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Updated on Sunday, April 2 at 09:21 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Yellow-breasted Canary,©Barry Kent Mackay

2 Apr FW: Mercurial Skipper at Blucher Park in Corpus Christi [Willie Sekula ]
2 Apr Re: My earliest yard record of Gulf Fritillary [Steven Schafersman ]
31 Mar Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Mar 31, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
1 Apr My earliest yard record of Gulf Fritillary [Anthony Hewetson ]
29 Mar Re: What happened to the common wood nymph? [Brush Freeman ]
28 Mar Re: What happened to the common wood nymph? [Dora Smith ]
28 Mar Re: What happened to the common wood nymph? [Dora Smith ]
28 Mar Re: What happened to the common wood nymph? [Brush Freeman ]
28 Mar Re: What happened to the common wood nymph? [Steven Schafersman ]
28 Mar What happened to the common wood nymph? [Dora Smith ]
27 Mar Falcon Heights notes [Berry Nall ]
28 Mar Re: Request for Caterpillar Photos - Strymon solitario, Apodemia chisosensis, Satyrium polingi [Cathryn Hoyt ]
27 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Dora Smith ]
27 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Anthony Hewetson ]
27 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Mitch Heindel ]
27 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Jan Dauphin ]
27 Mar Request for Caterpillar Photos - Strymon solitario, Apodemia chisosensis, Satyrium polingi ["[Jim Weber]" ]
26 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Dora Smith ]
26 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Dora Smith ]
26 Mar Austin Butterfly Forum during Zilker Garden Fest - pix [Mike Quinn ]
26 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [David Kent ]
26 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Bill and Pam Dempwolf ]
26 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Dora Smith ]
26 Mar Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Mike Rickard ]
26 Mar Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly [Dora Smith ]
23 Mar Re: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden [amber collins ]
23 Mar Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden [Mary Ludwick ]
23 Mar Re: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden [Dora Smith ]
24 Mar Estero Butterfly Walk Mar 24, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
23 Mar Re: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden [Melanie Weiss ]
20 Mar Golden-Banded Skipper in Medina County [Bill Dempwolf ]
19 Mar Early Monarch? [Mary Ludwick ]
17 Mar Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Mar 17, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
10 Mar Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Mar 10, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
8 Mar Re: Anyone else seeing white-striped longtails in central Texas? [James Giroux ]
26 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 24, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
26 Feb Nueces Co. 2.25.17 [Jason Cole ]
24 Feb Re: Statesman: Texas wildflowers more than a month ahead of the typical, flowering season - Feb. 21 [Phil Schappert ]
23 Feb Statesman: Texas wildflowers more than a month ahead of the typical flowering season - Feb. 21 [Mike Quinn ]
22 Feb Falcate Orangetip [Brush Freeman ]
17 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk Feb 17, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
15 Feb Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting, February 27, 2017- The Natural and Cultural History of the Long Expedition [ABF Announce ]
14 Feb 2017 Entoblitz site is one county north of College Station - April 21-23 [Mike Quinn ]
13 Feb Midland County, Texas [Steven Schafersman ]
12 Feb So far in Grayson County... [Laurie Sheppard ]
12 Feb Flying in Crosby County [Anthony Hewetson ]
10 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
9 Feb AP: Monarch butterfly numbers drop by 27 percent in Mexico - Feb 9 [Mike Quinn ]
5 Feb Mourning Cloak [Brush Freeman ]
3 Feb Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
27 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 27, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
21 Jan Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk Correction [Rick Snider ]
20 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 20, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
13 Jan Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 13, 2017 [Rick Snider ]
11 Jan Austin Butterfly Forum presents Butterflies of Panama - Monday, January 23, 2017 [ABF Announce ]
9 Jan late report: Brazos County Laviana White 12/1/16 [Shirley Wilkerson ]
9 Jan people pix from TAMU's 2017 Ento Open House [Mike Quinn ]
2 Jan Recap: 4 New US Butterfly Records in the RGV for 2016 [Mike Quinn ]
1 Jan New US Record Butterfly in the RGV [Mike Rickard ]
30 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Dec 30, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
29 Dec apparent 5th US record of spectacular tiger moth [Mike Quinn ]
24 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Dec 23, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
18 Dec Blomfild's Beauty at National Butterfly Center, 12/17/16 [Dan Jones ]
16 Dec Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk - Dec 16, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
14 Dec What is correct nomenclature of Eastern and Texas Tailed Blue? [Dora Smith ]
14 Dec Rare cricket documented in Austin [Chuck Sexton ]
13 Dec National Butterfly Center, 12/13/16 [Dan Jones ]
11 Dec Malachite, Clytie life histories [Berry Nall ]
2 Dec Estero Butterfly Walk Friday Dec 2, 2016 [Rick Snider ]
2 Dec Common Mestra unusually common from Rio Grande to Red River [Mike Quinn ]
28 Nov Yellow-tipped Flasher - Falcon Heights [Berry Nall ]
28 Nov Heliopetes alana, New US Record [Mike Rickard ]
28 Nov Local transmission of Zika reported in Brownsville - Nov 28 [Mike Quinn ]
25 Nov Exciting Estero Butterfly Walk [Rick Snider ]
26 Nov Perching Saliana at Estero Llano Grande St. Park, 11/26/16 [Dan Jones ]
23 Nov Re: Buckeye ID, Starr Co. 11/5/16 [Charlie Sassine ]

Subject: FW: Mercurial Skipper at Blucher Park in Corpus Christi
From: Willie Sekula <wsekula AT COPPER.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 21:10:17 -0500
Kim Garwood and I observed (and photographed) a Mercurial Skipper at Blucher
Park today.  It was nectaring on Duranta not far from the public library.   

Willie Sekula
Falls City

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Subject: Re: My earliest yard record of Gulf Fritillary
From: Steven Schafersman <sschafersman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 14:43:55 -0500
I saw a Gulf Fritillary on the rosemary in my vegetable garden on March 31,
too, while watering the tomatoes. I also have never seen one this early.

Steven Schafersman, Midland

On Sat, Apr 1, 2017 at 7:38 PM, Anthony Hewetson 
wrote:

> Greetings All:
>
> I have been tracking butterflies in my Lubbock yard on almost a daily
> basis for over ten years.
>
> I was stunned, on 31 March 2017, to see a fresh Gulf Fritillary at my
> Pincushion Flowers.  This beats, by over a month, my previous early date
> for the species.
>
> Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock
>
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>
>

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Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Mar 31, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 21:44:11 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Mar 31, 2017



It was warm, mostly sunny, with strong south winds. About 18 of us,
including several experienced butterfliers, found 61 species, the highest
total of the last 5 months of walks.



Today, the whole valley, Estero included, experienced a large influx of
Theona Checkerspots. Other highlights were Elada Checkerspot, Brazilian
Skipper, Two-barred Flasher and both Zebra and Julia Heliconians. A 5 PM
check of the Green Jay Trail revealed Band-celled Sister and Nysa
Roadside-Skipper.



Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their expert help finding
butterflies.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe
Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Clytie Ministreak  Ministrymon clytie
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Ceraunus Blue  Hemiargus ceraunus
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Variegated Fritillary  Euptoieta claudia
Theona Checkerspot  Thessalia theona
Bordered Patch  Chlosyne lacinia
Elada Checkerspot  Texola elada
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Band-celled Sister  Adelpha fessonia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Nysa Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes nysa
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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Subject: My earliest yard record of Gulf Fritillary
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 19:38:53 -0500
Greetings All:

I have been tracking butterflies in my Lubbock yard on almost a daily basis
for over ten years.

I was stunned, on 31 March 2017, to see a fresh Gulf Fritillary at my
Pincushion Flowers.  This beats, by over a month, my previous early date
for the species.

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

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Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 02:26:16 +0000
Dora.  I can't get my head around the research you are dragging up, but
with all due respect, in the right habitat here in Central Texas they are
dirt common tight now as early spring butterflies,  especially east of I-35
in Bstrop Co riparian woodlands. Find some mesic oak, youpan, elbowbush red
cedar etc and enjoy.  That's gonna be all I am gonna be able to offer up.
I figure people are not seeing them anymore where they used to be around
Austin because it has all been trashed out and paved...it is 50x more
developed rhan it was as I remember it 50 years ago.   Good luck.


On Tue, Mar 28, 2017 at 9:00 PM Dora Smith 
wrote:

> According to my research tonight, common wood nymphs live on forest edges
> and in brushy fields and meadows, and also love “reconstituted” prairies.
> One would expect them to love the Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin – but
> they aren’t on the list of wildlife seen there this spring, nor were they
> reported on the five weeks in May through August I looked at last summer.
>
> They evidently eat any nectar as well as mold and rotten fruit, but have
> been reported in connection with various purple and white wild flowers and
> butterfly weed.  One would basically expect to see them everywhere.   Their
> host plants are a number of native grasses, especially colored ones, some
> of which have become native lawn grass.    Their larvae live through the
> winter without eating, everywhere from central Texas to southern Canada and
> New England.  The eggs are laid on or near grass and then the larvae eat
> the grass in the spring.   They lay only one generation of eggs a year but
> the females are very long lived.  They should be seen in May through
> September.
>
> A range map of reports, a number of range maps, and two discussions, all
> place Austin and San Antonio on the southwestern edge of their range in
> Texas.   They aren’t always very common at the edge of their range, and
> should be an area where they are “locally common”.   They should be more
> common in, for instance, Grayson County on the northeastern edge of
> Texas.   Grass has a hard time west of Austin.   My sister lives out
> there.  The land was overgrazed, and cedar forest took over, interspersed
> with half living dry gray grass, cactus, and bare earth.   The hill country
> gets only half as much rain as Bastrop does.
>
> Bastrop is in a completely different climate zone than Austin despite
> being 15 miles away – they get far more rain, they have far more rain, and
> the one time I ever road my bike out there my allergies nearly killed me.
> Austin sits on the edge between two very different ecosystems.   So does
> San Antonio.
>
> Where exactly are people not seeing these butterflies where they used to
> see them?
>
> Dora
>
> *From:* Steven Schafersman 
> *Sent:* Tuesday, March 28, 2017 5:47 PM
> *To:* TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?
> Common Wood Nymphs live in woods. With very few exceptions, all primary
> growth forests in the U.S. have been cut for their timber. What we see
> today are secondary growth forests that date from the late 19th-early 20th
> centuries. So their prime habitat has been decimated. I think they are
> suffering from habitat destruction, which is the reason for most animal
> population declines.
>
>
>
> ======================================
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>
> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
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toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
> --

Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

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Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 21:00:42 -0500
According to my research tonight, common wood nymphs live on forest edges and 
in brushy fields and meadows, and also love “reconstituted” prairies. One 
would expect them to love the Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin – but they 
aren’t on the list of wildlife seen there this spring, nor were they reported 
on the five weeks in May through August I looked at last summer. 


They evidently eat any nectar as well as mold and rotten fruit, but have been 
reported in connection with various purple and white wild flowers and butterfly 
weed. One would basically expect to see them everywhere. Their host plants are 
a number of native grasses, especially colored ones, some of which have become 
native lawn grass. Their larvae live through the winter without eating, 
everywhere from central Texas to southern Canada and New England. The eggs are 
laid on or near grass and then the larvae eat the grass in the spring. They lay 
only one generation of eggs a year but the females are very long lived. They 
should be seen in May through September. 


A range map of reports, a number of range maps, and two discussions, all place 
Austin and San Antonio on the southwestern edge of their range in Texas. They 
aren’t always very common at the edge of their range, and should be an area 
where they are “locally common”. They should be more common in, for 
instance, Grayson County on the northeastern edge of Texas. Grass has a hard 
time west of Austin. My sister lives out there. The land was overgrazed, and 
cedar forest took over, interspersed with half living dry gray grass, cactus, 
and bare earth. The hill country gets only half as much rain as Bastrop does. 


Bastrop is in a completely different climate zone than Austin despite being 15 
miles away – they get far more rain, they have far more rain, and the one 
time I ever road my bike out there my allergies nearly killed me. Austin sits 
on the edge between two very different ecosystems. So does San Antonio. 


Where exactly are people not seeing these butterflies where they used to see 
them? 


Dora

From: Steven Schafersman 
Sent: Tuesday, March 28, 2017 5:47 PM
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?

Common Wood Nymphs live in woods. With very few exceptions, all primary growth 
forests in the U.S. have been cut for their timber. What we see today are 
secondary growth forests that date from the late 19th-early 20th centuries. So 
their prime habitat has been decimated. I think they are suffering from habitat 
destruction, which is the reason for most animal population declines. 



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Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 18:30:46 -0500
Thanks.  LOL.

Over the past couple of days several people said they haven’t seen common 
wood nymphs in a long time, how are they common, and noone else said anything. 


Dora

From: Brush Freeman 
Sent: Tuesday, March 28, 2017 5:48 PM
To: Dora Smith 
Cc: tx-butterfly 
Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?

I am not sure if this is some kind of joke or what? I have not had time to 
follow, but if you want some, Just go to Utley, Bastrop Co. and walk the woods. 
They are nothing if not abundant right now. Assuming we are talking about 
pegala 


On Tue, Mar 28, 2017 at 5:37 PM, Dora Smith  wrote:

 Can people please share with me where in Texas the common wood nymph was 
previously common, and where it is specifically missing now? 

  Also, do people have any theories on what happened to it?
 I mentioned this to the head of the UT insect collection, and also mentioned 
the book that was suggested to me. He said that it isn’t unusual for 
butterflies to have been common at one time but no longer, but it isn’t very 
common for anyone to look into what happened to them. Often it’s a change in 
something like their host plant, sometimes due to climate variation such as 
drought. 

 But the common wood nymph’s host plant is, on superficial research, grass. 

 It must have indeed have been common; it’s on that plastic foldout local 
butterfly guide you can buy at HEB, with not more than 40 other local 
butterflies. 

  Thanks!
  Yours,
  Dora Smith
   
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-- 


Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




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Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:48:24 -0500
I am not sure if this is some kind of joke or what?  I have not had time to
follow, but if you want some, Just go to Utley, Bastrop Co. and walk the
woods.  They are nothing if not abundant right now.  Assuming we are
talking about pegala

On Tue, Mar 28, 2017 at 5:37 PM, Dora Smith 
wrote:

> Can people please share with me where in Texas the common wood nymph was
> previously common, and where it is specifically missing now?
>
> Also, do people have any theories on what happened to it?
>
> I mentioned this to the head of the UT insect collection, and also
> mentioned the book that was suggested to me.   He said that it isn’t
> unusual for butterflies to have been common at one time but no longer, but
> it isn’t very common for anyone to look into what happened to them.
> Often it’s a change in something like their host plant, sometimes due to
> climate variation such as drought.
>
> But the common wood nymph’s host plant is, on superficial research,
> grass.
>
> It must have indeed have been common; it’s on that plastic foldout local
> butterfly guide you can buy at HEB, with not more than 40 other local
> butterflies.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Yours,
> Dora Smith
>
>
>
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>


-- 

Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: What happened to the common wood nymph?
From: Steven Schafersman <sschafersman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:47:45 -0500
Common Wood Nymphs live in woods. With very few exceptions, all primary
growth forests in the U.S. have been cut for their timber. What we see
today are secondary growth forests that date from the late 19th-early 20th
centuries. So their prime habitat has been decimated. I think they are
suffering from habitat destruction, which is the reason for most animal
population declines.

On Tue, Mar 28, 2017 at 5:37 PM, Dora Smith 
wrote:

> Can people please share with me where in Texas the common wood nymph was
> previously common, and where it is specifically missing now?
>
> Also, do people have any theories on what happened to it?
>
> I mentioned this to the head of the UT insect collection, and also
> mentioned the book that was suggested to me.   He said that it isn’t
> unusual for butterflies to have been common at one time but no longer, but
> it isn’t very common for anyone to look into what happened to them.
> Often it’s a change in something like their host plant, sometimes due to
> climate variation such as drought.
>
> But the common wood nymph’s host plant is, on superficial research,
> grass.
>
> It must have indeed have been common; it’s on that plastic foldout local
> butterfly guide you can buy at HEB, with not more than 40 other local
> butterflies.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Yours,
> Dora Smith
>
>
>
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

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Subject: What happened to the common wood nymph?
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:37:47 -0500
Can people please share with me where in Texas the common wood nymph was 
previously common, and where it is specifically missing now? 

Also, do people have any theories on what happened to it?
I mentioned this to the head of the UT insect collection, and also mentioned 
the book that was suggested to me. He said that it isn’t unusual for 
butterflies to have been common at one time but no longer, but it isn’t very 
common for anyone to look into what happened to them. Often it’s a change in 
something like their host plant, sometimes due to climate variation such as 
drought. 

But the common wood nymph’s host plant is, on superficial research, grass.   
It must have indeed have been common; it’s on that plastic foldout local 
butterfly guide you can buy at HEB, with not more than 40 other local 
butterflies. 

Thanks!
Yours,
Dora Smith

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Subject: Falcon Heights notes
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 21:55:32 -0500
Hi all,
Business is starting to pick up out this way. This morning I was surprised to 
find a Polydamas Swallowtail at my blacklight; this evening I found eggs on the 
pipevine. An Erichson's White-Skipper was flying in a nearby field. Earlier in 
the month I collected some Banded Patch caterpillars (I'm sure they 
overwintered); today I was able to release a pair of adults. The female's 
orange, especially on the VFW, had much more red in it than the male's; anyone 
know if that is typical or just happenstance? 

I had to make a weekend trip to Brenham area. No time to look for butterflies 
but the wildflowers were spectacular, especially the bluebonnets. 


Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net

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Subject: Re: Request for Caterpillar Photos - Strymon solitario, Apodemia chisosensis, Satyrium polingi
From: Cathryn Hoyt <cawhoyt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 01:31:55 +0000
Man, you're not asking for the easy ones, are you???😋 I'm in BBNP now.
I'll keep an eye out!
Cathy
On Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 8:55 AM [Jim Weber]  wrote:

> Lynne and I are working on a book project with Texas A & M University
> Press on native host plants for Texas butterflies.  We plan to highlight
> approximately 100 native host plants and the butterflies that utilize them.
>
> We are still looking for late instar caterpillar photos of three special
> species:
>
> Big Bend Scrub-Hairstreak, Strymon solitario
> Chisos Metalmark, Apodemia chisosensis
> Poling's Hairstreak, Satyrium polingi
>
> If anyone has good photos of these that they would be willing to
> contribute to this project please contact me.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Jim Weber
> Austin, TX
> jweber AT austin.rr.com
> http://naturewatchaustin.blogspot.com
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/webersaustin/
>
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Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 18:32:21 -0500
Wow, thanks, Jan! I’ll look into it. The insect collection where I volunteer 
might be interested in a book like that as well. 


Dora

From: Jan Dauphin 
Sent: Monday, March 27, 2017 2:42 PM
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

Dora, 

Here is a book you might find helpful in your research: The Common Names of 
North American Butterflies, edited by Jacqueline Y. Miller. In this book, Dr. 
Miller has compiled a list of all the butterflies in North America and all the 
common names each butterfly has had in the past. For instance the butterfly you 
have been researching, Common Wood Nymph, lists all the other common names you 
have mentioned plus others. 


My book was published in 1992 by the Smithsonian Institution. I’m sure it 
could be updated by now. 


Hope this is helpful,
Jan Dauphin


  On Mar 26, 2017, at 11:37 PM, Dora Smith  wrote:

 In books. And online. LOL. Mike Rickard had told me I ought to be able to find 
information about them easily. Or atleast that’s what I thought he said. 


 What I want to know is, what is a Texas grayling or a large wood nymph? I 
can’t find them anywhere. But someone else confirmed that they are the common 
wood nymph. 


  Dora

  From: David Kent 
  Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 3:28 PM
  To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
  Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

  "I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph."



 Well, I am. I haven't seen the uncommon wood nymph in decades. Where have they 
gone? There are absolutely none of them in E.Texas as far as I can tell, and 
I've been looking. Please tell me where to find them. 


 On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 12:46 PM, Dora Smith  
wrote: 


    Thanks for fixing my spelling.

    I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.

 The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling, ojos 
azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are all the 
same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be – though I 
found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the common wood 
nymph. 


    Yours,
    Dora

    From: Mike Rickard 
    Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
    To: Dora Smith 
    Cc: tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu 
    Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

 The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a 
numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides. All range 
maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in Texas, and all 
species accounts mention the variations that can occur throughout the range of 
C. pegala. A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for example, makes this obvious, 
so I'm not sure why you are having difficulties. The subspecies in Texas is 
texana, not texicana. 


    Mike Rickard
    Mission, TX

 On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith  
wrote: 



 I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 


 Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is also 
called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything about. The 
“large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it makes good 
sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a “large” 
one. 


 The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, 
and has considerable regional variation. 


 By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the common 
wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 


      Thanks!

      Yours,
      Dora Smith
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Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 18:32:13 -0500
Greetings All:

Up my way, I see Common Wood Nymphs annually and have found them in all
fifteen of my counties (even the ones where 'woods' boils down to isolated
woodlots and woodrows) during the past decade.  On the other hand, they
seem to have become scarcer during the last five years and I now have to
trek to wooded areas in my eastern counties (Motley, Floyd, Dickens,
Crosby, Kent, Garza) to find them dependably.

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

On Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 3:56 PM, Mitch Heindel 
wrote:

> I wanted to add a me too to Mr. Kent's observation, or lack
> thereof, of Common (Texan) Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala).
> In now 14 years in the Utopia area, I have not seen
> ten of them.  I do not record it every year.  I have
> not seen one in a couple years.
>
> Interestingly in that study published in the Lep Soc.
> News I think in the 1990's about Bandera, Uvalde, and
> Real Co. butterflies which was 10 years or so of
> regular multiple per year collecting trips in the
> area, as I recall that author took 80 or 90 of them.
>
> Is there a niche habitat I am missing, or else,
> where have all the common wood-nymphs gone?
>
> Locally we have just begun hitting the ca. 30 species
> of butterfly mark in a day here, and now 90dF.
>
> happy huntin'
> Mitch
>
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia
>
> FROM: David Kent
>>
>>> SENT: Sunday, March 26, 2017 3:28 PM
>>> TO: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>>> SUBJECT: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas
>>> butterfly
>>>
>>> "I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph."
>>>
>>> Well, I am. I haven't seen the uncommon wood nymph in decades. Where
>>> have they gone? There are absolutely none of them in E.Texas as far
>>> as I can tell, and I've been looking. Please tell me where to find
>>> them.
>>>
>>
> ======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Mitch Heindel <mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 13:56:56 -0700
I wanted to add a me too to Mr. Kent's observation, or lack
thereof, of Common (Texan) Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala).
In now 14 years in the Utopia area, I have not seen
ten of them.  I do not record it every year.  I have
not seen one in a couple years.

Interestingly in that study published in the Lep Soc.
News I think in the 1990's about Bandera, Uvalde, and
Real Co. butterflies which was 10 years or so of
regular multiple per year collecting trips in the
area, as I recall that author took 80 or 90 of them.

Is there a niche habitat I am missing, or else,
where have all the common wood-nymphs gone?

Locally we have just begun hitting the ca. 30 species
of butterfly mark in a day here, and now 90dF.

happy huntin'
Mitch

Mitch Heindel
Utopia

> FROM: David Kent
>> SENT: Sunday, March 26, 2017 3:28 PM
>> TO: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>> SUBJECT: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas
>> butterfly
>> 
>> "I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph."
>> 
>> Well, I am. I haven't seen the uncommon wood nymph in decades. Where
>> have they gone? There are absolutely none of them in E.Texas as far
>> as I can tell, and I've been looking. Please tell me where to find
>> them.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Jan Dauphin <dauphins AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:42:04 -0500
Dora,

Here is a book you might find helpful in your research: The Common Names of 
North American Butterflies, edited by Jacqueline Y. Miller. In this book, Dr. 
Miller has compiled a list of all the butterflies in North America and all the 
common names each butterfly has had in the past. For instance the butterfly you 
have been researching, Common Wood Nymph, lists all the other common names you 
have mentioned plus others. 


My book was published in 1992 by the Smithsonian Institution. I’m sure it 
could be updated by now. 


Hope this is helpful,
Jan Dauphin


> On Mar 26, 2017, at 11:37 PM, Dora Smith  wrote:
> 
> In books. And online. LOL. Mike Rickard had told me I ought to be able to 
find information about them easily. Or atleast that’s what I thought he said. 

>  
> What I want to know is, what is a Texas grayling or a large wood nymph? I 
can’t find them anywhere. But someone else confirmed that they are the common 
wood nymph. 

>  
> Dora
>  
> From: David Kent 
> Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 3:28 PM
> To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
> Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
>  
> "I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph."
> 
> Well, I am. I haven't seen the uncommon wood nymph in decades. Where have 
they gone? There are absolutely none of them in E.Texas as far as I can tell, 
and I've been looking. Please tell me where to find them. 

>  
> On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 12:46 PM, Dora Smith > wrote: 

>> Thanks for fixing my spelling.
>>  
>> I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.
>>  
>> The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling, 
ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are all 
the same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be – 
though I found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the common 
wood nymph. 

>>  
>> Yours,
>> Dora
>>  
>> From: Mike Rickard 
>> Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
>> To: Dora Smith 
>> Cc: tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu 
>> Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
>>  
>> The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a 
numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides. All range 
maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in Texas, and all 
species accounts mention the variations that can occur throughout the range of 
C. pegala. A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for example, makes this obvious, 
so I'm not sure why you are having difficulties. The subspecies in Texas is 
texana, not texicana. 

>>  
>> Mike Rickard
>> Mission, TX
>>  
>> On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith > wrote: 

>>>  
>>> I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 

>>>  
>>> Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is 
also called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything 
about. The “large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it 
makes good sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a 
“large” one. 

>>>  
>>> The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, 
and has considerable regional variation. 

>>>  
>>> By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the 
common wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 

>>>  
>>> Thanks!
>>>  
>>> Yours,
>>> Dora Smith
>>> ======================================
>>> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY to
>>> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
>>> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST to
>>> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
>>> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: > 

>> 
>>  
>> ======================================
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> 
>  
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Request for Caterpillar Photos - Strymon solitario, Apodemia chisosensis, Satyrium polingi
From: "[Jim Weber]" <jweber AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 08:55:23 -0500
Lynne and I are working on a book project with Texas A & M University Press on 
native host plants for Texas butterflies. We plan to highlight approximately 
100 native host plants and the butterflies that utilize them. 


We are still looking for late instar caterpillar photos of three special 
species: 


Big Bend Scrub-Hairstreak, Strymon solitario
Chisos Metalmark, Apodemia chisosensis 
Poling's Hairstreak, Satyrium polingi

If anyone has good photos of these that they would be willing to contribute to 
this project please contact me. 


Thanks!

Jim Weber
Austin, TX
jweber AT austin.rr.com
http://naturewatchaustin.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/webersaustin/

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 23:37:14 -0500
In books. And online. LOL. Mike Rickard had told me I ought to be able to find 
information about them easily. Or atleast that’s what I thought he said. 


What I want to know is, what is a Texas grayling or a large wood nymph? I 
can’t find them anywhere. But someone else confirmed that they are the common 
wood nymph. 


Dora

From: David Kent 
Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 3:28 PM
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

"I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph."



Well, I am. I haven't seen the uncommon wood nymph in decades. Where have they 
gone? There are absolutely none of them in E.Texas as far as I can tell, and 
I've been looking. Please tell me where to find them. 


On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 12:46 PM, Dora Smith  wrote:

  Thanks for fixing my spelling.

  I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.

 The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling, ojos 
azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are all the 
same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be – though I 
found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the common wood 
nymph. 


  Yours,
  Dora

  From: Mike Rickard 
  Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
  To: Dora Smith 
  Cc: tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu 
  Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

 The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a 
numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides. All range 
maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in Texas, and all 
species accounts mention the variations that can occur throughout the range of 
C. pegala. A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for example, makes this obvious, 
so I'm not sure why you are having difficulties. The subspecies in Texas is 
texana, not texicana. 


  Mike Rickard
  Mission, TX

 On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith  
wrote: 



 I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 


 Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is also 
called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything about. The 
“large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it makes good 
sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a “large” 
one. 


 The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, 
and has considerable regional variation. 


 By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the common 
wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 


    Thanks!

    Yours,
    Dora Smith
======================================
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Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 23:36:18 -0500
Oh, they are.   OK, thanks!

I thought Mike was just telling me I oughtn’t to have trouble finding 
information on the common wood nymph. 


Dora

From: Bill and Pam Dempwolf 
Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:56 PM
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

As Mike indicated, those are all various names for the Common Wood Nymph, 
Cercyonis pegala texana. 


I've found C. pegala in south Austin as well as west of Dripping Springs. I'm 
not sure why I haven't found it more common around Austin. 


Bill


On Mar 26, 2017, at 12:46 PM, Dora Smith  wrote:


  Thanks for fixing my spelling.

  I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.

 The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling, ojos 
azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are all the 
same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be – though I 
found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the common wood 
nymph. 


  Yours,
  Dora

  From: Mike Rickard 
  Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
  To: Dora Smith 
  Cc: tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu 
  Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

 The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a 
numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides. All range 
maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in Texas, and all 
species accounts mention the variations that can occur throughout the range of 
C. pegala. A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for example, makes this obvious, 
so I'm not sure why you are having difficulties. The subspecies in Texas is 
texana, not texicana. 


  Mike Rickard
  Mission, TX

 On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith  
wrote: 



 I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 


 Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is also 
called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything about. The 
“large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it makes good 
sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a “large” 
one. 


 The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, 
and has considerable regional variation. 


 By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the common 
wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 


    Thanks!

    Yours,
    Dora Smith
======================================
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum during Zilker Garden Fest - pix
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 20:42:13 -0500
Pix from behind the Austin Butterfly Forum tables during this weekend's
Zilker Garden Fest

https://goo.gl/photos/id5iYEY7hVhrhCKx9

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: David Kent <dkent3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 15:28:31 -0500
"I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph."

Well, I am. I haven't seen the uncommon wood nymph in decades. Where have
they gone? There are absolutely none of them in E.Texas as far as I can
tell, and I've been looking. Please tell me where to find them.

On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 12:46 PM, Dora Smith 
wrote:

> Thanks for fixing my spelling.
>
> I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.
>
> The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling,
> ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are
> all the same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be –
> though I found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the
> common wood nymph.
>
> Yours,
> Dora
>
> *From:* Mike Rickard 
> *Sent:* Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
> *To:* Dora Smith 
> *Cc:* tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu 
> *Subject:* Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas
> butterfly
>
> The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a
> numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides.  All
> range maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in
> Texas, and all species accounts mention the variations that can occur
> throughout the range of C. pegala.  A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for
> example, makes this obvious, so I'm not sure why you are having
> difficulties.  The subspecies in Texas is texana, not texicana.
>
> Mike Rickard
> Mission, TX
>
> On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith 
> wrote:
>
>>
>> I put together a local butterfly list from several sources.   I seem to
>> have ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has
>> no scientific name, and none can be found.   It is variously called the
>> Texas grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling.
>>
>> Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is
>> also called a “grayling”.  That is the only name I could find anything
>> about. The “large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though 
it 

>> makes good sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a
>> “large” one.
>>
>> The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States,
>> and has considerable regional variation.
>>
>> By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the 
common 

>> wood nymph?  Cercyonis pegala texicana?
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Yours,
>> Dora Smith
>>
>> ======================================
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Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Bill and Pam Dempwolf <bdempwolf AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 12:56:04 -0500
As Mike indicated, those are all various names for the Common Wood Nymph, 
Cercyonis pegala texana. 


I've found C. pegala in south Austin as well as west of Dripping Springs. I'm 
not sure why I haven't found it more common around Austin. 


Bill

On Mar 26, 2017, at 12:46 PM, Dora Smith  wrote:

> Thanks for fixing my spelling.
>  
> I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.
>  
> The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling, ojos 
azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are all the 
same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be – though I 
found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the common wood 
nymph. 

>  
> Yours,
> Dora
>  
> From: Mike Rickard
> Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
> To: Dora Smith
> Cc: tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu
> Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
>  
> The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a 
numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides. All range 
maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in Texas, and all 
species accounts mention the variations that can occur throughout the range of 
C. pegala. A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for example, makes this obvious, 
so I'm not sure why you are having difficulties. The subspecies in Texas is 
texana, not texicana. 

>  
> Mike Rickard
> Mission, TX
>  
> On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith  
wrote: 

>>  
>> I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 

>>  
>> Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is 
also called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything 
about. The “large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it 
makes good sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a 
“large” one. 

>>  
>> The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, 
and has considerable regional variation. 

>>  
>> By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the 
common wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 

>>  
>> Thanks!
>>  
>> Yours,
>> Dora Smith
>> ======================================
>> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY to
>> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST to
>> LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU
>> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
> 
>  
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Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 12:46:40 -0500
Thanks for fixing my spelling.

I’m not having any trouble finding the common wood nymph.

The problem is that the local butterfly lists refer to a Texas grayling, ojos 
azules, large wood nymph, and blue-eyed grayling, that apparently are all the 
same thing, but I am not able to uncover what that thing might be – though I 
found a single indirect hint it might be a local version of the common wood 
nymph. 


Yours,
Dora

From: Mike Rickard 
Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:07 PM
To: Dora Smith 
Cc: tx-butterfly AT listserv.uh.edu 
Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly

The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a numerous 
local, state, regional, and national books and field guides. All range maps 
and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in Texas, and all 
species accounts mention the variations that can occur throughout the range of 
C. pegala. A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for example, makes this obvious, 
so I'm not sure why you are having difficulties. The subspecies in Texas is 
texana, not texicana. 


Mike Rickard
Mission, TX

On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith  wrote:


 I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 


 Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is also 
called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything about. The 
“large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it makes good 
sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a “large” 
one. 


 The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, 
and has considerable regional variation. 


 By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the common 
wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 


  Thanks!

  Yours,
  Dora Smith
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Subject: Re: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 12:07:44 -0500
The Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala) is prominently displayed in a
numerous local, state, regional, and national books and field guides.  All
range maps and/or range discussions include widespread distribution in
Texas, and all species accounts mention the variations that can occur
throughout the range of C. pegala.  A glance at Kaufman or Glassberg, for
example, makes this obvious, so I'm not sure why you are having
difficulties.  The subspecies in Texas is texana, not texicana.

Mike Rickard
Mission, TX

On Sun, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:22 AM, Dora Smith 
wrote:

>
> I put together a local butterfly list from several sources.   I seem to
> have ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has
> no scientific name, and none can be found.   It is variously called the
> Texas grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling.
>
> Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is
> also called a “grayling”.  That is the only name I could find anything
> about. The “large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it 

> makes good sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a
> “large” one.
>
> The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States,
> and has considerable regional variation.
>
> By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the common
> wood nymph?  Cercyonis pegala texicana?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Yours,
> Dora Smith
>
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> To change to the daily digest, send the message SET TX-BUTTERFLY DIGEST 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

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Subject: Trying to pin down an imaginary common central Texas butterfly
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 11:22:06 -0500
I put together a local butterfly list from several sources. I seem to have 
ended up with a butterfly that is abundant in Central Texas, but has no 
scientific name, and none can be found. It is variously called the Texas 
grayling, ojos azules, large wood nymph, and blue eyed grayling. 

Wikipedia says the blue-eyed grayling is the common wood nymph, which is also 
called a “grayling”. That is the only name I could find anything about. The 
“large wood nymph” is evidently an imaginary animal, though it makes good 
sense that if there is a “small wood nymph” there would be a “large” 
one. 

The “common wood nymph” is allegedly common all over the United States, and 
has considerable regional variation. 

By any chance, is the “Texas grayling” the Texas subspecies of the common 
wood nymph? Cercyonis pegala texicana? 

Thanks!
Yours,
Dora Smith

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Subject: Re: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden
From: amber collins <collins.amber.l AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 16:20:47 -0500
I have the same problem.  Any suggestions would be helpful.


-- 
Thank You,

Amber Collins
Collins.Amber.L AT gmail.com

On Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 4:19 PM, Mary Ludwick  wrote:

> Do any of you have good ideas on how to rid our garden of wasps (red wasps
> and yellow ones)?
> They harvest the caterpillars and I really would like to get rid of them.
> I tried one of those wasp traps (bottle design) and never attracted any
> wasps.
>
> I'll welcome any ideas.
>
> Mary Croix Ludwick
> ludwick AT swbell.net
>  maryludwick67 AT gmail.com
>  Farmers Branch, Texas
>
> ======================================
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> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

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Subject: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden
From: Mary Ludwick <ludwick AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 21:19:30 +0000
Do any of you have good ideas on how to rid our garden of wasps (red wasps and 
yellow ones)?They harvest the caterpillars and I really would like to get rid 
of them.I tried one of those wasp traps (bottle design) and never attracted any 
wasps. 

I'll welcome any ideas.
 Mary Croix Ludwick
ludwick AT swbell.net
 maryludwick67 AT gmail.com
 Farmers Branch, Texas

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Subject: Re: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:19:00 -0500
I know some people put the caterpillars in screened areas or butterfly cages 
with host plants for this reason. 


In addition to the predators you can see, which include birds as well as other 
bugs, there are also parasitoids you can’t see, and I think that they usually 
destroy more caterpillars than reach adulthood. 


Dora

From: Mary Ludwick 
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 4:19 PM
To: TX-BUTTERFLY AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 
Subject: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden

Do any of you have good ideas on how to rid our garden of wasps (red wasps and 
yellow ones)? 

They harvest the caterpillars and I really would like to get rid of them.
I tried one of those wasp traps (bottle design) and never attracted any wasps.

I'll welcome any ideas.


Mary Croix Ludwick
ludwick AT swbell.net
maryludwick67 AT gmail.com
Farmers Branch, Texas
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Mar 24, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:38:27 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Mar 24, 2017

It was warm, mostly sunny, with strong south winds. 9 of us ventured out
and were delighted to find 50 species in total, all seen on the walk.

Highlights were a White Scrub Hairstreak, Lantana Scrub Hairstreaks,
Band-celled Sister, and Julia and Zebra Heliconians. It took a while but we
eventually got good looks at, and photographed, a Two-barred Flasher.

There was no sign of the Falcate Orangetip and Red Rim found during the
week.

Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their help finding
butterflies.

Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
White Scrub-HairstreakStrymon albata
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Band-celled Sister  Adelpha fessonia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Common Mellana  Quasimellana eulogius
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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Subject: Re: Dealing with wasps and our butterfly garden
From: Melanie Weiss <melanierweiss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 18:24:20 -0700
Mary,

Have you tried putting netting or a large cage over the area where you have
caterpillars?

Melanie



On Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 2:19 PM, Mary Ludwick  wrote:

> Do any of you have good ideas on how to rid our garden of wasps (red wasps
> and yellow ones)?
> They harvest the caterpillars and I really would like to get rid of them.
> I tried one of those wasp traps (bottle design) and never attracted any
> wasps.
>
> I'll welcome any ideas.
>
> Mary Croix Ludwick
> ludwick AT swbell.net
>  maryludwick67 AT gmail.com
>  Farmers Branch, Texas
>
> ======================================
> To unsubscribe, send the message SIGNOFF TX-BUTTERFLY 
toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

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toLISTSERV AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU 

> TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
>
>

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Golden-Banded Skipper in Medina County
From: Bill Dempwolf <bdempwolf AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:15:06 -0500
A friend and I stopped around Hondo Creek yesterday (March 19, 2017) to see 
what butterflies were flying. On CR 4541 he located an Autochton cellus 
(Golden-banded Skipper). This was definitely the highlight of that area 
(although the Gesta invisius (False Duskywing) were pretty exciting as well). 


Bill Dempwolf

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Early Monarch?
From: Mary Ludwick <ludwick AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 19:47:52 +0000
I think I saw a monarch in my north Dallas yard today.It kept flying, so I am 
not 100% sure. 

 Mary Croix Ludwick
ludwick AT swbell.net
 maryludwick67 AT gmail.com
 Farmers Branch, Texas

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Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Mar 17, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 21:40:55 -0500
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Mar 17, 2017



It was warm with partial clouds and strong south winds. 15 of us covered
butterfly plants in the more sheltered areas and found 41 species.



Highlights were a Brown-banded Skipper, both Julia and Zebra Heliconians
and the always wonderful Mexican Bluewing.


Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their expert help.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
Brown-banded Skipper  Timochares ruptifasciatus
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Mar 10, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 21:50:05 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Mar 10, 2017



There were short sunny periods in the morning but the afternoon was cloudy
and rainy and butterflies were hard to find. 12 of us started and most
continued on in the light rain through the afternoon. 33 species were seen
through the day.



The highlight was the discovery of 3 Zebra Heliconians hanging from a vine.
presumably coming to roost early in the rain. Also seen were a Question
Mark and Mimosa Yellow. We enjoyed a great view of a Giant Swallowtail,
wings flat, sitting still on a host plant, Lime Prickly Ash, in full
flowers.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Question Mark  Polygonia interrogationis
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Anyone else seeing white-striped longtails in central Texas?
From: James Giroux <jamesagiroux AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 21:55:30 -0600
I've seen a couple (or perhaps the same one twice) in the last couple of weeks 
in Austin. The first was on March 1st. I don't recall ever seeing them in early 
spring. Their numbers were unusually high this past fall. 


James Giroux
Austin, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Friday Feb 24, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 20:07:54 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Feb 24, 2017



The weather, for the second week in a row, was good for butterflies, warm,
sunny and calm.



The highlight was a Pale-spotted Leafwing. The very worn individual made 3
appearances at the bait. It was a lifer for some. A photo is on the Estero
facebook page. Quite a bit of our time was spent waiting for the Leafwing
to reappear which reduced our time searching the gardens, but with 14 of us
looking we ended up with a respectable 55 species overall. We also enjoyed
many views of Zebra and Julia Heliconians and Band-celled Sister



Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their expert help.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Orange Sulphur  Colias eurytheme
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Reakirt's Blue  Hemiargus isola
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Pale-banded Crescent  Phyciodes tulcis
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Band-celled Sister  Adelpha fessonia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Pale-spotted Leafwing  Anaea pithyusa
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Common Mellana  Quasimellana eulogius
Nysa Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes nysa
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Nueces Co. 2.25.17
From: Jason Cole <marioman12 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 15:31:57 -0600
Just moved out to Nueces county from Dallas, and I've really been enjoying the 
weather down here! It's crazy to see so many wildflowers in February. 

I went to Hazel Bazemore park because I heard it was pretty good, and was 
astonished at the variety of butterflies I found for it being so early in the 
year. Most butterflies were on plum trees near the bathrooms/swings and on the 
small yellow flowers out in the field around it. 

If you are in the Nueces County area, I'd love to talk.

Lyside sulphur-2 on the birding trail
Cloudless sulphur-2
Little yellow sulphur-3
Dainty sulphur-1
Great Southern White-6
Giant swallowtail-2
Tiger swallowtail-3 on the trail
Pipevine swallowtail-dozens
Black swallowtail-only one that I got a good look at, but they could be there 
could have been more among the pipevines 

Gulf frittilary- 2 worn on the birding trail
Variegated frittilary-2
Graphic crescent-3
Pearl crescent
Texan crescent-3
Funeral duskywing-3
Turk's cap white skipper-1 on the birding trail at the top of the hill
Tropical checkered skipper
Common checkered skipper
Sachem- 1
Fiery skipper-2
Southern skipperling-2
Eufala skipper-1
Mallow scrub hairstreak-1 

23 sp.

Jason Cole

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Statesman: Texas wildflowers more than a month ahead of the typical, flowering season - Feb. 21
From: Phil Schappert <philjs AT EASTLINK.CA>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 06:22:32 -0400
On Thu, 23 Feb 2017 12:08:41 -0600, Mike Quinn  wrote:

> I'll believe the "may last longer" part when I see it...

And, as Dr. Gilbert would say, "typical, in central TX, is an anomaly!"

Phil

-- 

Phil Schappert, PhD

27 Clovis Ave.
Halifax, NS, B3P 1J3

philschappert.ca
soundcloud.com/phil-schappert
imaginaturestudio.ca

   ◎|||||||◎

"Just let imagination lead, reality will follow through..."
                                         (Michael Hedges)

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Statesman: Texas wildflowers more than a month ahead of the typical flowering season - Feb. 21
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 12:08:41 -0600
Texas wildflower season arriving early, may last longer
February 21, 2017
Austin American-Statesman

Bluebonnets are already beginning to bloom, more than a month ahead of the
typical April flowering season. As are the purple spiderworts near Lake
Austin. And they will probably be joined shortly by many other Central
Texas wildflowers.

The relatively rainy 2016 and warm winter have triggered an early
wildflower season, according to experts at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower
Center.

“Wildflower season is taking off faster than you expect,” said Andrea
DeLong-Amaya, the Wildflower Center’s director of horticulture.

Full text:

http://weather.blog.mystatesman.com/2017/02/21/texas-wildflower-season-arriving-early-may-last-longer/ 


=================================================

I'll believe the "may last longer" part when I see it...

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Falcate Orangetip
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 12:03:31 -0600
.

Had my first of year this morning.

-- 

Brush Freeman
Biospatialservices.com

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
503-551-5150

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Feb 17, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 20:24:39 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Feb 17, 2017



The weather was perfect for butterflies, warm, sunny and calm. 24 of us
visited all the butterfly gardens at Estero.



Participants got photos of male Chestnut Crescents, Band-celled Sister, and
Julia Heliconian. Near 5 PM, a Common Mellana and Two-barred Flasher were
discovered. The day's list came to 54 species.



In the day before the hike, Red Rim, Zilpa Longtail, and Bordered Patch
were recorded.



Around 4 PM a few of us visited Grebe Marsh in search of dragonflies and
damselflies.

Some seen were: Common Green Darner, Red Saddlebags, Striped Saddlebags,
Roseate Skimmer, Thornbush Dasher, Great Pondhawk, Common Pondhawk,
Familiar Bluet, Ramburs Forktail, and Desert Firetail.



Special thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their expert help.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Chestnut Crescent  Phyciodes argentea
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
American Lady  Vanessa virginiensis
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Band-celled Sister  Adelpha fessonia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Two-barred Flasher  Astraptes fulgerator
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Mournful Duskywing  Erynnis tristis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Turk's-cap White-Skipper  Heliopetes macaira
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Common Mellana  Quasimellana eulogius
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting, February 27, 2017- The Natural and Cultural History of the Long Expedition
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 20:41:02 -0600
*Austin Butterfly Forum Meeting*

*February 27, 2017, 7:00 p.m.*

*Zilker Botanical Garden Center*




*The Natural and Cultural History of the Long Expedition*

*(1819-1820)*



*Presented by Mike Quinn*



The Long Expedition was the first exploration of the West that included
trained scientists. The party of 22, under the guidance of Major Stephen
Long, included botanist Edwin James, zoologist Thomas Say and
artist/naturalist Titian Peale. They traveled from Pittsburgh, PA to the
Rocky Mountains and passed through the Texas Panhandle on their return. The
"gentlemen scientists", on their expedition through the "Great American
Desert", collected and later described over 300 new species of plants,
insects, reptiles, amphibians and birds.

[image: Inline image 4]

 *Colorado Potato Beetle - Photo by Mike Quinn*








***** This event is free and open to the public ***

For more information, please visit our website: austinbutterflies.org.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: 2017 Entoblitz site is one county north of College Station - April 21-23
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 18:51:11 -0600
Please contact Ryan for details and to RSVP. Thanks, Mike

==============================================

ENTOBLITZ 2017 - Salter Research Farm along the Brazos River, in Robertson
County, TX, April 21st-23rd

Map to Salter Research Farm: https://goo.gl/maps/SBBGY8MfzNQ2 (not actual
camp site)

*Lodging: *Camping is allowed on the property, and there are a couple of
ex-sharecropper houses that got refurbished with new wood flooring and
bathroom facilities (water is not potable however, so be sure to bring your
own). Other nearby lodging accommodations can be found in the towns of
Calvert and Bremond.

*Supplies and food: *You are on your own in terms of food and collecting
equipment. Campfires can be made and outdoor cooking equipment can be used
on the property. As usual, bring out what you bring in.

*Visit: *The Entoblitz 2017 planning page at entoblitz.tamu.edu for more
details and updates. http://entoblitz.tamu.edu/

*RSVP: Ryan T. Selking (optimus1 AT tamu.edu ) by April
16th if you plan to attend. *

*Organized by: *The Texas A&M Entomology Graduate Student Organization
(EGSO) and Undergraduate Entomology Student Organization (UESO).

Download a pdf of the 2017 Flyer:

http://entoblitz.tamu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/68/2017/02/Entoblitz-Flyer-2017.pdf 


Entoblitz is welcome to anyone interested in insect collecting, entomology,
or anyone who wants to learn about insect diversity in the state of Texas.
Come join us on this private piece of land for a weekend of insect
collecting, friends, and fun!

=============================================

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Midland County, Texas
From: Steven Schafersman <sschafersman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 00:21:14 -0600
In the last two weeks in Midland County, species seen in my backyard (!)
include Black Swallowtail, Checkered White, Southern Dogface, Sleepy
Orange, Orange Sulphur, Dainty Sulphur, and Variegated Fritillary. Only the
rosemary is blooming. The temperature today was 93 F, an amazing record.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: So far in Grayson County...
From: Laurie Sheppard <lshepstew AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 11:36:51 -0600
I've been seeing occasional butterflies on warm days since the end of
January.  So far I've seen an overwintered Southern Dogface, as well
as Checkered White, Orange Sulphur, and Question Marks at Hagerman NWR.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Flying in Crosby County
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 11:30:54 -0600
Greetings All:

I visited White River Lake - and a few other spots - in Crosby County
yesterday.  The temperature spiked at 94 - awesomely record breaking - and
butterflies were out and about in good numbers.

Species seen were Checkered White, Orange Sulphur, Southern Dogface, Sleepy
Orange, Dainty Sulphur, Variegated Fritillary,  Mourning Cloak, Red
Admiral, and Goatweed Leafwing.

We have a cold front coming through early this week but temperatures aren't
expected to be below freezing for any length of time and I think most of
these bugs will pull through.

Anthony 'Fat Tony' Hewetson; Lubbock

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2017 19:08:59 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Feb 10, 2017



It was a beautiful warm day with a light breeze and cloud and sun which
turned into full sun during the afternoon. There were lots of butterflies
flying and we tallied 57 species for the day.

There were about 20 of us and we made a bee line to the trellis garden
where 2 male Chestnut Crescents were flying. Everyone had a look and got
photos. At the bait station a Band-celled Sister flew in. We also had
Potrillo Skipper, White-scrub Hairstreak, Silver-banded Hairstreak, fresh
female Chestnut Crescent, Olive-clouded Skipper, and finally a Ruddy/Muted
type hairstreak. And there were several Julia Heliconians, and a Zebra
Heliconian.



With so many participants and skilled observers we saw lots of great
butterflies. Special thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their
expert help.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
White Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon albata
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Ruddy Hairstreak  Electrostrymon sangala (possibly)
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Chestnut Crescent  Phyciodes argentea
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Band-celled Sister  Adelpha fessonia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Funereal Duskywing  Erynnis funeralis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Olive-clouded Skipper  Lerodea dysaules

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: AP: Monarch butterfly numbers drop by 27 percent in Mexico - Feb 9
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 13:35:19 -0600
FYI:

https://phys.org/news/2017-02-monarch-butterfly-percent-mexico.html


Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Mourning Cloak
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 2017 14:26:35 -0600
.

Had one today at 2:15 PM interested (maybe) near compost heap with rotten
pears in Leander.  I am not sure of the status of them here on this date.
Still have a Tailed Orange too.

-- 

Brush Freeman
Biospatialservices.com

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
503-551-5150

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 2017 18:11:44 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Feb 3, 2017



It was rather cool for butterflies and cloudy with short sunny periods.
There were more butterflies in flight this week than last and our group of
16 tallied 32 species.

A highlight was a Julia Heliconian found by Mike egg-laying on passion
vine. Photographs were taken of Red-bordered Metalmark, Common Mestra, and
Mazans Scallopwing.



Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their help finding many of
the butterflies.



During the past week of warm sunny weather and south winds we had Texas
Powdered Skippers, Band-celled Sisters, and a Cyna Blue.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 27, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2017 21:30:33 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Jan 27, 2017



It was cool, cloudy, and damp, terrible butterfly weather, but 7 of us
ventured out to see how many we could find. We saw 17 species and perhaps
twice that number of individuals. It was easy for a change to photograph
the Giant Swallowtail that flew to the ground and sat with wings flat out,
not moving. We all had a good time.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk Correction
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 22:47:18 -0600
Hi all,

Typo in Jan 20, 2017 list of species- no Tailless Scrub-Hairstreak.

Today I had 2 Malachites, Orange Sulphur,  Pygmy Blue, and Purple-washed
Skipper, not seen on Fri.

Rick Snider
Volunteer Host

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 20, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:33:50 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Jan 20, 2017



It was warm, calm, and overcast. There were a lot of butterflies on the
wing. 17 of us started on the walk and we ended with 49 species recorded.



Highlights were White Scrub-Hairstreak, Mimosa Yellow, Julia Heliconians,
and 5 Silver-banded Hairstreaks.

Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for finding so many great
butterflies for the group.



Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
Silver-banded Hairstreak  Chlorostrymon simaethis
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
White Scrub-HairstreakStrymon albata
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Tailless Scrub-HairstreakStrymon cestri
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Ceraunus Blue  Hemiargus ceraunus
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Hermes Satyr  Hermeuptychia hermes
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Celia's Roadside-Skipper  Amblyscirtes celia
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Jan 13, 2017
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 20:25:37 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Jan 13, 2017



It was warm, mostly cloudy all day, with strong winds from the south. 14 of
us participated in the walk.



We did not expect to find too many species, but with 14 people looking, 40
species were tallied for the day.



Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their help. Everyone had a
good time.



The Guatemalan Cracker, discovered on Dec 11 on a Live Oak tree, roosted on
the tree for 26 straight days. It was last seen on its tree on Jan 5. It
was joined at the roost on two nights, Fri Dec 30 and Tues Jan 2, by a
Blomfild's Beauty that was last seen on the morning of Wed Jan 3.



Great Southern White  Ascia monuste
Orange Sulphur  Colias eurytheme
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Gray Hairstreak  Strymon melinus
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Dusky-blue Groundstreak  Calycopis isobeon
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Metalmark  Caria ino
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Pearl Crescent  Phyciodes tharos
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Southern Skipperling  Copaeodes minimus
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Austin Butterfly Forum presents Butterflies of Panama - Monday, January 23, 2017
From: ABF Announce <abfannounce AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 19:41:34 -0600
*Butterflies of Panama - presented by Ron Martin, Susan Martin and Dan
Hardy*
[image: Displaying image.png]
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Rusted Clearwing Satyr *(Cithaerias pireta)*

*Zilker Botanical Garden Center - Monday, January 23, 2017, 7:00 p.m.*

Ron Martin, Susan Martin and Dan Hardy will treat the club to a
presentation about tropical butterflies, moths and other insects
encountered around the Canopy Tower and Canopy Lodge in Panama, sites that
are famous among birdwatchers.
Please join us for the club’s first presentation of 2017.
For more information about the Austin Butterfly Forum and our programs and
activities, please visit our website: www.austinbutterflies.org
Thank you for helping us get the word out.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: late report: Brazos County Laviana White 12/1/16
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 20:57:26 -0600
Got too busy with Christmas and did not get this great Brazos County
butterfly reported.  I know they were seen in Austin this year and are a
dime a dozen in the valley.    Glad one finally made it here!

Photo here:

http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/recentimages#page-0

Shirley Wilkerson
Bryan, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: people pix from TAMU's 2017 Ento Open House
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 11:00:26 -0600
I think everyone had a great time, but the cold weather prevented a few
folks from travelling over to College Station...

https://goo.gl/photos/TwUKWc1uS9PFhYhX6

other ppl pix posted to facebook here: http://bit.ly/2i9eQ4g

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Recap: 4 New US Butterfly Records in the RGV for 2016
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Jan 2017 17:13:48 -0600
Four new 2016 US butterfly records per Mr. Rickard's list:

Gnosia Hairstreak
Gargina gnosia (Hewitson, 1868) - Mexico to Argentina
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/L/gargina_gnosia.htm

Nikko Skipper
Niconiades nikko Hayward, 1948 - e. Mex to S. Amer.
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/niconiades_nikko.htm

Perching Saliana
Saliana esperi Evans, 1955 - E & W Mexico to S. Amer.
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/saliana_e_esperi.htm

Alana White-Skipper
Heliopetes alana (Reakirt, 1868) - E & W Mexico to Argentina
http://butterfliesofamerica.com/heliopetes_alana.htm

Mike Quinn, Austin


On Sun, Jan 1, 2017 at 10:25 AM, Mike Rickard 
wrote:

> On Dec. 27 I photographed a very worn hairstreak at the National
> Butterfly Center.  Study of field guides and online photos led me to
> determine it as Gargina gnosia, aka. Gnomic Hairstreak.  This
> identification has now been confirmed by several knowledgeable
> individuals.
>
> This gives the RGV four US records for the year, others being
> Niconiades nikko, Saliana esperi, and Heliopetes alana.
>
> Mike Rickard
> Mission, TX


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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: New US Record Butterfly in the RGV
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Jan 2017 10:25:59 -0600
On Dec. 27 I photographed a very worn hairstreak at the National
Butterfly Center.  Study of field guides and online photos led me to
determine it as Gargina gnosia, aka. Gnomic Hairstreak.  This
identification has now been confirmed by several knowledgeable
individuals.

This gives the RGV four US records for the year, others being
Niconiades nikko, Saliana esperi, and Heliopetes alana.

Mike Rickard
Mission, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Dec 30, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2016 21:13:54 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Dec 30, 2016



Today was cool with partial sun and calm. It was not the best butterfly
weather but with 13 participants we were able to find 35 species.



Our Guatemalan Cracker has been roosting near the same spot on the tree for
20 days. It spends most of the day on the tree, with only the occasional
flight in hot weather to the banana food mix. As the group was looking at
it, one participant spotted a Blomfild's Beauty a few inches away. It was
very hard to see.  Our Blomfild's from last week was last seen Saturday.
Could it be that it has been roosting near the Cracker every day and not
seen?

The Zebra and Julia Heliconians continue.



Thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their help finding new
species for the group.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Guatemalan Cracker  Hamadryas guatemalena
Blomfild's Beauty  Smyrna blomfildia
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
White Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus albescens
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer.

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM.

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: apparent 5th US record of spectacular tiger moth
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 10:43:14 -0600
apparently the 5th US record of this spectacular tiger moth

Pseudosphex leovazquezae (Pérez & Sánchez)
http://jaspersailfin.zenfolio.com/p705812635#h8048ffd7

shot by John S. Christensen at Casa Santa Ana B&B so. of Alamo, Hidalgo
Co., TX on 11/29/2016

species background: http://texasento.net/Pseudosphex.htm

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Fri Dec 23, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2016 09:02:23 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Dec 23, 2016



It was a very nice day for a butterfly walk, hot, with partial sun and 20
mph winds from the south.

The best butterfly of the day was a Blomfild's Beauty found by park
superintendent Javier de Leon after the walk was over. It was feeding on
the ground on very old Wild Olive fruits that had fallen off the tree. The
Guatemalan Cracker was still on the Live Oak tree, day 13. It takes
occasional short forays to the banana mix for food and always returns to
the same general area on the trunk of the tree. Also seen were 2
Malachites, Red Rim, Zebra Heliconians, Julia Heliconians, Potrillo
Skipper, Orange-barred Sulphur, and Mexican Bluewing.

Many thanks to Mike Rickard and Ginny Musgrave for their help finding so
many butterflies for the group, especially the Potrillo Skipper.

While our list for the day was fairly short, 38 species, we saw wonderful
tropical butterflies.

On Thursday there 20 Queens and a Monarch nectaring together on flower
clusters of White Twinevine, Funastrum clausum, a milkweed vine and native
species that seldom flowers in the winter. Also feeding on them was a Great
Purple Hairstreak.



Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Orange-barred Sulphur  Phoebis philea
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mimosa Yellow  Eurema nise
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Malachite  Siproeta stelenes
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Red Rim  Biblis hyperia
Guatemalan Cracker  Hamadryas guatemalena
Blomfild's Beauty  Smyrna blomfildia
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Blomfild's Beauty at National Butterfly Center, 12/17/16
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Sun, 18 Dec 2016 13:10:27 -0500
Good butterflies yesterday at the National Butterfly Center included Blomfild's 
Beauty, Pavon Emperor, Mexican Silverspot and Malachite. Photos and list are on 
my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2016/12/national-butterfly-center-121716.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Llano Grande Butterfly Walk - Dec 16, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Dec 2016 19:40:06 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Dec 16, 2016



Today's walk started out with temperatures in the low 70s and clouds. The
sun gradually appeared over the afternoon and it warmed up. There were 7 of
us on the walk and we tallied 43 species.



It was day 6 for the Guatemalan Cracker roosting on the Live Oak tree. We
also saw: Malachite, Zebra Heliconian, Julia Heliconian, Red-bordered
Pixie, Mexican Yellow, and Mexican Bluewing, adding up to an impressive
group of tropical butterflies.



Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Mexican Yellow  Eurema mexicana
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Red-bordered Pixie  Melanis pixe
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Malachite  Siproeta stelenes
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Guatemalan Cracker  Hamadryas guatemalena
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala



Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: What is correct nomenclature of Eastern and Texas Tailed Blue?
From: Dora Smith <villandra24 AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Dec 2016 14:19:54 -0600
I’m putting together my own database of local Austin, Texas butterflies, from 
published lists and guides to local butterflies. 


I have the eastern tailed blue, and a Texas tailed blue. Their nomenclature is 
scrambled online and in my books, and I can find only hints at explanations. 
Even John and Gloria Tveten, who usually give the complete history of any 
changes in names and classification, simply apply their own preference to the 
eastern tailed blue. 


C. J. Durde (1990), in Guide to Butterflies of Austin, names the Cupido 
(Everes) comyntas comyntas (Godart), and the Texas Tailed Blue is called Cupido 
(Everes) texanus texanus (R. Chermock). The text mentions minor differences in 
coloring and markings. (page 27) 


I am using the copy of Durde’s book that Mike Quinn gave to the head of the 
UT Austin insect collection. Mike usually penciled in alternate names. He has 
drawn an arrow from Texas Tailed Blue to Eastern Tailed Blue, which could mean 
that he thinks they are the same thing, or that he thinks one is a subspecies 
of the other. 


The first question is, is the genus name of the Eastern Tailed Blue currently 
Everes or Cupido? 


Online I learned in Wikipedia that “Cupido is a genus in the family 
Lycaenidae. The subgenus Everes (Hubner, 1819]) is included here.” The source 
cited for this doesn’t mention both names. It’s the only reference to the 
idea that Everes is a subgenus that I have come across. 


I also found the following name origins appended to the two names, in addition 
to (Hubner, 1842). 


Cupido comyntas (Godart, [1842])
Everes comyntas (Godart, [1824])

It seems as if both names date to early in the 19th century, and Everes was 
used first. 


Which version is correct, and why?

My second question is, what is the correct classification of the Texas Tailed 
Blue? 


I found seeming hints online that Texas Tailed Blue is another name for the 
Eastern Tailed Blue. 


At Butterfliesofamerica.com I found “Cupido comyntas texana (F. Chermock, 
1945) (Eastern Tailed-Blue)”, with no explanation. This suggests both that 
the Texan Tailed Blue is a subspecies of Cupido comyntas, and that it is 
another name for the Eastern Tailed Blue. 


At http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Cupido_comyntas/
“There is a subspecies of E. comyntas in Texas called E. comyntas texanus 
(Texas Tailed Blue)”. There is no source given for that idea. 


This article uses C. comyntas and E. comyntas interchangeably in the text. The 
header has Cupido comyntas, and then E. comyntas pops up in the text with no 
explanation. 


Googling Cupido comyntas texana Chermock 1945 gets me more citations to the 
same source but no further details about it, except the list of butterfly 
species where he found it. EG 
https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=778806#null 


This person thinks he spotted it.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/2363191

Usually it ought to be possible to follow some chain of references to whatever 
F. Chermock wrote in 1945, but I’m not finding it. However, following a chain 
of clues starting with a prominent relative and sometime coauthor named Ralph 
Chermock, I found that possibly the source is this 1944 or 1945 article by 
Franklin Hugo Chermock: “Some new North American Lycaenidae”, Canadian 
Entomologist 76(11): 213-16 (Nov 1944, 19 Jan 1945). 


I’d appreciate any help straightening it out, as well as the history of the 
controversy on the name of the eastern tailed blue. 


Thanks!



Yours,

Dora Smith





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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Rare cricket documented in Austin
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Dec 2016 09:32:17 -0600
TX-Butterfliers,

I’m stretching the limits of taxonomic propriety here, but this critter *was* 
photographed during a blacklight session on my back porch in NW Austin on 
October 18: 


I documented a species known as Belfrage’s Cricket, Trigonidomimus belfragei 
(Gryllidae, Pentacentrinae), which was previously known from only four 
specimens (Texas, Oklahoma, Veracruz) and had never been photographed. Here are 
links to my original upload on iNaturalist and BugGuide, and the species page 
on the Singing Insects of North America website: 


http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4772040
http://bugguide.net/node/view/1322793
http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/walker/buzz/401a.htm

Chuck Sexton
Austin
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: National Butterfly Center, 12/13/16
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2016 22:29:28 -0500
71 species today at the National Butterfly Center included three Mexican 
Silverspots, a Band-celled Sister, a Curve-winged Metalmark, five Julia 
Heliconians, four Mexican Yellows and a Glazed Pellicia. Photos and list are on 
my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2016/12/national-butterfly-center-121316.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco, TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Malachite, Clytie life histories
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Sun, 11 Dec 2016 22:45:21 -0600
Hi,
A few days of cold drizzle gave me a chance to work on the website. I have 
added life history studies of Clytie Ministreak and MAlachite. The links to 
both are on the homepage, http://leps.thenalls.net/index.php. 

A little sun this afternoon brought out about a dozen and a half species of 
butterflies: Monarchs, Great Purple Hairstreaks, and 9 species of Sulphurs were 
in the mix. Not bad for a day that barely got to 70. 


Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Estero Butterfly Walk Friday Dec 2, 2016
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 18:33:37 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Dec 2, 2016



The weather was calm and 80, but mainly cloudy. 10 of us participated. 56
species were seen during the day.

Highlights were the Band-celled Sister on the bait log in the morning. The
Zebra and Julia Heliconians and Pixies continue. It is nice to have
Potrillo Skippers on our list again.



Black Swallowtail  Papilio polyxenes
Giant Swallowtail  Papilio cresphontes
Checkered White  Pontia protodice
Orange Sulphur  Colias eurytheme
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Lyside Sulphur  Kricogonia lyside
Mexican Yellow  Eurema mexicana
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Sleepy Orange  Eurema nicippe
Dainty Sulphur  Nathalis iole
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon bazochii
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Ceraunus Blue  Hemiargus ceraunus
Fatal Metalmark  Calephelis nemesis
Rounded Metalmark  Calephelis perditalis
Red-bordered Pixie  Melanis pixe
American Snout  Libytheana carinenta
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Texan Crescent  Phyciodes texana
Pale-banded Crescent  Phyciodes tulcis
Vesta Crescent  Phyciodes vesta
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia
White Peacock  Anartia jatrophae
Band-celled Sister  Adelpha fessonia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tropical Leafwing  Anaea aidea
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Soldier  Danaus eresimus
White-striped Longtail  Chioides catillus
Long-tailed Skipper  Urbanus proteus
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Brown Longtail  Urbanus procne
Potrillo Skipper  Cabares potrillo
Mazans Scallopwing  Staphylus mazans
White-patched Skipper  Chiomara asychis
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Julia's Skipper  Nastra julia
Fawn-spotted Skipper  Cymaenes odilia
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Whirlabout  Polites vibex
Southern Broken-Dash  Wallengrenia otho
Sachem  Atalopedes campestris
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala
Brazilian Skipper  Calpodes ethlius
Ocola Skipper  Panoquina ocola

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Common Mestra unusually common from Rio Grande to Red River
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 17:04:46 -0600
Per Dale Clark's Butterflies of Dallas County, the previous Mestra outbreak
was in 2007.

I spent some time today fleshing out the BugGuide Mestra page:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/31884

Hope this helps,

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology
http://texasento.net

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Yellow-tipped Flasher - Falcon Heights
From: Berry Nall <lb AT THENALLS.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 21:56:24 -0600
Hi,
Sunday evening in Falcon Heights I found a Yellow-tipped Flasher, Astraptes 
anaphus. To my surprise, it was quite a bit larger than a Two-barred Flasher. 
It's no competition for today's Heliopetes, but still a neat skipper. 


Berry Nall
Falcon Heights, Starr Co, TX
leps.thenalls.net


 

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Heliopetes alana, New US Record
From: Mike Rickard <mikearickard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 18:36:35 -0600
This morning I found and photographed Heliopetes alana at the National
Butterfly Center in Mission, TX.  It shortly flew away and was not found
for a while but eventually relocated and photographed by local and visiting
butterfly watchers as well as NBC staff.  This is the first record of this
species in the United States but the species is common in neighboring
Mexican states of Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon, with records within 100 miles
of the US border.

Mike Rickard
Mission TX

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Local transmission of Zika reported in Brownsville - Nov 28
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 17:44:23 -0600
long article on the WaPo website...

==============================

Zika surfaces in Texas, likely to be first local transmission

By Lena H. Sun - November 28 at 4:06 PM
Washington Post

Texas health authorities said Monday that a Brownsville woman is infected
with Zika, a case that could make the south Texas city the second place in
the continental United States where the mosquito-borne virus is spreading
locally.

Laboratory testing confirmed that the 43-year-old patient, who is not
pregnant, had been infected. State and local health authorities said she
reported no recent travel to any location with ongoing Zika transmission
and no other risk factors.



"We have not identified more than an isolated circumstance" in Texas, CDC
Director Tom Frieden said in an interview.

full text:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2016/11/28/zika-surfaces-in-texas-likely-to-be-first-local-transmission/ 

or: http://wapo.st/2fFrTcm

==============================

Mike Quinn, Austin

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Exciting Estero Butterfly Walk
From: Rick Snider <ricksnid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2016 20:03:52 -0600
Estero Llano Grande State Park Butterfly Walk, Friday Nov 25, 2016



The weather was calm, warm and mostly cloudy. 15 of us participated.

Shortly after starting, a few people left the walk, heading to NBC when a
Spot-celled Sister was found there. We continued enjoying a Brown-banded
Skipper, Red-bordered Pixie, and Zebra and Julia Heliconians during the
first half of the walk. But then we came upon a skipper, nectaring on
bougainvillia, that nobody recognized. Photos were taken before it flew. We
tentatively identified it as a Perching Saliana, Saliana espari, a Mexican
species,  and a possible new US record. Very exciting. We put the word out
and others came, but we could not find it again.

We only covered half of our normal walk locations and tallied 30 species.



Pipevine Swallowtail  Battus philenor
Southern Dogface  Colias cesonia
Cloudless Sulphur  Phoebis sennae
Large Orange Sulphur  Phoebis agarithe
Tailed Orange  Eurema proterpia
Little Yellow  Eurema lisa
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak  Strymon istapa
Cassius Blue Leptotes cassius
Red-bordered Pixie  Melanis pixe
Gulf Fritillary  Agraulis vanillae
Julia Heliconian  Dryas iulia
Zebra Heliconian  Heliconius charithonia
Phaon Crescent  Phyciodes phaon
Red Admiral  Vanessa atalanta
Common Buckeye  Junonia coenia
Mexican Bluewing  Myscelia ethusa
Common Mestra  Mestra amymone
Tawny Emperor  Asterocampa clyton
Monarch  Danaus plexippus
Queen  Danaus gilippus
Guava Skipper  Phocides polybius
Dorantes Longtail  Urbanus dorantes
Sickle-winged Skipper  Achlyodes thraso
Brown-banded Skipper  Timochares ruptifasciatus
Tropical Checkered-Skipper  Pyrgus oileus
Laviana White-Skipper  Heliopetes laviana
Clouded Skipper  Lerema accius
Fiery Skipper  Hylephila phyleus
Eufala Skipper  Lerodea eufala

Rick Snider - Host Volunteer

Butterfly walks are Fridays at 1:30 PM

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Perching Saliana at Estero Llano Grande St. Park, 11/26/16
From: Dan Jones <00000067bd2937ce-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 22:36:33 -0500
A Peching Saliana (Saliana esperi) was found yesterday afternoon during the 
Friday butterfly walk in the tropical zone at Estero Llano Grande State Park. 
This first US record for any member of the genus Saliana was enjoyed by many 
this morning. Photos are on my blog. 




http://rgvbutterflies.blogspot.com/2016/11/perching-saliana-at-estero-llano-grande_26.html 



Dan Jones, Weslaco

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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: 
Subject: Re: Buckeye ID, Starr Co. 11/5/16
From: Charlie Sassine <0000010334c77fc4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 08:41:04 -0500
Tropical - Junonia evarete.  genoveva is more like coenia dorsally.  



-----Original Message-----
From: Rich Kostecke 
To: TX-BUTTERFLY 
Sent: Sat, Nov 19, 2016 2:44 pm
Subject: Buckeye ID, Starr Co. 11/5/16


Hi,


On 11/5/16, I photographed a buckeye at Rancho Lomitas in Starr Co. (just north 
of Rio Grande City). The buckeye looks pretty good for Mangrove to my eyes 
, but 
I also know that there is lots of variation in Common Buckeye phenotypes. This 
particular buckeye doesn’t strike me as Tropical, so the leaves either an odd 
Common or Mangrove. I would appreciate any thoughts on this butterfly. Thanks, 



Rich Kostecke
Austin, TX 
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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: ;



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TX-BUTTERFLY archives: