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Updated on Monday, October 20 at 12:16 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Rail,©Sophie Webb

19 Oct ASDM Butterfly List October 16, 2014 ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
18 Oct RE: Cloudless Sulphurs ["Richard James Richard.James AT longbeach.gov [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Oct Re: [DesertLeps] Sycamore Canyon, Santa Cruz Co, AZ ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Oct Re: Cloudless Sulphurs ["Pete Spino petespino8 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Oct Cloudless Sulphurs ["'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Oct Re: Cloudless Along the Central Coast ["Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Oct Cloudless Along the Central Coast ["Bouton Bill boutonbill AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
15 Oct Weldon, Kern Co., CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Oct Saguaro West Visitor Center- Javelina Wash ["Diane Touret dctouret AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]
10 Oct Silver Emperor in Pima County AZ ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
10 Oct hot butterflying at SNPW ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
9 Oct Viceroy In Carr Canyon ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Oct Several migrations in process-upper Kern River ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
6 Oct Admiral Riddle ["David Ferguson manzano57 AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Oct SE AZ: NE Tucson Violet-clouded Skipper ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Oct RE: SE AZ: California Gulch/Sycamore Canyon, 3 Oct. 2014 ["'Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)' jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Oct Anza Borrego Desert State Park 9/30-10/1 ["fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
03 Oct SE AZ: California Gulch/Sycamore Canyon, 3 Oct. 2014 ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Sep RE: No Monarchs at Quaking Aspen ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Sep No Monarchs at Quaking Aspen ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Sep SE AZ: Santa Rita Mts Fall butterfly count results ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
27 Sep Cloudless Sulphur ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
26 Sep SE AZ: W Tucson CA Patch ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
26 Sep Re: SE AZ: NE Tucson CA PATCH ["Gail Morrs gail-marie AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
26 Sep SE AZ: NE Tucson CA PATCH ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
24 Sep RE: Other wildlife and plant observations ["'Norbert Kondla' nkondla AT telus.net [SoWestLep]" ]
24 Sep Other wildlife and plant observations ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
23 Sep Weldon/Sageland, Kern County ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Sep Scientists create new species ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Sep Reminder: Santa Rita Mts Fall butterfly count ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Sep RE: late season vagrancy potential ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Sep Kernville to top of Sherman Pass ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Sep Re: late season vagrancy potential ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Sep late season vagrancy potential ["'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Sep Grand Canyon's first Annual Butterfly Count ["Robb Hannawacker hannawacker AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
10 Sep Checkered Skipper ID's ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
10 Sep Box Canyon, Santa Rita Mtns, Pima Co, AZ ["azttttommy AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
10 Sep Sherman Pass and 2 other places ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
8 Sep Re: San Diego Co. ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
8 Sep RE: San Diego Co. ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Sep San Diego Co. ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Sep Identification issues from Sherman Pass ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
04 Sep Dark Canyon Colorado ["pinkmouse84043 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
03 Sep Re: SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014 ["azttttommy AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
2 Sep Upper Kern River & Sherman Pass ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
2 Sep RE: SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014 ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
02 Sep SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014 ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
2 Sep SE AZ: Brown-banded skipper! ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
1 Sep Re: [DesertLeps] Elf left ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
1 Sep Elf now ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Aug SE AZ: Santa Rita Mts Fall Butterfly Count ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
28 Aug SE AZ: Montosa Canyon, Santa Rita Mts., 28 August 2014 ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
26 Aug Kern River Valley and beyond ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
25 Aug SE AZ: Sycamore Canyon, 25 August 2014 ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
23 Aug Re: Lyside Sulphur ["Keith Wolfe bflyearlystages AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Aug Lyside Sulphur ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Aug Tijuana River, San Diego Co. ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Aug Great Southern White (Ascia monuste) in Patagonia: 17 Aug 2014 ["'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Aug Another WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos chlorinde) south of Patagonia Lake ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Aug Hammock Skipper ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Aug Kern River Valley, Kern County, CA ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Aug Re: Hammock Skippers reach California ["Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Aug Re: Hammock Skippers reach California ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Aug Hammock Skippers reach California ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
9 Aug Scissors Crossing, San Diego ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
04 Aug SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics, cont. ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
04 Aug SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug RE: Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today ["'Todd Stout' todd AT raisingbutterflies.org [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug Lysides & Cloudless Sulphurs in SE AZ ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
4 Aug Anteos clorinde: White angled-sulphur south of Patagonia Lake ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
03 Aug SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail ["teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Aug Anteos clorinde: 2 August, Ash Canyon, Cochise Co, AZ ["'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Aug Miguelito Canyon, Santa Barbara County, CA ["'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" ]
31 Jul RE: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Jul Re: lyside sulphur ["Kim Garwood kimgrwd AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" ]

Subject: ASDM Butterfly List October 16, 2014
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 21:48:27 -0700
 The late rains seem to have had a positive effect on butterflies so far this 
fall. As a docent at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, I've noticed the 
abundance of butterflies, but haven't had much time to focus on them on my 
normal docenting day which is Friday when I am interacting with our visitors. 
Thus I decided to go out last Thursday, October 16 with my wife Mary Klinkel to 
do nothing but butterfly for most of the day. 

 Although, ASDM is an oasis in the middle of Arizona Upland Sonoran Desert with 
lots of well watered flowers, the species counts are not generally impressive, 
but that day we managed to find 41 species. Please find the entire list below. 
Aside from the number of species, the sheer quantity of butterflies is amazing. 
Dogface, Queen and Gulf Frit were abundant. The Eufala was probably the most 
common skipper. The Mournful Duskywing which is probably a first record for 
ASDM was a surprise and certainly way out of habitat. 

Dorantes Longtail and Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak seem to be having a banner year 
in SE AZ and the California Patch which has been a recent rare addition to our 
local butterfly list has had a few reports this fall. 


 Pipevine Swallowtail - (Battus philenor) 
Giant Swallowtail - (Papilio cresphontes) 
Checkered White - (Pontia protodice)
Southern Dogface - (Zerene cesonia) abundant 
Cloudless Sulphur - (Phoebis sennae) 
Large Orange Sulphur - (Phoebis agarithe) 
Mexican Yellow - (Eurema mexicana) 
Tailed Orange - (Pyrisitia proterpia) 
Sleepy Orange - (Abaeis nicippe) 
Dainty Sulphur - (Nathalis iole) 
Great Purple Hairstreak - (Atlides halesus) Quite a few, all nectaring on the 
base of Yellow Bells (Tecoma stans) flowers which had been sliced by carpenter 
bee nectar thieves. 

Gray Hairstreak - (Strymon melinus)
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak - (Strymon istapa) 
Leda Ministreak - (Ministrymon leda) 
Marine Blue - (Leptotes marina) 
Western Pygmy-Blue - (Brephidium exilis) 
Spring 'Echo' Azure - (Celastrina ladon echo)  Ovipositing on Dalea 
Ceraunus Blue - (Hemiargus ceraunus) 
Reakirt's Blue - (Echinargus isola)  Ovipositing on Dalea 
Fatal Metalmark - (Calephelis nemesis) 
American Snout - (Libytheana carinenta) 
Monarch - (Danaus plexippus) two individuals ovipositing, one on A. 
angustifolia and one on A. curassavica Queen - (Danaus gilippus) abundant 

Gulf Fritillary - (Agraulis vanillae) abundant 
Variegated Fritillary - (Euptoieta claudia) 
Bordered Patch - (Chlosyne lacinia) 
California Patch - (Chlosyne californica) 2 both worn 
Tiny Checkerspot - (Dymasia dymas) 
Texan Crescent - (Anthanassa texana) 
Painted Lady - (Vanessa cardui) 
Empress Leilia - (Asterocampa leilia) 
Dorantes Longtail - (Urbanus dorantes) most missing one or both tails 
Arizona Powdered-Skipper - (Systasea zampa) 
Funereal Duskywing - (Erynnis funeralis) 
Mournful Duskywing - (Erynnis tristis) First record for ASDM? 
White Checkered-Skipper - (Pyrgus albescens) 
Erichson's White-Skipper - (Heliopyrgus domicella) 
Orange Skipperling - (Copaeodes aurantiaca) 
Fiery Skipper - (Hylephila phyleus) 
Violet-clouded Skipper - (Lerodea arabus) 
Eufala Skipper - (Lerodea eufala) Most common skipper




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Fred Heath" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: Cloudless Sulphurs
From: "Richard James Richard.James AT longbeach.gov [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:15:07 +0000
Hi,

Here in Long Beach, CA, I have Cassia didymobotrya and C. tomentosa in the 
yard. The Cloudless Sulfurs are there all year long with continuous broods. I 
get occasional Sleepy Oranges part of the year. 


From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Pete Spino petespino8 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep] 

Sent: Friday, October 17, 2014 10:49 AM
To: sowestlep AT yahoogroups.com; NickLethaby
Subject: Re: [SoWestLep] Cloudless Sulphurs



Nick, Bill, Ken,
I read with interest the numbers and sightings of SW Cloudless Sulphurs this 
year further 

up the coast and well inland. Obviously down here -especially in coastal San 
Diego - they've 

been proliferating and are very conspicuous. There indeed has been a lot of 
monsoonal 

precipitationto the south and east of us over the last couple of months. 
Everywhere but here. 


Any healthy Cassia tree in San Diego has a number of adults flying around it. 
In one particular 

area at my church in inland north county there have been continuous broods all 
year. Reading 

about them in Emmel's book, 'The Butterflies of Southern California', it's 
interesting to note 

the fluctuations of this species in southern CA over the last century. Comstock 
in 1927 noted 

them to be "a familiar sight", while Langston stated that "it was still common 
in 1941". When the 

Emmel's published their book in 1973 however they wrote that sennae was not a 
permanently 

established resident anywhere in SoCal anymore except in parts of San Diego 
County, and 

that it was "considered a rather rare capture among lepidopterists."

Times of changed once again for this species here. They're so common I see them 
everyday. 

One interesting sighting was an exceptionally white adult female. Although I've 
observed these 

whiter form marcellina girls before, I've never ever seen one as white as this 
individual was. 

I first thought it to be a summer form male protodice. After quickly ruling 
that out my pulse 

briefly quickened that it might just be a rare fall sighting of the white form 
female agarithe fisher, 

which like sennae, will feed on Cassias. But upon further review this girl was 
indeed a female 

SW Cloudless Sulphur. She appeared quite popular with the males and a week 
later was 

observed laying eggs.

Pete
San Diego

--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 10/17/14, 'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com
[SoWestLep]  wrote:

Subject: [SoWestLep] Cloudless Sulphurs
To: "sowestlep AT yahoogroups.com" 
Date: Friday, October 17, 2014, 7:04 AM

Bill:
There have been small numbers in N. coastal Santa Barbara County this year
as well (1-2 most days near Lompoc in Sept) where the species is barely annual
according to the butterfly biologists on VAFB. Also I had a count of 30 at one 
location 

on the south coast of the county, where the maxima would typically be 5-6.

I am assuming the large numbers are related to the heavy rainfall in south Baja 

and AZ, since butterfly numbers in CA are generally low this year. 
Unfortunately 

there don’t seem to be any other species having a big year.

As an FYI, I photographed a Giant Swallowtail in Lompoc a couple of weeks ago.
That is only about 30 miles from the SLO county border. So look out for these 
as well. 


Nick




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: Richard James 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] Sycamore Canyon, Santa Cruz Co, AZ
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 21:15:18 -0700
>>> For those of you who have hiked/collected the Canyon (I have not been there 
yet), how far down the canyon from the road do you normally have to hike in 
terms of hitting the "sweet" areas? 


Sometimes the butterflies are thick right at the parking area. Certainly, 
hiking 1/2 to one or two miles is enough to have a good day. There are two 
marshy areas and another with cattails that I always look forward to exploring. 


On my most memorable day, I estimated over 20,000 Phoebis sennae, and several 
thousand Abaeis nicippe. 


---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: Re: Cloudless Sulphurs
From: "Pete Spino petespino8 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 10:48:39 -0700
Nick, Bill, Ken,
I read with interest the numbers and sightings of SW Cloudless Sulphurs this 
year further 

up the coast and well inland. Obviously down here -especially in coastal San 
Diego - they've 

been proliferating and are very conspicuous. There indeed has been a lot of 
monsoonal 

precipitationto the south and east of us over the last couple of months. 
Everywhere but here. 


Any healthy Cassia tree in San Diego has a number of adults flying around it. 
In one particular 

area at my church in inland north county there have been continuous broods all 
year. Reading 

about them in Emmel's book, 'The Butterflies of Southern California', it's 
interesting to note 

the fluctuations of this species in southern CA over the last century. Comstock 
in 1927 noted 

them to be "a familiar sight", while Langston stated that "it was still common 
in 1941". When the 

Emmel's published their book in 1973 however they wrote that sennae was not a 
permanently 

established resident anywhere in SoCal anymore except in parts of San Diego 
County, and 

that it was "considered a rather rare capture among lepidopterists."

Times of changed once again for this species here. They're so common I see them 
everyday. 

One interesting sighting was an exceptionally white adult female. Although I've 
observed these 

whiter form marcellina girls before, I've never ever seen one as white as this 
individual was. 

I first thought it to be a summer form male protodice. After quickly ruling 
that out my pulse 

briefly quickened that it might just be a rare fall sighting of the white form 
female agarithe fisher, 

which like sennae, will feed on Cassias. But upon further review this girl was 
indeed a female 

SW Cloudless Sulphur. She appeared quite popular with the males and a week 
later was 

observed laying eggs.

Pete 
San Diego


--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 10/17/14, 'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com 
[SoWestLep]  wrote:

Subject: [SoWestLep] Cloudless Sulphurs
To: "sowestlep AT yahoogroups.com" 
Date: Friday, October 17, 2014, 7:04 AM

Bill:
There have been small numbers in N. coastal Santa Barbara County this year 
as well (1-2 most days near Lompoc in Sept) where the species is barely annual 
according to the butterfly biologists on VAFB. Also I had a count of 30 at one 
location 

on the south coast of the county, where the maxima would typically be 5-6. 
    
I am assuming the large numbers are related to the heavy rainfall in south Baja 

and AZ, since butterfly numbers in CA are generally low this year. 
Unfortunately 

there don’t seem to be any other species having a big year. 
    
As an FYI, I photographed a Giant Swallowtail in Lompoc a couple of weeks ago. 
That is only about 30 miles from the SLO county border. So look out for these 
as well. 

    
Nick 
     




------------------------------------
Posted by: Pete Spino 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Cloudless Sulphurs
From: "'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 14:04:52 +0000
Bill:

There have been small numbers in N. coastal Santa Barbara County this year as 
well (1-2 most days near Lompoc in Sept) where the species is barely annual 
according to the butterfly biologists on VAFB. Also I had a count of 30 at one 
location on the south coast of the county, where the maxima would typically be 
5-6. 


I am assuming the large numbers are related to the heavy rainfall in south Baja 
and AZ, since butterfly numbers in CA are generally low this year. 
Unfortunately there don't seem to be any other species having a big year. 


As an FYI, I photographed a Giant Swallowtail in Lompoc a couple of weeks ago. 
That is only about 30 miles from the SLO county border. So look out for these 
as well. 


Nick
Subject: Re: Cloudless Along the Central Coast
From: "Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 15:51:02 +0000 (GMT)
Bill, et al.,

Known to me, the first record of that species in the SLO area was in Los Osos, 
taken by my wife, Linnell, in the mid-1980s. She went running off out of sight, 
chased it, and bagged a single male. 


Here in Orange Co., CA, that species is wildly abundant this year and last.
Bob Allen

On Oct 16, 2014, at 07:58 AM, "Bouton Bill boutonbill AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" 
 wrote: 


Ive lived in San Luis Obispo County for 17 years now. Until this summer, Id 
seen two Cloudless Sulphurs in this areaboth in Los Osos. Ive been doing 
little butterflying during the last couple of years due to our continuing 
drought and a paucity of butterflies. But since late August, mostly while 
birding (And, by the way, this autumns vagrant bird season has also been 
incredibly dismal; even the resident birds are scarce), Ive been regularly 
seeing Cloudless, all in Los Osos except for one in Arroyo Grande. Yesterday, 
Wednesday October 15, in Los Osos, I noted 7 individuals of this species - at 
one point two together. Ive had good looks at many, and all have appeared to 
be very fresh. 



Whats going on?

Bill


Bill Bouton
2221 King Ct. #16
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 USA
boutonbill AT gmail.com
www.flickr.com/photos/billbouton/sets/





Subject: Cloudless Along the Central Coast
From: "Bouton Bill boutonbill AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 07:58:02 -0700
Ive lived in San Luis Obispo County for 17 years now. Until this summer, Id 
seen two Cloudless Sulphurs in this areaboth in Los Osos. Ive been doing 
little butterflying during the last couple of years due to our continuing 
drought and a paucity of butterflies. But since late August, mostly while 
birding (And, by the way, this autumns vagrant bird season has also been 
incredibly dismal; even the resident birds are scarce), Ive been regularly 
seeing Cloudless, all in Los Osos except for one in Arroyo Grande. Yesterday, 
Wednesday October 15, in Los Osos, I noted 7 individuals of this species - at 
one point two together. Ive had good looks at many, and all have appeared to 
be very fresh. 


Whats going on?

Bill


Bill Bouton
2221 King Ct. #16
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 USA
boutonbill AT gmail.com
www.flickr.com/photos/billbouton/sets/



Subject: Weldon, Kern Co., CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 22:14:18 -0700
Everyone:

 

   Stephen Randall and I spent most of the butterfly flight part of the day
at Weldon in the Kern River Valley with stops in the morning near Kernville
and at Hanning Flat, also in the Kern River Valley.

   Weather conditions were cool and very breezy with obvious signs of the
major drought of 2014.  Plants in general were in poor leaf condition and
milkweeds in pastures had gone to seed.  There was no water in the south
fork of the Kern River, Weldon Meadows and Lake Isabella is dry in most of
its former range.  Butterfly activity overall was very poor and numbers were
down.

   Milkweed Butterfly numbers are very much below normal, likely because of
the very real drought conditions.  It is apparent that the Monarch migration
is happening now based on movements seen in Bakersfield in the southern San
Joaquin Valley in recent days.  But numbers seen at Weldon were better than
mid-September when I saw no Monarchs or Queens.  There were good nectar
sources (blooming rabbitbrush) available in the Weldon area.  17 or 18
Species seen and comments:

 

Checkered Skipper complex  Pyrgus communis/albescens at Hanning Flat-4 or
more.

Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti sabuleti)-30 (normally these are in the
hundreds in mid-October)

Field Skipper or Sachem (Atalopedes campestris campestris): 1 or 2 (normally
these would be common)

Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)-1 at Weldon by Steve Randall.

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)- 8 at Weldon

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae): 2 at Weldon

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-8 or more

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)-1 collected at Paul's Place, Weldon.

Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides)-20 or so (usually over 100 to 200 in a
normal rainfall year)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudicus)-2 at Weldon, none at Hanning Flat
where normally common

Western Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-30

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)- 4 or more (numbers way down).

San Emigdio Blue (Plebejus emigdionis)-one possibly seen by Steve Randall at
Weldon.

Behr's Metalmark (Apodemia virgulti ssp.): one individual near Kernville.

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-1 at Weldon.

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): 12 at Weldon, numbers way down from a normal
year.  2 at Erskine Creek.

Buckeye (Junonia coenia)-2

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-around 20 at Weldon, usually 50-100 in 3 hours.
Two at Erskine Creek E Lake Isabella.

Queen (Danaus plexippus thersippus): 1 at Weldon (10 to 20 are normal this
time of year here, on a very good year saw 60 in one morning in early
November.

 

   The day illustrated how drought can have a very strong affect on the
numbers of butterflies seen and cause many plants including milkweeds to go
to seed earlier than what is normally seen.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Saguaro West Visitor Center- Javelina Wash
From: "Diane Touret dctouret AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 05:22:02 -0700
Yesterday I decided to follow-up on last week's posting about the great 
butterflies nectaring at the Bebbia (sweetbush) along the wash below the 
Visitor Center at Saguaro National Park (West). Although I didn't see as 
many species as were reported last week, I did see about 27 species in 
about 1.5 hrs, some of which were quite fantastic! The sweetbush was a 
little past its peak, but there were literally hundreds of butterflies 
to check out.

Best butterfly species for me:

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak    (3-4, quite fresh-looking)
Great Purple Hairstreak     (below eye-level, just great for photos)
California Patch                 (only one, but quite a surprise)
Erichson's White-Skipper
White-patched Skipper    (1-2)
Violet-clouded Skipper     (2)

Diane Touret    (Tucson, AZ)



------------------------------------
Posted by: Diane Touret 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Silver Emperor in Pima County AZ
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 20:00:54 -0700
                Kim Garwood and Willie Sekula (a visiting birder/butterflyer
from Texas) found a female Silver Emperor Doxocopa laure at the Proctor
stream crossing at the bottom of Madera Canyon (Pima Canyon). Willie was
able to get a photo which was sent to Rich Bailowitz and Ken Davenport for
documentation. Both Kim and Willie noticed the chartreuse-colored tongue
which is not shown in the photo. 

                I thought this might be a first Arizona record, but I see
from Rich's AZ list, that there are 3 records by Killian Roever all in late
May 1979 in Cochise Co. in Leslie and Rucker Canyons. 

Way to go Kim and Willie!!

 
Subject: hot butterflying at SNPW
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 17:04:38 -0400
Friends,
 
Just got a second report about really good butterflies and a great  
opportunity for butterfly photography on the west side of Tucson at Saguaro 
Natl 

Park west. There is a trail at the visitor center that is easy walking and 
the  two reports both confirm about 35 species of butterflies on the Bebbia 
juncea  along the trail including fair numbers of Mallow Scrub Hairstreaks 
(Strymon  istapa). Also seen today was one White Patched Skipper, (Chiomara  
georgina).
 
Jim B in Tucson, AZ
 
Subject: Viceroy In Carr Canyon
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 12:14:16 -0700
We had our first (yard butterfly 120) Viceroy today flying between a Black 
Cottonwood and a Fremont Cottonwood, apparently ovipositing. We were able to 
get photos. 


Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/
Subject: Several migrations in process-upper Kern River
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 21:24:30 -0700
Everyone:

   In the 3 weeks since my last visit up the Kern River and to the summit of
Sherman Pass at 9200' (Tulare County, CA) habitat conditions have reversed
and fall blooming plants at high elevation have largely "crashed" early in
this very dry year while plant blooms along the lower Kern River are doing
well.  So butterflies are not thriving above 6800' or 8000' as they were in
late August to at least mid-September and elevations below 6000' which were
very poor before mid-September are now the hot spots for butterflies, and
several moths were seen as well.  These migrations apparent:

(1) Monarchs (Danaus plexippus): Present above 7600' in the Sherman Pass
area but no longer in numbers like they were.  Present sparingly at
mid-elevations.  28 sightings today (October 7, 2008) with most in the Kern
River Corridor at about 3600', most common at Calkin's Flat.  Very few
nectar sites now available at high altitude, blooms going to seed earlier in
season than normal.

(2) Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)  No longer restricted to above 8000' up
Sherman Pass Rd. as they were late Aug-first half of Sept.  Many sightings
in Kern River Corridor and still up Sherman Pass Rd. at about the 8000'
level.  Saw approx. 40

(3) West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): Usually rare in the Kern
River-Sherman Pass region but now regular (30+) along Kern River Corridor to
above 8000'.  This seems to be a regular movement each year.

 

Other butterflies observed:

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)-1 at Calkin's Flat

Large or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum): 70+ 3400-8400'

Juba Skipper (Hesperia juba)-25 Calkin's Flat up to over 8000'

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)-1 female at Calkin's Flat, unusual
along upper Kern River.

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)-20+

Umber Skipper (Poanes melane)-probable sighting at Calkin's Flat

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-60, 3400-9200'

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-3, 5650-8500'

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-1 Limestone Camp along Kern River

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus)- 1 fresh female Calkin's Flat
(seen)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus); 3 locations- 4

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-15

Cythera Metalmark (Apodemia mormo cythera- 2 at 4900' Sherman Pass Rd.

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola)-1 at about 7700' Sherman Pass
Rd.

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-15, several localities.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella): 7600-7800'-10

American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)-2 along Kern River

Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)-14, several localities

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-16, several localities

California Ringlet (Coenonympha california california)-2 at lower Alder Crk.
crossing

 

15 of the 23 species seen were at Calkin's Flat.  Not seen were the Western
Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado), Columbia Skipper (Hesperia columbia),
Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus) and Mormon and Great Basin
Fritillaries (Speyeria mormonia and egleis).  Zephyrus overwinters as
adults.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Admiral Riddle
From: "David Ferguson manzano57 AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 22:39:55 -0600
I just stumbled across this old thread, and at the risk of annoying some 
people, I thought I throw out some comments. It is a fascinating subject. 








I wan't to emphasize Alex's comment.
 
"It almost appears to me, - - - , that arthemis itself is a very wide "blend 
zone" taxon between astyannax and rubrofasciata...We even begin to see some 
rubrofasciata characters in extreme northern New England especially at higher 
altitudes... " 


I think this is exactly what is going on, and this sums up what I've thought 
for a long time. People are so tuned into looking at the white bands across the 
wings, that they forget to look at all the other traits of color pattern, as 
well as things like wing shape, host plant preferences, and phenology. Most of 
the white-banded population in the northeastern United States is actually 
intermediate in character. 

 
Since "arthemis" is the oldest name in this complex, and thus the name for the 
species, it complicates things greatly that the name is based on the blend zone 
part of the population. Sort of hard to know what to do in such a case. I think 
this has tended aslo to temper the idea that there has to be a "typical" L. 
arthemis population that is an entity unto itself (but there really isn't). The 
fact that "arthemis" occurs where it does (sort of the historical population 
center for North America), and because it was the first named, most studied, 
and most collected of this species complex, it has been considered the 
"typical" White Admiral for a very long time. However, to me, the "typical" 
White Admiral population is actually what occurs further north across much of 
Canada. What was named arthemis appears to me to be intermediate individuals 
that happen to have white wing bands. The population that covers a large part 
of Canada (call it rubrofasciata - at least in a loose broad sense) is the one 
that is at the northern side of the blend zone occupied by "arthemis", and 
astyanax is the population that occupies most of the eastern US. Insects that 
we call "arthemis" are part of what is sandwiched in between them, and they are 
intermediates. We tend to restrict the name "arthemis" to individuals with 
white cross bands, but if those bands are absent or reduced we have called them 
"hybrids". However, in reality these are all part of the blend zone between the 
two main types, whether they have a white band or not. 

 
Occasional insects showing traits from the white-banded type do show up far to 
the south (all the way to nw. Georgia and the Ozarks), implying that there is 
some north-south genetic flow reaching even that far south (perhaps it reaches 
all the way to the Gulf?). In fact, I suspect similarly southern looking 
individuals, showing hints of astyanax characteristics, likely could be found 
far to the north in eastern Canada as well, but they probably would not be as 
likely to be noticed. I suspect that there is (and has long been) a rather free 
north and south gene flow, but that requirements imposed by environment, 
predation, and competition have favored adaptations that have tended to 
maintain the north-south distinction, even thought here is gene flow through a 
huge blend zone. 

 
Moving to the southwest, my gut instinct is that arizonensis is probably a 
representative of something very close to what astyanax might have once been 
when the gene flow between north and south was perhaps interrupted. In other 
words, I suspect that all eastern astyanax are basically arizonensis with at 
least some genetic influence from the northern population. I suspect that it is 
arizonensis that is closer to the "pure" genetic conditon that perhaps resulted 
from the absence of that north-south gene exchange, perhaps a relict from a 
past north-south division/isolation in the over-all population. 

 
I'm sure that L. arthemis is a dynamic and ever-changing population system, and 
that we are only seeing a fleeting result of what has been, and only an 
indication of what might be to come. 

 
As for the L. weidemeyeri / lorquini situation. I firmly believe that most of 
the Great Basin is a blend zone. Again people are looking at a few very obvious 
traits, but I think are ignoring the broad picture. Insects in the Great Basin 
that have orange at the tip of the wings and reddish dark patterning on the 
underside are refered to L. lorquini, while those flying with them that lack 
(or mostly lack) these hues are called L. weidemeyeri (or "hybrids"). However, 
if you look at the structure of the pattern, those insects found in the Great 
Basin tend to be very different from those further west, and they consistently 
lean strongly toward the pattern seen in L. weidemeyeri from further east. This 
is easiest to see if you look at black and white images, and in fact it then 
becomes strikingly obvious. East from the Sierra Nevada and Cascades, the 
pattern on the underside is broken into a network of dark lines as in L. 
weidemeyeri, and the disposition of other pattern elements is also much closer 
to L. weidemeyeri than it is in specimens from the west coast. This variation 
in pattern forms an irregular and broken continuum across the Great Basin. 
Probably due to the intermitant and isolated occurences of suitable habitat 
across this region, there is not an even disposition of genetics in the 
populations of Admiral butterflies found here (they are mostly restricted to 
isolated areas of habitat in the mountains), and so there are pockets of 
insects, isolated from one another in varying degrees, that seem to show more 
or less influence from west or east (or perhaps some are maintaining certain 
traits unique to their own local populations). Along the east side of the 
Sierra Nevada, both "species" seem to occur together along with an abundant 
supply of intermediates. However, I would submit that this is one population in 
which individuals simply vary in the degree of development of the reddish 
pigments at the for wing apex and in the underside pattern. If you look at 
those black and white images of these specimens, it becomes clear that most of 
them are not really very different from one another at all, only a few 
individuals will look like they are actually "typical" of one or the other 
"species". In other words there is variation within the population in the 
development of the reddish pigments, but they do not correlate very well with 
the variation in the disposition of the pattern elements. 

 
It seems to me that there is a general predisposition and bias in most 
lepidopterists that requires these insects to belong to either one or the other 
species, and so most of them are sorted accordingly, based primarily on color 
hue, and forced into one or the other name, but with an inconvenient 
contingient that are colored so as to be called "hybrids". However, if a person 
doesn't approach the situation with that bias, the categorization into two 
entities begins to appear rather artificial. 

 
Now, you can throw this out without comment, shoot it down, or - go have a look 
at those images in black and white (or look at the pattern, wing shape, etc., 
as well as the colors). 

 
I'm not even going to comment on the interraction between L. lorquini / 
weidemeyeri and L. arthemis, except to say that there definitely is blending of 
characters in the populations, it's not just limited isolated F1 hybrid 
individuals. I just don't know the insects well enough where L. arthemis meets 
the others to have a strong opinion. 

 
Where L. weidemeyeri and L. arthemis (arizonensis) meet in New Mexico and 
Arizona they appear to behave as if different species (they favor different 
elevations, different habitats, and tend to use different host plants; however, 
meet they do, and what appear to be only F1 hybrids occur). Where L. 
weidemeyeri meets L. arthemis astyanax near the east base of the Rockies in 
Colorado and in the Black Hills, astyanax is so rare and localized (maybe not a 
permanent resident) that there is little chance for interaction (even so, I 
seem to recall that hybrids have been found). 

 
Dave Ferguson




















































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Subject: SE AZ: NE Tucson Violet-clouded Skipper
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 22:53:53 +0000
New for my yard #58:  Lerodea arabus  (#38 for 2014)


Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: RE: SE AZ: California Gulch/Sycamore Canyon, 3 Oct. 2014
From: "'Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)' jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 02:47:27 +0000
Lighted the gulch last week with Dave Mardsen. Lots of green, but bugs were 
below-averge. Nice numbers, low diversity, nothing unusual. 

________________________________________
From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, October 03, 2014 7:45 PM
To: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [SoWestLep] SE AZ: California Gulch/Sycamore Canyon, 3 Oct. 2014

Bugs of note today (3 Oct. 2014) were Elf (Microtia elva) of course, with 21 
counted in California Gulch, and a single Barred Yellow (Eurema daira) mixed in 
with one of the many pierid puddle parties in Sycamore Canyon. 


Ken Kertell
Tucson




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Anza Borrego Desert State Park 9/30-10/1
From: "fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 00:55:04 -0400
Hi Koji,


I was in the desert September 30 - October 1. The very dry conditions left me 
apprehensive, but this is my first autumn in SoCal, so I figured anything 
decent would be exciting. I did not do too well with my two target species. The 
were no Dammer's blues and only two very tenuous California GS fly-bys in an 
area on Rt. 78 [0.8 miles E of the entrance to Plum Canyon] which was loaded 
with desert agave. I am calling them sightings because the size, color, and 
rapid flight were about right for the species; however, I won't REALLY count 
them until I get decent pictures, which won't be this year. 



But other than that, it was actually a pretty good butterfly trip. I booked 20 
species, the majority of them in the desert. And there were some pretty good 
species including desert black swallowtail, mallow scrub hairstreak [good in 
SoCal anyway], purplish copper, and mojave sootywing. 



My list follows along with links to some pictures. [I have photos of several of 
the other species, but enough is enough.] 



Cheers,
Frank 


Laguna Mountains [Laguna Campground, Kwaaymii Point]


dainty sulphur
orange sulphur
purplish copper   https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15430088742/
Acmon blue
Behr's metalmark
white checkered skipper
Juba skipper
woodland skipper


ABDSP [mostly along Rte. 78 esat of entrance to Plum Canyon]


desert black swallowtail   https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15243690369/
checkered white
sleepy orange
mallow scrub hairstreak   https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15243683819/
Ceraunus blue   
Wright's metalmark
tiny checkerspot   https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15430441815/
painted lady
funereal duskywing
white checkered skipper
Mojave sootywing   https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15430094142/
orange skipperling
California giant skipper [? - 2 fly-bys]
Subject: SE AZ: California Gulch/Sycamore Canyon, 3 Oct. 2014
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Oct 2014 19:45:52 -0700
Bugs of note today (3 Oct. 2014) were Elf (Microtia elva) of course, with 21 
counted in California Gulch, and a single Barred Yellow (Eurema daira) mixed in 
with one of the many pierid puddle parties in Sycamore Canyon. 

  
 Ken Kertell
 Tucson   
 

Subject: RE: No Monarchs at Quaking Aspen
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:57:59 -0700
Everyone:

   I should have added that Quaking Aspen is at about 7300' elevation about
30 miles north of the Sherman Pass Rd.  While in a National Monument, it is
administered by the National Forest Service and has National Forest rules.
One can collect.  But today, all I did was net some fritillaries to ID, then
released them back into the wild.  A few of the Speyeria egleis were in good
condition.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [SoWestLep] No Monarchs at Quaking Aspen

 

  Everyone:

   In the past several weeks I have been reporting Monarchs being common at
higher elevations along the Sierran Crest in the Sherman Pass area of Tulare
County, CA.

   Today (September 30, 2014) I made a transect from Corral Creek and
Calkin's Flat along the Kern River at about 3000' and so no Monarchs in
about an hour.  I did not survey Sherman Pass today, instead I went north to
Quaking Aspen into Sequoia National Monument (also in Tulare County, CA) to
see if good nectar sources were available, if there was permanent water and
to see if there were Monarchs and how many.  There was running water in the
stream, a few asters left but no fall yellow or orange flowering vegetation
and NO MONARCHS in about an hour and a half.

   I did find several Great Basin Fritillaries (Speyeria egleis egleis) and
a single Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia) and several
California Sisters and Orange Sulphurs.

   Afterwards I worked down the west side to Camp Nelson and Camp Wishon
where Adelpha californica was the dominate butterfly.  Lorquin's Admiral
singleton females were at Calkin's Flat and Quaking Aspen.

   So it would appear Quaking Aspen is not part of their migratory route, at
least not today.  I may try Sherman Pass next week to check Monarch and
Painted Lady activity.  A couple Painted Ladies were seen along the Kern
River and near Quaking Aspen.

   I also saw one very large rattlesnake along the road to Camp Wishon.  And
several Giant Sequoia's at the trail of one hundred giants off the road.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 




 


Subject: No Monarchs at Quaking Aspen
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:52:06 -0700
Everyone:

   In the past several weeks I have been reporting Monarchs being common at
higher elevations along the Sierran Crest in the Sherman Pass area of Tulare
County, CA.

   Today (September 30, 2014) I made a transect from Corral Creek and
Calkin's Flat along the Kern River at about 3000' and so no Monarchs in
about an hour.  I did not survey Sherman Pass today, instead I went north to
Quaking Aspen into Sequoia National Monument (also in Tulare County, CA) to
see if good nectar sources were available, if there was permanent water and
to see if there were Monarchs and how many.  There was running water in the
stream, a few asters left but no fall yellow or orange flowering vegetation
and NO MONARCHS in about an hour and a half.

   I did find several Great Basin Fritillaries (Speyeria egleis egleis) and
a single Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia) and several
California Sisters and Orange Sulphurs.

   Afterwards I worked down the west side to Camp Nelson and Camp Wishon
where Adelpha californica was the dominate butterfly.  Lorquin's Admiral
singleton females were at Calkin's Flat and Quaking Aspen.

   So it would appear Quaking Aspen is not part of their migratory route, at
least not today.  I may try Sherman Pass next week to check Monarch and
Painted Lady activity.  A couple Painted Ladies were seen along the Kern
River and near Quaking Aspen.

   I also saw one very large rattlesnake along the road to Camp Wishon.  And
several Giant Sequoia's at the trail of one hundred giants off the road.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: SE AZ: Santa Rita Mts Fall butterfly count results
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:46:56 +0000


The fourth annual Santa Rita Mts Fall butterfly count was held Sunday 9/28/14 
with 20 excellent people covering Box, Florida, Madera & Montosa canyons plus 
territory accessed via Gardner Canyon Road on the east side of the Santa Rita 
Mts. The day started with heavy cool overcast skies for the high country, and 
some high areas rarely saw sun. Lower elevations basked in sunlight & 
butterflies were out in good numbers. Some highlights: new for this count 
Eastern Tailed-blue, Common Streaky-skipper & White-striped Longtail. Dorantes 
Longtails were found in great numbers after seeing zero last year. One Dull 
Firetip was seen, only the second time they have been found on this count. 
Complete list follows, total 59 species seen. Thank you to all the 
participants, and those of you with butterfly envy, come & join us next year!! 
Mary Klinkel, compiler, Tucson AZ 




Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor  56

Two-tailed Swallowtail  Papilio multicaudata  6

Giant Swallowtail   Papilio cresphontes  14

Checkered White  Pontia protodice  5

Orange Sulphur  Colias eurytheme  1

Southern Dogface  Zerene cesonia  46

Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae  290

Mexican Yellow  Eurema Mexicana  291

Tailed Orange  Pyrisitia proterpia  83

Sleepy Orange  Abaeis nicippe  28

Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole  114

Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus  3

Leda Ministreak  Ministrymon leda  4

Marine blue   Leptotes marina  86

Western Pygmy-blue  Brephidium exilis  27

Eastern Tailed-blue  Cupido comyntas  2

‘Echo’ Spring Azure  Celastrina ladon ‘echo’  129

Ceraunus Blue  Hemiargus ceraunus  22

Reakirt’s Blue  Echinargus isola  30

Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis  14

AZ Metalmark  Calephelis arizonensis  4

Palmer’s Metalmark  Apodemia palmerii  1

American Snout  Libytheana carinenta  112

Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanilla  15

Variegated Fritillary  Euptoieta Claudia  19

Theona Checkerspot  Chlosyne theona  7

Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia  61

Elf  Microtia elva   1

Tiny Checkerspot   Dymasia dymas  40

Elada Checkerspot  Texola elada  79

Texan Crescent   Anthanassa texana  35

Tropical Buckeye  Junonia evarete  11

Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia  23

Painted Lady  Vanessa cardui  24

American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis  5

Red-spotted Purple  Limenitis arthemis  8

AZ Sister  Adelpha eulalia  66

Hackberry Emperor  Asterocampa celtis  37

Empress Leilia  Asterocampa  leilia   111

Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton  33

Nabokov’s Satyr  Cyllopsis pyracmon  11

Red Satyr  Megisto rubricate   3

Red-bordered Satyr  Gyrocheilus patrobas  46

Monarch  Danaus plexippus   22

Queen  Danaus gilippus  49

Dull Firetip  Apyrrothrix Araxes  1

White-striped Longtail  Chioides albofasciatus  2

Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes  58

Golden-headed Scallopwing  Staphylus ceos  2

AZ Powdered-skipper  Systasea zampa  8

Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis  1

Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis  24

White Checkered-skipper  Pyrgus albescens  13

Desert Checkered-skipper  Pyrgus philetas  14

Common Streaky-skipper  Celotes nessus  1

Orange Skipperling  Copaeodes aurantiaca  36

Fiery skipper  Hylephila phyleus  2

Sheep Skipper  Atrytonopsis edwardsii  5

Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala  2







Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Cloudless Sulphur
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 14:00:02 -0700
Everyone:

   Just a note to share that I saw a Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae
marcellina) in my yard in east Bakersfield at 1:05 PM today.  That is the
2nd time one has been in my yard and the only two I have seen in Bakersfield
other than in the big migration years of 1983-84 and 1992.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: SE AZ: W Tucson CA Patch
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 19:39:25 +0000
Fred Heath reports at least 2 California Patches flying at the Desert Museum 
today. 



Mary Klinkel, Tucson AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Re: SE AZ: NE Tucson CA PATCH
From: "Gail Morrs gail-marie AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 11:46:55 -0700
I also had them in small numbers in my yard in Chandler on Tues increasing a 
bit on Wed. Close to the same time I saw them last year for a short time. 


Gail Morris
Chandler, AZ

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 26, 2014, at 10:17 AM, "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> New yard butterfly #57 for my yard, #37 for 2014: California Patch just seen 
& photographed in NE Tucson. 

>  
> Mary Klinkel
> Tucson, AZ
>  
> Sent from Windows Mail
>  
> 
Subject: SE AZ: NE Tucson CA PATCH
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 17:17:05 +0000
New yard butterfly #57 for my yard, #37 for 2014: California Patch just seen & 
photographed in NE Tucson. 



Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: RE: Other wildlife and plant observations
From: "'Norbert Kondla' nkondla AT telus.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 08:46:10 -0600
Speaking of other wildlife, here is an item at the wet end of the landscape
moisture continuum  -

http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/excursions/post/explorer-first-reach-worlds-l
argest-beaver-dam/

 

 

Norbert Kondla

Rimbey, Alberta

 

From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of 'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]
Sent: September-24-14 8:05 AM
To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com; Stephen A Randall
Subject: [SoWestLep] Other wildlife and plant observations

 

  

Everyone:

   In my quest for butterflies yesterday (Sept. 23, 2014) I visited a spring
used by cattle in the Kelso Valley area (Kern County, CA). The cattle were
not there in this drought year and there was very little surface water and I
approached the spring using a high walled ravine that drains the surrounding
desert hills and is the headwaters area for Kelso Creek.  I was not the only
hunter there.  While approaching the spring I noticed a huge bird flying
into the ravine just ahead of me within a couple feet of the ground and
would see this bird do this again minutes later. I don't know if it caught a
meal or not as I was viewing the moving bird from behind. It was a Golden
Eagle with at least a 6 foot wingspread. In a previous trip there I had
found a Bobcat and butterfly wise, even a Milbert's Tortoiseshell near the
Stinging Nettles growing in there. Higher up in the sky were Turkey Vultures
and a sign at the Audubon Preserve at Weldon invited passer-bys to the
Turkey Vulture Festival next Saturday.

    The lack of cattle feeding in the area in the desert N of Kelso Valley
had a dramatic effect as did the barriers to keep motorcyclists out of the
ravine.  Vegetation was very high in and around the spring and plants were
abundant in the ravine were abundant and healthy despite the severe drought.
But plant life elsewhere was severely affected by the drought.

   I have also had notable predatory wildlife visiting the streets around my
house in east Bakersfield.  Two weeks ago, we had a bear 3 blocks down the
street and on the other cross street we had a bear last week.  Apparently,
there is no water for them in the mountains where they came from.

   As I pointed out, Monarchs in the Weldon area seem to have disappeared
because of lack of water and milkweed hosts due to drought.  The only place
where I encountered Monarchs yesterday were in the area around the seep
north of Kelso Valley.  As things bloom in Kelso Valley, I will monitor the
situation to see if Monarchs and Queens become more visible as they are in
normal years there or not.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 




 


Subject: Other wildlife and plant observations
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 07:04:30 -0700
Everyone:

   In my quest for butterflies yesterday (Sept. 23, 2014) I visited a spring
used by cattle in the Kelso Valley area (Kern County, CA). The cattle were
not there in this drought year and there was very little surface water and I
approached the spring using a high walled ravine that drains the surrounding
desert hills and is the headwaters area for Kelso Creek.  I was not the only
hunter there.  While approaching the spring I noticed a huge bird flying
into the ravine just ahead of me within a couple feet of the ground and
would see this bird do this again minutes later. I don't know if it caught a
meal or not as I was viewing the moving bird from behind. It was a Golden
Eagle with at least a 6 foot wingspread. In a previous trip there I had
found a Bobcat and butterfly wise, even a Milbert's Tortoiseshell near the
Stinging Nettles growing in there. Higher up in the sky were Turkey Vultures
and a sign at the Audubon Preserve at Weldon invited passer-bys to the
Turkey Vulture Festival next Saturday.

    The lack of cattle feeding in the area in the desert N of Kelso Valley
had a dramatic effect as did the barriers to keep motorcyclists out of the
ravine.  Vegetation was very high in and around the spring and plants were
abundant in the ravine were abundant and healthy despite the severe drought.
But plant life elsewhere was severely affected by the drought.

   I have also had notable predatory wildlife visiting the streets around my
house in east Bakersfield.  Two weeks ago, we had a bear 3 blocks down the
street and on the other cross street we had a bear last week.  Apparently,
there is no water for them in the mountains where they came from.

   As I pointed out, Monarchs in the Weldon area seem to have disappeared
because of lack of water and milkweed hosts due to drought.  The only place
where I encountered Monarchs yesterday were in the area around the seep
north of Kelso Valley.  As things bloom in Kelso Valley, I will monitor the
situation to see if Monarchs and Queens become more visible as they are in
normal years there or not.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Weldon/Sageland, Kern County
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 21:57:36 -0700
Everyone:

   I decided to check out the south fork of the Kern River at Weldon, Paul's
Place, Hanning Flat and then 17 miles south to Sageland in Mojave Desert
habitat and the east side of the Piutes, all in Kern County, California on
September 23, 2014.  The drought was evident: there was no water in the
south fork of the Kern River and only a trickle in only a very small part of
Kelso Creek.  I did not check out the Audubon Preserve but it was apparent
that Monarchs and Queens were unusually scarce in the region, undoubtedly
because of drought and the milkweeds were gone to seed so far as I could
tell.

 

Butterflies seen or collected.  Only 7 butterflies and moths were collected.
Most were just observed.:

 

1. Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis)-1 at Weldon

2. Checkered Skipper complex (Pyrgus communis/albescens)-6 at Hanning Flat

3. Large or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-8 1-2 mi. SE of
Sageland

4. Field Skipper or Sachem (Atalopedes campestris campestris)-3; just
beginning to emerge at Weldon.

5. Juba Skipper (Hesperia juba)-2 at Weldon

6. Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti sabuleti)-60 at Weldon

7. Checkered White (Pontia protodice): 6 at Weldon

8. Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-6 at Weldon

9. Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-10 at Weldon and 0.7 mi. SE of
Sageland.

10. Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides): 4 at Weldon, just beginning fall
brood.

11. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)-12 at Weldon and Hanning Flat

12. Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-3 at Weldon

13. Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa)-1 SE of Sageland

14. Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes tildeni):3 E side of Piutes

15. Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis): 12 total: Weldon and Sageland area

16. Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): singletons at Weldon and Hanning Flat

17. Buckeye (Junonia coenia): 12 at Weldon

18. Monarch (Danaus plexippus): one lower Kern River Canyon between
Bakersfield & Lake Isabella, one at Weldon and 4 at desert spring SW of
Sageland.

19. Queen (Danaus gilippus): one at Sageland at creek crossing with Piute
Mtn. Rd.

20. California Sister (Adelpha californica): 2 mi. W of Sageland on E side
of Piutes-1

 

   It is possible one of the blues seen on the E side of the Piutes was
Euphilotes pallescens elvirae but I failed to net it.  It is also possible I
saw a Plebejus emigdionis at Weldon.  I did not go another couple miles
higher up the Piute Mtn Rd. where Apodemia mormo cythera and several
additional species would be likely.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Scientists create new species
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 18:59:28 -0700
Genome fusion at stem graft junctions can generate new plant species.


http://www.the-scientist.com//?articles.view/articleNo/40859/title/Sexless-Hook-Up/ 


---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: Reminder: Santa Rita Mts Fall butterfly count
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 14:58:59 +0000
Meet Sunday 9/28/14 at 7:30am in Green Valley, AZ, specifically at 
McDonald’s/Safeway parking lot on Continental Road approximately 1/10 mile 
west of I-19, unless you have made previous arrangements with compiler Mary 
Klinkel. 



Recent rains have encouraged lush vegetation & clouds of butterflies.


Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ

520 615 0969





Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: RE: late season vagrancy potential
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:52:40 -0700
Nick:

   Cloudless Sulphurs made it to SLO County in August per William Bouton!
No Snouts seen in Kern County by me this year yet.  Strays and migrants show
up best after desert rains and heavy winds from the south.  I did have a
Desert Black Swallowtail on Sherman Pass in the Sierra Nevada 2 weeks ago
though not in the best of condition.  Though not in numbers, Becker's Whites
have done well in reaching many localities in my region in 2014, despite the
drought.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [SoWestLep] late season vagrancy potential

 

  

All:

 

I am wondering if all the rain in AZ and the SE California deserts is likely
to result in later season emergences of migratory species in atypical areas.
I am thinking of things like Sleepy Oranges and Snout for example reaching
the coast. Or is rain in August/Sep too late to get things going?

 

Nick Lethaby

office: +1 805 562 5106

mobile: +1 805 284 6200

e-mail: nlethaby AT ti.com

 


Subject: Kernville to top of Sherman Pass
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:27:50 -0700
Everyone:

   For the 4th straight week, I made it up to the top of Sherman Pass in
Tulare County at 9200'.  Kernville in Kern County only turned up one species
(Pygmy Blue) in the vacant lot across from the Forest Service Building.
Everything else along the upper Kern River to the top of Sherman Pass except
for a Monarch in Riverkern (Kern County) was in Tulare County.  It was very
cloudy in the Sherman Pass area above 6800' interfering with Monarch and
Painted Lady counts and assessments.  Today's list included 29 or 30
species:

 

Checkered Skipper complex:  Pyrgus communis or albescens singletons at
Corral Creek (about 3600') and just W of Sherman Pass (9100').  I could have
had one or both species.  I'll never know because I failed to net either.

Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis): Alder Creek at 6800', W of Sherman
Pass-1

Juba Skipper (Hesperia juba)-25 as late season brood takes off 3600-8100'

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado-late summer/fall entity): 16,
3600'-9100'

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)-! at 7600' W of Sherman Pass.

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides) 3600'-8100'-50

Checkered White (P. protodice):1

Cabbage White (P. rapae)-2

Orange Sulphur (C. eurytheme): 30, mostly above 7000 to 9100'

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus): 1 male on Cherry Hill Rd. near
Alder Creek Crossing.

Gray Hairstreak (S. melinus): singletons near Chico Flat and Corral Creek
along Kern River.

Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium probably saepium): one at Alder Creek
6800', LATE for Tulare County but not for the state.

Pygmy Blue (B. exilis)-1

Acmon Blue (P. acmon): 16

Melissa Blue (P. melissa)-2 at Calkin's Flat

Dotted Blue (E. enoptes tildeni):1 on yellow E. nudum; none found on white
flowered buckwheats.

Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis):  I thought these might be
done after a single sighting last week BUT they were out in numbers again
(over 10 and most were fresh!) from 7600' to 9100'. Still emerging after
summer rains?

Cythera Metalmark  (Apodemia mormo, cythera group), over 20- returning to
several localities extirpated by the 2002 McNally Fire, but also taken at
Alder Creek again this month, not taken there before this year.  Also
returning to Corral Creek (1); Calkin's Flat (over 10); Limestone Camp (5);
Cyn at 4900' E of Kern River (about 6)

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia):  About 8 west of Sherman
Pass at 9100-9150',  I did not check the subalpine meadow E of the Pass.
Some of the females were fresh.

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes m. mylitta).  Went from one last week to about
30 this week from 3600' along the Kern River to above 9100' W of Sherman
Pass.

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella)-20 from Alder Creek to W of Sherman
Pass at 9100'

Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)- about 16.  14 were very
fresh, 1 kinda faded and 1 very ragged and worn out...an individual left
that overwintered?

American Lady (V. virginiensis)-1

Painted Lady (V. cardui): 16, back after a weeks absence but less than 40
two weeks ago, possibly because of clouds and coolness.  Totally absent last
week.  Unlike two weeks ago, many individuals this time were quite worn.

West Coast Lady (V. annabella): 2 at 7600-7700' and another at 9100' on fall
blooms-all freshly emerged.  Soon these will be common at such high levels.
From what source?...these are normally scarce in this area-except in Oct.
and early November.

California Sister (Adelpha californica): 18, unusually common for this
locality.

California Ringlet (C. "tullia" california): 9

Monarch (D. plexippus):33, probably not close to accurate because the best
area for these was very cool and cloudy with little butterfly activity.
Only 1 out of 33 was worn with half seen from lower levels than two weeks
ago.

Queen (D. gilippus):   Collected a perfect male at Corral Creek along the
Kern River, the 4th observed in my 4 trips to Sherman Pass, all along the
Kern River, a corridor for desert species.  The individual taken south of
Calkin's Flat Sept. 2nd was also in perfect condition.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Re: late season vagrancy potential
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 00:25:06 -0400
Nick,
 
If the rain produces fresh hackberry leaves I'd say maybe the snouts will  
continue to breed for a few more weeks. Not sure.
 
For Sleepy Orange, I don't think they rely as much on fresh growth and  
Senna around here has it anyway so maybe they'll breed for another month or  
more. Just guessing.
 
Jim B
 
 
In a message dated 9/16/2014 1:59:36 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,  
SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com writes:

 
 
 
 
All: 
I am wondering if all the rain in AZ and the SE California  deserts is 
likely to result in later season emergences of migratory species in  atypical 
areas. I am thinking of things like Sleepy Oranges and Snout for  example 
reaching the coast. Or is rain in August/Sep too late to get things  going? 
Nick Lethaby 
office: +1 805 562 5106 
mobile: +1 805 284 6200 
e-mail: nlethaby AT ti.com 



Subject: late season vagrancy potential
From: "'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:59:30 +0000
All:

I am wondering if all the rain in AZ and the SE California deserts is likely to 
result in later season emergences of migratory species in atypical areas. I am 
thinking of things like Sleepy Oranges and Snout for example reaching the 
coast. Or is rain in August/Sep too late to get things going? 


Nick Lethaby
office: +1 805 562 5106
mobile: +1 805 284 6200
e-mail: nlethaby AT ti.com
Subject: Grand Canyon's first Annual Butterfly Count
From: "Robb Hannawacker hannawacker AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 16:47:23 -0700
On 6 September 2014 we completed our first butterfly count at Grand
Canyon National Park, with a count cirlce centered at our South
Entrance Station. We had 18 participants.  This Grand Canyon Village
Count, varied in terrain and ecosytems from Ponderosa Forest, pinyon
juniper woodland, and desert scrub; from 7400' to 2300' above
sea-level.


The weather was cool, and unproductive in the morning.  Most butterfly
watchers were inexperienced in identification. But we had participants
Joseph Zarki, Marilyn Lutz and I, from Joshua Tree National Park to
help mentor participants in observation skills.


Two-tailed Swallowtails, Papilio multicaudata (8) South Rim
Checkered White, Pontia protodice protodice (1) South Rim
Orange Sulphurs, Colias eurytheme (30) all South Rim
Cloudless Sulphurs, Phoebis sennae (12) Phantom Ranch
Sleepy Orange, Eurema nicippe (1) (Seen above 7000'. Normally stays
low in canyon.) South Rim
Mormon metalmarks, Apodemia mormo (3) 3 Mile House
Variegated Fritillary,Euptoieta claudia (1) 3 Mile House
Sagebrush Checkerspot, Chlosyne acastus neumoegeni (1)
Field Crescents, Phyciodes campestris (2) South Rim
American Lady, Vanessa virginiensis (1) (Not seen frequently, but
known to be in region) South Rim
Painted Ladies, Vanessa cardui (18) South Rim
Canyonland Satyrs, Cyllopsis pertepida dorothea (4) 3 Mile House
Mead's Wood-Nymph, Cercyonis meadii damei (1) (Endemic) 3 Mile House
Monarchs, Danaus plexippus (29) 28 South Rim & 1 Indian Garden
Queen Danaus gilippus strigosus (1) Phantom Ranch
Silver-spotted Skippers, Epargyreus clarus (3) 3 Mile House
Common/White Checkered-Skippers,  Pyrgus communis or P. albescens (15)
(no butterfly specimens collected in 2014 count) South Rim
Taxiles Skipper, Poanes taxiles (1) South Rim
Unknown skippers (7) South Rim
Unknown Blue Species (1) South Rim
Unknown Crescent (1) South Rim


Total 21 species, 141 individuals.  Next year's Grand Canyon Village
Count may happen on 4 July, 2015 for better species richness.
Additionally, the summer of 2015 is expected to be our first North Rim
count, which should be very productive!


Stay posted at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/GrandCanyonButterflyCount/


Robb Hannawacker
hannawacker AT gmail.com


------------------------------------
Posted by: Robb Hannawacker 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Checkered Skipper ID's
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:22:07 -0700
Everyone:

   As most of you know, I send a lot of the butterflies I collect to the
Colorado State Museum each year. Three boxes were shipped to them a few
weeks back and some results came back on members of the Checkered Skipper
complex I sent them.  Some of these were surprising:

 

Mono County: Pyrgus albescens, Poison Creek Ravine, Campito Meadows, White
Mts. at around 10,000', July 23, 2014, MONO COUNTY RECORD for albescens.

 

Inyo County: Pyrgus communis: White Mts. from Silver Creek Canyon east of
Laws in June and July.  Communis from lower elevation than albescens.

 

Tulare County: Whiskey Flat Trail along Kern River near Fairview Camp June
29th: Pyrgus albescens.

 

   Both albescens and communis are known from west of Westgard Pass in the
Narrows area.

 

   I will also point out I have collected no Monarchs this year, museums do
not request them and documenting records seems to require a lower level of
documentation than other species.  I will be sending a few Western Tiger
Swallowtails to Colorado State Museum to document their occurrence in the
White Mts. and I am keeping one of those for my own collection.  I have 4
boxes of material to send the Colorado State Museum and some of those will
be Euphilotes for ID verification of male genitalia.  Many Euphilotes
centralis hadrochilus from the White Mts. were already sent.  Many of these
cannot be reliably identified except by examination of male genitalia, which
I personally cannot do.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Box Canyon, Santa Rita Mtns, Pima Co, AZ
From: "azttttommy AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 10 Sep 2014 16:57:26 -0700
Got a late start on a beautiful day. I was in the Canyon from about noon to 
2:00P.M. Temperature stayed under 90. Lots and lots of butterflies. Nothing 
special, but lots. 

 
 Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata)
 Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor))
 Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
  Checkered White (Pontia protodice)
  Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)
  Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia)
 Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)
 Tailed Orange (Pyrisitia proterpia)
 Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)
  Mexican Yellow (Eurema mexicana)
  Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)
 Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
  Leda Ministreak (Ministrymon leda)
  Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)
 Western Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exile)
 Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus)
 Reakirt’s Blue (Echinargus isola)
  Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis)
  Palmer’s Metalmark (Apodemia palmeri)
  Tiny Checkerspot (Dymasia dymas)
  Texan Crescent (Anthanassa texana)
 Elf (Micotia elva)
  Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia)
 Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)
  Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)
  Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)
  Arizona Sister (Adelphia eulalia)
  Hackberry Emeror (Asterocampa celtis)
 Empress Leilia (Asterocampa leilia)
 American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)
  Queen (Danaus gilippus)
 Red Satyr (Megistro rubricata)
 Acacia Skipper (cogia hippalus)
  Dorantes Longtail (Urbanus dorantes)
  Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)
  White/Common Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus communis/albescens)
 Golden-headed Scallopwing (Staphylus ceos)
  Sheep Skipper (Atrytonpsis edwardsii)
 

 Also came across four butterfly folks, Fred, Mary, Pat and Dick (you know who 
they are). 

 

 I did have on wind blown raggedy-assed stray.  Picture is here:
 Black Witch Moth by azttttommy http://www.pbase.com/image/157333455

 
 
 http://www.pbase.com/image/157333455
 
 Black Witch Moth by azttttommy http://www.pbase.com/image/157333455 Box Canyon 
Santa Rita Mtns Pima Co, AZ 



 
 View on www.pbase.com http://www.pbase.com/image/157333455
 Preview by Yahoo
 

 

 Tom
 
 



 
 Reply
 Delete

 


 

Subject: Sherman Pass and 2 other places
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 06:23:35 -0700
Everyone:

   Since Sherman Pass (Tulare County, CA) has been interesting following
summer rains this year and Bald Mtn. had 0.75 inches of rain Monday, I went
back again Tuesday, September 9th---but spent less time there to also visit
Hanning Flat in the Weldon-Lake Isabella area and Bald Mtn., also losing
time talking to the fire tower operator.  Of interest was his experience
being struck at his boot by a rattlesnake 2 weeks ago as he was about to
step off the fire observation tower, even at 9430' one has to be careful.
At Hanning Flat on alkali mallow, I only found Gray Hairstreaks and a
Checkered Skipper (not sure if communis or albescens), no Mallow Scrub
Hairstreaks (Strymon istapa).

 

Annotated list from Sherman Pass area with some comments:  Only spent 3
hours on Sherman Pass Rd.; lost 2 1/2 hours on Bald Mtn. run and an hour to
visit Hanning Flat.  So different numbers from previous week may not
indicate much of significance in many cases.

1. Checkered Skipper complex-Pyrgus communis or albescens)-1

2. Juba Skipper (Hesperia juba)-just beginning fall flight, 1 male; 1
female.

3. Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado)-4

4. Large or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-35

5. Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)-30

6. Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-1

7. Becker's White (Pontia beckerii)-one nice female at Alder Creek 6800';
had a male nearby last August 26th.  Those are the only two records for the
Sherman Pass Rd. I have for the Sherman Pass Rd. EVER from the Kern River to
the 9200' summit.  I also had 2 beckerii records from along the Kern River
in Tulare County this past spring and lots of records from Inyo and Mono
Cos.

8. Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-2 at Limestone Camp

9. Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-8

10. Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)-3 at Hanning Flat

11. Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes complex)-1

12. Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-14 

13. Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-3 at Hanning Flat

14. Cythera Metalmark (Apodemia mormo cythera)-14 in side canyon 4900', one
at Limestone Camp along Kern River.  This has been one of the slowest
butterflies to recover from the 2002 forest fire and is still absent from
many places where formerly common.

15. Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola)-one at flowers 8100'

16. Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)-one freshly emerged male
along road a mile or so east of the Pass.

17. Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia)-20, some quite fresh.

18. Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta): 6, another brood beginning
to emerge.

19. Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella AKA campestris);-6 at Alder Creek, 2
seen higher up

20. Zephyr Hoary Comma (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus)-1, I probably missed
the main flight while at Bald Mtn.

21. American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)-3 at Alder Creek area on
roadside flowers.

22. Buckeye (Junonia coenia)-1

23. Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini)-1 freshly emerged.

24. California Sister (Adelpha californica)-1 fresh male on roadside flowers
nectaring.  In the fall season they do this!

25. Monarch (Danaus plexippus):  3 or 4 along the Kern River, 1 at Bald Mtn.
and another 20 or so along the Sherman Pass Rd.

26. California Ringlet (Coenonympha (tullia) california)-3; appears to be
beginning another brood emergence.

 

Most significant missing butterfly: Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): 40 seen
in one hour above 7700' last week, none this week.  Where did they go?  This
is an example of how surveys can give misleading data as to the health of a
population.  This species and the other Vanessa's tend to become very common
along the Sherman Pass Rd. in October-even annabella rarely seen here before
then.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Re: San Diego Co.
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 09:33:50 -0700
Thank you Ken. 

Yes, I know tristis feeds on Oak, but I couldn't find new shoots now. Matured 
leaves are so hard that I don't think the young larvae can eat. I wonder where 
female would lay eggs now. 


As for Leda, there were lots of them in Laguna Mountain last year. Maybe they 
are in dispersal mode after few drought years? Anyway, they are reaching 
coastal area now and mesquites are here to support the population :) 


Koji

> Koji:
> Mournful Duskywing larvae feed on Oaks. Leda Hairstreaks often stray out of 
the deserts and turn up in higher mountains in Arizona. Sagebrush Checkerspots 
(Chlosyne acastus neumoegeni) are flying in the Mazourka Canyon area in the 
Owens Valley area (Inyo County, CA) right now, reported with photos by Dennis 
Holmes. 

>  
> Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
> kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
> 
> Subject: [SoWestLep] San Diego Co.
>  
>  
> Hi All,
> 
> Headed to Anza-Borrego today, but it was raining (yes, rain). At the Banner 
Grade, there was a small spot where sun was shining on golden bush. There, I 
found: 

> 
> Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis): What do their larvae eat around 
this time of the year? 

> Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides): many fresh
> 
> From Scissors Crossing, I turned towards San Felipe, but it was 
raining/cloudy all the way to Pauma Valley. 

> On Lantana flowers at Pauma Valley:
> 
> Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis)
> Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala eufala)
> Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)
> Umber Skipper (Poaned melane melane)
> Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)
> Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
> Cabbage White (Pieris rapae rapae)
> California Sister (Adelpha californica)
> Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata)
> 
> After 1 hour, started to rain again.
> 
> At my home (Rancho Penasquitos), I was surprised to find a female Leda 
Ministreak (Ministrymon leda) in my garden, basking on lawn. 

> Always thought they are the desert species. First time I saw this species in 
city of San Diego! 

> 
> Anyway, glad to see serious rain in the desert!
> 
> Koji
> San Diego
> 
> 
Subject: RE: San Diego Co.
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 06:03:03 -0700
Koji:

   Mournful Duskywing larvae feed on Oaks.  Leda Hairstreaks often stray out
of the deserts and turn up in higher mountains in Arizona.  Sagebrush
Checkerspots (Chlosyne acastus neumoegeni) are flying in the Mazourka Canyon
area in the Owens Valley area (Inyo County, CA) right now, reported with
photos by Dennis Holmes.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [SoWestLep] San Diego Co.

 

  

Hi All,

Headed to Anza-Borrego today, but it was raining (yes, rain). At the Banner
Grade, there was a small spot where sun was shining on golden bush. There, I
found:

Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis): What do their larvae eat
around this time of the year?
Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides): many fresh

From Scissors Crossing, I turned towards San Felipe, but it was
raining/cloudy all the way to Pauma Valley.
On Lantana flowers at Pauma Valley:

Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala eufala)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)
Umber Skipper (Poaned melane melane)
Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae rapae)
California Sister (Adelpha californica)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata)

After 1 hour, started to rain again.

At my home (Rancho Penasquitos), I was surprised to find a female Leda
Ministreak (Ministrymon leda) in my garden, basking on lawn.
Always thought they are the desert species. First time I saw this species in
city of San Diego!

Anyway, glad to see serious rain in the desert!

Koji
San Diego


Subject: San Diego Co.
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 23:31:49 -0700
Hi All,

Headed to Anza-Borrego today, but it was raining (yes, rain). At the Banner 
Grade, there was a small spot where sun was shining on golden bush. There, I 
found: 


Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis): What do their larvae eat around 
this time of the year? 

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides): many fresh

From Scissors Crossing, I turned towards San Felipe, but it was raining/cloudy 
all the way to Pauma Valley. 

On Lantana flowers at Pauma Valley:

Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis)
Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala eufala)
Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)
Umber Skipper (Poaned melane melane)
Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae rapae)
California Sister (Adelpha californica)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata)

After 1 hour, started to rain again.

At my home (Rancho Penasquitos), I was surprised to find a female Leda 
Ministreak (Ministrymon leda) in my garden, basking on lawn. 

Always thought they are the desert species. First time I saw this species in 
city of San Diego! 


Anyway, glad to see serious rain in the desert!

Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Identification issues from Sherman Pass
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 03:10:40 -0700
Everyone:

   Getting away from Monarch issues, I have looked closely at three
butterflies collected that involved problem identifications collected west
of Sherman Pass last September 2nd.

 

The possible Pale Blue (Euphilotes pallescens) is clearly not subspecies
elvirae.  It is a very heavily spotted female but is more likely the
possible undescribed member of the Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes group).
As a female, checking male genitalia won't work.

 

The possible Veined Blue (Plebejus neurona) may be a possible hybrid with an
Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) as it has strong field marks of both.  The
dominant marks and coloration above are neurona like with the orange along
the veins reduced but not absent but very strong orange on the HW aurora and
FW.  The underside looks acmon like but with strong gold outside the aurora
as one would expect from neurona.  Neurona does occur at places along the
Sherman Pass Rd. as near Bald Mtn. but there are records from one west side
canyon, just south of Limestone Camp (one last May 13th) and the Dam a mile
or so south of that.

 

The "Anise Swallowtail" appears to be a female Desert Black Swallowtail
(Papilio polyxenes coloro) which would explain an uncharacteristic late
summer flight.  The median band spots tend to be narrower and more oval
shaped than zelicaon, the spots along the FW band are more rounded than
zelicaon.  The body of the butterfly is predominately yellow with narrow
black stripe like other coloro females I have taken in the southern Sierra
Nevada.  Strange that I would catch the same butterfly twice at the very
same location on the same plant a week apart.  I should have kept it the
first time, even though it is not in great consition.  The only other coloro
record I have from west of Sherman Pass was a sight record of an obvious
male from Alder Creek on a past butterfly count but I have 2 captures from
Bald Mountain E of Sherman Pass and 2 captures from Baker Ridge in the
Greenhorn Mts.  They also occur in the Piute Mts. and periodically in the
Lake Isabella area and rarely stray into Bakersfield.  The 2 September date
should be a late date for Tulare County.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Dark Canyon Colorado
From: "pinkmouse84043 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Sep 2014 19:54:19 -0700
I hiked the dark canyon trail (Gunnison Co. CO) for a few miles east of 
Erickson Springs Trail on September 3, 2014. The elevation is 6,700' to 7,100 
and is a very diverse woodland along Anthracite Creek including pine, firs, 
oak, aspen and wild cherry. 

 

 I found (and vouchered) a worn Boloria bellona which seemed very late and in 
an unusual habitat/low elevation. I don't know if it is resident there or made 
it's way down from the higher parts of the Raggeds Wilderness. 

 

 Also spotted (everything worn except the Nymphalinae, Pieridae and 
Hesperiidae) 

 

 Nymphalis californica
 Polygonia faunus
 Polygonia satyrus
 Cercyonis pegala
 Cercyonis oeta
 Speyeria zerene
 Speyeria hesperis
 Speyeria aphrodite
 Limenitis weidemeyerii
 Pieris marginalis
 Colias philodice
 Colias eurytheme
 Lycaena arota
 Hypaurotis crysalus
 Ochlodes sylvanoides 
 Hesperia sp.
 

 Mike Hofmann
Subject: Re: SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014
From: "azttttommy AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Sep 2014 15:55:45 -0700
Nicely done Ken!
Subject: Upper Kern River & Sherman Pass
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 22:11:41 -0700
Everyone:

   Today (September 2, 2014), I observed and did some collecting along the
Kern River north of Kernville to Sherman Pass and up to the top of Sherman
Pass at 9200'.  All areas sampled were in Tulare County California and
butterflies observed totaled 31 species with some dramatic changes in the
one week since last August 26th, 2014.  There was one butterfly I regretted
I did not keep last week and oddly I would collect it (the very same
individual) again, slightly more worn a week later on the very bush and same
spot I took it last week.  I would also see an example of a butterfly
species finally recovering after a major forest fire 12 years later.  And I
would gain some insight into the coming fall migrations of the Monarch and
Painted Lady.  Monarchs do not look like an "endangered species" in this
area but appear to have permanent water sources and abundant nectar to get
healthy before starting their migrations.  Some may move to the Kern River
Valley where there is also water and nectar and abundant host plants in good
condition.

 

Butterflies observed or collected:

 

Large White or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-80+  much more
abundant than last week.

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado ssp.)-6

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)-40, also much more
common

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)-0.7 mi. W Sherman Pass, 9100', same
female as caught and released last week.  Shows some of same wing and body
characters as S. polyxenes coloro.

Checkered White (Pontia protodice): absent below 7700' and scarcer.  Saw
6-8, 7700-8200'.

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-2 at Limestone Camp, Kern River.

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-50 but all at levels above 7000' except 2
at Limestone Camp

Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides)-1 at Alder Creek Crossing 6800' Sherman
Pass Rd.

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus)-1 at lower Alder Creek Crossing
5680' along Cherry Hill Rd.

Golden Hairstreak (Habrodais grunus grunus)-1 on tall oak but dropping to
just out of net range.

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)-1 along upper Alder Creek

Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-1 at lower Alder Creek Crossing 5690'

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)-1 at Limestone Camp

Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes complex)-Saw 4, collected 3.

Pale Blue (Euphilotes pallescens?)-1  Needs to be closely examined when off
the spreading board.  This would be a TULARE COUNTY record if pallescens.

Veined Blue (Plebejus neurona?):  This female has bright orange up the
forewing and a broad orange  HW aurora..  An acmon that looks more orange on
the FW I've ever seen, an out of flight period lupini female which such
characters.  There is some blue overscaling.

Melissa Blue (Plebejus melissa)-2 at Calkin's Flat

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-50, much more common than last week, all above
5680'

Cythera Metalmark (Apodemia mormo cythera): Finally starting to reappear in
numbers following their extirpation within the McNally Fire burn area in
2002.  Common in side canyon at 4900' off Sherman Pass at locality where
Sonoran Blues flew in numbers last January, 2 at lower Alder Creek Crossing
and even one near upper Alder Creek Crossing at 6800'.

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola)-8 including 2 at lower Alder
Creek Crossing at about 5700' and the other 6 between 7800-8200' west of
Sherman Pass at the snowmobile pullout area.  This is an area of heavy winds
coming up from lower canyons in one of the worst fire damaged areas within
the McNally Fire burn area.  Several species favored this area.

Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)-2 at the 8100-8200' level W
of Sherman Pass.

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia)-12. Subalpine meadow not
checked.  These were visiting roadside flowers in the forest outside the
meadows, rarely seen earlier in season.

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta): one at 4900., another at 8000'

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella)-8 along Alder Creek 6800'

Zephyr Anglewing (Polygonia gracilis zephyrus): 11 from 7700-9100', all
freshly emerged.  None seen last week.

American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)-1 at 8060'

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui).  None seen on Sherman Pass Rd. between 10
AM-2 PM while below 7700'. 40+ seen in about an hour after that from
7700-9200' on flowers.  Most were very fresh.  This species appears to enjoy
food and drink at the higher levels of the Sierra before its migration
begins on a yearly basis.

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-3 at mid-elevation seeps.

Monarch (Danaus plexippus): 36 seen, 5 along the upper Kern, a few at levels
up Sherman Pass Rd. as low as 5000' but most common from 7700-9150'.  These
were most common in the same area as Speyeria zerene, often visiting flowers
or patrolling, apparently uplifted by the lower canyon winds.  Like Painted
Lady's, Monarchs gather in the Sherman Pass area from mid-summer to late
October. Some breed here in the spring.  Milkweeds along Cherry Hill Rd.
were in pretty poor condition.  Some (Aslepias fascicularis) along seeps
along the Kern River were in better shape and appeared to be used by both
Monarchs and the next species.

Queen (Danaus gilippus thersippus): Collected one immaculate very large male
about 3 miles south of Calkin's Flat along the Kern River.  Another fresh
Queen flew in front of me while driving just south of Limestone Camp where
swamp milkweed was common and in decent condition because of seeps.  Rare in
Tulare County, but Mojave Desert species use the Kern River as a
distribution corridor.

California Ringlet (Coenonympha (tullia) california california-2 at 6800',
none seen last week.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: RE: SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 19:42:28 -0700
Dear Ken,

Phenomenal photos documenting this relative newcomer to our regular breeding 
butterfly fauna!! 


----Best regards, Fred

 

From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2014 4:15 PM
To: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [SoWestLep] SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014

 

  

Today (2 September) I spent the morning in Florida Canyon on the north side of 
the Santa Rita Mountains. Several Elf (Microtia elva), seven to be exact, were 
out and about including one fine female that oviposited on a small Tetramerium 
nervosum. The eggs, 35 in all, were placed on the underside of a leaf near the 
top of the plant. Attached are links to images of the egg-laying sequence for 
your viewing pleasure. 


 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15122417085/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935763220/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15119420811/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935847177/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15119416661/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935757170/

 

Ken Kertell

Tucson

 


Subject: SE AZ: Elf egg-laying sequence, 2 September 2014
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 02 Sep 2014 16:14:44 -0700
Today (2 September) I spent the morning in Florida Canyon on the north side of 
the Santa Rita Mountains. Several Elf (Microtia elva), seven to be exact, were 
out and about including one fine female that oviposited on a small Tetramerium 
nervosum. The eggs, 35 in all, were placed on the underside of a leaf near the 
top of the plant. Attached are links to images of the egg-laying sequence for 
your viewing pleasure. 

  
 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15122417085/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15122417085/ 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935763220/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935763220/ 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15119420811/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15119420811/ 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935847177/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935847177/ 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15119416661/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/15119416661/ 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935757170/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14935757170/ 

  
 Ken Kertell
 Tucson
 

Subject: SE AZ: Brown-banded skipper!
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 20:40:06 +0000
This morning after accidentally leaving a hose running on purple lantana, I 
returned around 10:30am to find 4 new species for the year for my yard: common 
sootywing, fatal metalmark, bordered patch, and a new yard bug, brown-banded 
skipper!! As I tried to photograph it, it flew off out of sight, so I have no 
evidence. 



Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] Elf left
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 15:41:54 -0400 (EDT)
Folks,
 

After two hours on my Coral vine Elva has left the building! Couldn't  
resist- Hah!!
 
Jim B
  
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Subject: Elf now
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 14:26:56 -0400 (EDT)
Folks,
 
Yet another amazing bug has turned up in my backyard in the Catalina  
foothills near Sabino Canyon. I've been watching an Elf (Microtia elva) for the 

past half hour. The good thing is it's a female and I'm hoping she'll find 
time  to leave a few crawling cards on the two available hosts I have for her.
 
I would have to check but to my knowledge this is only the second  
individual found this far north. Last year Bill and Mary found one in the lower 

Santa Catalina's. I'm guessing that this one originated there or in the Rincons 

 because she is pristine.
 
She was first found nectaring on Duranta but she flew over the fence to my  
Coral Vine next to my mailbox where she's been sitting on the same flower 
for 25  minutes! Way cool!!
 
Jim B
Subject: SE AZ: Santa Rita Mts Fall Butterfly Count
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:59:33 +0000
The fourth annual Fall Santa Rita Mts Butterfly Count will be held Sunday, 
September 28, 2014. This SE AZ mountain range near the US/MX border tallies one 
of the highest numbers of species seen in the US, with possibilities for 
tropical influx species. Meet at 7:30 am at the parking lot of 
McDonald’s/Safeway in Green Valley AZ just west of I-19 on Continental Road, 
unless you have made previous arrangements with compiler Mary Klinkel 
Munchita AT msn.com 520 615 0969. All counters are welcome to join this count, 
even if you only have one hour or only know one butterfly species. Compilation 
dinner time & location TBD. Please bring $3/person for compilation fees 
collected by compiler and paid to NABA. 



Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: SE AZ: Montosa Canyon, Santa Rita Mts., 28 August 2014
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 28 Aug 2014 14:36:38 -0700
Gentle bug people,
 

 Took a stroll around lower Montosa Canyon this morning. Seepwillow (Baccharis 
salicifolia) was blooming and a good attractant. 33 species, as follows: 

  
 Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata) 2
 Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) 6
 Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes) 1
 Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) 2
 Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae) 15
 Mexican Yellow (Eurema mexicana) 25
 Tailed Orange (Pyrisitia proterpia) 4
 Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe) 5
 Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole) 1
 Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus) 1
 ‘Siva’ Juniper Hairstreak (Callophrys gryneus siva) 3
 Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) abundant
 Fatal Metalmark (Calephelis nemesis) 4
 Ares Metalmark (Emesis ares) 1
 Palmer’s Metalmark (Apodemia palmeri) 2
 Tiny Checkerspot (Dymasia dymas) abundant
 Elada Checkerspot (Texola elada) 3
 Elf (Microtia elva) 1 
 Bordered Patch (Chlosyne lacinia) 100
 American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis) 2
 Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis) 1
 Arizona Sister (Adelpha eulalia) 1
 Hackberry Emperor (Asterocampa celtis) 2
 Empress Leilia (Asterocampa leilia) 5
 American Snout (Libytheana carinenta) 21
 Queen (Danaus gilippus) 2
 Red Satyr (Megisto rubricate) 5
 Nabokov’s Satyr (Cyllopsis pyracmon) 1
 Dull Firetip (Ayrrothrix Araxes) 4
 Sheep Skipper (Atrytonopsis edwardsii) 2
 Hammock Skipper (Polygonus leo) 1 
 Golden-headed Scallopwing (Staphylus ceos) 5
 Orange Skipperling (Copaeodes aurantiaca) 1
  
 Ken Kertell
 Tucson   
 

Subject: Kern River Valley and beyond
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:08:44 -0700
Everyone:

   I collected or observed butterflies briefly in the Kern River Valley
today (August 26, 2014 in Kern County, California at Lake Isabella (Tank
Park), Weldon and Hanning Flat) and had the following butterflies:  Time
spent: 1 1/2 hours.  Objective: check alkali mallow for Mallow Scrub
Hairstreaks, none found.

 

Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)-Hanning Flat

White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)-Hanning Flat (both species occur
at this site)-total of about 6 of the two.

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus): Lake Isabella-1

Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti sabuleti)-Weldon-2

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-Lake Isabella (1), Hanning Flat (1)

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-Lake Isabella (1), Hanning Flat (2)

Pigmy Blue (Brephidium exilis): Weldon (2); Hanning Flat (3)

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)-Weldon (1); Hanning Flat (9)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus): Weldon (1)

 

Upper Kern River to Sherman Pass Rd. to Sherman Pass summit and subalpine
meadow on east side. Tulare County, California.  Also August 26, 2014. Time
spent: 5 hours.

 

Large or Northern White Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)-seen from 3000' to
6800'-12

Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado ssp.)- seen from 6700-7600'-14

Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides syvanoides)-seen from 4000' to
7600'-8

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora sonora): Sherman Pass area above 8000'-2

 

Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon): Just west of Sherman Pass 9100+'-1
female, very unusual at this locality in late August even in a wet year.
Specimen was netted, P. polyxenes coloro ruled out, then released.  Adults
are common in the San Joaquin Valley right now.

 

Checkered White (Pontia protodice): 6000' to 9000'-16

Becker's White (Pontia beckerii): One collected at 6650' near Alder Creek,
another seen near 8000' west of Sherman Pass.  Maybe the first taken in this
stretch of road.

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)-1 at Limestone Camp, Kern River

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)-20

Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium saepium)-2 at Alder Creek 6800'

Marine Blue (Leptotes marina): 1 at Alder Creek 6800'

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon): 1 at 5900' near Cherry Hill Rd., but 20
6600'-8000'

 

Dotted Blue complex (Euphilotes enoptes complex?)-3 collected but phenotype
not like E. enoptes tildeni also found in the region...the latter adversely
affected in 2014 by the drought.  The 2 blues are associated with different
buckwheats.

Cythera Metalmark (Apodemia mormo cythera)- 1 in side canyon 4900'

 

Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene monticola) W of Sherman Pass 7000'-8100',
3

Great Basin Fritillary (Speyeria egleis egleis)-3 from 7600-9000' W of
Sherman Pass

Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia mormonia): one along roadside flowers
in forest opening along road (collected and ID confirmed) at 9100 W of Pass
and 50+ in subalpine meadow E of  Sherman Pass in association with asters.
Many were fresh, others very worn.

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)-1 at Alder Creek 6800'

Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella)-4 at Alder Creek 6800'

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): 4 above 6000' up to 9000'

American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)-1 seen 1/4 mi. along road below Alder
Creek

California Sister (Adelpha californica)-2

 

Monarch (Danaus plexippus): 15-18 seen along Kern River and up Sherman Pass
Rd. up to at least 7600'.  These were often in riparian areas with water or
at flowers along the road.  I have no need to net a Monarch, unless it
carries a tag!  This is a common gathering area for late summer Monarchs and
they are distributed widely in this area.  I did not check Cherry Hill Rd.,
a nearby hotspot for Monarchs.

 

Queen (Danaus gilippus)-1 fresh individual seen along Kern River at Calkin's
Flat, a rarity in this county seen with some regularity along the Kern
River-Sherman Pass corridor.

 

 

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: SE AZ: Sycamore Canyon, 25 August 2014
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 25 Aug 2014 16:37:44 -0700
Today (25 August), Jim Brock and I visited Sycamore Canyon in the Atascosa 
Mountains and counted 32 species. Vegetation is lush, water is abundant, and 
conditions have improved over the past few weeks, but butterfly numbers in 
general continue to be low, and nymphalids were poorly represented. On the 
upside, there are now good numbers of Tailed Orange. Noteworthy was a single, 
male Orange-Barred Sulphur that we were able to watch for several minutes as it 
flew around us showing interest in patches of woolly senna (Senna hirsuta) 
about a mile down canyon. 

  
 Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata) 2
 Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) 12
 Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) 2
 Checkered White (Pontia protodice) 2
 Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia) 8
 Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae) abundant
 Orange-barred Sulphur (Phoebis philea) 1 male
 Mexican Yellow (Eurema mexicana) 5
 Tailed Orange (Pyrisitia proterpia) 60
 Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe) 20
 Lyside Sulphur (Kricogonia lyside) 1 (Ruby Road east of Sycamore Canyon)
 Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole) 3
 Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus) 1
 Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) abundant
 Ceraunus Blue (Hemiargus ceraunus) common
 Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola) uncommon
 American Snout (Libytheana carinenta) 6
 Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) 2
 Variegated Fritillary (Euptoieta claudia) 2
 Tiny Checkerspot (Dymasia dymas) common
 Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui) 1
 Queen (Danaus gilippus) 3
 Dull Firetip (Ayrrothrix Araxes) 12
 Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades) 1
 Dorantes Longtail (Urbanus dorantes) 10
 Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis) 1
 Desert Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus philetas) 1
 Golden-headed Scallopwing (Staphylus ceos) 15
 Common Sootywing (Pholisora catullus) 6 
 Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus) 1
 Sheep Skipper (Atrytonopsis edwardsii) 2
 Toltec Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscires tolteca) 1
 
 Ken Kertell
 Tucson
 
Subject: Re: Lyside Sulphur
From: "Keith Wolfe bflyearlystages AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 01:18:59 +0000 (UTC)
Jim, I'm not surprised. I reared Kricogonia lyside twice (Arizona, September 
2003; Texas, October 2004), and though my rearing notes have no mention of 
larval nests, there is this observation regarding AZ chrysalises: 



"Four pupae were whitish green (2) or grayish brown (2), one of the latter 
inside a well-constructed shelter of leaves silked together." 



Blue skies,


Keith


From: JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep] 
To: DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com, SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:25:56 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: [SoWestLep] Lyside Sulphur


Lepsters,


Yesterday I had a female Lyside Sulphur ovipositing on both guayacan plants in 
my front yard. This is a month after the first influx individuals which is no 
big deal but upon closer inspection this morning I found the larger of the two 
plants loaded with Lyside caterpillars indicating oviposition from about a week 
or so ago probably by a different female. 



I have had Lysides attack my plants before and I have taken photos and watched 
the larvae grow but I've never observed nest making by the larvae. Has anyone 
else out there ever observed this? I can't believe I've never seen this before! 
Must have missed it. There are at least a half dozen last or next to last 
instars in leaf nests on the plant. 



This is butterfly # 42 for the yard this year which is only significant when 
compared to last year's final total which was 42 and it's only August 22! I 
would need 21 more to reach the number of butterflies in the yard for 2012. The 
yard is currently averaging about 15 species per day. It's not bad but not 
great either since I have had daily averages in the high twenties in previous 
Augusts. 



I am hosting an open yard next Saturday for SEABA members thus the lengthy 
post. 



Jim B


------------------------------------
Posted by: Keith Wolfe 
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Subject: Lyside Sulphur
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 14:25:56 -0400 (EDT)
Lepsters,
 
Yesterday I had a female Lyside Sulphur ovipositing on both guayacan plants 
 in my front yard. This is a month after the first influx individuals which 
is no  big deal but upon closer inspection this morning I found the larger 
of the two  plants loaded with Lyside caterpillars indicating oviposition 
from about a week  or so ago probably by a different female. 
 
I have had Lysides attack my plants before and I have taken photos and  
watched the larvae grow but I've never observed nest making by the larvae. Has 

anyone else out there ever observed this? I can't believe I've never seen  
this before! Must have missed it. There are at least a half dozen last or 
next  to last instars in leaf nests on the plant.
 
This is butterfly # 42 for the yard this year which is only significant  
when compared to last year's final total which was 42 and it's only August  
22! I would need 21 more to reach the number of butterflies in the yard for  
2012. The yard is currently averaging about 15 species per day. It's not bad 
but  not great either since I have had daily averages in the high twenties 
in  previous Augusts.
 
I am hosting an open yard next Saturday for SEABA members thus the lengthy  
post.
 
  Jim B
Subject: Tijuana River, San Diego Co.
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 20:28:53 -0700
Hello,

I was at the Bird and Butterfly Garden near Tijuana River yesterday.
Lots of swallowtails.

Skipper - did not id.  Probably Fiery Skipper or Umber Skipper.  Worn out.
Westen Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) - many females.  About 20 of them.
Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon) - 5-6
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) - 4-5.  Only on Lantana.
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) - common
Powell's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini powelli) - 2 females

If you want to see swallowtails, this is good place right now.  Many and fresh.

Koji
San Diego

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Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
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Subject: Great Southern White (Ascia monuste) in Patagonia: 17 Aug 2014
From: "'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:50:03 -0700
Dear Lepsters,

 

Dont know if this has been reported already. Sorry if a dupe. 

 

Today I found a rather fresh-looking Great Southern White nectaring on
lantana in front of the Patagonia, AZ post office. It was photographed by my
birding clients.

 

Best to all,

RAB

 

 

Robert A. Behrstock

10359 S. Thicket Pl. 

Hereford, AZ 85615

Phone:  (520) 378-3262

Cell: (520) 732-4784

N31 22' 49.75"  W110 13' 41.08",  5,012' elev. 

Please visit my website:  
http://www.naturewideimages.com/

Birdlife of Houston, Galveston, and the Upper Texas Coast

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Birdlife-of-Houston-Galveston-and-the-Upper
-Texa,356.aspx

Finding Birds on the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Finding-Birds-on-the-Great-Texas-Coastal-Bi
rding-T,709.aspx

Dragonflies & Damselflies of the Southwest

 
http://www.rionuevo.com/book.php?book_isbn=9781933855141 

 

 
Subject: Another WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos chlorinde) south of Patagonia Lake
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 16:41:35 -0700
Earlier this month I documented WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos chlorinde) in my 
yard (on a hilltop about 3 miles south of Patagonia Lake) on two different 
days. On Aug 14th and again today I had one again stop briefly in my yard (on a 
hilltop about 3 miles south of Patagonia Lake). Each has spent just a few 
minutes or less at flowers, then moved on to the north. So apparently they are 
still moving. 



Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ 85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Hammock Skipper
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 12:16:21 -0400 (EDT)
Lepheads,
 
Had a Hammock Skipper in the yard yesterday morning for about 40 minutes.  
Choice of nectar was plain old lantana of the gold variety. Yard activity is 
 finally improving with twenty species seen over the past three days. I'm 
near  Sabino Canyon in Tucson, AZ. 
 
My area and lower Sabino Canyon has not had that much rain this summer. My  
yard has received just under three inches since July 1 start of  the 
monsoon.
 
Jim B
Subject: Kern River Valley, Kern County, CA
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 22:08:43 -0700
These butterflies from the Kern River Valley (Hanning Flat, Weldon, Onyx),
Kern County, CA 13 August 2014.  There were recent summer rains, Alkali
Mallow was in much improved leaf condtion and some was in full bloom.  Some
Atriplex canescens was also in improved condition at Weldon and Onyx.  No
late summer-fall composites were yet in bloom.

 

White Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus albescens)

Common Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis)-both occur at Hanning Flat-saw
about a dozen Pyrgus.

Sandhill Skipper (Polites sonora): 1 on Heliotrophe in the Audubon Preserve.

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)-common all sites

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)- several, especially at Hanning Flat.

Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)-2 at Hanning Flat

Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis)-20+ several localities

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) at Weldon

San Emigdio Blue (Plebejus emigdionis): 8 males at Weldon; 2 males at Onyx.

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)-1 at Weldon

Queen (Danaus gilippus): 3 on Heliotrophe on Audbon Preserve.

 

Goals were to try and find strays of the Hammock Skipper, find a population
of Mallow Scrub Hairstreaks at Hanning Flat and monitor the occurrence of
San Emigdio Blues at the two sites checked.  Recent summer rains are not
likely to trigger a large emigdionis flight and many seen were showing wear.
It is possible Strymon istapa may be between broods if it occurs here as
more than a stray.  The larval host was abundant at Hanning Flat.  There was
lots of narrow leaf milkweed available for use by Danaids in the Weldon area
in pastures and ravines along the roads.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 
Subject: Re: Hammock Skippers reach California
From: "Bob Allen bugbob AT mac.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 11:17:40 -0700
Since I'm in Orange County, I'd like to know where/when it was found.

-Bob Allen
bugbob AT mac.com
Author, Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains

Sent from my iPhone 5S

> On Aug 12, 2014, at 6:50 AM, "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> Wouldn't it be cool to know where it came from? My thoughts are hundreds of 
miles to the south. 

>  
> Just curious,  Jim B
>  
> In a message dated 8/11/2014 10:00:54 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, 
SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com writes: 

>  
> Everyone:
> 
> I just verified a photo of a Hammock Skipper in Orange County seen today. So 
here is a chance to find an exotic tropical skipper in California now. But 
these are limited time offers! Happy hunting! 

> 
> 
> Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
> kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Hammock Skippers reach California
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 09:50:24 -0400 (EDT)
Wouldn't it be cool to know where it came from? My thoughts are hundreds of 
 miles to the south.
 
Just curious,  Jim B
 
 
In a message dated 8/11/2014 10:00:54 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,  
SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com writes:

 
 
 
 
Everyone: 
I just verified a  photo of a Hammock Skipper in  I jus    seen today. 
 So here is a chance to find an exotic tropical skipper in  So here i now. 
But these are limited time offers!   Happy hunting! 
Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
_kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com_ (mailto:kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com)  or 
_flutterflies93306 AT att.net_ (mailto:flutterflies93306 AT att.net)   




Subject: Hammock Skippers reach California
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 22:00:48 -0700
Everyone:

   I just verified a photo of a Hammock Skipper in Orange County seen today.
So here is a chance to find an exotic tropical skipper in California now.
But these are limited time offers!  Happy hunting!

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Scissors Crossing, San Diego
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 23:47:21 -0700
All,

After seeing good amount of rain last week, I decided to head out to the desert 
today. 

Scissors Crossing had good amount of flowers, mainly thistles and heliotropes.

Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala eufala)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme) - fairly common even in higher altitude and 
cities. 

California Dogface (Zerene eurydice)
Marine Blue (Leptotes marina)
Edward's Blue (Echiargus ceraunus gyas)
Palmer's Metalmark (Apodemia palmerii)
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)
Monarch (Danaus plexippus plexippus)
Striated Queen (Danaus gilippus thersippus)

Plum Canyon was dead dry, but I see Ocotillo were turning bright green, and 
also saw water puddles. 

May be we will have a nice fall flight.

If Colorado Desert received good amount of rain, another Painted Lady outburst 
may occur again? 


Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics, cont.
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 15:48:05 -0700
Here's the ventral.
 

 Ken
 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14827030881/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14827030881/ 


 

 

 

Subject: SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail pics
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 15:43:38 -0700
With Debbie Sebesta's permission, and for the sake of documentation, I've 
uploaded a couple pictures of the Broad-banded Swallowtail to my flickr site 
(see links below). 

 

 Ken Kertell
 Tucson
 

 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14829744102/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14829744102/ 


 

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14827030881/ 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kkertell/14829744102/ 


 

Subject: RE: Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today
From: "'Todd Stout' todd AT raisingbutterflies.org [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 14:13:24 -0600
Very nice!!  I'd love to rear those some day!  :)

 

Thx, Todd

 

Todd L. Stout 
Raising Butterflies 
http://www.raisingbutterflies.org/about-me/ 
http://www.facebook.com/Raising.Butterflies 
  todd AT raisingbutterflies.org
801-326-4683 

  _____  

From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]
Sent: Monday, August 04, 2014 12:59 PM
To: SoWestLep
Subject: [SoWestLep] Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde)
today

 

  

A different WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) passed through my yard
south of Patagonia Lake, Santa Cruz Co, AZ at 1120 today. This is a
different bug than yesterdays sighting.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/14827328214/

 

 

Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ  85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
 www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan


Subject: Another yard WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) today
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:59:15 -0700
A different WHITE ANGLED-SULPHUR (Anteos clorinde) passed through my yard south 
of Patagonia Lake, Santa Cruz Co, AZ at 1120 today. This is a different bug 
than yesterdays sighting. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/14827328214/



Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ 85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Lysides & Cloudless Sulphurs in SE AZ
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 13:35:53 +0000
Yesterday (Sunday 8/3/14) as I drove back to Tucson from Phoenix via Florence 
there were both Lysides & Cloudless Sulphurs flying across the highway 
constantly from 9:30 am to 11:30 am. 



Mary Klinkel

Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Anteos clorinde: White angled-sulphur south of Patagonia Lake
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 06:31:06 -0700
Another White angled-sulphur yesterday (3 Aug). In my yard on a hilltop on 
Circulo Montana Road, south of Patagonia Lake. It nectared on yellow verbena, 
bird of paradise and oleander, then apparently moved on. Four photos start at: 




https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/14798651596/



Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ 85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: SE AZ: Broad-banded Swallowtail
From: "teleost07 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Aug 2014 16:23:20 -0700
Yesterday (2 August), Debbie Sebesta identified a Broad-banded Swallowtail 
(Heraclides astyalus bajaensis) in her Patagonia garden and forwarded to me a 
couple nice photos. Thanks, Debbie. 

  
 Ken Kertell
 Tucson
  
 

Subject: Anteos clorinde: 2 August, Ash Canyon, Cochise Co, AZ
From: "'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 08:03:42 -0700
Dear Lepsters,

 

During yesterdays Ramsey Canyon butterfly count, we found a White
Angled-Sulphur (Anteos clorinde) in the yard - the third or fourth here in
10 years. Also of interest was a Many-spotted Skipperling (Piruna aea), and
Elissa Roadside-Skipper (Amblyscirtes elissa), which was butterfly # 115 for
the yard.

 

Best,

RAB

 

 

Robert A. Behrstock

10359 S. Thicket Pl. 

Hereford, AZ 85615

Phone:  (520) 378-3262

Cell: (520) 732-4784

N31 22' 49.75"  W110 13' 41.08",  5,012' elev. 

Please visit my website:  
http://www.naturewideimages.com/

Birdlife of Houston, Galveston, and the Upper Texas Coast

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Birdlife-of-Houston-Galveston-and-the-Upper
-Texa,356.aspx

Finding Birds on the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Finding-Birds-on-the-Great-Texas-Coastal-Bi
rding-T,709.aspx

Dragonflies & Damselflies of the Southwest

 
http://www.rionuevo.com/book.php?book_isbn=9781933855141 

 

 
Subject: Miguelito Canyon, Santa Barbara County, CA
From: "'Lethaby, Nick' nlethaby AT ti.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 01:05:41 +0000
All,

Checking this area out yielded a single Field and three Mylitta Crescents, as 
well as the usual riparian species like Lorquin's Admiral and W. Tiger 
Swallowtail. 


Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

------------------------------------
Posted by: "Lethaby, Nick" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: RE: Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 22:11:35 -0700
Thanks Art!

   I now seem to recall such a sign as well.  The landowner told me the
curve below is named Rattlesnake Bend or some such name. Other animals in
the region besides the rattler at Mono Lake I saw were deer and coyotes and
lots of bunny rabbits, maybe the cause of the rattlers.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

  _____  

 

Subject: Re: [SoWestLep] Ken's Big Week, not The Big Year

 

Ken,

 

Some years ago, my brother and sister-in-law parked along 395 not far south
of Devil's Gate Pass to look for butterflies.  There was actually a sign up
that warned of rattlesnakes in the area.  Sure enough, that afternoon they
saw four of them, one of which slithered underneath their car after my
sister-in-law had retreated into it.

 

Art Douglas

 

On Wednesday, July 30, 2014 7:16 AM, "'Kenneth Davenport'
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" 
wrote:

 

  

Everyone:

   I envy folks like Robert Michael Pyle (or Kenn Kaufman with birds) who
can spend an entire Season traveling to find and experience as many
butterflies as they can.  Best I could do was take a whole week affected by
summer rains in Yosemite and the Great Basin .  On July 25th I had maybe the
best overall day of the trip but would have to deal with private land issues
and dangers that accompany butterfly collectors or watchers.  Ranchers gave
me permission as I worked areas outside of fences or watched me from their
vehicles while checking about me with their bosses.  One landowner gave me
some unsettling news from his land near Devil's Gate Pass : You can use my
land to look for butterflies but just be aware I have rattlesnakes on my
land, just ran into one yesterday!  I had left my snake boots at home, had
my chaps in the car but failed to put them on, only to have a close
encounter with one on the day of the Yosemite Butterfly Count.

 

Bridgeport, Mono County , CA , July 25, 2014.

Sonora Skipper (Polites sonora loninqua)-a few

Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

Ruddy Copper (Lycaena rubidus monachensis)

Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria)-1

Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)

Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala walkerensis)-100+, maybe many seen
multiple times

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

 

   Two folks came out to see what I was doing walking along the fence line
just on the edges of town.  They told me no Monarchs had yet been seen in
Bridgeport this year and were concerned by declining numbers as told on TV.
Some Monarchs were seen there shortly after they left and later on with
other noted observers.  Other locations covered separately.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 
For more information: http://www.tils-ttr.org/
TILS Motto: "We can not protect that which we do not know" C 1999

 



 
Subject: Re: lyside sulphur
From: "Kim Garwood kimgrwd AT sbcglobal.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 10:06:36 -0700
I've had them in my yard at the base of the Mt. Lemmon road, NE Tucson.
kim

On 7/30/2014 9:45 AM, JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep] wrote:
>
> Had a Lyside Sulphur in the Tucson foothills yesterday so they've made 
> it at least that far to the NE.
> Cloudless Sulphur females really hitting my yard Senna hard this 
> morning, A whole lot of egg laying goin' on.
> Jim B
>
>