Cogia hippalus
Orange Skipperling, Copaeodes aurantiaca
Silver-spotted Skipper, Epargyreus clarus
Dreamy Duskywing, Erynnis icelus
Meridian Duskywing, Erynnis meridianus
Persius Duskywing, Erynnis persius
Afranius Duskywing, Erynnis afranius
Funereal Duskywing, Erynnis funeralis
Horace’s Duskywing, Erynnis horatius
Juvenal’s Duskywing, Erynnis juvenalis
Propertius Duskywing, Erynnis propertius
Dun Skipper, Euphyes vestris
Northern White Skipper, Heliopetes ericetorum
Common Branded Skipper, Hesperia comma
Pahaska Skipper, Hesperia pahaska
Fiery Skipper, Hylephila phyleu
Strecker’s Giant-Skipper, Megathymus streckeri
Yucca Giant-Skipper, Megathymus yuccae
Garita Skipperling, Oarisma garita
Woodland Skipper, Ochlodes sylvanoides
Yuma Skipper, Ochlodes yuma
Russet Skipperling, Piruna pirus
Taxiles Skipper, Poanes taxiles
Draco Skipper, Polites draco
Common Checkered-skipper, Pyrgus albescens
Small Checkered Skipper, Pyrgus scriptura
Arizona Powdered Skipper, Systacea zampa
Northern Cloudywing, Thorybes pylades


------------------------------------
Posted by: Robb Hannawacker 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Ebutterfly
From: "Richard Carlson rccarl AT pacbell.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:41:11 -0700
Nick is correct, local review a good idea. I'm enthused about ebutterfly but my 
wife reminded me to not report rarities: too many over-enthusiastic collectors 
out there to risk losing a colony. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

------------------------------------
Posted by: Richard Carlson 
------------------------------------


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Subject: New Species of Moth Described in Great Smocky Mts.
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 03:46:08 -0700
A new species of moth from the Appalachian Mountains named to honor the 
Cherokee Nation 



http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140627113050.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28Latest+Science+News+--+ScienceDaily%29 


Older mothers may recognize the name John Franclemont in connection with the 
discovery of the new species. 


---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: ebutterfly
From: "'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 17:19:21 +0000
All:

I just took a quick look at ebutterfly with a view to seeing which species 
could be entered for Santa Barbara County. Unsurprisingly, the default 
checklist contains all the species for California (or possibly even more). 
Given the significant problems with the e-bird database, I think we need a 
similar system (to e-bird) of county coordinators who can ensure the species 
lists are correct, flight time periods are correct, etc, and do some vetting of 
any submissions. Assume e-butterfly allows this, I would encourage people to 
sign up as county coordinators to get these put in place ASAP. I will be 
enquiring about becoming the coordinator for Santa Barbara County. 


Nick Lethaby
office: +1 805 562 5106
mobile: +1 805 284 6200
e-mail: nlethaby AT ti.com
Subject: Kernville to Sherman Pass, CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 22:42:03 -0700
Everyone:

   I visited the Sherman Pass region (Tulare County). today (June 26, 2014)
to find the season running well ahead of normal.  This Saturday we will be
doing a butterfly county largely centered in the Greenhorn Mts. and Sunday
we will be doing the Kern River-Sherman Pass Rd. and a portion of Sequoia
National Monument.  Numbers of butterflies were relatively low and number of
species encountered were about 20 species less than in an average or good
year.  Drought and early snow melt appear to be the culprits.  Most species
were found above 6700'.   High winds and clouds seemed to heavily restrict
flights.  Better weather is forecast for the actual counts.  List of the 40
species found:

 

Silver-Spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus californicus)-5

Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades indistinctus)-7 or 8

Nevada Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana nevada)-2

Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius)-1

Pacuvius Duskywing (Erynnis pacuvius lilius)-1

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)-1

Sonoran Skipper (Polites sonora sonora)-4

Clodius Parnassian (Parnassius clodius baldur-6

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)-1

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)-4

Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon):8-10

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-10

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-1

Large Marble (Euchloe ausonides transmontana)-1

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-6

Golden Hairstreak (Habrodais grunus grunus)-2

Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium)-4

Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak (Satyrium tetra)-10

Brown Elfin (Callophrys augustinus iroides)-2

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) 3 at Kernville, Kern County, CA

Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo)-12

Comstock's Blue (Euphilotes glaucon comstocki)-1

Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus)-40

Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides icarioides X evius)-12

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-10

Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini chlorina)-3

Sierra Nevada Blue (Agriades podarce cilla)-6

Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe macaria)-7

Great Basin or Egleis Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)-15

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola)-1

 

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia)-12 Comment: A fresh
individual was collected at Alder Creek 6800' after 4 PM miles from
appropriate habitat.  The coloration of this individuals suggest that this
individual was blown miles from its original origin blowing up from the
Poison Meadow area or Big Meadow where mormonia have a more yellowish ground
color than those from the Pass area itself which are more orange.

 

Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla)-6

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-15

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella AKA campestris)-18

Chalcedon Checkerspot (Euphydryas chalcedona near olancha)-1...very worn

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)-6

American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)-1

Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini lorquini)-1

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-1

Monarch (Danaus plexippus): -2

 

Added Note:  I was astounded to find absolutely no parnassians anywhere in
the usual habitats along the road until 2:30 PM.  Perhaps the main flight is
ending very early, habitat succession issues or a very poor flight due to
the drought.  To find out if parnassians were to be found, I hiked upstream
in a known population center never surveyed during the count for both this
species and Polygonia gracilis zephyrus.  I was able to find a few clodius
at elevations 8500-8700' well off the road among boulders and fallen trees
but Polygonia were to be found nowhere in their usual spots, nor were any
Nymphalis species.

   Some say the California water shortage is just political.  Based on
observations today, I can testify that it is very real.  Most streams I
checked were bone dry.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: New Version of eButterfly up and ready!
From: "Katy Prudic klprudic AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 16:56:27 -0700
Greetings fellow leppers,


After less than a year and many hours coding, our new version of eButterfly
is up and active.


eButterfly is an online checklist service for butterfly enthusiasts of all
stripes to record, share and explore not only their personal records but
the rest of the communities. You can attach photos to your checklists as
well.


For those of you who are birders, it is similar to eBird. In fact, our new
design was heavily influenced by a workshop we had with them last summer so
you may notice several similarities.


John Acorn has put together a few videos on our youtube channel
 to help
guide you through the process of entering your data and giving you an
entertaining overview of the website.


Let me know if you have any questions or concerns. I am happy to help you
get started. And I'll be at the Lep Soc meetings with a demonstration
during the poster session.


Happy lepping everyone! Best, Katy Prudic




-- 


Kathleen L Prudic, PhD
Research Scientist
Integrative Biology, Oregon State University
Subject: Databases for California
From: "'Norbert Kondla' nkondla AT telus.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Jun 2014 06:51:03 -0600
Another databasing operation that contains and accepts California records is
ebutterfly:

http://www.e-butterfly.org/contents/?portal=ebutterfly

 

Unlike BAMONA, there is no problem for anyone to access the data ---

 

Norbert Kondla

Rimbey, Alberta

 

From: TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of 'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [TILS-leps-talk]
Sent: June-25-14 1:33 AM
To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com;
TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [leps-talk] Databases for California

 

  

Everyone: 

   Jonathan Pelham asked me privately if there is a central California
database for butterflies and in reality, I was planning on writing up some
comments on this soon anyway.

   The truth is that we are far far from having any kind of comprehensive
database and for a lot of reasons.  Here is where databases do exist:

(1) Regional papers or books: for example Art Shapiro's paper on the Trinity
Alps; George T. Austin's publication on Clark County, Nevada, Garth &
Tilden's Yosemite book and my publications on Kern and Tulare Counties and
the Yosemite region in California.

(2) Revisionary papers, for example: Oakley Shield's papers on blue we now
place in Euphilotes.

(3) The NABA database

(4) The BAMONA database

(5) The Season Summary database

 

   As I received Pelham's email it so happened I was working on a database
for the White Mts. in California and Nevada.  Some comments on limiting
factors on both the NABA and BAMONA databases:

   Both have the same programs and the problems have to do with access.
Only those submitting records, those approving and confirming the records or
the organizations can access those records.

BAMONA records are refereed, I do not believe NABA records are.  BAMONA
records can be edited and corrected by state Coordinators provided they can
access the records.  Funding for BAMONA is sparse and there is insufficient
staff to keep up with spread sheets submitted by Coordinators.  Many records
I have submitted to BAMONA appear to have been lost or backlogged.

   Records I have put in the BAMONA database are from Season Summaries,
published data and personal records.  I do not pull records from list serves
(with rare exceptions) to put into the BAMONA database.  Anyone desiring to
submit records can do so themselves and regional experts can do so
themselves via spread sheets through Kelly Lotts.

   The amount of work involved to create an extensive database is extensive
and I do not have such time since I have to work about 50-60 hours a week to
make a living and care for other necessary business.  I would expect to be
paid to do such a thing as too many hours would be required to do it as an
unpaid volunteer.

   Another comment.  Like it or not, the name of a person submitting a
record is often used in the Season Summary and the actual person with the
photo or specimen is often listed in a separate comment under the record.
One reason is to safeguard limited letter combinations available and not use
them up for very rare or one time contributors.  Those who become regular
contributors soon earn a code for themselves.  But the reporter may be as
important or more important that the person with the record.  We may not
know someone who shared in an NABA butterfly count and his or her record of
a "Pussycat Swallowtail" may be questionable, but if Fred Heath vouches for
it after reviewing her sighting and photograph it, I am much more likely to
accept it.

   The Season Summary Database hopes to expand BUT there remain limiting
factors: available time for Coordinators and the prohibitive cost in
printing a phone book sized publication.

   In time we may have a comprehensive database.  It just isn't there now.
And in many cases in old season summaries: records lack full dates,
localities or dates...rendering them of little value in terms of being truly
a scientific record.

   So at present: databases for any given butterfly can be obtained by
making literature searches, checking museum and private collections or
checking various web sites like the Butterflies of America website.  I
personally rarely access personal websites because of problems I have
accessing those and my limited time.  I may if they are Season Summary
potential records.  

   Also, every year someone gets mad at me for not accepting their record or
getting their details correct.  While I make some errors virtually every
year and I will strive to correct those...records that lack specific
localities and counties, are based on poor photographs or lack a specimen to
verify ID or lack specific dates or the name of the person with the record
or don't give specifics as to life stage other than that of the adult really
lack necessary information to justify publishing.

   Butterfly Counts are often not a source of reliable data unless they
contain specifics within the count circle, ID verification and from a
credible source or reporter that can verify them.  Example: my trip to
Fresno Dome last June 19th, I reported a likely Thorybes diversus from the
Fresno Dome Trailhead.  A check of the actual butterfly after I took it off
the mounting board is that it was Thorybes mexicana nevada but atypical and
similar looking to diversus.  The others from Fresno Dome Camp and lower
down were actual specimens of T. diversus.  Sometimes, getting ID's right in
the field are very problematic.  Once wrongly identified butterflies get
into a database, they are very difficult to remove.  About every county in
the Southwest has 4 or 5 butterflies of questionable inclusion into its
county list.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 




 


Subject: Databases for California
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Jun 2014 00:33:19 -0700
Everyone: 

   Jonathan Pelham asked me privately if there is a central California
database for butterflies and in reality, I was planning on writing up some
comments on this soon anyway.

   The truth is that we are far far from having any kind of comprehensive
database and for a lot of reasons.  Here is where databases do exist:

(1) Regional papers or books: for example Art Shapiro's paper on the Trinity
Alps; George T. Austin's publication on Clark County, Nevada, Garth &
Tilden's Yosemite book and my publications on Kern and Tulare Counties and
the Yosemite region in California.

(2) Revisionary papers, for example: Oakley Shield's papers on blue we now
place in Euphilotes.

(3) The NABA database

(4) The BAMONA database

(5) The Season Summary database

 

   As I received Pelham's email it so happened I was working on a database
for the White Mts. in California and Nevada.  Some comments on limiting
factors on both the NABA and BAMONA databases:

   Both have the same programs and the problems have to do with access.
Only those submitting records, those approving and confirming the records or
the organizations can access those records.

BAMONA records are refereed, I do not believe NABA records are.  BAMONA
records can be edited and corrected by state Coordinators provided they can
access the records.  Funding for BAMONA is sparse and there is insufficient
staff to keep up with spread sheets submitted by Coordinators.  Many records
I have submitted to BAMONA appear to have been lost or backlogged.

   Records I have put in the BAMONA database are from Season Summaries,
published data and personal records.  I do not pull records from list serves
(with rare exceptions) to put into the BAMONA database.  Anyone desiring to
submit records can do so themselves and regional experts can do so
themselves via spread sheets through Kelly Lotts.

   The amount of work involved to create an extensive database is extensive
and I do not have such time since I have to work about 50-60 hours a week to
make a living and care for other necessary business.  I would expect to be
paid to do such a thing as too many hours would be required to do it as an
unpaid volunteer.

   Another comment.  Like it or not, the name of a person submitting a
record is often used in the Season Summary and the actual person with the
photo or specimen is often listed in a separate comment under the record.
One reason is to safeguard limited letter combinations available and not use
them up for very rare or one time contributors.  Those who become regular
contributors soon earn a code for themselves.  But the reporter may be as
important or more important that the person with the record.  We may not
know someone who shared in an NABA butterfly count and his or her record of
a "Pussycat Swallowtail" may be questionable, but if Fred Heath vouches for
it after reviewing her sighting and photograph it, I am much more likely to
accept it.

   The Season Summary Database hopes to expand BUT there remain limiting
factors: available time for Coordinators and the prohibitive cost in
printing a phone book sized publication.

   In time we may have a comprehensive database.  It just isn't there now.
And in many cases in old season summaries: records lack full dates,
localities or dates...rendering them of little value in terms of being truly
a scientific record.

   So at present: databases for any given butterfly can be obtained by
making literature searches, checking museum and private collections or
checking various web sites like the Butterflies of America website.  I
personally rarely access personal websites because of problems I have
accessing those and my limited time.  I may if they are Season Summary
potential records.  

   Also, every year someone gets mad at me for not accepting their record or
getting their details correct.  While I make some errors virtually every
year and I will strive to correct those...records that lack specific
localities and counties, are based on poor photographs or lack a specimen to
verify ID or lack specific dates or the name of the person with the record
or don't give specifics as to life stage other than that of the adult really
lack necessary information to justify publishing.

   Butterfly Counts are often not a source of reliable data unless they
contain specifics within the count circle, ID verification and from a
credible source or reporter that can verify them.  Example: my trip to
Fresno Dome last June 19th, I reported a likely Thorybes diversus from the
Fresno Dome Trailhead.  A check of the actual butterfly after I took it off
the mounting board is that it was Thorybes mexicana nevada but atypical and
similar looking to diversus.  The others from Fresno Dome Camp and lower
down were actual specimens of T. diversus.  Sometimes, getting ID's right in
the field are very problematic.  Once wrongly identified butterflies get
into a database, they are very difficult to remove.  About every county in
the Southwest has 4 or 5 butterflies of questionable inclusion into its
county list.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Corrections in Season Summary:
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 10:11:14 -0700
Everyone:

   These contributor corrections for the 2013 Season Summary for Arizona:
Contributor was Ken Kertell, not Tom Horton.

 

Copaeodes minima:  Pima County.  Lukeville.  20 Oct 2013.

Agathymus gentryi:  Pima: Bull Pasture, Ajo Mtn. Dr., Organ Castus NM  20
Oct 2013.

 

The following record was attributed correctly to Ken Kertell who reported
it, but another line attributing the sighting of Ganyra howarthi (Santa Cruz
County: Patagonia 10 August 2013) should have been made to Debbie Sebesta
who had that actual observation.

 

   Both Tom Horton and Ken Kertell regularly report important records to the
annual Season Summary Report.  Thank you both and sorry that I made these
errors in the report which I can correct in the 2014 Report.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Dry San Diego
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:37:45 -0700
Things are getting pretty dry here in San Diego.
For unknown reasons, there are few wet spots where some butterflies are 
attracted, but it sure is much less than usual... 


June 15 - Bankhead Springs
Only one Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis) and two Mountain Mahogany 
Hairstreaks (Satyrium tetra). 


June 15 - Alpine
Driving around looking for new locations.

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funereal) - looked smaller.  Few of the out fresh.
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Hedgerow Hairstreaks (Satyrium saepium chalcis/chlorophora)
San Bernardino Blue (Euphilotes bernardino bernardino)

June 22 - Bankhead Springs again
Same as June 15, few more Mountain Mahogany Hairstreaks... The flowers 
(Eriogonum) are starting to dry out which is bit earlier than normal. Some 
plants (Gooseberry) gave up bearing flowers and dried out. 


June 22 - Noble Canyon
Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funereal)
Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
Harford's Sulphur (Colias harfordii)
Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)
Bronzed Hedgerow Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium chalcis)
Desert Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus desertorum)
Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides xanthoides)
San Bernardino Blue (Euphilotes bernardino bernardino)
Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)
Clemence's Blue (Plebejus lupini monticola)
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)
California Sister (Adelpha californica)
Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta)

Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: RE: Fresno Dome area, California:
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2014 08:25:17 -0700
Todd:

   We arrived at Fresno Dome very EARLY and left LATE before and after Sara
Orange Tips would have been flying.  I suspect any overlaps were a month
earlier.  As some may know, Sara Orange-tips (worn second brood)and newly
emerging Stella Orangetips can both fly together at Big Sandy Camp (4 miles
downstream from Fresno Dome Camp, Madera Co.) and they occur very close
together and likely overlap elsewhere.

   The yellow nature of the male stella I took yesterday was not evident in
the field, but sure was when I put them on the spreading board.  For those
not up on these, yellow form stella within Sara Orangetip populations are
biologically different than what we are calling A. julia stella.  The fact
that the two occur together at several sites (fide Shapiro and Langston)
argues that 2 species are involved.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: RE: [SoWestLep] Fresno Dome area, California:

 

  

Hi Ken,

 

With A. julia stella flying higher up, was there any evidence of second
brood A. sara flying at lower elevations?

 

Thx, Todd

 

Todd L. Stout 
Raising Butterflies 
http://www.raisingbutterflies.org/about-me/ 
http://www.facebook.com/Raising.Butterflies 
  todd AT raisingbutterflies.org
801-326-4683 

  _____  

From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of 'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]
Sent: Friday, June 20, 2014 8:59 AM
To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; John Emmel; Rlromeyn AT aol.com; Richard Meyer;
SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com; Stephen A Randall;
TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com; RUBBERTLAW AT aol.com
Subject: [SoWestLep] Fresno Dome area, California:

 

  

Everyone:

   What follows is the list of butterflies found in the Fresno Dome area on
June 19, 2014, mostly found around the Trailhead but also up Fresno Dome
itself and up the forest service road 2-3 miles above the trailhead with a
late day stop at 4:40-5pm stop at a road junction adjacent to a wet meadow.
We did not have time to sample many areas we know (Stephen Randall and I) to
have other species.  Over 100 species are known to occur in this area.  The
region visited is all in Sierra National Forest and in Madera County,
California.

 

1. Silver-Spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus californicus): One seen in
forest glade off side road within wet forest.

2. Nevada Mexican Cloudywing (Thorybes mexicana nevada): Common throughout
much of the Fresno Dome area at mud or visiting Polygonum flowers.

3. Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades indistinctus): Found 1 in forest
glade with the Silver-Spotted Skipper and the next species.

4. Western Cloudywing (Thorybes diversus): I found evidence on this trip
that Thorybes diversus may stray out of the usual wet forest glade habitat
and into higher levels.  I collected a definite T. diversus along the creek
below Fresno Dome Camp at 3:30 PM.  and another possible diversus (it's on
my mounting board awaiting confirmation) at mud at the beginning of the
trailhead flying with T. mexicana nevada.  The last stop at the road
junction 5 miles below Fresno Dome Camp very late in the day produced 3
diversus in 5 minutes, one of which I was able to collect.  This is a known
colony site which has large numbers of adults.  This rare and local skipper
can be very common in much of the area, as Kilian Roever and I have both
encountered huge numbers of these skippers in the region, even up to 200+ in
a single day in a real wet year.

5. Propertius Duskywing (Erynnis propertius): Seen sparingly.

6. Dyar's Pacuvius Duskywing (Erynnis pacuvius lilius): several seen during
the day at several locations.

7. Tecumseh Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti tecumseh): common in drier
meadows.

8. Sonoran Skipper (Polites sonora sonora): common in wet meadow.

9. Clodius Parnassian (Parnassius clodius baldur and sol). Very common in
the region, especially in meadows off the Fresno Dome Trail.  Some
individuals were very large and may have been sol flyups from lower levels.
Brian Banker could have gotten a full series of baldur with both sexes in
one day.

10. Indra Swallowtail (Papilio indra near indra): I narrowly missed a large
female 2-3 miles uproad from Fresno Dome Trailhead on the dry side of a wet
meadow.  First time I have seen one in the Fresno Dome area, though I have
one record from Fresno Dome in Mariposa County.

11. Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus): Steve reported seeing one
off the Fresno Dome Saddle.

12. Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon): Much less common than usual.  Poor
winter rains?

13. Checkered White (Pontia protodice): scarce

14. Pearly Marble (Euchloe hyantis hyantis): Steve got one on the hilltop on
the Fresno Dome Trail saddle.

15. Stella Orangetip (Anthocharis julia stella: sara complex): May have had
its major flight a month earlier. We saw about a dozen: Steve and I netted
singletons at Bear Creek below Fresno Dome Creek and I had one in the wet
meadow near the Fresno Dome Trailhead and along the road 2 miles up the road
from the Trailhead.

16. Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme): only one I know of

17. Lustrous Copper (Lycaena cupreus lapicola): Previously known from just
one record in the area just off the Big Sandy Road.  I guess the secret to
finding them in the region is go earlier in June and check out seeps in
drier areas off the road and meadow edges.  Not common, but I believe we
caught 4 of them.

18. Thicket Hairstreak (Callophrys spinetorum): Saw 3, netted 2 in wet
habitats in the Fresno Dome Trailhead area.

19. Western Pine Elfin (Callophrys eryphon eryphon): Seen sparingly near
pines in the Trailhead area and along Bear Creek below Fresno Dome Camp.

20. Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo):  general, fairly sparse.

21. Greenish Blue (Plebejus saepiolus aehaja): very abundant in wet meadows.

22. Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides icarioides): very common locally.

23. Anna Blue (Plebejus anna anna): One male taken in wet meadow off the
tail to Fresno Dome.  The population here tends to be small.

24. Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon): Taken by Steve Randall, likely acmon since
the buckwheat host for P. lupini did not appear to be present at the site
taken.

25. Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini alpicola): These may have flown a month
earlier than usual and we saw only a small number on Fresno Dome and saddle
itself where the buckwheat hosts were dominant.  No Lembert's Hairstreaks
were seen here on this trip, present here in the past.

26. Sierra Nevada Blue (Agriades (Plebejus) podarce cilla): Common in wet
meadows with "shooting stars host" in wet meadows around Fresno Dome
Trailhead.

27. Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis): Occasional at wet spots
or mud in meadows or in ravines along the road in drier forest.

28. Western Meadow Fritillary (AKA Pacific Fritillary): Extremely abundant,
especially in the Trailhead area and in the Camp-Bear Creek area

29. Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla altasierra).  Garth & Tilden
included this in their 1963 Yosemite book despite no records because "it has
to be here."  It is...just outside the Park.  These were relatively scarce,
maybe 15-20 during the day and maybe the most distinctive high elevation
population I have seen in the Sierra.  Four were at a wet spot along a drier
portion of the forest about a mile above the trailhead.

30. Hoffmann's Checkerspot (Chlosyne hoffmanni hoffmanni):  I collected 2
males and saw at least one other in the Trailhead area.  The first week in
July tends to be best for this area.

31. Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta): sparse but general.

32. Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella AKA campestris): saw 4 or 5, not
sticking around to be sampled.

33. California Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis californica): Steve reported one
near Fresno Dome.

34. Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa): A small number seen during the day.

35. American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis). Common about 2-3 miles up
road from the trailhead in meadows and edges of forest.

36. Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): Mercifully, only a few of these
potentially distracting butterflies.

37. West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): One on flower in meadow near
trailhead.

38. Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria)- One near Fresno Dome seen by
Steve Randall.                       

39. Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea):  Saw 3-4, often in drier portions of
the forest.

40. Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus): Steve saw one earlier in
the day but I saw none until 2:45 PM, then would see many after that.  One
individual looks like a Gray Comma (Polygonia progne) but with a lesser
amount of black on the hindwing.  All are of the higher elevation phenotype
and appeared to be associated with willows.  Art Shapiro suggests in his
recent book we have 2 possible species within "zephyrus"  and I allow for
the possibility which is why I kept the 3 or 4 I took in good condition.  I
took mine both above (up road) Fresno Dome and along Bear Creek below Fresno
Dome Camp.

41. Green Comma (Polygonia faunus rusticus): These butterflies emerge in
September, overwinter and then emerge during snowmelt time so are rarely
seen when collectors arrive in their habitats.  Based on observations on
this trip, the flight probably peaked a month earlier.  I mentioned the
individual that visited a wet spot in a meadow adjacent to a forest edge
while talking with forest service folks. Very unusual.  Steve and I dropped
down to Bear Creek below Fresno Dome after 3 PM (Steve was  pushing his time
limit and then some).  One of the larval hosts azalea (and I think birch is
also there) was common.  I split off and went downstream while Steve stayed
upstream.  My experience with Green Commas is that the observer or collector
will have to get his feet and legs wet up to the knees to successfully
complete his quest.  The creek had flooded and much had changed. Initially I
found no Green Commas...everything was zephyrus.

   But faunus were there with some in places downstream where I had not seen
them before.  They were sitting on dead branches above the stream, sitting
on pine trees high up and once having a territorial fight with other faunus
in willow sandbar areas...adults sometimes alighting on the tops of the
smaller willows allowing easy capture at least once.  These sometimes go to
flowers in gladed areas in mornings but frequent streambeds 2-5 PM.  I
netted 2 faunus below Fresno Dome with one of the males in fairly decent
shape.  To be successful, I had to do a lot of wading, rock hopping and
going around huge fallen trees.  I don't know yet how Steve did but saw him
leaving at 4 PM as I was returning upstream where our cars were parked.  He
left me a note that he did get a nice stella, a butterfly a close friend had
said we would fail to get.

42. California Sister (Adelpha californica): Seen frequently even into the
higher Canadian Zone, perhaps because of dry conditions.

43. Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini lorquini): Fairly frequent (but
not in numbers) at the trailhead and below Fresno Dome Camp. One individual
had very reduced orange tips, looking more like the Pacific Northwest
subspecies.

 

Added Notes: Other species known to occur in this area at this time of the
year not seen were: Western Branded Skipper, Anise Swallowtail, Gray Marble,
Spring White, Small Veined White (Soquel Rd. and lower down to above Redwood
Camp) Nelson's Hairstreak (probably common where I took T. diversus late in
the day), Marine Blue, Arrowhead Blue (possibly seen but not verified) and
Orseis Crescent (Phyciodes orseis herlani), the latter possibly seen but
eluded ID confirmation or capture.  Persius Duskywing, Chalcedon
Checkerspot, Great Basin Wood-Nymph, California Ringlet and Callippe
Fritillary (unsilvered subspecies) occur at Oakhurst.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999