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Updated on Tuesday, December 16 at 09:49 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Wilsons Plover,©David Sibley

16 Dec Re: yard happenings ["Gail Morrs gail-marie AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Dec Deem Hills Park ["azttttommy AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Dec yard happenings ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
15 Dec Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Dec 12, 2014 ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Dec Western Tiger Swallowtail ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Dec Sabino Canyon NE Tucson: 25+ 4 species 12/7/14 + ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
7 Dec NE Tucson: 25 + species 12/7/14 ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
6 Dec Gulf Fritillary ["Bruce Webb BruWebb AT surewest.net [SoWestLep]" ]
5 Dec AZ-Sonora Desert Museum Butterrflies Dec 3, 2014 ["'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
5 Dec FW: Snout Butterflies early and late records for California: ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
5 Dec Snout Butterflies early and late records for California: ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
5 Dec Insecticides foster 'toxic' slugs, reduce crop yields ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Dec Desert Swallowtail ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Dec Painted Lady Fall migration ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
3 Dec Dorantes Continue In SEAZ ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
1 Dec RE: BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Nov Re: Large Orange Sulphur in Southern California ["Robb Hannawacker hannawacker AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Nov Large Orange Sulphur in Southern California ["fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
30 Nov BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Nov Re: Bakersfield, CA observations ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
29 Nov Bakersfield, CA observations ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
27 Nov Happy Thanksgiving! ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
27 Nov RE: [leps-talk] Surveys for Butterfly migrations to Weldon ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
27 Nov Surveys for Butterfly migrations to Weldon ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
27 Nov NE Tucson: 27 species still flying ["mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" ]
25 Nov Hammock Skipper ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Nov Harshaw Road, Santa Cruz Co, AZ, Barred Yellow, another late date ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Nov Re: [DesertLeps] RE: [leps-talk] Shapiro and his migration notes. ["Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Nov RE: [leps-talk] Shapiro and his migration notes. ["Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
22 Nov RE: [NEleps] New digital Mourning Cloaks ["Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
21 Nov Re: LRGV 2014 ["fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
20 Nov BARRED YELLOW (Eurema daira) at Harshaw Rd, santa Cruz Co, az - Late date? ["Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
20 Nov Re: soldier update again ["'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
19 Nov LRGV 2014 ["fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
19 Nov soldier update again ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Nov Re: Re: [DesertLeps] Warmest oceans ever recorded ["Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
17 Nov Re: [DesertLeps] Warmest oceans ever recorded ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
16 Nov Warmest oceans ever recorded ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
15 Nov Another Soldier (Danaus eresimus) in Tucson; 15 Nov 2014 ["'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" ]
15 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov yard today ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov Final Soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier news ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov Shapiro and his migration notes. ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov soldier update ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
14 Nov Re: [DesertLeps] Danaus eresimus ["Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov RE: Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants ["Ken Wilson kaeagles AT hotmail.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov Danaus eresimus ["JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov Re: [DesertLeps] Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation | The Scientist Magazine® ["Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation | The Scientist Magazine ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov RE: Re: [SoWestLep] Painted Lady southward migration ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov Re: Painted Lady southward migration ["Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov RE: [leps-talk] Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov RE: [leps-talk] Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
13 Nov Sexy spiders - link ["zapjammer AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov RE: Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov RE: Painted Lady southward migration ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants ["Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov RE: [DesertLeps] Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Painted Lady's and other migrants ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration ["chris kline kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Groundwater warming up in sync ["'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Re: Painted Lady southward migration ["Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration ["Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Painted Lady southward migration ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
12 Nov Re: Painted lady migration south ["Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Nov RE: Painted lady migration south ["'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Nov Re: Painted lady migration south ["Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Nov Re: Painted lady migration south ["Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" ]
11 Nov Painted lady migration south ["zapjammer AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" ]

Subject: Re: yard happenings
From: "Gail Morrs gail-marie AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 18:20:09 -0800
Jim,

Thanks for your post. Only seen this once before on a newly purchased plant 
right next to another milkweed – so yours is the first documented. Many 
suspicions earlier, but yours is the first documentation. Thanks. 


Several reports of monarch oviposition, eggs, larvae and pupae in the greater 
Phoenix area still. 


Gail
Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 16, 2014, at 1:45 PM, "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" 
  
> Yesterday, I found a last instar Monarch larva on climbing milkweed 
(Sarcostemma cyanchoides). Up to now I have only found Queen larvae on this 
vine. Gail, do you have this as a host already? 

>  
> Jim B
> 
Subject: Deem Hills Park
From: "azttttommy AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 16 Dec 2014 13:48:09 -0800
I was out hiking Deem Hills Park in North Phoenix this morning. I was very 
surprised to see my first Mallow Scrubstreak (Strymon istapa) of the year. 

 

 Tom
 http://www.pbase.com/image/158550982 http://www.pbase.com/image/158550982

Subject: yard happenings
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:45:08 -0500
Lepsters,
 
The lep season continues to extend here in my yard with another batch of  
firsts. 
 
Yesterday, I found a last instar Monarch larva on climbing milkweed  
(Sarcostemma cyanchoides). Up to now I have only found Queen larvae on this 
vine. 

Gail, do you have this as a host already?
 
Secondly, on the same plant there are at least two Erynnis obscura larvae  
(Sphingidae) which seems late for my yard. Normally, by this date we have 
had  frost and there are no more milkweed leaves to eat. I guess both species 
have  lucked out so far. I think adults of this moth have been recorded in  
Dec/January.
 
Finally, last week on my Mexican sunflower (Tithonia fruticosa), I found a  
small batch of 1st instar Bordered Patch caterpillars! Normally, if I have  
them on this plant they would have gone into diapause by mid-October,  
fully two months ago and any traces of them except for feeding damage would be 

long gone. Also, the plants have usually been frosted enough by  
mid-December to have lost their leaves. Not this year, however, and the eggs 
must have 

been laid by a female within the last two weeks. I have not recorded  an 
adult since October 6. This is really bitchen to have going on in  December 
but frosty mornings may loom ahead this next week. It will be  interesting to 
see if they get to diapause stage. Stan, can they diapause as 2nd  instars?
 
Jim B
Subject: Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Dec 12, 2014
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 21:42:58 -0700
Since it was a warm and sunny day,  between my docent duties at the
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum (ASDM) on this past Friday, Dec 12, I decided
to see what butterflies I could find. I was specially looking for a Dorantes
Longtail which had been seen on Tuesday, Dec 9 (a new late date by 5 days),
by docents Sue Bridgemon  and Libby Sullivan. We've been having a friendly
competition as to who will get the latest date for this species. Since I
missed it and the weather has been cold and/or stormy since Saturday and
will continue to be for a least the next week, I guess theirs will be the
late date. 

                I was able to find 28 species on Friday. 16 of these species
were found nectaring on Wolfberry (Lycium sp?). These have been denoted with
an "L" below. The second most attractive plant has been the Baja Fairy
Duster  (Calliandra californica) which seems to be a favorite of the
Lycaeninae especially the Leda Ministreaks. The numbers of Painted Ladies
has grown exponentially since last week. This reminds me of the good late
winter flights. Since the food plants for Sara Orangetips are germinating,
maybe we should be looking for early records of this species soon (December
19, 1934  is the earliest) .

                In total, we have found 35 species at the ASDM so far this
December. Pretty remarkable as the total number of species ever seen in
December in SE AZ is around 70 species. For Sabino Canyon, we've (Mary a
Klinkel and I) also found 35 species this month with pretty much the same
species. Sabino has had and Variegated Frit, Empress Leilia and
White-patched Skipper not seen in ASDM while the ASDM has had Tiny
Checkerspot, West Coast Lady and Fiery Skipper. So between Sabino and the
ASDM we've had 38 species this month. Even if the weather never gets better
for butterflies this month, it's been a great December. 

 

Pipevine Swallowtail - (Battus philenor) L Still many caterpillars around

Checkered White - (Pontia protodice) L

Southern Dogface - (Zerene cesonia) L several

Mexican Yellow - (Eurema mexicana) many 

Tailed Orange - (Pyrisitia proterpia) several

Sleepy Orange - (Abaeis nicippe) L many 

Dainty Sulphur - (Nathalis iole) L Continues to be the most common species 

Great Purple Hairstreak - (Atlides halesus) 1

Gray Hairstreak - (Strymon melinus) L 2

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak - (Strymon istapa) L Still a number, including fresh
ones

Leda Ministreak - (Ministrymon leda) many

Marine Blue - (Leptotes marina) L

Western Pygmy-Blue - (Brephidium exilis)

Spring Azure - (Celastrina ladon)

Ceraunus Blue - (Hemiargus ceraunus)

Reakirt's Blue - (Echinargus isola)

American Snout - (Libytheana carinenta) L

Monarch - (Danaus plexippus) 1 fresh male, seen several times during the
day. When I saw it at the end of the day, I went to get the ASDM net and
tags (thanks to Gail Morris), but it knew I was coming and promptly
disappeared.

Queen - (Danaus gilippus) L many

Gulf Fritillary - (Agraulis vanillae)

Texan Crescent - (Anthanassa texana) L

Common Buckeye - (Junonia coenia)

Painted Lady - (Vanessa cardui) L Second most common species by far

Funereal Duskywing - (Erynnis funeralis) L 2 one very fresh 

White Checkered-Skipper - (Pyrgus albescens) L

Erichson's White-Skipper - (Heliopyrgus domicella) 1

Fiery Skipper - (Hylephila phyleus) L 1

Eufala Skipper - (Lerodea eufala) L 2

 
Subject: Western Tiger Swallowtail
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2014 21:30:34 -0800
Everyone:

   Today while in west Bakersfield I saw another Western Tiger Swallowtail
flying on December 7th.  I had seen another about 8 days prior, this one
extending the Kern County LATE record.  It is also one day short of the
STATE record for California: 8 December 1981 Orange County at Disneyland by
me.

   If things stay warm, one of you folks may secure ephemeral fame by
breaking the record and becoming instantly famous....until someone breaks
your new record.  And if you go to Disneyland, you may have fun doing it.
Remember also: there is a Disneyland record for the Hammock Skipper
(Polygonus leo).

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Sabino Canyon NE Tucson: 25+ 4 species 12/7/14 +
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2014 20:43:05 -0700
 Even though Mary wandered into Sabino later in the day and left earlier she 
managed to find a few more butterflies than Dick and Pat Carlson, Gary Jue and 
I. We only came up with 22 species (list below) adding 4 to Mary’s list to 
total 29 species for the day at Sabino. On December 1, I had four additional 
species (Gray Hairstreak, Gulf Frit, Empress Leilia, and Dorantes Longtail) 
which makes a total of 33 species seen so far in December at Sabino. It’s not 
South Texas, but it sure beats South Dakota!!! 


 The best nectar plant (for the most species) continues to be Paper Flower 
(Psilostrophe cooperi), found mainly in the bajada areas. This plant is 
blooming very profusely and late this year, probably in response to our good 
October rains and above normal fall temperatures. My guess it will only last 
for a week or so longer. Other good nectar plants today were Sunflower Family: 
Coreocarpus arizonicus, Odora (Porophyllum gracile), Bur Marigold (Bidens 
aurea); Pea Family: Marina parryi, Dalea pringlei; Acanthus Family: Twin Seed 
(Dicliptera resupinata). 


---Fred  

 

Checkered White - (Pontia protodice) A fair number. The only possible food 
plant noted is London Rocket (introduced mustard) 


Southern Dogface - (Zerene cesonia) a few

Mexican Yellow - (Eurema mexicana) common

Tailed Orange - (Pyrisitia proterpia) 3

Sleepy Orange - (Abaeis nicippe) Common  

Dainty Sulphur - (Nathalis iole) Most abundant species. Has been for the last 
month 


Leda Ministreak - (Ministrymon leda) Missed by Mary

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak - (Strymon istapa) Lots. Probably most common 
Lycaenidae 


Marine Blue - (Leptotes marina). A close second to Mallow Scrub in numbers. Two 
ovipositing on Baby Bonnets (Coursetia glandulosa). 


Western Pygmy-Blue - (Brephidium exilis) a few

Spring 'Echo' Azure - (Celastrina ladon echo)  A few. Missed by Mary 

Ceraunus Blue - (Hemiargus ceraunus) a few

Reakirt's Blue - (Echinargus isola) A few including one on Dalea pringlei

American Snout - (Libytheana carinenta) Getting hard to find

Monarch - (Danaus plexippus) 1 Missed by Mary 

Queen - (Danaus gilippus) Fair numbers 

Texan Crescent - (Anthanassa texana) Second most abundant species behind Dainty 
Sulphur. Using Paper Flower almost exclusively. Lots of their host plant, 
Dicliptera resupinata, in bloom. 


Common Buckeye - (Junonia coenia) 3

Painted Lady - (Vanessa cardui) 1

White-patched Skipper - (Chiomara georgina) 1 Missed by Mary. Bill Beck 
reported and photographed one in Sabino also today. 


White Checkered-Skipper - (Pyrgus albescens) 3

Eufala Skipper - (Lerodea eufala) 2

 

 

 

 

From: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep] 

Sent: Sunday, December 07, 2014 2:59 PM
To: sowestlep AT yahoogroups.com
Cc: bill & mary adams
Subject: [SoWestLep] NE Tucson: 25 + species 12/7/14

 

  

This is a December to remember for butterflies in SE AZ so far! Today I 
wandered around about 2 miles round trip in Sabino Canyon and found 25 species. 
Fred Heath & Gary Jue are still out there looking, so the total they see will 
definitely be more. We had about 1” of rain this past week with a warm 
tropical flow, and no super cold weather yet. 


 

Checkered white, Cloudless sulphur, Orange Sulphur, Southern Dogface, Large 
Orange Sulphur, Mexican Yellow, Tailed Orange, Sleepy Orange, Dainty Sulphur, 
Mallow Scrub-hairstreak, Marine Blue, Reakirt’s Blue, Western Pygmy-blue, 
Ceraunus Blue, Fatal Metalmark, Snout, Queen, Variegated Fritillary, Texan 
Crescent, Common Buckeye, Painted Lady, Checkered-skipper, Funereal Duskywing, 
Orange Skipperling, Eufala Skipper. 


 

Mary Klinkel, Tucson AZ

 

Sent from Windows Mail

 


Subject: NE Tucson: 25 + species 12/7/14
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2014 21:58:32 +0000
This is a December to remember for butterflies in SE AZ so far! Today I 
wandered around about 2 miles round trip in Sabino Canyon and found 26 species. 
Fred Heath & Gary Jue are still out there looking, so the total they see will 
definitely be more. We had about 1” of rain this past week with a warm 
tropical flow, and no super cold weather yet. 



Checkered white, Cloudless sulphur, Orange Sulphur, Southern Dogface, Large 
Orange Sulphur, Mexican Yellow, Tailed Orange, Sleepy Orange, Dainty Sulphur, 
Mallow Scrub-hairstreak, Marine Blue, Reakirt’s Blue, Western Pygmy-blue, 
Ceraunus Blue, Fatal Metalmark, Snout, Queen, Variegated Fritillary, Texan 
Crescent, Common Buckeye, Painted Lady, Checkered-skipper, Funereal Duskywing, 
Orange Skipperling, Eufala Skipper. 



Mary Klinkel, Tucson AZ






Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Gulf Fritillary
From: "Bruce Webb BruWebb AT surewest.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 19:07:36 -0800
Granite Bay is between Folsom Lake and Roseville, CA in Placer County.  

This afternoon, Dec 6, 2014, after several days of 100% overcast and heavy 
rain, a Gulf Fritillary was nectaring in the sunlight on a Lantana in my yard 
in Granite Bay. 


As I approached it flew up and quickly disappeared over my house, so it seemed 
in good condition. 


During the summer/fall months in the last two years I've had Gulf Fritillaries 
using the Lantanas in my yard almost daily. 


Not sure where this December sighting fits in as a late date in northern 
California. 


Bruce Webb, Granite Bay, CA
Sent from my mobile phone


------------------------------------
Posted by: Bruce Webb 
------------------------------------


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Subject: AZ-Sonora Desert Museum Butterrflies Dec 3, 2014
From: "'Fred Heath' fred.heath43 AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2014 22:52:53 -0700
                SE AZ in the vicinity of Tucson continues to have a fair
number of butterflies into December. On Wednesday, December 3, I managed to
find 29 species at the AZ-Sonora Desert Museum (list follows). The ASDM is
in the middle of typical Arizona Upland habitat of the Sonoran Desert, but
it is, among other things, a well-watered botanical garden. The best nectar
plants were Baja Fairy Duster (Calliandra californica) and Wolfberry (Lycium
sp?). Almost 2/3 of the species found were on one or the other of these
plants. Many of these species were found throughout November with Turpentine
Bush (Ericameria laricifolia) being one of the better nectar sources early
in the month (there are still a few flowers of this plant left which attract
an occasional butterfly). Dorantes Longtail has had a good flight this fall
including a fresh one on Wednesday . As mentioned by Hank Brodkin the late
date for this species is December 4 and I expect  that someone will beat
that date this year. The other butterfly not usually seen in this area in
numbers has been the Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak which was first noted by Bill
Beck in early (?) October. This species has continued to be present in
decent numbers with many fresh individuals through the present. I am
wondering what host plant they are using locally. A good possibility is one
(or more) of the Indian Mallows (Abutilon sp?) many of which are showing new
leaf growth after good September and October rains. I did see one sitting on
a dried seed head of Abultilon abutiloides in Sabino Canyon the other day.  

                Today (Dec 5) I was back at ASDM and checking out
butterflies between my volunteer docent duties and managed to find 25
species, three of which I missed on Wednesday: Great Purple Hairstreak, West
Coast Lady (a rarely noted species at the ASDM) and Funereal Duskywing. I
couldn't find a Dorantes today so the Dec 4 record is holding so far.. 

 

Pipevine Swallowtail - (Battus philenor)

Checkered White - (Pontia protodice)

Orange Sulphur - (Colias eurytheme)

Southern Dogface - (Zerene cesonia)

Cloudless Sulphur - (Phoebis sennae)

Mexican Yellow - (Eurema mexicana)

Tailed Orange - (Pyrisitia proterpia)

Sleepy Orange - (Abaeis nicippe)

Dainty Sulphur - (Nathalis iole)

Leda Ministreak - (Ministrymon leda)

Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak - (Strymon istapa)

Marine Blue - (Leptotes marina)

Western Pygmy-Blue - (Brephidium exilis)

Spring 'Echo' Azure - (Celastrina ladon)

Ceraunus Blue - (Hemiargus ceraunus)

Reakirt's Blue - (Echinargus isola)

Fatal Metalmark - (Calephelis nemesis)

American Snout - (Libytheana carinenta)

Queen - (Danaus gilippus)

Gulf Fritillary - (Agraulis vanillae)

Tiny Checkerspot - (Dymasia dymas)

Texan Crescent - (Anthanassa texana)

Painted Lady - (Vanessa cardui)

Dorantes Longtail - (Urbanus dorantes)

White Checkered-Skipper - (Pyrgus albescens)

Erichson's White-Skipper - (Heliopyrgus domicella)

Orange Skipperling - (Copaeodes aurantiaca)

Fiery Skipper - (Hylephila phyleus)

Eufala Skipper - (Lerodea eufala)

 

 
Subject: FW: Snout Butterflies early and late records for California:
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2014 19:40:17 -0800
Everyone:

   The September early date for Snouts somehow got left out.  The verified
EARLY date is 6 September.  Surely it gets here in California before that.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 




Subject: Snout Butterflies early and late records for California:

 

Everyone:

    I made some adjustments in the early and late flight periods for the
Southwestern Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta streckeri) for California
since records before suggested a January through December flight.

   So here is the new arrangement of records:

22 Jan 2013 San Diego Co P. Spino to 29 Jan 1989 Riverside Co. J. F. Emmel;
then  6 Sep 06 Kern K Davenport to 29 Dec 1963 D Davenport.

   I suspect someone may have an earlier record, a September 1st record I
have for Glen Broadwater is an arbitrary date used to publish a COUNTY
record for Kern County.  The January records are probably holdovers from the
Fall.  Does anyone have records from February through August in California?
If so, I would love to know of it.  Thanks!

   I wrote up an article that will explain the Snout Butterflies occurrence
in the Sierra Nevada as known at the present time.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 

 
Subject: Snout Butterflies early and late records for California:
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2014 17:58:08 -0800
Everyone:

    I made some adjustments in the early and late flight periods for the
Southwestern Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta streckeri) for California
since records before suggested a January through December flight.

   So here is the new arrangement of records:

22 Jan 2013 San Diego Co P. Spino to 29 Jan 1989 Riverside Co. J. F. Emmel;
then  Sep 2006 Kern K Davenport to 29 Dec 1963 D Davenport.

   I suspect someone may have an earlier record, a September 1st record I
have for Glen Broadwater is an arbitrary date used to publish a COUNTY
record for Kern County.  The January records are probably holdovers from the
Fall.  Does anyone have records from February through August in California?
If so, I would love to know of it.  Thanks!

   I wrote up an article that will explain the Snout Butterflies occurrence
in the Sierra Nevada as known at the present time.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Insecticides foster 'toxic' slugs, reduce crop yields
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2014 15:00:17 -0700
I saw this on ScienceDaily:

Insecticides foster 'toxic' slugs, reduce crop yields. Who wud of thunk it?


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141204121436.htm?utm_source=feedburner 
Subject: Desert Swallowtail
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2014 22:42:44 -0800
Hi all,

We are receiving good amount of rain in Southern California for last couple of 
days! 


With moisture level going up (now above 70+% in my house), my Desert 
Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes coloro) pupa eclosed today. This one pupated 
back in October 2013. I was hoping it will diapause for 10+ years. Oh well, 
I’ll try again next time. 


Koji
San Diego

------------------------------------
Posted by: Kojiro Shiraiwa 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Painted Lady Fall migration
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2014 18:19:24 -0800
Everyone:

   I finally got some time to look at past Season Summaries from 1975-1999
when Robert L. Langston, then Coordinator, covered migratory butterflies of
the Southwest Zone, but I only checked for California data for Painted
Ladies, which many are apparently unaware that they not only migrate north
in the spring, but that there is a return migration in the fall.

   Years in which Langston mentioned southerly return flights in the Fall
included reports from 1978-79; 1981; 1991-92 and 1998.  Reports included
observations by Langston himself, Oakley Shields and Art Shapiro and others.

   Data and stated conclusions in the reports were undoubtedly influenced by
many not contributing data, me included.  I personally felt that everyone
knew Monarchs and Painted Lady's have both spring and fall migrations.  I
have observed such since 1961.  I felt providing data was rather redundant. 

   But some interesting comments in those 24 years of Langston Season
Summaries.  Many years gave reports of very low dire numbers for both
Monarchs and Painted Ladies.  I am sure the actual numbers were better than
that.  I live in an area to the south of the data given in those reports and
more tributary areas contribute to the bigger picture of migratory movements
at the south end of the San Joaquin Valley.  I also expect NW movements of
Painted Ladies in the late Fall are headed for the Coast Ranges where adults
likely overwinter in some numbers based on my observations in that Range in
Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties in February.

   For the few of you that retained the Season Summary Reports, look at them
carefully.  I also found another overlooked record for a Snout Butterfly in
January: January 29, 1989 at Hemet, Riverside County by John F. Emmel.

   Also, check out the Shapiro & Manolis book (2007) for comments under
Painted Ladies and West Coast Ladies in the Butterflies of the San Francisco
Bay and Sacramento Valley Regions.  Somehow, observations in past literature
are not getting passed down to the younger generation of "butterfliers."  Or
else is going unnoticed.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Dorantes Continue In SEAZ
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2014 15:52:46 -0700
One day shy of the Arizona late record (per Rich Bailowitz), a fairly fresh 
Dorantes Longtail was found and photographed on our porch in lower Carr Canyon 
today by Priscilla Brodkin. 



Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W 
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/
Subject: RE: BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2014 20:07:42 -0800
Alan:

   Your record is likely LATE in the calendar year in Arizona for a
Blackened Bluewing but there is a January Record in Richard Bailowitz's list
I have which may not be up to date.  I will put it in the Season Summary
regardless.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [SoWestLep] BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at
Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az

 

  

I found and photographed a BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at
about 1100,  at Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az. Take the east
end birding trail. Opposite "Third Wash", just before the trail comes to a
large felled willow in a clearing, it was left (north) in a muddy area. It
showed no signs of leaving right away.





This may be a late date by a few weeks and one of only a few dozen records
in AZ.





Photos at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/15915388662/

 

 

Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ  85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
 www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan




Subject: Re: Large Orange Sulphur in Southern California
From: "Robb Hannawacker hannawacker AT gmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2014 17:13:02 -0800
P. agarithe have been common in the Coachella Valley this fall and early
winter, though I do not remember seeing them before. Perhaps I wasn't as
observant in past years.


I live within Joshua Tree National Park, near Cottonwood Spring. I was
hopeful that I would see a Large Orange Sulphur within the park boundaries,
to add one more butterfly to our ever growing list. None so far, but I have
seen them at the Cactus City Rest Area on Interstate 10 just a mile south
of the NPS boundary https://www.flickr.com/photos/39422575 AT N02/15732876447/
, and collected a male specimen at Chiriaco Summit 17 November 2014.


Robb
Subject: Large Orange Sulphur in Southern California
From: "fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2014 14:55:07 -0500
Greetings and Happy Christmas Shopping Season,


Best butterfly from my Thanksgiving in the Desert [Coachella Valley, Palm 
Springs and vicinity] was this Large Orange Sulphur, Phoebis agarithe, at the 
Living Desert, Palm Desert, CA, Riverside County, November 28, 2014. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15728928050/


This species is laughably common to the southeast, especially in the LRGV, but 
it is fairly scarce in CA, with sightings primarily from the SE corner of the 
state. But there appears to be a fairly stable colony in Palm Desert, based on 
my limited observation. I don't know whether they fly the year around here, but 
it is a possibility. Anyone know? 



Cheers,
Frank
Subject: BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2014 19:25:02 +0000 (UTC)
I found and photographed a BLACKENED BLUEWING (Myscelia cyananthe) today at 
about 1100,  at Patagonia Lake State Park, santa cruz co, az. Take the east 
end birding trail. Opposite "Third Wash", just before the trail comes to a 
large felled willow in a clearing, it was left (north) in a muddy area. It 
showed no signs of leaving right away. 

This may be a late date by a few weeks and one of only a few dozen records in 
AZ. 

Photos at:https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/15915388662/
   Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ  85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
 www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Re: Bakersfield, CA observations
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 20:17:00 -0800
Ken,

I had similar observation in San Diego with Painted Lady movement.

Couple of them were heading south, while 4 of them heading north.

Koji
San Diego

> 2014/11/29 19:54、'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep] 
 のメール: 

> 
> 
> Everyone:
> 
> Today, while at work in Bakersfield, CA. I had some interesting butterfly 
observations: 

> 
>  
> 
> Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus). Seen (two sightings over an hour 
apart) at the Lori Brock and Kern CountyMuseums (adjacent to each other), 
possibly the same individual, extends the previous LATE record for Kern County 
by 23 days. It was in good shape and likely emerged recently. 

> 
>  
> 
> In the Jamison Center Park:
> 
>  
> 
> Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): Most moving south but some were moving 
northwest. 10+ in about 30 minutes. 

> 
>  
> 
> West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): two are resident in the Park, but 10+ 
were seen either going south or moving northwest. Two were seen at the Kern 
County Museum and they were not moving directionally. 

> 
>  
> 
> Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta): Two or more, residents in the park.
> 
>  
> 
> Monarch (Danaus plexippus): one moving south, did not stay in park.
> 
>  
> 
>    It was a sunny day, temps in high 60's or low 70's.
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
> kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com  or 
flutterflies93306 AT att.net  

> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Bakersfield, CA observations
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 19:54:54 -0800
Everyone:

   Today, while at work in Bakersfield, CA.  I had some interesting
butterfly observations:

 

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus).  Seen (two sightings over an
hour apart) at the Lori Brock and Kern County Museums (adjacent to each
other), possibly the same individual, extends the previous LATE record for
Kern County by 23 days.  It was in good shape and likely emerged recently.

 

In the Jamison Center Park:

 

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): Most moving south but some were moving
northwest. 10+ in about 30 minutes.

 

West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): two are resident in the Park, but 10+
were seen either going south or moving northwest.  Two were seen at the Kern
County Museum and they were not moving directionally.

 

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta): Two or more, residents in the park.

 

Monarch (Danaus plexippus): one moving south, did not stay in park.

 

   It was a sunny day, temps in high 60's or low 70's.

 

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Happy Thanksgiving!
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 23:49:30 -0700
I hope it’s not too late to wish everyone a happy Thanksgiving.

Among the things I am thankful for are our vast public lands and the creatures 
that inhabit them. 


We should note the special role that artists and writers, such as George 
Catlin, James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Thomas Cole, and Frederick 
Edwin Church have played in popularizing the idea of national parks. In our own 
day, writer Ursula LeGuin (who just won a National Book Award) has been a 
conservation champion. 


Abraham Lincoln signed an act protecting the Yosemite Valley 150 years ago. 
Recently, President Obama has acted to preserve large areas of critical habitat 
from development. 


I am thankful for the organizations that work to protect nature, among them the 
Nature Conservancy, National Audubon Society, Sierra Club, Center for 
Biological Diversity, and Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. 


---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: RE: [leps-talk] Surveys for Butterfly migrations to Weldon
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 20:54:26 -0800
Rick:

   The precipitous drops in numbers of virtually all butterfly species at
Weldon  in 15 days could be interpreted by some that they are threatened by
extinction.  In reality, many migrants stop at Weldon to nectar and probably
do so for several days, then resume their travels.  Temperatures are
dropping and day length hours are getting shorter.  I suspect they are on
their way to the overwintering sites.

   Monarchs and Painted Ladies have been observed by me in Bakersfield in
recent days.  They appear to be heading west or south.  Some Painted Ladies
will likely overwinter in Bakersfield (as they did last winter) and at
Weldon.

   The changes in numbers are also reminders that any survey can become
meaningless if done too early or too late in that species flight period or
movements to gage the health of a population, a real issue with P. shasta
charlestonensis when evaluated for endangered status.

   Three species at Weldon today were new LATE records for Kern County.
Those were Checkered White, Purplish Copper and Marine Blue.  I collected
the two Purplish Coppers, a male and female and those were also LATE for the
STATE by one day.

   West Coast Ladies are still common in the Park where I work in
Bakersfield.  So not all individuals move into the Sierra.  This seems to be
an elevational movement in the mountains to nectar and not a north to south
movement.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: Re: [leps-talk] Surveys for Butterfly migrations to Weldon

 

  


To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com; Stephen A
Randall ; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2014 8:39 PM
Subject: [leps-talk] Surveys for Butterfly migrations to Weldon

 

  

Everyone:

   I have been observing the following species that were/are migrating or
emigrating in the southern Sierra Nevada at Weldon in Kern County ,
California from October 15-November 27, 2014.  The numbers really highlight
how numbers can vary dramatically even in a few days.

                                                Oct 15   Oct 28   Nov 4
Nov 12   Nov. 27 (latter date 2 hours)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus))        20          60+        100+   45-50
Zero

 

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)      12          60+        100+     140+
15

 

West Coast Lady (V. annabella)   Zero      10         100+     70-80
2

 

Queen (Danaus gilippus)                 1         12           14         16
Zero

 

Snout (Libytheana carinenta)        Zero       8-9          6-7        1-2
Zero

 

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)        1          10            1
Zero     Zero        

 

   Numbers largely seem to coincide with both weather conditions (Oct 15 was
cool & windy) and the quality and availability of blooming rabbitbrush and
other nectar sources.   

 

Other species observed today at Weldon, some LATE for Kern County in the
season.

Pyrgus communis complex-1

Pontia protodice-1

Colias eurytheme-1

Lycaena helloides-2 

Brephidium exilis-2 

Leptotes marina-1

 

Some may doubt that Monarchs and Painted Ladies at Weldon are migrating
south or westward and freeze to death. However there has been no winter
freeze yet.  What was obvious is that the Fall bloom is over and that
butterflies have dispersed, migrated or died over the 15 day gap since
November 12th.  Also no Monarchs were seen in the Havilah and Caliente areas
in the early afternoon.  Painted Lady's (2) were at Sandcut Hill 7 mi. E of
Bakersfield at 3 PM.  A West Coast Lady was seen flying at Lake Isabella
across Hwy. 178. The "bush" so prominent a draw November 12th was one of
only three bushes that was drawing any butterfly activity at all off Hwy.
178 on Kelso Valley Rd.

     

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 

 

 


Subject: Surveys for Butterfly migrations to Weldon
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 17:39:01 -0800
Everyone:

   I have been observing the following species that were/are migrating or
emigrating in the southern Sierra Nevada at Weldon in Kern County,
California from October 15-November 27, 2014.  The numbers really highlight
how numbers can vary dramatically even in a few days.

                                                Oct 15   Oct 28   Nov 4
Nov 12   Nov. 27 (latter date 2 hours)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus))        20          60+        100+   45-50
Zero

 

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)      12          60+        100+     140+
15

 

West Coast Lady (V. annabella)   Zero      10         100+     70-80
2

 

Queen (Danaus gilippus)                 1         12           14         16
Zero

 

Snout (Libytheana carinenta)        Zero       8-9          6-7        1-2
Zero

 

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)        1          10            1
Zero     Zero        

 

   Numbers largely seem to coincide with both weather conditions (Oct 15 was
cool & windy) and the quality and availability of blooming rabbitbrush and
other nectar sources.   

 

Other species observed today at Weldon, some LATE for Kern County in the
season.

Pyrgus communis complex-1

Pontia protodice-1

Colias eurytheme-1

Lycaena helloides-2 

Brephidium exilis-2 

Leptotes marina-1

 

Some may doubt that Monarchs and Painted Ladies at Weldon are migrating
south or westward and freeze to death. However there has been no winter
freeze yet.  What was obvious is that the Fall bloom is over and that
butterflies have dispersed, migrated or died over the 15 day gap since
November 12th.  Also no Monarchs were seen in the Havilah and Caliente areas
in the early afternoon.  Painted Lady's (2) were at Sandcut Hill 7 mi. E of
Bakersfield at 3 PM.  A West Coast Lady was seen flying at Lake Isabella
across Hwy. 178. The "bush" so prominent a draw November 12th was one of
only three bushes that was drawing any butterfly activity at all off Hwy.
178 on Kelso Valley Rd.

     

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: NE Tucson: 27 species still flying
From: "mary klinkel munchita AT msn.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Nov 2014 14:33:44 +0000
Sabino Canyon yesterday 11/26/14 was warm & sunny, mid-70’s temperatures, 
with some nectar plants still available. 



checkered white, cloudless sulphur, southern dogface, tailed orange, sleepy 
orange, Mexican yellow, dainty sulphur, mallow scrub-hairstreak (at least 6), 
leda ministreak, gray hairstreak, echo azure, marine blue, ceraunus blue, 
reakirt’s blue caterpillar being tended by ants, western pygmy-blue, queen, 
snout, gulf fritillary, Texan crescent, common buckeye, red admiral, painted 
lady, empress leilia, funereal duskywing, common/white checkered-skipper, 
orange skipperling, fiery skipper, eufala skipper 




Happy Thanksgiving!!  Mary Klinkel, Tucson, AZ



Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Hammock Skipper
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 13:58:38 -0500
Lepsters,
 
Yet another Hammock Skipper (Polygonus leo) has arrived in the yard  today. 
The only significance of this is that this is the fourth one this fall  
that I've seen in my yard. I'm lucky to see one a year.
 
No sign of the female Soldier. She was last seen a week ago. Bugs are  
tapering off in the yard but we've managed to escape frost so far so the  
crucita might have another good week or so of bloom on it.
 
Cheers,  Jim B
Subject: Harshaw Road, Santa Cruz Co, AZ, Barred Yellow, another late date
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 23:08:51 +0000 (UTC)
Today at the Santa Cruz Co, AZ,  the Harshaw Road rabbitbrush was 95% dead, 
but butterflies persist, including at least one late date BARRED YELLOW (Eurema 
daira). About 12 species there, including a very fresh ACMON BLUE (Plebejus 
acmon). 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/15852551291/  At the Las Cienegas 
National Conservation Area, Pima Co, AZ there was a rather fresh GREAT PURPLE 
HAIRSTREAK (Atlides halesus) and many others. 

 
Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ  85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
 www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] RE: [leps-talk] Shapiro and his migration notes.
From: "Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 09:01:39 -0800
Harry Pavulaan wrote:

> While the common perception indicates a southward migration 
> in fall, I have seen increased numbers of Vanessa cardui
> along the southern New England and Long Island coast in
> fall, but these almost always seem to be nectaring on th
> abundant Solidago that grows in the swales behind the
> dunes.  Same with Junonia coenia.  Yet I have never
> actually witnessed directional movement in these two
> species as I did with Danaus plexippus and Polygonia
> interrogationis.  My clear impression in Rhode Island
> and on Long Island is that they gather along the coast,
> remain behind after plexippus departs, but perish with
> the first hard freeze.
>  
> My own observations seem to indicate that if there is a
> southward migration in fall, it must be rather imperceptible.
>  A migration of individuals going their own way south,
> with no migratory paths such as along the coast. 

Harry, those are exactly the same experiences I have had
in the Sierra foothills of central California in October and
November and in Iowa, Nebraska and Oklahoma in September.

The late summer and fall Painted Ladies spend a huge
amount of time nectaring - the same butterfly one sees
in the morning on a butterfly bush will be there several
hours later - but the southward flight behavior is
not something I routinely see. In the spring the reverse
is true - the northward flight behavior is very obvious
and the butterflies seem to spend relatively little time
nectaring.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Cherubini 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: [leps-talk] Shapiro and his migration notes.
From: "Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:37:15 +0000
All:

While the common perception indicates a southward migration in fall, I have 
seen increased numbers of Vanessa cardui along the southern New England and 
Long Island coast in fall, but these almost always seem to be nectaring on the 
abundant Solidago that grows in the swales behind the dunes. Same with Junonia 
coenia. Yet I have never actually witnessed directional movement in these two 
species as I did with Danaus plexippus and Polygonia interrogationis. My clear 
impression in Rhode Island and on Long Island is that they gather along the 
coast, remain behind after plexippus departs, but perish with the first hard 
freeze. 


My own observations seem to indicate that if there is a southward migration in 
fall, it must be rather imperceptible. A migration of individuals going their 
own way south, with no migratory paths such as along the coast. 


Interestingly, I have heard reports to the contrary, with some observers 
claiming to witness "hundreds" of both cardui and coenia moving south over open 
water (i.e. Chesapeake Bay) in fall. Clearly a lot to be learned of these 
migrations. 


Harry Pavulaan

To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com; 
TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com 

From: TILS-leps-talk-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 09:11:46 -0800
Subject: [leps-talk] Shapiro and his migration notes.












































































Everyone:


   If you have Shapiro's San Francisco Bay Area
and Sacramento Valley book, read the species accounts
for Painted Lady and West Coast Lady.


   Shapiro DID recognize a Fall migration for
Vanessa cardui and mentioned that the migration was more casual in nature.
If I read his comments correctly, spring migrants hatch out with body fat that
powers their northward movements while fall migrants lack such body fat and
have to spend much more time seeking sustenance.  So their directional
movement would be less likely to be observed.


   On page 197 Shapiro states: "A reverse
(southward) migration occurs from late August through November. This is a much
more casual affair. The butterflies, that were mostly born in the Pacific 
Northwest, are not provisioned with fat and must 

feed as they go."


   Shapiro also mentions elevational movements up
or downslope for Vanessa annabella but no movements going north or south.
They can be hilltoppers.





Best Wishes, Ken Davenport


kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net

















































 		 	   		  
Subject: RE: [NEleps] New digital Mourning Cloaks
From: "Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 04:56:49 +0000
Norbert, all:

Amazingly, hyperborea is most distinct from all other antiopa subspecies. 
Despite descriptions of antiopa in texts, these have a red dorsal ground color. 
Some are remarkably red. Eurasian antiopa is more blackish, as is lintneri. 


Harry

To: WCanButterflies AT yahoogroups.com; TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com; 
DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com; butterfly_obs AT yahoogroups.ca; 
NorWestLeps AT yahoogroups.com; neleps AT yahoogroups.com; sowestlep AT yahoogroups.com 

From: NEleps-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 09:35:32 -0700
Subject: [NEleps] New digital Mourning Cloaks
















      
























I previously put pics of some older and faded Cloak specimens in my cloak album 
on 
flickrhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/118126948 AT N03/sets/72157642797352014/Yesterday 
I added jpg format screen clips from pdf files, showing some fresh/fresher 
individuals of the taxa antiopa, asopos, hyperborea and lintnerii.The source 
pdf files are available in my public folder on 
Onedrivehttp://1drv.ms/1pPxZrEThese provide the option of viewing the pics up 
to 300% magnification without signifiant quality reduction.One thing I have 
learned from watching Cloak specimens fade over the past 9 years is that 
hyperborea usually fades from blackish to brownish faster and to a larger 
degree than other cloak taxa. Even some very fresh hyperborea start off with 
noticeable brown on venter. Norbert KondlaRimbey, Alberta 































 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: LRGV 2014
From: "fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 14:46:04 -0500
Hi again,



The album I posted to Facebook yesterday did not carry forward my captions, 
which contained the time, place, and ID information. So that noble experiment 
didn't work. I have therefore now also posted to Flickr, which retains that 
information. Anyone who wants to know what I saw and not just the pictures, can 
access that here. 

https://www.flickr.com/phot…/fsmodel/sets/72157647069045404/



Cheers,
Frank



-----Original Message-----
From: fsmodel 
To: MassLep ; sowestlep 
Sent: Wed, Nov 19, 2014 7:36 pm
Subject: LRGV 2014


Happy Week-Before-Thanksgiving,


I am back from the LRGV. I have posted my photos to Facebook [rather than 
Flickr] and you can access the album here: 




https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.864401406933577.1073741826.100000911786591&type=3 



Three US lifers [curved-wing metalmark, pearly gray hairstreak, common 
bluevent]. It was a very good fall season and most people had many more lifers 
than I. On the other hand, my "secondary" butterflies included a lot of 
goodies, such as Xami hairstreak, Lacey's scrub hairstreak, saltbush sootywing, 
red-crescent scrub hairstreak, Erichson's white skipper, red rim, lantana scrub 
hairstreak [with good dorsal shots of both male and fermale], etc. 



So click on the link and enjoy the show.


Cheers,
Frank
Subject: BARRED YELLOW (Eurema daira) at Harshaw Rd, santa Cruz Co, az - Late date?
From: "Alan Schmierer aaschmierer AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 22:21:53 +0000 (UTC)
 There were 3, possibly 4, BARRED YELLOW (Eurema daira) at the mostly-gone-by 
rabbitbrush along Harshaw Rd, Patagonia Mts, Santa Cruz Co, AZ near noon today. 
One was rather pale like the "summer from" and 2 were more marked with brown 
ventrally like the "winter form". This may be a late date for Arizona. There is 
a photo of the latter at:https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/15651059168/ 




Alan Schmierer
PO Box 626
Patagonia, AZ  85624
805-801-3701 (cell)
PHOTOS AT:
 www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan
Subject: Re: soldier update again
From: "'Hank Brodkin' hbrodkin AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 07:38:35 -0700
Jim:
Is this not a latest date for P. leo?

Hank Brodkin 
Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
31°26’59.8”N 110°16’02.8”W
hbrodkin AT cox.net
"Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
"Finding Butterflies in Arizona - a Guide to the Best Sites"
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b222/hbrodkin/


From: mailto:SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2014 1:21 PM
To: DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com ; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [SoWestLep] soldier update again




Lepstalkers,

Had the Soldier in the yard yesterday afternoon after it was MIA for 
Sunday/Monday. Today, no show so far but a Hammock Skipper (Ploygonus leo) in 
reasonably good shape is in the house also on crucita. 


Jim B


Subject: LRGV 2014
From: "fsmodel AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 22:36:38 -0500
Happy Week-Before-Thanksgiving,


I am back from the LRGV. I have posted my photos to Facebook [rather than 
Flickr] and you can access the album here: 




https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.864401406933577.1073741826.100000911786591&type=3 



Three US lifers [curved-wing metalmark, pearly gray hairstreak, common 
bluevent]. It was a very good fall season and most people had many more lifers 
than I. On the other hand, my "secondary" butterflies included a lot of 
goodies, such as Xami hairstreak, Lacey's scrub hairstreak, saltbush sootywing, 
red-crescent scrub hairstreak, Erichson's white skipper, red rim, lantana scrub 
hairstreak [with good dorsal shots of both male and fermale], etc. 



So click on the link and enjoy the show.


Cheers,
Frank
Subject: soldier update again
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 15:21:47 -0500
Lepstalkers,
 
Had the Soldier in the yard yesterday afternoon after it was MIA for  
Sunday/Monday. Today, no show so far but a Hammock Skipper (Ploygonus  leo) in 
reasonably good shape is in the house also on crucita.
 
Jim B
Subject: Re: Re: [DesertLeps] Warmest oceans ever recorded
From: "Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 17:44:23 +0000 (UTC)
John,
Obviously you and I and everyone else knows that the Earth has gone through a 
series of NATURALLY occurring warming and cooling cycles over the past 
100 thousand years or thereabouts - with "man's inputs"....We're apparently in 
just another such (natural) cycle (which from what I have been reading has 
actually been LEVELLING off over the past decade. 

Oh, and I suppose it's just a shame that the ESA wasn't in place late in the 
Cretaceous...Who know, Tyrannosaurus Rex might have been "saved" and still be 
extant... 

Alex
  From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" 
 

 To: Lep1 ; Lep2  
 Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 2:31 AM
 Subject: [SoWestLep] Re: [DesertLeps] Warmest oceans ever recorded
   
  >>> Did the Vikings record sea temperatures, when they settled in Greenland? 
Should have been the same as today. 

 According to the IPCC in 2007, "Average Northern Hemisphere temperatures 
during the second half of the 20th century were very likely higher than during 
any other 50-year period in the last 500 years and likely the highest in at 
least the past 1,300 years."  The thermometer dates from the early 17th 
century. World temperature records exist for only the last 150 or so years. 
 However, using proxies for actual temperature measurements, such as tree 
rings, lake sediments, ice cores, and corals, on the one hand, and historical 
records of crop harvest dates and ice-free periods in harbors, on the other, 
augmented by diary entries of heat waves and frosts, scientists are able to 
form a fairly accurate impression of world temperatures over the last 
millennium or two. There are now over two dozen reconstructions of world temps 
over the last 2,000 years, leading to a consensus that we are now in the 
warmest period of the last two millennia. --- 

John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!  #yiv0681699593 #yiv0681699593 -- 
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Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] Warmest oceans ever recorded
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 00:31:23 -0700
>>> Did the Vikings record sea temperatures, when they settled in Greenland? 
Should have been the same as today. 



According to the IPCC in 2007, "Average Northern Hemisphere temperatures during 
the second half of the 20th century were very likely higher than during any 
other 50-year period in the last 500 years and likely the highest in at least 
the past 1,300 years." 


The thermometer dates from the early 17th century. World temperature records 
exist for only the last 150 or so years. 


However, using proxies for actual temperature measurements, such as tree rings, 
lake sediments, ice cores, and corals, on the one hand, and historical records 
of crop harvest dates and ice-free periods in harbors, on the other, augmented 
by diary entries of heat waves and frosts, scientists are able to form a fairly 
accurate impression of world temperatures over the last millennium or two. 


There are now over two dozen reconstructions of world temps over the last 2,000 
years, leading to a consensus that we are now in the warmest period of the last 
two millennia. 


---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: Warmest oceans ever recorded
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 15:12:22 -0700
I saw this on ScienceDaily:

Warmest oceans ever recorded

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141114090009.htm?utm_source=feedburner 

---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: Another Soldier (Danaus eresimus) in Tucson; 15 Nov 2014
From: "'Robert A. Behrstock' rbehrstock AT cox.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 20:21:00 -0700
Dear Lepsters,

 

On the heels of Jim Brocks Soldier in his yard a couple days ago:

 

Karen and I were at Desert Survivors (1020 W Starr Pass Blvd, Tucson) this
morning loading up on plants. This native plant nursery sells hundreds of
small plants, trees, vines, shrubs, etc. from S Arizona and N Mexico and is
an astonishing resource for naturalist/gardeners. Their plants are
propagated by seed and cuttings; theyre not bringing truckloads of plants
in from south of the border. There was lots of nectar available and there
were plenty of butterflies on the property - Queens, several species of
pierids, ladies, several blues, etc. Around 11:30, I noted one basking
individual that was a deeper burnt orange then the surrounding Queens - a
useful field mark for the several dozen Soldiers I saw in Texas during the
last couple of weeks. Also obvious was the white spot band that crossed the
forewing tip but didnt turn inward toward the abdomen (as in a Queen). When
I got a bit closer, the black veins in the forewing tip were obvious - not
the case with Queens. This individual was a male. When we photographed it
around 11:45 it was resting on a boneset/mistflower (Eupatorium or whatever
it is now) about 40 in front of the office door.  Both Karen and I obtained
dorsal and ventral photos. We were able to share the sighting with two staff
members and one other customer.  I will circulate some photos tomorrow to
the Powers That Be. Note: Desert Survivors is not open on Sunday or Monday.


 

Best to all,

RAB  

 

 

Robert A. Behrstock

10359 S. Thicket Pl. 

Hereford, AZ 85615

Phone:  (520) 378-3262

Cell: (520) 732-4784

N31 22' 49.75"  W110 13' 41.08",  5,012' elev. 

Please visit my website:  
http://www.naturewideimages.com/

Birdlife of Houston, Galveston, and the Upper Texas Coast

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Birdlife-of-Houston-Galveston-and-the-Upper
-Texa,356.aspx

Finding Birds on the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

http://www.tamupress.com/product/Finding-Birds-on-the-Great-Texas-Coastal-Bi
rding-T,709.aspx

Dragonflies & Damselflies of the Southwest

 
http://www.rionuevo.com/book.php?book_isbn=9781933855141 

 

 
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 14:47:09 -0500
The female Danaus eresimus is still hanging out today in my  yard. Now I 
wonder if she might have been here sooner since I was out of  town until last 
Wednesday afternoon.
 
Jim B
Subject: yard today
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 17:15:44 -0500
Lepheads,
 
Despite the weather it turned out to be a good day for butterflies in the  
yard. I think I guessed there were about 50 individuals hanging around but 
it  turns out to be closer to 100. Judy and John can attest to that fact. 
Counted 23  species, the best being the aforementioned Soldier and a 
Mallow-scrub Hairstreak. I did not see the Dorantes Longtail that showed up 
yesterday. 

 
La lista:
 
Giant Swallowtail    P  cresphontes                         1
Checkered White    P.  protodice                            1
Mexican Yellow      E mexicana  and  larvae           10
Sleepy Orange       E  nicippe                                  5
Dainty Sulphur       N iole   and  larvae                     1
Southern Dogface   C  cesonia                                8
Fatal Metalmark     C  nemesis                               3
Gray Hairstreak      S  melinus                               3
Mallow-scrub HS    S  istapa                                  1
Great Blue HS        A  halesus                               2
Ceraunus Blue        H  ceraunus                            4
Marine Blue            L  marina                                6
Western Pygmy B   B  exile                                  1
Monarch                  D  plexippus                          2
Queen                     D  gilippus                            20-25
Soldier                 D  eresimus                           1
Texan Crescent       A  texana                             20 -30
Painted Lady           V  cardui                              10-15
American Lady        V  virginiensis                        1
American Snout       L  bachmani                          5-15
Gulf  Fritillary            A  vanillae                            2
Eufala Skipper         L  eufala                              2
Fiery Skipper           H  phyleus                            3
 
Jim B
 
Subject: Final Soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 16:33:07 -0500
Have not seen the eresimus since about 2 PM when it started to really cloud 
 up and get windy. Thanks to the hundreds of folks that stopped by!
 
With sun tomorrow I'll check for her again.
 
Jim B
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 15:09:21 -0500
She's still here. Audience has swollen to three folks counting myself.  
There is also a Mallow Scrub Hairstreak nearby.
 
Jim B
Subject: soldier news
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 13:50:53 -0500
Rich Bailowitz informs me that the last sighting on record was 2001. Does  
that tell you how rarely this bug is observed in Arizona? I'm jazzed that 
not  only is it in my yard but it is in really excellent condition for 
photographs. The weather is improving and warming up big time now. I must have 
50 

butterflies  in the yard - mostly queens and Texan crescents but also Great 
Purple  Hairstreaks, Mexican Yellows, etc.
 
Jim B
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 13:43:42 -0500
She's back! Just spotted her on the crucita. If you want to drop by send me 
 an E-mail. If I've already contacted you just come through the arched gate 
next  to my garage. I'll be keeping an eye out for you.
 
Jim B
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 13:06:18 -0500
Lepsters,
 
No Soldier as of this posting so I'm going to call it for today unless she  
shows meaning no more posts on this. Thanks for all your interest. If I see 
her  I'll let you know.
 
Jim B
Subject: Shapiro and his migration notes.
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 09:11:46 -0800
Everyone:

   If you have Shapiro's San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento Valley book,
read the species accounts for Painted Lady and West Coast Lady.

   Shapiro DID recognize a Fall migration for Vanessa cardui and mentioned
that the migration was more casual in nature.  If I read his comments
correctly, spring migrants hatch out with body fat that powers their
northward movements while fall migrants lack such body fat and have to spend
much more time seeking sustenance.  So their directional movement would be
less likely to be observed.

   On page 197 Shapiro states: "A reverse (southward) migration occurs from
late August through November. This is a much more casual affair. The
butterflies, that were mostly born in the Pacific Northwest, are not
provisioned with fat and must feed as they go."

   Shapiro also mentions elevational movements up or downslope for Vanessa
annabella but no movements going north or south.  They can be hilltoppers.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 12:03:28 -0500
Still no sign, folks. Cloud cover is an issue so I'll keep checking. Next  
post will be 11 AM unless I spot her prior. Activity was good around 9:30 AM 
 with full sun but it has tailed off. My Mexican Yellows aren't even flying 
and  most of the queens are basking on trees. :(
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 11:30:18 -0500
No sight of her yet. Dealing with cloud cover the next hour. Next post will 
 be 10 AM.
 
Jim B
Subject: soldier update
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 11:12:26 -0500
Lepnuts,
 
The yard is just warming up and so are the Queens. No sign of the Soldier  
yet but the crucita is still mostly in shade. I'll have another update at 
9:30  AM or in roughly 20 minutes.
 
Jim B
Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] Danaus eresimus
From: "Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 12:44:39 +0000 (UTC)
What do y'all think:
Is it EH-RE-Sigh-mus or eh-re-si-MUS?
I've always called it the first way.....

Alex
  From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [DesertLeps]"  

 To: DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2014 5:36 PM
 Subject: [DesertLeps] Danaus eresimus
   
[an error occurred while processing this directive] 


Lepheads, I've had a Soldier (Danaus eresimus) in the yard the entire day. 
It's a girl and it's in excellent shape. Good chance it will stay and 
be around tomorrow. It's been on the same patch of crucita all day. If you 
would like to come by tomorrow and see it, reply to this post and I'll give you 
my address. I have to do some errands in the morning then by 10 AM I'll check 
to see if it's still here and I'll send out an E-mail saying yea or nay. This 
is the first one I've seen in the state for 15 years or so and a first for the 
yard!  Jim B 




  
Subject: RE: Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants
From: "Ken Wilson kaeagles AT hotmail.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 03:18:32 +0000
Paul,


I still have Gulf Fritillary coming to my yard. Last year was the first year I 
ever saw them here. We have a passion vine and I've seen as many as 6 cats at 
various stages on it. Had a fresh female here 2 days ago. 



Ken Wilson
Pleasanton CA


CC: SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com; TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com
To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com
From: SoWestLep-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 18:27:02 -0800
Subject: [SoWestLep] Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants












































 

      Kenneth Davenport wrote:






> Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata): the first collected in the


> southern Sierra Nevada to my knowledge






I also had a fresh male Gulf Frit in my north-central Sierra foothill


El Dorado, Calif. yard last week at 1,505 feet elevation 35 miles


east of Sacramento and 4 miles west of downtown Placerville,


Calif. nectaring on buddleia bush flowers - only the


second Gulf I have seen in 26 years living at this location.  And


the first one was seen last year.  So maybe these Gulfs are


increasing in abundance over time in inland California.






No one grows passion vines in the Sierra foothills because


winters are too cold for the vines to survive.






Art Shapiro has no records of Gulf Frit sightings in the Sierra


foothills or higher elevations:


http://butterfly.ucdavis.edu/butterfly/Agraulis/vanillae






Paul Cherubini


El Dorado, Calif.






























   		 	   		  
Subject: Danaus eresimus
From: "JimJoanJoy AT aol.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 17:36:43 -0500
Lepheads,
 
I've had a Soldier (Danaus eresimus) in the yard the entire day. It's a  
girl and it's in excellent shape. Good chance it will stay and  be around 
tomorrow. It's been on the same patch of crucita all day. If you would like to 

come by tomorrow and see it, reply to this post and I'll give you  my 
address. I have to do some errands in the morning then by 10 AM I'll check to 
see 

if it's still here and I'll send out an E-mail saying yea or  nay.
 
This is the first one I've seen in the state for 15 years or so and a first 
 for the yard! 
 
Jim B
Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation | The Scientist Magazine®
From: "Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 21:53:00 +0000 (UTC)
Of course...anyone with a collection will notice how the eyespots (ocelli) of 
Buckeyes or Satyrs attract bird attacks.... 

Alex
  From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [DesertLeps]" 
 

 To: Lep1 ; Lep2  
 Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2014 4:49 PM
 Subject: [DesertLeps] Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation | The Scientist 
Magazine® 

   
[an error occurred while processing this directive] 


Tucson lepsters will remember Katy Prudic, the lead 
author: http://shar.es/1XnIip 


Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of 
distracting predators from vital body parts. 


This message was sent using ShareThis (http://www.sharethis.com) ---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!



  
Subject: Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation | The Scientist Magazine
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 14:49:38 -0700
Tucson lepsters will remember Katy Prudic, the lead author:
http://shar.es/1XnIip

Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of 
distracting predators from vital body parts. 


This message was sent using ShareThis (http://www.sharethis.com)
---
John Saba
Tucson, AZ
Nature Study Is a Grand Adventure!
Subject: RE: Re: [SoWestLep] Painted Lady southward migration
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 08:47:04 -0800
Paul:

   I agree, the Monarch seems to have lots of back up plans.  They don't put
all their "eggs" in a single overwintering site, or even in a lot of
overwintering sites.  I see that in the area I live and Monarchs do filter
into the Eastern Mojave Desert into NW Arizona.  Maybe some of those Weldon
Monarchs go there.

   I also note that individual Monarchs (and Painted Ladies) at Weldon may
pause at a patch of flowers for hours in the morning before disappearing in
the afternoon when winds come up.  I even saw a Queen individual sit on one
bush (yes, the "bush) for an hour and a half through 3 checks.

   During these calm early hours, non directional seems to be the rule for
both species.  Snouts on the other hand are going north and only pause
briefly.  Novel idea: Migrating north for the winter!  I wonder if any of
those Snouts will survive the winter in the Sierra?

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [DesertLeps] Re: [SoWestLep] Painted Lady southward migration

 

  

Kenneth Davenport wrote:

> Paul:
> A LOT of Monarchs right now are also non-directional or flying northward
> at least for short distances. 

True. The southward migratory drive of monarchs weakens in
early November and vanishes by Thanksgiving. That's why 
considerable numbers of fall migrant monarchs don't reach
the traditional big overwintering sites along the California
coast and high mountains of Michoacan, Mexico. Instead,
they end up spending the winter at widely scattered spots
in the desert Southwest, the lowlands of central and northern
Mexico, parts of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts including islands 
just off the coast of N & S Carolina.

This is one reason why the monarch migration is extinction-proof;
i.e. it is inconceivable that any natural or anthropogenic calamity
could wipe out all or nearly all the overwintering monarchs.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


Subject: Re: Painted Lady southward migration
From: "Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 08:12:05 -0800
Kenneth Davenport wrote:

> Paul:
> A LOT of Monarchs right now are also non-directional or flying northward
> at least for short distances. 

True.  The southward migratory drive of monarchs weakens in
early November and vanishes by Thanksgiving.  That's why 
considerable numbers of fall migrant monarchs don't reach
the traditional big overwintering sites along the California
coast and high mountains of Michoacan, Mexico.  Instead,
they end up spending the winter at widely scattered spots
in the desert Southwest, the lowlands of central and northern
Mexico, parts of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts including islands 
just off the coast of N & S Carolina.

This is one reason why the monarch migration is extinction-proof;
i.e. it is inconceivable that any natural or anthropogenic calamity
could wipe out all or nearly all the overwintering monarchs.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.






------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Cherubini 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: [leps-talk] Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 07:50:29 -0800
Eddie:

   Thank you for providing the source document information.  A LOT of people
were involved weren't they?  Awake! doesn't usually give references but I
know that every statement made in that magazine has to have a reference/s to
back it up and that organization keeps such records.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: RE: [leps-talk] Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe

 

Hello All

1.                              For those wishing to have the full reference
to the Painted Lady article, here it is:

Multi-generational long-distance migration of insects: studying the painted
lady butterfly in the Western Palaearctic. 2012. Constant Stefanescu,
Ferran Pramo, Susanne kesson, Marta Alarcn, Anna vila, Tom Brereton,
Jofre Carnicer, Louis F. Cassar, Richard Fox, Janne Helil, Jane K. Hill,
Norbert Hirneisen, Nils Kjelln, Elisabeth Khn, Mikko Kuussaari, Matti
Leskinen, Felix Liechti, Martin Musche, Eugenie C. Regan, Don R. Reynolds,
David B. Roy, Nils Ryrholm, Heiko Schmaljohann, Josef Settele, Chris D.
Thomas, Chris van Swaay and Jason W. Chapman. Ecography 35: 001014, 2012.

2.                              Google on Ecography 35: 001014, 2012 and
youll find a download available via ResearchGate.

3.                               

4.                              The eastern Mediterranean experiences
something similar each year, with spring migrations northwards through
countries of the Levant and return (far less noticeable) migrations in the
autumn.  Numbers are generally smaller than in the western Mediterranean 
although much work remains to be done in the east. 

 

All the best

Eddie

 

CBSG-logoWeb

Eddie John FLS, FRES

  www.cyprusbutterflies.co.uk

 

From: TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of 'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [TILS-leps-talk]
Sent: 13 November 2014 06:43
To: desertleps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com;
TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [leps-talk] Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe

 

  

Everyone:

   I stated that Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe.  I had understood
they did that for a long time.  But anyway, there is a one page article in
the Awake! magazine on page 14 in the December 2013 issue entitled "The
Painted Lady, a Mystery Revealed published by Jehovah's Witnesses.  It is a
science article which can probably be accessed by going to JW.org   I will
leave out the picture of a Painted Lady with the wings folded over its back.
You all know what they look like anyway.

 

   " European observers have long admired colorful painted lady butterflies
(Vanessa cardui) and wondered what happened to them at the end of each
summer. Do they simply perish with the onset of cold weather?  Fresh
research reveals an extraordinary story. The butterflies make an annual
journey between northern Europe and Africa.

   Researchers combined results from sophisticated radar with thousands of
sightings reported by volunteers across Europe. The results revealed  that
as the summer ends, millions of painted lady  butterflies migrate south,
mostly flying at an altitude of more than 1,600 feet (500 m)--therefore
hardly ever seen by humans. The butterflies wait for favorable winds, which
they ride at an average speed of 28 miles per hour (45 KM/h) on the long
trip to Africa. Their annual migration is up to 9,300 miles (15,000 km)
long, beginning from as far north as the fringes of the arctic and
terminating as far south as tropical West Africa.  The trip is almost double
that of the North American monarch butterfly.  It takes six successive
generations of painted ladies to complete the round trip.

   Professor Jane Hill of the University of York, in England, explains: "The
Painted Lady" just keeps going, breeding and moving." Annually, those steps
take the whole population from northern Europe to Africa and back again.

  "This tiny creature weighing less than a gram (0.04 oz) with a brain the
size of a pin head and no opportunity to learn from older, experienced
individuals, undertakes an epic intercontinental migration, states Richard
Fox, surveys manager at Butterfly Conservation.  This insect was "once
thought to be blindly led, at the mercy of the wind, into an evolutionary
dead end in the lethal British winter," Fox adds. Yet this study "has shown
Painted Ladies to be sophisticated travellers."

 

End of article:  My personal comments:

 

  Since they do this across the "big pond", should it surprise us that
Painted Ladies would do the same in North America?  I saw over 140 Painted
Lady's at Weldon in the Kern River Valley in the southern Sierra Nevada
today on a November 12th.  That would seem most unusual so late in the
Season were they not migrating. Based on personal experience, most Fall
migrations of Vanessa cardui have more individuals than the spring northward
flights in my region, though Spring flights can have much greater numbers at
times and are more ubiquitous in their occurrence.  Their southern migration
in California may also use high elevation flight, maybe why they are seen in
the Sherman Pass area a few miles to the north commonly above 8000'
elevation.  Their movements seem more leisurely than the spring migrations
and they seem more preoccupied feeding which may explain non directional
flights happening more frequently.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Kenneth Davenport" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: [leps-talk] Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 23:05:05 -0800
Paul:

   Send me the County and date and I can publish your Gulf Fritillary
record.

 

   I also have this record for it from Marla Sisneros submitted to BAMONA
with a photo or two:

 

Agraulis vanillae: Diamond Spring 16 Sept. 2014, El Dorado County.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [leps-talk] Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants

 

  

Kenneth Davenport wrote:

> Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata): the first collected in the
> southern Sierra Nevada to my knowledge 

I also had a fresh male Gulf Frit in my north-central Sierra foothill
El Dorado, Calif. yard last week at 1,505 feet elevation 35 miles 
east of Sacramento and 4 miles west of downtown Placerville,
Calif. nectaring on buddleia bush flowers - only the 
second Gulf I have seen in 26 years living at this location. And
the first one was seen last year. So maybe these Gulfs are
increasing in abundance over time in inland California. 

No one grows passion vines in the Sierra foothills because 
winters are too cold for the vines to survive. 

Art Shapiro has no records of Gulf Frit sightings in the Sierra
foothills or higher elevations:
http://butterfly.ucdavis.edu/butterfly/Agraulis/vanillae

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


Subject: Sexy spiders - link
From: "zapjammer AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 06:56:23 +0000 (UTC)
All, 

Here is a link of some interest: 

http://www.insidescience.org/blog/2014/11/11/smell-sex-lures-moths-spidery-doom 


Jonathan P. Pelham 
Subject: Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 22:42:37 -0800
Everyone:

   I stated that Painted Lady's migrate south in Europe.  I had understood
they did that for a long time.  But anyway, there is a one page article in
the Awake! magazine on page 14 in the December 2013 issue entitled "The
Painted Lady, a Mystery Revealed published by Jehovah's Witnesses.  It is a
science article which can probably be accessed by going to JW.org   I will
leave out the picture of a Painted Lady with the wings folded over its back.
You all know what they look like anyway.

 

   " European observers have long admired colorful painted lady butterflies
(Vanessa cardui) and wondered what happened to them at the end of each
summer. Do they simply perish with the onset of cold weather?  Fresh
research reveals an extraordinary story. The butterflies make an annual
journey between northern Europe and Africa.

   Researchers combined results from sophisticated radar with thousands of
sightings reported by volunteers across Europe. The results revealed  that
as the summer ends, millions of painted lady  butterflies migrate south,
mostly flying at an altitude of more than 1,600 feet (500 m)--therefore
hardly ever seen by humans. The butterflies wait for favorable winds, which
they ride at an average speed of 28 miles per hour (45 KM/h) on the long
trip to Africa. Their annual migration is up to 9,300 miles (15,000 km)
long, beginning from as far north as the fringes of the arctic and
terminating as far south as tropical West Africa.  The trip is almost double
that of the North American monarch butterfly.  It takes six successive
generations of painted ladies to complete the round trip.

   Professor Jane Hill of the University of York, in England, explains: "The
Painted Lady" just keeps going, breeding and moving." Annually, those steps
take the whole population from northern Europe to Africa and back again.

  "This tiny creature weighing less than a gram (0.04 oz) with a brain the
size of a pin head and no opportunity to learn from older, experienced
individuals, undertakes an epic intercontinental migration, states Richard
Fox, surveys manager at Butterfly Conservation.  This insect was "once
thought to be blindly led, at the mercy of the wind, into an evolutionary
dead end in the lethal British winter," Fox adds. Yet this study "has shown
Painted Ladies to be sophisticated travellers."

 

End of article:  My personal comments:

 

  Since they do this across the "big pond", should it surprise us that
Painted Ladies would do the same in North America?  I saw over 140 Painted
Lady's at Weldon in the Kern River Valley in the southern Sierra Nevada
today on a November 12th.  That would seem most unusual so late in the
Season were they not migrating. Based on personal experience, most Fall
migrations of Vanessa cardui have more individuals than the spring northward
flights in my region, though Spring flights can have much greater numbers at
times and are more ubiquitous in their occurrence.  Their southern migration
in California may also use high elevation flight, maybe why they are seen in
the Sherman Pass area a few miles to the north commonly above 8000'
elevation.  Their movements seem more leisurely than the spring migrations
and they seem more preoccupied feeding which may explain non directional
flights happening more frequently.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: RE: Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 21:34:04 -0800
Chris:

   That would be interesting.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [SoWestLep] Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration

 

  

I have always wondered if Queens had a fall migration.  If I had stayed in
AZ, that was a direction I was going to take the monarch study, start
tagging queens in fall to study their movements.

 

 


Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio

To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com  

 

 


Subject: RE: Painted Lady southward migration
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 21:26:24 -0800
Paul:
  A LOT of Monarchs right now are also non-directional or flying northward
at least for short distances.  My experience in my area is that Fall
migrations are not as hurried and the butterflies are busy taking nectar.
But collecting by locality to the south shows the movement is generally
moving south.

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 

Subject: Re: [SoWestLep] Painted Lady southward migration

Ken wrote:

> Everyone:
>    Apparently many folks are not aware that Painted Lady Butterflies
> (Vanessa cardui) have a southward migration.  

Bob Allen and Koji reported them moving in northerly directions in recent
weeks in SoCal. So whereas we all agree Painted Ladies are moving
north in March-April throughout the West, their flight directions in the 
fall are more variable and inconsistent.  And some may not even
migrate as evidenced by the fact I can shoot video of them nectaring in
my Sierra foothill yard east of Sacramento until late November (until
the last of my Buddleia flowers are still in bloom).

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Kenneth Davenport" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Re: [DesertLeps] Painted Lady's and other migrants
From: "Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 18:27:02 -0800
Kenneth Davenport wrote:

> Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata): the first collected in the
> southern Sierra Nevada to my knowledge 

I also had a fresh male Gulf Frit in my north-central Sierra foothill
El Dorado, Calif. yard last week at 1,505 feet elevation 35 miles 
east of Sacramento and 4 miles west of downtown Placerville,
Calif. nectaring on buddleia bush flowers - only the 
second Gulf I have seen in 26 years living at this location.  And
the first one was seen last year.  So maybe these Gulfs are
increasing in abundance over time in inland California.  

No one grows passion vines in the Sierra foothills because 
winters are too cold for the vines to survive. 

Art Shapiro has no records of Gulf Frit sightings in the Sierra
foothills or higher elevations:
http://butterfly.ucdavis.edu/butterfly/Agraulis/vanillae

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.




------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Cherubini 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: [DesertLeps] Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:53:43 -0800
Alex:

   I believe that was evidence of a migration, just as it was for Monarchs
you saw there.  That is published in the Season Summary.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: [DesertLeps] Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration

 

  

There was a HUGE flight of them at and near Lake Havasu City, AZ as I
observed in early December 2000.......

 

One West Coast Lady was also observed among them...if there were more I
didn't notice them.

 

Alex
  

  _____  

From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [TILS-leps-talk]"

To: DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com;
TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:27 AM
Subject: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration

 

  

Everyone:

   Apparently many folks are not aware that Painted Lady Butterflies
(Vanessa cardui) have a southward migration.  Looking at some of the
literature, it is apparent some (many?) authors were only aware of the
spring migration.  In 2013 my region in south-central California saw an
extremely poor barely discernable spring migration north but had a major
southerly migration in the late summer and fall.  In fact Painted Lady
butterflies returning south in my area way outnumber the Monarchs out there.
The southerly movement is not a brief one, it lasts as long as the Monarch
migration...months.  Some Painted Lady's in the southern Sierra Nevada
overwinter in the Jawbone Canyon area and in the southern San Joaquin Valley
.

   Huge numbers in the Fall can be observed.  In the Hualapai Mts. of Mohave
County , AZ they have been so abundant as to be an incredible distraction.
I have seen them commonly in the Fall months moving south in the Mojave
Desert and like the Monarch, they follow the Sierra Nevada southward along
the Kern River Corridor and seem to me most common at high elevations that
have abundant late summer -fall nectar sources and water.

   I have been posting these observations for years in my posts and have an
article into the News of the Lepidopterists' Society, though that article
focuses more on the Monarch. I thought everyone was aware Painted Ladies
have a return migration just like the Monarch, but the route of the Painted
Lady movement may differ from Monarchs.  When the fall nectar sources to
support Monarchs, Queens and Painted Ladies, the butterflies disappear,
rather abruptly.  Where do these adults go and by what route?  Good question
but my thorough collecting in the southern Sierra and Mojave Desert (the
latter mostly in good years of rainfall).  Painted Ladies may seem
non-directional at sites where observed because they as individuals seem to
hold up at suitable locations that provide what they need and they aggregate
in such areas (they can be common at a site one day, scarce at the same site
a week later, then common the next day).  Robert Langston published spring
and fall records of Painted Ladies under "Migratory species" for years.
Believing both migrations in the spring and fall were well known I have not
done so.  At some point records become redundant.

   Maybe Fall Painted Lady migrations get less noted because they don't
appear to have prominent overwintering sites assembling in trees but I would
guess these butterflies largely migrate into Mexico with overwintering areas
in the southern portions within the southwestern states.  They also are not
tagged and monitored like Monarchs are.  Maybe they should be.

   Here are other butterfly movements I notice that maybe most don't:

(1) West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): While these do overwinter in cities
in the San Joaquin Valley, these butterflies become notably more common in
the Kern River Valley, the Kern River Corridor and even above 7000-9000' at
Sherman Pass where these are normally scarce from September into early
November then abruptly disappear when the fall blooms disappear.  Where do
all of these West Coast Lady's come from?

(2) Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta streckeri): This year they have
been observed and collected in small numbers at Weldon in the Kern River
Valley in the southern Sierra Nevada, apparently moving together in some
numbers (last week at Weldon I observed six and collected three in 20
minutes whereas the rest of the day there I only observed one).  I had a
similar experience there the week before.  There are maybe twelve documented
records of Snouts in the Sierra Nevada , but these may be a northwardly
emigration into the Sierra for no apparent survival purpose.

(3) Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole):  These may be migrants or maybe they
just disperse from high population areas like the Snouts.  Two were at
Weldon, but I also saw three in the White Mts. east of Bishop last summer.
One was at nearly 12,000' on Sheep Mountain flying with Hesperia miriamae.

(4) Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe): These appear to move into the southern
Sierra in the spring and fall and some individuals may overwinter there.

(5) Queens (Danaus gilippus): Breed in the Kern River Valley in Spring and
summer, probably from spring emigrants since this species can probably not
survive winters in that region.  They are common in early November most
years then abruptly disappear when the nectar sources do.  Where do they go?
I don't know but John Emmel told me once that they move southward into the
deserts elsewhere.

 

   Many of the most popular books used by the newer generation of
lepidopterists (watchers and collectors) have identification as the main
focus.  Not very many get books with more details that help all of us to get
into a deeper knowledge of the butterflies we seek to photograph or collect.
Maybe with respect to Painted Lady's, the return migration is not
nationwide, but more limited to the Pacific Coast states and western Arizona
?  Is there not a return migrations of Painted Ladies in Europe, Asia and
Africa ?

 

   While I am a collector, I am also very much a watcher.  If weather
permits, I may be heading back to the southern Sierra this morning to see
what I can find or observe.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 

 

 


Subject: Painted Lady's and other migrants
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:51:54 -0800
Everyone:

   Despite overcast conditions in Bakersfield I went to Weldon (November 12,
2014) in the Sierra where there was a weather inversion and conditions there
were sunny and fairly warm until a little after 1 PM when winds came up.  I
noticed a certain bush in full bloom as I turned right on Kelso Valley Rd.
off Hwy. 178 at about 10:25 AM. I stopped and checked it out.  The one bush
had 5 Monarchs, 6 Painted Lady's and 5 West Coast Lady's and 2 Queens.  That
bush would kind of become like the burning bush was to Moses in the book of
Exodus.  It would be historic through the collecting day until shadows
covered it by about 1:30 PM.

   Before I start discussing the days finds I have confirmed in the
literature that Painted Lady's do indeed migrate south at the end of summer
from northern Europe down into Africa.  So the northward migration on those
continents does have a purpose.  Maybe later today I can share an article on
that subject that discusses that.  There is no question in my mind that
Painted Lady's do migrate in North America the same way and there are
reasons why few may have seen them in the Fall.  But it is apparent that I
live in a corridor where they do migrate south.  The Painted Lady migration
also peaks when most butterfly watchers and collectors are no longer in the
field.

 

Butterflies observed at Weldon, Kern County, CA along Kelso Valley Rd. and
Paul's Place and at Hanning Flat off the Sierra Hwy., the latter site had
none of the migrants...no nectar sources.  November 12, 2014; 4 hours of
observations.  17 species.

 

Checkered Skipper (Pyrgus communis complex), both communis and albescens
occur here: 10-12, fresh brood.  Found at all 3 sites.

Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti sabuleti)-40+

Field Skipper or Sachem (Atalopedes campestris campestris including dark
form tenebricosus: 20+

Checkered White (Pontia protodice including some form "vernalis": 30+

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme): 30+

Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus corcorani): 3, 2 were found on the
"historic" bush at the entrance to the habitat collected.

Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides): 60+, common on the bush as well.

Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis): 15

Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)-1

 

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata): the first collected in the
southern Sierra Nevada to my knowledge (Fred Heath saw one two summers ago
at Wofford Heights on the Greenhorn Mts. butterfly count).  I was a block or
more uproad from the "bush" when I saw a very reddish butterfly with I
initially believed was an unusually reddish Queen.  It perched for a moment
on rabbitbrush and I saw it was a Gulf Fritillary in perfect condition.  As
I approached it, it flew up a steep hill and alighted on other blooms of
rabbitbrush only to take off again as I neared it several times, then
disappeared heading out of sight towards Hwy. 178.  I followed in the hope
it would stop at the "bush."  As I approached the "bush" I did not see it
but then it appeared from a spot previously out of sight.  I netted it while
visiting a bloom and I had it.  Somehow, it had been bird beaked in the 2-3
minutes I had lost sight of it.  That doesn't ruin its scientific
appearance.  It needs to be in a museum. Indiana Jones would approve.

 

Southwestern Snout (Libytheana carinenta streckeri): None seen in the area
where I collected 6 other Snouts and saw others in the past 2 weeks, but at
the "bush" I caught a perfect individual and may have seen another there 2
minutes before.

 

Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta): 8

 

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui): 140+ most commonly seen first 2 hours of the
day but seen at the bush all day.  There were always at least 4 cardui there
till the bush went dark when shadows covered it.  Very common W of Paul's
Place on blooms there.  Painted Lady's are rarely seen in Weldon between
spring and fall migrations.  Ditto for the Kern River Corridor and the
Sherman Pass area (Tulare County, CA) until August at the latter location
where adult cardui are common above 7000' prior to the migration, presumably
for abundant nectar and water.  Painted Lady's are seen in numbers lower
down (Kern River Corridor below 3000' in late Sept.-October and November as
higher elevation blooms go to seed.

 

West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): 70-80 seen.  This is another species
that occurs in the Kern River Valley, Kern River Corridor and Sherman Pass
region not seen in numbers until late summer and fall when it becomes
markedly common, even to 9000' W of Sherman Pass.  Common on the "bush" as
long as it was in the sun.

 

Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)-7

 

Monarch (Danaus plexippus): 70+  Essentially missing at Weldon Aug-Sept.
this year until the Fall blooms. Breeds commonly here at those times most
wetter years.  Painted Lady's much more common than Monarchs.  Common all
day on the bush.

 

Queens (Danaus gilippus thersippus): 16, usually at least 2 on the bush
everytime checked.  Also common at usual spots uproad and 2 seen near Paul's
Place.  All but 2 were in mint condition except 2 near Paul's Place which
had faded coloration but intact wings.

 

Notes: Number of species had declined. No Heliopetes ericetorum, Pieris
rapae, Abaeis nicippe, Nathalis iole, Strymon melinus or istapa, Vanessa
virginiensis or atalanta.  16 out of the 17 species were observed on the
bush sometime during the 10:25-1:30 PM time.  Maybe not coincidently, I am
actually sometimes paid to provide tours to the former home of the two
President Bush's to the home where they previously lived in Bakersfield.  By
the way, it is a "white house".  Weldon is only a little over an hours drive
from my home, only two blocks off Hwy. 178 in Bakersfield.  I guess I have a
direct route since most of todays collecting was 1-2 blocks off Hwy. 178.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration
From: "chris kline kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 13:32:44 -0800
I have always wondered if Queens had a fall migration. If I had stayed in AZ, 
that was a direction I was going to take the monarch study, start tagging 
queens in fall to study their movements. 

 
 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 
Subject: Groundwater warming up in sync
From: "'John Saba' sabaj AT theriver.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 13:42:21 -0700
I saw this on ScienceDaily:

Groundwater warming up in sync

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141111111701.htm?utm_source=feedburner 
Subject: Re: Painted Lady southward migration
From: "Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 08:42:17 -0800
Ken wrote:

> Everyone:
>    Apparently many folks are not aware that Painted Lady Butterflies
> (Vanessa cardui) have a southward migration.  

Bob Allen and Koji reported them moving in northerly directions in recent
weeks in SoCal. So whereas we all agree Painted Ladies are moving
north in March-April throughout the West, their flight directions in the 
fall are more variable and inconsistent.  And some may not even
migrate as evidenced by the fact I can shoot video of them nectaring in
my Sierra foothill yard east of Sacramento until late November (until
the last of my Buddleia flowers are still in bloom).

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Cherubini 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration
From: "Alex Grkovich agrkovich2003 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 16:00:14 +0000 (UTC)
There was a HUGE flight of them at and near Lake Havasu City, AZ as I observed 
in early December 2000....... 

One West Coast Lady was also observed among them...if there were more I 
didn't notice them. 

Alex
  From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [TILS-leps-talk]" 
 

 To: DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestLep AT yahoogroups.com; 
TILS-leps-talk AT yahoogroups.com 

 Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:27 AM
 Subject: [leps-talk] Painted Lady southward migration
   
   Everyone:    Apparently many folks are not aware thatPainted Lady 
Butterflies (Vanessa cardui) have a southward migration. Looking at some of 
the literature, it is apparent some (many?) authors wereonly aware of the 
spring migration.  In 2013 my region in south-central California saw 
anextremely poor barely discernable spring migration north but had a 
majorsoutherly migration in the late summer and fall.  In fact Painted 
Ladybutterflies returning south in my area way outnumber the Monarchs out 
there. The southerly movement is not a brief one, it lasts as long as the 
Monarchmigration...months.  Some Painted Lady's in the southern Sierra 
Nevadaoverwinter in the Jawbone Canyon area and in the southern San Joaquin 
Valley .    Huge numbers in the Fall can be observed. In the Hualapai Mts. 
of Mohave County , AZ they have been so abundant asto be an incredible 
distraction.  I have seen them commonly in the Fallmonths moving south in the 
Mojave Desert and like the Monarch, they follow theSierra Nevada southward 
along the Kern River Corridor and seem to me mostcommon at high elevations that 
have abundant late summer -fall nectar sourcesand water.    I have been 
posting these observations foryears in my posts and have an article into the 
News of the Lepidopterists'Society, though that article focuses more on the 
Monarch. I thought everyonewas aware Painted Ladies have a return migration 
just like the Monarch, but theroute of the Painted Lady movement may differ 
from Monarchs.  When thefall nectar sources to support Monarchs, Queens and 
Painted Ladies, the butterflies disappear, rather abruptly.  Where dothese 
adults go and by what route?  Good question but my thoroughcollecting in the 
southern Sierra and Mojave Desert (the latter mostly in good years of 
rainfall).  Painted Ladies may seemnon-directional at sites where observed 
because they as individuals seem tohold up at suitable locations that provide 
what they need and they aggregate insuch areas (they can be common at a site 
one day, scarce at the same site aweek later, then common the next day).  
Robert Langston published springand fall records of Painted Ladies under 
"Migratory species" foryears.  Believing both migrations in the spring and 
fall were well known Ihave not done so.  At some point records become 
redundant.    Maybe Fall Painted Lady migrations get lessnoted because they 
don't appear to have prominent overwintering sitesassembling in trees but I 
would guess these butterflies largely migrate into Mexico withoverwintering 
areas in the southern portions within the southwestern states. They also are 
not tagged and monitored like Monarchs are.  Maybe theyshould be.    Here 
are other butterfly movements I noticethat maybe most don't: (1) West Coast 
Lady (Vanessa annabella): While these dooverwinter in cities in the San Joaquin 
Valley, these butterflies becomenotably more common in the Kern River Valley, 
the Kern River Corridor and evenabove 7000-9000' at Sherman Pass where these 
are normally scarce from Septemberinto early November then abruptly disappear 
when the fall blooms disappear. Where do all of these West Coast Lady's come 
from? (2) Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta streckeri): Thisyear they have 
been observed and collected in small numbers at Weldon in theKern River Valley 
in the southern Sierra Nevada, apparently moving together insome numbers (last 
week at Weldon I observed six and collected three in 20minutes whereas the rest 
of the day there I only observed one).  I had asimilar experience there the 
week before.  There are maybe twelvedocumented records of Snouts in the Sierra 
Nevada ,but these may be a northwardly emigration into the Sierra for no 
apparentsurvival purpose. (3) Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole):  These may be 
migrants or maybe they just disperse fromhigh population areas like the 
Snouts.  Two were at Weldon, but I also sawthree in the White Mts. east of 
Bishop last summer.  One was at nearly12,000' on Sheep Mountain flying with 
Hesperia miriamae. (4) Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe): These appear to move 
into the southern Sierra in the springand fall and some individuals may 
overwinter there. (5) Queens (Danaus gilippus): Breed in the Kern River Valley 
in Spring and summer, probably from spring emigrants since this species 
canprobably not survive winters in that region.  They are common in 
earlyNovember most years then abruptly disappear when the nectar sources 
do. Where do they go?  I don't know but John Emmel told me once that they 
move southward into the deserts elsewhere.      Many of the most popular 
books used by thenewer generation of lepidopterists (watchers and collectors) 
haveidentification as the main focus.  Not very many get books with 
moredetails that help all of us to get into a deeper knowledge of the 
butterflieswe seek to photograph or collect.  Maybe with respect to Painted 
Lady's,the return migration is not nationwide, but more limited to the Pacific 
Coast states and western Arizona ? Is there not a return migrations of Painted 
Ladies in Europe, Asia and Africa ?      While I am a collector, I am also 
very much awatcher.  If weather permits, I may be heading back to the southern 
Sierrathis morning to see what I can find or observe.   Best Wishes, Ken 
Davenport 

kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 

   [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Painted Lady southward migration
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 07:27:25 -0800
Everyone:

   Apparently many folks are not aware that Painted Lady Butterflies
(Vanessa cardui) have a southward migration.  Looking at some of the
literature, it is apparent some (many?) authors were only aware of the
spring migration.  In 2013 my region in south-central California saw an
extremely poor barely discernable spring migration north but had a major
southerly migration in the late summer and fall.  In fact Painted Lady
butterflies returning south in my area way outnumber the Monarchs out there.
The southerly movement is not a brief one, it lasts as long as the Monarch
migration...months.  Some Painted Lady's in the southern Sierra Nevada
overwinter in the Jawbone Canyon area and in the southern San Joaquin
Valley.

   Huge numbers in the Fall can be observed.  In the Hualapai Mts. of Mohave
County, AZ they have been so abundant as to be an incredible distraction.  I
have seen them commonly in the Fall months moving south in the Mojave Desert
and like the Monarch, they follow the Sierra Nevada southward along the Kern
River Corridor and seem to me most common at high elevations that have
abundant late summer -fall nectar sources and water.

   I have been posting these observations for years in my posts and have an
article into the News of the Lepidopterists' Society, though that article
focuses more on the Monarch. I thought everyone was aware Painted Ladies
have a return migration just like the Monarch, but the route of the Painted
Lady movement may differ from Monarchs.  When the fall nectar sources to
support Monarchs, Queens and Painted Ladies, the butterflies disappear,
rather abruptly.  Where do these adults go and by what route?  Good question
but my thorough collecting in the southern Sierra and Mojave Desert (the
latter mostly in good years of rainfall).  Painted Ladies may seem
non-directional at sites where observed because they as individuals seem to
hold up at suitable locations that provide what they need and they aggregate
in such areas (they can be common at a site one day, scarce at the same site
a week later, then common the next day).  Robert Langston published spring
and fall records of Painted Ladies under "Migratory species" for years.
Believing both migrations in the spring and fall were well known I have not
done so.  At some point records become redundant.

   Maybe Fall Painted Lady migrations get less noted because they don't
appear to have prominent overwintering sites assembling in trees but I would
guess these butterflies largely migrate into Mexico with overwintering areas
in the southern portions within the southwestern states.  They also are not
tagged and monitored like Monarchs are.  Maybe they should be.

   Here are other butterfly movements I notice that maybe most don't:

(1) West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella): While these do overwinter in cities
in the San Joaquin Valley, these butterflies become notably more common in
the Kern River Valley, the Kern River Corridor and even above 7000-9000' at
Sherman Pass where these are normally scarce from September into early
November then abruptly disappear when the fall blooms disappear.  Where do
all of these West Coast Lady's come from?

(2) Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta streckeri): This year they have
been observed and collected in small numbers at Weldon in the Kern River
Valley in the southern Sierra Nevada, apparently moving together in some
numbers (last week at Weldon I observed six and collected three in 20
minutes whereas the rest of the day there I only observed one).  I had a
similar experience there the week before.  There are maybe twelve documented
records of Snouts in the Sierra Nevada, but these may be a northwardly
emigration into the Sierra for no apparent survival purpose.

(3) Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole):  These may be migrants or maybe they
just disperse from high population areas like the Snouts.  Two were at
Weldon, but I also saw three in the White Mts. east of Bishop last summer.
One was at nearly 12,000' on Sheep Mountain flying with Hesperia miriamae.

(4) Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe): These appear to move into the southern
Sierra in the spring and fall and some individuals may overwinter there.

(5) Queens (Danaus gilippus): Breed in the Kern River Valley in Spring and
summer, probably from spring emigrants since this species can probably not
survive winters in that region.  They are common in early November most
years then abruptly disappear when the nectar sources do.  Where do they go?
I don't know but John Emmel told me once that they move southward into the
deserts elsewhere.

 

   Many of the most popular books used by the newer generation of
lepidopterists (watchers and collectors) have identification as the main
focus.  Not very many get books with more details that help all of us to get
into a deeper knowledge of the butterflies we seek to photograph or collect.
Maybe with respect to Painted Lady's, the return migration is not
nationwide, but more limited to the Pacific Coast states and western
Arizona?  Is there not a return migrations of Painted Ladies in Europe, Asia
and Africa?

 

   While I am a collector, I am also very much a watcher.  If weather
permits, I may be heading back to the southern Sierra this morning to see
what I can find or observe.

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



 
Subject: Re: Painted lady migration south
From: "Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 06:23:53 -0800
Ken wrote:

> Paul, you've been so busy chasing Monarchs you failed
> to see the Painted Lady's?  

I see them all over central California in October-Nov,
but I don't see them regularly flying south. Maybe they
are high altitude flyers and soarers in the fall, hence
are largely out of sight - I just don't know.
These fall Painted Ladies seem to be obsessed
with nectaring.  They are mostly in young, brightly colored
condition and often rather large in size.  

Early spring Painted Ladies in central California are
generally smaller and more faded and seem obsessed with
migrating rapidly north, even against brisk northerly
winds.

In the 1990's Derham Guiliani and I witnessed Painted 
Ladies meandering around in the Saline Valley northwest 
of Death Valley in Dec & January in the same general
locations where monarchs overwintered (e.g. Hunter Canyon).

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Cherubini 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: Painted lady migration south
From: "'Kenneth Davenport' kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 21:21:36 -0800
Paul:

   Robert Langston reported the southern Painted Lady migration it regularly
on a yearly basis when he was the Season Summary Coordinator.  And I have
noticed it every year for over 50 years.  I wrote an article in the NEWS
several years ago re: an overwintering site for them in Kern County and have
one currently in press, though the main topic is the Monarch.

   Paul, you've been so busy chasing Monarchs you failed to see the Painted
Lady's?  You better widen out before they try to list them too.

   I have had several people tell me Painted Lady's are not in North
America...they are migratory in Europe, Asia and Africa only.

   Maybe people haven't noted the migrations because they are too busy read
leps serves posts, or writing them!

 

Best Wishes, Ken Davenport
kdavenport93306 AT yahoo.com or flutterflies93306 AT att.net 



Subject: Re: [SoWestLep] Painted lady migration south

 

  

Kenneth Davenport wrote:

> The migrations north in the spring and south in the fall are
> well known and documented. 

Ken, who has documented a southerly Painted Lady migration
in the western USA in the fall? So far none of the southern California
folks who have posted in this thread have said they have seen
Painted Ladies migrating south. 

For the past 3 consecutive years, Painted Ladies have been
common in my Sierra Nevada mountain foothill yard east
of Sacramento in Sept-Nov. nectaring on buddleia bush 
flowers, but I have not noticed any directionality to their flight.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


Subject: Re: Painted lady migration south
From: "Kojiro Shiraiwa whiterock AT bekkoame.ne.jp [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 17:45:56 -0800
Very interesting article.

This makes sense if they migrate north in the spring and south in the fall.
But looks like our Painted Ladies moves northward twice a year when there is 
precipitation in the south. I wonder if they also return south twice a year? I 
bet ours behave different from European/African ones. It would be interesting 
topic to research! 


Koji

> 2014/11/11 10:09、zapjammer AT comcast.net [SoWestLep] 
 のメール: 

> 
> 
> All,
> 
> Re: Painted Lady migration
> 
> Radar helps solve painted lady migration mystery
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/19991550 
> 
> Pelham
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Painted lady migration south
From: "Paul Cherubini monarch AT saber.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 12:20:47 -0800
Kenneth Davenport wrote:

> The migrations north in the spring and south in the fall are
> well known and documented.  

Ken, who has documented a southerly Painted Lady migration
in the western USA in the fall?  So far none of the southern California
folks who have posted in this thread have said they have seen
Painted Ladies migrating south.  

For the past 3 consecutive years, Painted Ladies have been
common in my Sierra Nevada mountain foothill yard east
of Sacramento in Sept-Nov. nectaring on buddleia bush 
flowers, but I have not noticed any directionality to their flight.

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.




------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Cherubini 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Painted lady migration south
From: "zapjammer AT comcast.net [SoWestLep]" <SoWestLep-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 18:09:43 +0000 (UTC)
All, 

Re: Painted Lady migration 

Radar helps solve painted lady migration mystery 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/19991550 

Pelham