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Updated on Monday, March 20 at 08:17 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black Stork,©Jan Wilczur

20 Mar purple finch Brentwood [William Fissell ]
16 Mar Memphis TOS Field Trip This Sunday [Judy Dorsey ]
17 Mar Cinnamon Teal in Lobelville Bottoms, Perry County [Ruben Stoll ]
15 Mar Davidson County- Radnor Lake ["Ann Inouye" ]
18 Mar American Golden-Plover Seen in Grundy County [Dralle ]
7 Mar Loggerhead Shrike: Sevier County: Pittman Center, TN []
10 Mar Davidson County-Radnor Lake FOS ["Ann Inouye" ]
11 Mar Blount County American White Pelicans. [Mort ]
10 Mar Black Scoter - Pickwick Lake (Hardin Co.) [Jud Johnston ]
7 Mar still more Com. Mergansers ["Richard Knight" ]
11 Mar Re: Priest Lake - ducks on the move [richard connors ]
7 Mar Black Scoters, Red-throated Loon at Pickwick [Ruben Stoll ]
10 Mar Polk County [rick houlk ]
7 Mar Common Mergansers: Sevier County, Pittman Center, Greenbrier []
9 Mar Blue-headed Vireo in Hamilton County ["Gary Lanham" ]
8 Mar Purple Martin [Tarcila Fox ]
9 Mar Purple Martens ["George's McNeil" ]
8 Mar Merlin Seen at Standifer Gap Marsh-Hamilton County [Dralle ]
11 Mar Snow birds in Clarksville March 11, 2017 ["Nita Heilman" ]
11 Mar Leucistic Mockingbird [Jeff Taylor ]
10 Mar Old Hickory Lake - Ducks on the Move [Michael Smith ]
10 Mar Priest Lake - ducks on the move [richard connors ]
10 Mar Cliff Swallows Seen at the Brainerd Levee-Hamilton County [Dralle ]
7 Mar Memphis TOS March Events [Judy Dorsey ]
11 Mar Authorization to post [Jeff Taylor ]
25 Feb Rusty blackbirds & Vesper sparows Great Smoky Mt. NP--Cades Cove, Feb 25, 2017 ["" ]
25 Feb NTOS Field Trip - 02/ 25/17 [Tarcila Fox ]
24 Feb Re: pair of Ospreys ["Gary Baumgardner" ]
24 Feb more Com. Mergansers ["Richard Knight" ]
23 Feb Ross's Geese or Snow Geese flyover at Kyker Bottoms [Randy Winstead ]
23 Feb Dickcissel in Loudon County [Jay S. ]
22 Feb Tree Swallows [Rack Cross ]
22 Feb Pectoral Sandpiper Seen at Camp Jordan-Hamilton County [Dralle ]
22 Feb Common Mergansers: Sevier County: Greenbrier []
21 Feb Common Mergansers at Big South Fork NRRA [Charles Nicholson ]
21 Feb FOY Osprey; Blount County [Randy Winstead ]
20 Feb Birding buddy needed [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
19 Feb Re: TOS Winter Meeting Summary [David Magers ]
20 Feb TOS Winter Meeting Summary [Steve Routledge ]
19 Feb Great birding in the backyard [Sara Smith ]
19 Feb Crockett and Obion Counties [Stephen Zipperer ]
19 Feb TOS Kentucky Lake field trip on Saturday [Greg Tomerlin ]
19 Feb Old Hickory Lake Birding - Dunlin, all three Mergansers, Red-breasted Nuthatch [Michael Smith ]
18 Feb Re: 50 Species in Birchwood Today [Charles Murray ]
18 Feb 50 Species in Birchwood Today [Charles Murray ]
17 Feb Old Hickory Lake birds [Frank Fekel ]
16 Feb Ross & snow Geese Knox county [Mort ]
15 Feb Snow goose [Randy Winstead ]
14 Feb Tn Bird Checklist -Thanks. ["Stephen Greenfield" ]
14 Feb Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards [Kevin Bowden ]
14 Feb Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards ["" ]
14 Feb Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards ["" ]
14 Feb Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards [Richard Blanton ]
14 Feb Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards ["Stephen Greenfield" ]
14 Feb A Pine Siskin at my Feeder! [Donna Ward ]
13 Feb Memphis TOS Meeting This Wednesday [Judy Dorsey ]
13 Feb Re: Tennessee River 4-County Big Year [Randy Winstead ]
13 Feb Re: Tennessee River 4-County Big Year [Michael Todd ]
13 Feb Re: Ring-necked ducks ["Gary Baumgardner" ]
13 Feb Tennessee River 4-County Big Year [Ruben Stoll ]
13 Feb Pine Siskin ["Tommie Rogers" ]
12 Feb photographs [van harris ]
12 Feb NTOS Monthly Meeting and Program Thursday Feb.16 Radnor [Daniel Shelton ]
11 Feb Davidson Co. Orange-Crowned Warblers [Frank Fekel ]
11 Feb Rusty blackbirds, 10-mile greenway, Knoxville ["Welsh, Christopher J E" ]
10 Feb Last reminder for head count for lunch at the TOS Winter Meeting [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
11 Feb Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge [Charles Murray ]
9 Feb Great Lakes/ Keebler Rd [Kevin Brooks ]
9 Feb Golden Eagle - Cumberland County ["Dowlen, Janet - NRCS-CD, Crossville, TN" ]
9 Feb Bald Eagle in Percy Warner Park on 7 February 2017 ["Sandy Bivens" ]
8 Feb Memphis TOS Field Trip This Saturday [Judy Dorsey ]
7 Feb Baltimore Oriole at Nashville feeder [richard connors ]
7 Feb Great Backyard Bird Count and eBird [Bill Pulliam ]
7 Feb Re: TOS WINTER MEETING - FEB. 17-19 [Bill Pulliam ]
7 Feb Herons at Looney Island [Lynne Davis ]
6 Feb Tennessee Birders by the Numbers: 2016 (Vol. 12) [kbreault ]

Subject: purple finch Brentwood
From: William Fissell <wfissell AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 08:05:41 -0500
to my surprise a lone male purple finch was at my feeders this morning,
distinct form the hordes of house finches.
Subject: Memphis TOS Field Trip This Sunday
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 22:41:37 -0500
This Sun., March 19: Dick Preston will lead a field trip to Eagle Lake
Refuge. Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park visitor
center nearby. Dick will preview the area beforehand, and if the birds
aren't there, we'll bird the forest instead.

More info: https://is.gd/FyG6Ow & https://is.gd/YYIa4L
Directions to meeting place: http://mapq.st/198HA3t

Visit our website at http://birdmemphis.org

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: Cinnamon Teal in Lobelville Bottoms, Perry County
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 11:58:47 -0500
  Alan Troyer reports a Cinnamon Teal with Blue-winged Teal this forenoon
(3-17-17) in Lobelville Bottoms, a private River bottom in Perry County.
  He is currently trying for photos, but the bird has retreated into a
wooded part of the Beaver flooded area where it's hanging out.
  I plan to try for it this afternoon and tomorrow. I'll let people know if
it's still around and I can come up with a plan for viewing it.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Davidson County- Radnor Lake
From: "Ann Inouye" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "cis_135" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 21:06:46 -0500
Nashville, TN
Davidson County
3-15-2017

At Radnor Lake this afternoon, I had my FOS Chimney Swift as I was standing at 
the new observation deck. Today I also had my first Bonaparte's Gull feeding in 
Radnor Lake. I also noticed that a Horned Grebe appeared to be feeding on the 
buds that were floating on top of the surface. 


Since the Saturday snow storm there have been many more Yellow Rumps and 
Eastern Phoebes at Radnor. 


~~Ann Inouye 
     Nashville, TN
     ūüĆé


~~Ann ūüĆé
Subject: American Golden-Plover Seen in Grundy County
From: Dralle <bwdralle AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:57:19 -0500
This morning there was one American Golden-Plover at the George Clay Road Farm 
Pond. 

The American Golden-Plover did not stay and flew to the North.

Bruce Dralle 
Hamilton County TN

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Loggerhead Shrike: Sevier County: Pittman Center, TN
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 16:59:46 +0000 (UTC)

I struck out on a mission to find the Common Mergansers this morning in the 
Pittman Center area and Greenbrier, then get home to do some projects. I didn't 
find the mergansers and 2 hours later I finally made it home but only after 
finding my 210th Sevier County species, a lifer in Sevier County, and a nemesis 
no longer. Talk about being in the right place at the right time! On my way 
home up Hwy 416, windy and raining, spotted a silhouette that looked familiar 
but unfamili ar, birders know what I mean. Zagged the car in the road, put the 
emergency flashers on, rolled down the window to find a Loggerhead Shrike! 
Found a place to park, walked around in the rain a while, no shrike. Got back 
in the car, drove around the area on 416 and Copeland Creek Road, nothing. The 
rain quit so I parked again, a friend Michael Webster drove by, pulled over and 
as we chatted, the Loggerhead Shrike flew up from some brush into a tree where 
these photos were taken. It flew back around some brush and wasn't seen again. 





If you want to look for this bird, go to the exact spot on this ebird 
checklist. There is only one small pulloff on the river side of Hwy 416 and it 
is a road down to the river, but there is room for a car on the side of the 
road here. Be careful, traffic is sometimes heavy and fast here. Search 
downstream (north) from the small mud puddle and parking area about 50 yards, 
the Shrike was using this area exclusively. 





http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35025204 

Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Sevier County 
Subject: Davidson County-Radnor Lake FOS
From: "Ann Inouye" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "cis_135" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 10:57:49 -0600
Nashville, TN
Davidson County
3-10-2017

At Radnor Lake SNA this morning, I saw my FOS Purple Martins and a flock of 
about twenty Red-Breasted Mergansers flew in. 


There are also three male scaup in the lake. 

~~Ann Inouye 
     Nashville, TN
     ūüĆé
Subject: Blount County American White Pelicans.
From: Mort <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 14:45:39 -0500
10 white pelicans flew over Louisville Point in Blount County today at 2:30. 
The birds circled for several minutes gaining altitude Now they are just 
circling at high altitude so not sure if they are headed out or just enjoying 
the flying. 


Morton Massey
Knoxville, TN
865-806-9967



Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Black Scoter - Pickwick Lake (Hardin Co.)
From: Jud Johnston <rivendell AT tds.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 11:55:28 -0600
Yesterday, I was able to find one of the black scoters reported by Ruben 
Stoll on Tuesday.  It was near the causeway on the south end of the dam, 
consorting with coots.  There was also a goodly raft of other waterfowl, 
containing numerous horned grebes. Unfortunately, I didn't have time on 
this visit to sort through them.


Jud Johnston

Waynesboro, TN
Subject: still more Com. Mergansers
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 13:49:39 -0500
7 Mar 2017
Nolichucky River, Washington Co., TN

Com. Merganser - 2, male & female
from A.J. Willis Rd. near Lamar

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: Re: Priest Lake - ducks on the move
From: richard connors <didymops07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 07:19:45 -0600
Correction: Reviewing my original notes and impressions, the non-common
loons reported for Friday were more likely RED-THROATED and not Pacific
Loons. Although both are possible on Priest in winter/spring, and we had 2
Pacifics there at 7 Points on our group field trip last month, these should
be Red-throated. No photos; and they were at some distance, but other than
some shimmer and bobbing motion, the light was not that bad. Neck markings
indicated adult in winter plumage, and thin up-turned bill sticks in my
memory as not right for Pacific. Sorry for the (my) confusion. Hopefully
they will be seen again this weekend.

Richard C
Nashville

On Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 5:13 PM, richard connors 
wrote:

> March 10, 2017
> J. Percy Priest Lake, Davidson Co. TN
>
> Similar conditions and mix at mid-day today on Priest, as reported by Mike
> Smith for Old Hickory. Large flocks of ducks out in the lake. Definite
> fall-out of migrant waterfowl, from storms overnight and/or stiff north
> winds holding the down, or just that time of the season. The predominant
> species at 7 Points were Red-breasted Mergansers, with over 150
> total. Two Pacific Loons also in the mix there.
>
> A Merlin at Cook, and my FOS Tree Swallow at the dam were other highlights.
>
> Richard Connors
> Nashville
>
Subject: Black Scoters, Red-throated Loon at Pickwick
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 18:29:28 -0600
March 7th, 2017

  Alan Troyer and I saw 9 Black Scoters far up lake, viewed from the dam at
Pickwick this afternoon when the rain stopped.
  The birds were still present this evening at dusk.

  An adult Red-throated Loon was also seen at the same time, close to the
South Shore beyond the TVA dock.

  Not at Pickwick, but a flyby American Golden Plover at the Busseltown
Unit TNWR in Decatur County this morning was FOS and seen by Victor and
myself, and was species #451 on my year list.
  The Plover spent 15 minutes in the river bottoms, then was seen heading
North towards the Duck River Unit.

  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Polk County
From: rick houlk <rhoulk AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 15:25:55 +0000
A good morning on Parksville lake in Polk. Waterfowl can be hard to come by 
here. The day started with Blue-winged teal at two locations. A mixed raft of 
ducks with 20 Bufflehead, a pair of Lesser Scaup and a male Red-breasted 
merganser. Pied-billed and Horned grebe and a Common loon in breeding plumage. 
Also three Bonaparte's gulls and 50+ tree swallows. 


One adult Bald eagle on the nest and another soaring.

Rick Houlk
Polk County

Get Outlook for Android
Subject: Common Mergansers: Sevier County, Pittman Center, Greenbrier
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:25:52 +0000 (UTC)
The pair of adult Common Mergansers are still in the Pittman Center/Greenbrier 
area of Sevier County and last seen on 3/6 in Greenbrier. They have been in the 
area since January 30th and ranging a distance of 12 river miles from near 
Sevierville and observed numerous locations in the river along Hwy 416 into 
Pittman Center. They seem to have been favoring a more southerly position 
closer to Greenbrier recently. That is, if this is the same pair. Last year, 
another distinct pair showed up in early May, but didn't stay. 


Hopefully, in the coming weeks, we'll have better observations on their 
activities in Greenbrier if this is where they decide to nest. 


Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Sevier County 
Subject: Blue-headed Vireo in Hamilton County
From: "Gary Lanham" <glanham AT epbfi.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 15:38:29 -0500
We heard a vireo singing in our neighborhood this morning on Signal Mountain
around 11 AM, and thought it was a Blue-headed vireo.  

 

After a thirty-minute search, we found the bird and confirmed that it was a
Blue-headed, our FOY.  

 

While searching for the vireo, we also came upon a Red-breasted Nuthatch.

 

Pixie and Gary Lanham

Signal Mountain

Hamilton County
Subject: Purple Martin
From: Tarcila Fox <tarcila AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 09:28:50 -0600
Our first Purple Martin just arrived! He is checking out his regular gourd.
Tarcila Fox, Goodlettsville, Davidson County, TN
tarcila AT bellsouth.net



Subject: Purple Martens
From: "George's McNeil" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mcneilg20" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 15:31:16 -0600
Yesterday, while adding seed to my feeder, I was greeted to the sounds of FOY 
Purple Martens chattering as they flew into my neighbor's gourd houses. 

Sounds like the beginning of spring....

Georges McNeil
Shelby County, TN

Sent from Georges McNeil's iPhone 6s.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Merlin Seen at Standifer Gap Marsh-Hamilton County
From: Dralle <bwdralle AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 16:55:49 -0500
Late this morning I watched an adult female Merlin (Taiga) subspecies being 
mobbed by Tree Swallows along Standifer Gap Road. 


The Merlin landed briefly in the trees along the edge of the farm field.
I could not relocate the Merlin but it may remain in the area the next few 
days. 


Bruce Dralle
Hamilton County TN

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Snow birds in Clarksville March 11, 2017
From: "Nita Heilman" <nrheilmanandcats AT charter.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 06:59:46 -0600
Snow that began before 6AM this morning has pushed birds up out of my 
riverbottom to yard feeders. In addition to usual yard birds, I saw Juncos, Fox 
Sparrow and Hermit Thrush before 6am. 


Nita Heilman
Clarksville, Tn
Montgomery Co.
Subject: Leucistic Mockingbird
From: Jeff Taylor <birdingtaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 19:06:14 -0600
March 11, 2017 Maple Dr., Sumner County, Hendersonville, TN

11:30 am today bird was working the fence line on north side of Maple Dr.
(closer to Indian Lake Rd.) in Hendersonville. Bird was nearly all white
with a touch of gray in wing.

Jeff Taylor
Hendersonville, TN
Subject: Old Hickory Lake - Ducks on the Move
From: Michael Smith <ms722 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 18:59:49 +0000 (UTC)
3-10-17Old Hickory Lake, Davidson Co.
I swung by Snow Bunting Peninsula on Old Hickory Lake during my lunch break 
today to see if the storms last night brought in any birds, particularly 
waterfowl.  It was very windy, and it was kicking up whitecaps on the water 
which made viewing conditions tough.  However, there was a large (300+) mixed 
raft of ducks out in the middle of the lake, and after scanning across the 
bobbing mass several times, I was able to pick out seven species.  There were 
200+ scaup (primarily Lesser; the conditions and distance prevented me from 
pulling out any Greaters), along with several smaller flocks of Canvasback, 
Redhead, Shoveler, Gadwall, Bufflehead, and Red-breasted Merganser.  Other 
ducks in the area were Ring-necked, Ruddy, Blue-winged Teal, and Mallard. 

Mike SmithHendersonville, TN
Subject: Priest Lake - ducks on the move
From: richard connors <didymops07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 17:13:52 -0600
March 10, 2017
J. Percy Priest Lake, Davidson Co. TN

Similar conditions and mix at mid-day today on Priest, as reported by Mike
Smith for Old Hickory. Large flocks of ducks out in the lake. Definite
fall-out of migrant waterfowl, from storms overnight and/or stiff north
winds holding the down, or just that time of the season. The predominant
species at 7 Points were Red-breasted Mergansers, with over 150
total. Two Pacific Loons also in the mix there.

A Merlin at Cook, and my FOS Tree Swallow at the dam were other highlights.

Richard Connors
Nashville
Subject: Cliff Swallows Seen at the Brainerd Levee-Hamilton County
From: Dralle <bwdralle AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 17:47:56 -0500
There were a couple of Cliff Swallows flying around the levee this afternoon 
with the Tree, Rough-winged and Barn Swallows. 

Today's Cliff Swallow sighting ties the Early Spring date for Chattanooga. 
The Birds of Tennessee A New Annotated Checklist by Somershoe and Sloan. List 
the Early Spring date as March 10th 1987. 


Bruce Dralle
Hamilton County

Sent from my iPhone


Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Memphis TOS March Events
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:02:52 -0600
This Sat., March 11: Field trip to Shelby Farms Park. Meet at the
amphitheater parking lot on North Pine Lake Drive at 8:00 a.m. David
Blaylock is our leader.

More info: http://is.gd/pIsdOx
Directions: http://is.gd/2nHjQD

Sun., March 19: Dick Preston will lead a field trip to Eagle Lake Refuge.
Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park visitor center
nearby. Dick will preview the area beforehand, and if the birds aren't
there, we'll bird the forest instead.

More info: https://is.gd/FyG6Ow & https://is.gd/YYIa4L
Directions to meeting place: http://mapq.st/198HA3t

Visit MTOS on the web at http://birdmemphis.org

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: Authorization to post
From: Jeff Taylor <birdingtaylor AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 18:51:42 -0600
Leucistic Mockingbird in Hendersonville.
Subject: Rusty blackbirds & Vesper sparows Great Smoky Mt. NP--Cades Cove, Feb 25, 2017
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "birdglass44" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 18:55:40 -0500

 
I had FOY Rusty blackbirds and 3 Vesper Sparrows in the field along the Cades 
Cove Loop Road 

Great Smoky Mt. NP--Cades Cove, Blount, Tennessee, US
Feb 25, 2017 8:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
12.0 mile(s)
Comments: Loop Road to sewage pond entrance, Sparks & Hyatt Lanes, Abrams Falls 
Trailhead, Cable Mill-PC, 50-55, breezy 

31 species

Canada goose 2 - sewage ponds
Bufflehead 8 - sewage ponds
Wild Turkey  16 -11 observed roosting in trees near office
Turkey Vulture - 6 landed on ground far end of field north of bridge, west of 
Hyatt Lane 

Northern Harrier  1- single male observed hunting in field west of John Oliver
Red-shouldered Hawk  3-     2 heard calling from campground
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  39 -    22 in burned field west of Hyatt Lane
Carolina Chickadee  8
Tufted Titmouse  8
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Brown Creeper  1
Carolina Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  6
American Robin 300 conservative estimate of robins observed in fields near 
stables, pasture along Spark Lane, in burned field west of Hyatt and around 
Cable Mill 

European Starling 2 in mixed flock of blackbirds in field east of Sparks Lane 

Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Field Sparrow  9
Dark-eyed Junco  5
Chipping sparrow 6
White-throated Sparrow  3
Vesper Sparrow 3 observed in burned field west of Hyatt Lane, noticed white 
outer feathers on tail when flying, sulking in low vegetation, one had reddish 
color on shoulder, did not respond to phishing 

Song Sparrow  14
Swamp Sparrow  1
Red-winged Blackbird 100 conservative estimate of birds in trees and on ground 
east of Sparks Lane 

Eastern Meadowlark  2
Rusty Blackbird 6 conservative estimate of rusties with red-winged blackbirds 
east of Sparks Lane 


View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34796614

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: NTOS Field Trip - 02/ 25/17
From: Tarcila Fox <tarcila AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 18:20:41 -0600
Nineteen NTOS Birders met this morning for a field trip exploring Robertson 
County. The temperature ranged from 40¬į - 48¬įf, and the winds were almost 
constant so it felt colder. We were led by Tony Lance, who is familiar with the 
area and who is able to take us through private property (with the owner’s 
blessing) to Cedar Hill Swamp, a small TWRA Wildlife Management Area. Some met 
and carpooled from the Adventure Science Center in Nashville to meet the rest 
of us at exit 24 on I-24. From there we went through Springfield to State Line 
Road, where the birds on one side of the road were in Kentucky and the birds on 
the other side of the road were in Tennessee. We saw Horned Larks on the side 
of the road that was toward Kentucky but we decided they were in Tennessee when 
they walked up on the pavement toward Tennessee. There were lots of Horned 
Larks, and American Pipits in the fields, and flying around back and forth 
between the two states. We traveled by car to many locations within the county, 
and then for the grande finale, we hiked to and through Cedar Hill Swamp, we 
were mostly on an active railroad track. Twice, we had to get off the tracks 
for oncoming trains, but it was easily the highlight of the morning. Our trip 
ended just after noon, and by then we had seen 41/42 species (one was Accipiter 
Species). 


Best birds: Northern Harrier, on State Line Road (Kentucky side), two Brewers 
Black Birds, Rusty Blackbirds, Red-headed Woodpeckers and a Tree Swallow, all 
at Cedar Hill Swamp. The Loggerhead Shrikes, on Homer Worsham Blvd. were 
another favorite. 


Thanks to everyone who attended, and made the field trip a success. A big 
thanks to Tony Lance for taking us to so many great birding spots. 

A list of species follows below.

Cheers, 
Tarcila Fox
tarcila AT bellsouth.net

Canada Goose
Mallard
Wild Turkey
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Accipiter sp.
Red-Shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Ring-billed Gull
Morning Dove
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
American Pipit
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Brewer’s Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
House Sparrow

Subject: Re: pair of Ospreys
From: "Gary Baumgardner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "baumgrdner" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 15:50:57 -0500
We saw a pair of Ospreys on a nest in Louisville, Blount county. 2/24/2017
Susan Baumgardner
Subject: more Com. Mergansers
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 13:20:40 -0500
24 Feb 2017
Watauga River, Washington Co., TN

Com. Merganser - 2, male & female together

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: Ross's Geese or Snow Geese flyover at Kyker Bottoms
From: Randy Winstead <randywendy AT att.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 21:15:15 +0000 (UTC)
I was at Kyker Bottoms Wildlife Refuge this morning.  It was very foggy with 
visibility practically nil until well after eight o'clock and clear conditions 
not present until past 9:30.   There were several flyovers of Canada Geese 
early, most of which could not be seen due to the fog.  One flyover, however, 
was almost directly overhead and consisted of five geese, three of which were 
Canada Geese and the other two being either Ross's Geese or Snow Geese.  The 
visibility was too poor to make a sure decision as to which species they were, 
but due to the small size I'm guessing that they were Ross's Geese.  Most of 
this morning's geese landed on the north side of the Refuge, which is not 
clearly visible from the observation deck or road. 

Among the 32 species seen there were no other significant local rarities, but 
there were seven duck species seen, including four American Black Ducks.  At 
one point there were 42 tree swallows on the wires over the adjacent pond. 
 They had been first noted here for this year about two weeks earlier. 

After visiting Kyker Bottoms, I traveled to Chilhowee Lake.  The most notable 
sighting was a common loon.  I have been seeing as many as four loons 
sporadically here over the last couple of months, all of them being seen from 
the boat ramp near where Highway 129 meets the Lake.  I usually see bald 
eagles somewhere along the Lake, but saw none today.  I probably heard one, 
but did not feel comfortable enough with it to record it. 

A link to this morning's eBird checklist for Kyker Bottoms is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34703298

Randy WinsteadMaryville, Blount County
Subject: Dickcissel in Loudon County
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 16:36:23 +0000
A DICKCISSEL is currently being seen at a feeder outside The Home Decor Resale 
Store at 6710 Morganton Road in Greenback (Loudon County). Janet Lee McKnight, 
store owner and TOS member, is happy to have birders over for a look. 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: Tree Swallows
From: Rack Cross <rackcross AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 18:52:54 -0500
3 - FOS Tree Swallows observed today at Kingsport Birding Trail (KBT)
location Cattails Golf Course on Birding Kingsport field trip lead by Gary
Bailey. A bit on the early side but no regional record. Five intrepid
birders pushed through steady rain that kept golfers at bay all morning to
gather a nice species list.


Rack Cross
Kingsport, Tennessee
Subject: Pectoral Sandpiper Seen at Camp Jordan-Hamilton County
From: Dralle <bwdralle AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 10:44:46 -0500
This morning I observed two Pectoral Sandpipers feeding with a large flock of 
Killdeers. The location is the large field across from the Camp Jordan Arena. 


Bruce Dralle
Hamilton County TN

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Common Mergansers: Sevier County: Greenbrier
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 00:19:18 +0000 (UTC)
Seeing Chuck Nicholson's post regarding Common Mergansers prompted me to give 
an update on the pair on the Middle Prong here in Sevier County, which were 
first observed on January 30th. 


There is at least one pair on the river, possibly two, hesitatingly stated. 
They are moving a lot, from near Sevierville and into Greenbrier in the 
Smokies, about 10-11 river miles. 


They were last seen this morning in Greenbrier, their second appearance this 
winter in the park, typically remaining farther downstream. I tried to 
photograph them but when I stopped the car, the flew downstream immediately and 
I did not relocate them. 


No courtship has been observed, but they remain together, and feed and preen 
together. In only one instance has the female been seen singly. 


I will keep this forum updated with significant developments.

Keith Watson
Pittman Center TN
Sevier County


Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
Subject: Common Mergansers at Big South Fork NRRA
From: Charles Nicholson <cpnicholson53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 18:10:46 -0500
This morning I observed and photographed one male and two female Common
Mergansers on the Big South Fork River in Scott County. The birds were a
few hundred yards upstream from the Leatherwood Ford Bridge. During the 20
minutes that I observed them, they slowly swam back and forth in a large
pool and occasionally dived and preened. I did not observe any courtship
activity. It will be interesting to see if these birds stay around like the
birds at Greenbriar in the Smokies.  There are very few, if any, previous
records of this species in the park.

Chuck Nicholson
Norris, TN
Subject: FOY Osprey; Blount County
From: Randy Winstead <randywendy AT att.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 19:49:35 +0000 (UTC)
I saw my first osprey of the year for Blount County today.  It was at 
Louisville Point Park on the nesting platform that is nearest to the sandbar 
where ring-billed gulls gather.  I will have an eBird report later. 

Randy WinsteadMaryville, Blount County
Subject: Birding buddy needed
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 06:59:33 -0600
Morning Tn-birdersä
  We received an email request from a gentlemen from South Africa who is
looking for a someone to guide him on a bird walk around Radnor Lake on
Sunday, March 19thäfor the morning onlyäwhile he is here visiting his son.
If youĻd like to assist him please contact me and I will put you in touch
with him directly. 

Thanks!

<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge, NTOS President
Southeastern Avian Research
www.southeasternavianresearch.org



Subject: Re: TOS Winter Meeting Summary
From: David Magers <magerdp AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 20:32:48 -0600
And a huge thanks to Cyndi and Steve for hosting and leading this most 
enjoyable and highly successful event!! 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 19, 2017, at 7:25 PM, Steve Routledge  
wrote: 

> 
> 2/19/2017
> 
> 
> This weekend forty-seven birders enjoyed a wonderful weekend at Paris Landing 
State Park and surrounding environs. Birders from Memphis to Kingsport gathered 
to enjoy the wintering waterfowl as well as each other's company as the group 
totaled 95 species seen or heard collectively. Besides the variety of birds we 
were seeing, another major highlight was the generous BBQ lunch hosted by Joan 
Howe and the refuge staff and Friends of TNWR. The complimentary hospitality 
room provided by Paris Landing State Park served as the perfect venue to unwind 
both Friday and Saturday night. As always, it was great fun catching up with 
old friends and making several new ones. 

> 
> Here is a summary of birds reportedly seen or heard as far as we know now:
> 
> Greater White -fronted Goose
> Snow Goose
> Canada Goose
> Tundra Swan
> Wood Duck
> Gadwall
> American Wigeon
> American Black Duck
> Mallard
> Northern Shoveler
> Northern Pintail
> Green-winged Teal
> Canvasback
> Redhead
> Ring-necked Duck
> Greater Scaup
> Lesser Scaup
> Bufflehead
> Common Goldeneye
> Hooded Merganser
> Common Merganser
> Red-breasted Merganser
> Ruddy Duck
> Wild Turkey
> Common Loon
> Pied-billed Grebe
> Horned Grebe
> Double-crested Cormorant 
> American White Pelican 
> Great Blue Heron
> Black Vulture 
> Turkey Vulture
> Osprey
> Northern Harrier
> Bald Eagle 
> Red-shouldered Hawk
> Red-tailed Hawk
> American Coot
> Sandhill Crane
> Killdeer
> Bonaparte's Gull
> Ring-billed Gull
> Herring Gull
> Lesser Black-backed Gull
> Forster's Tern
> Mourning Dove
> Eastern Screech Owl
> Barred Owl
> Belted Kingfisher
> Red-headed Woodpecker
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 
> Downy Woodpecker 
> Hairy Woodpecker
> Northern Flicker
> Pileated Woodpecker
> American Kestrel
> Peregrine Falcon
> Eastern Phoebe 
> Blue Jay
> American Crow
> Horned Lark
> Tree Swallow
> Carolina Chickadee
> Tufted Titmice
> White-breasted Nuthatch
> Brown Creeper
> Winter Wren
> Carolina Wren
> Golden-crowned Kinglet
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> Eastern Bluebird
> American Robin
> Brown Thrasher
> Northern Mockingbird
> European Starling
> American Pipit
> Cedar Waxwing
> Pine Warbler
> Yellow-Rumped Warbler
> Eastern Towhee
> Chipping Sparrow
> Field Sparrow
> Savannah Sparrow
> Song Sparrow
> Swamp Sparrow
> White-throated Sparrow
> Dark-eyed Junco
> Northern Cardinal
> Red-winged Blackbird
> Eastern Meadowlark
> Common Grackle
> House Finch 
> American Goldfinch
> House Sparrow
> 
> Honorable mention: Golden Eagle at the Duck River Unit seen Friday
> 
> So there you have it! Thanks to everyone who travelled from far and wide to 
join us this weekend. You really helped to make our winter meeting a rousing 
success. Hope to see everyone (and all others) again very soon. Mark your 
calendars for the first weekend in May for our Annual Spring Meeting in 
Knoxville and for the first weekend in October for our Fall Meeting for the 
very first time in Kingsport!! 

> 
> Good Birding to One and All !!!
> 
> Steve and Cyndi Routledge 
> Clarksville/ Montgomery County
> 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: TOS Winter Meeting Summary
From: Steve Routledge <sroutledge1957 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 01:25:36 +0000
2/19/2017


This weekend forty-seven birders enjoyed a wonderful weekend at Paris
Landing State Park and surrounding environs. Birders from Memphis to
Kingsport gathered to enjoy the wintering waterfowl as well as each other's
company as the group totaled 95 species seen or heard collectively. Besides
the variety of birds we were seeing, another major highlight was the
generous BBQ lunch hosted by Joan Howe and the refuge staff and Friends of
TNWR. The complimentary hospitality room provided by Paris Landing State
Park served as the perfect venue to unwind both Friday and Saturday night.
As always, it was great fun catching up with old friends and making several
new ones.

Here is a summary of birds reportedly seen or heard as far as we know now:

Greater White -fronted Goose
Snow Goose
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
American White Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Northern Harrier
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Coot
Sandhill Crane
Killdeer
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Forster's Tern
Mourning Dove
Eastern Screech Owl
Barred Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmice
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Winter Wren
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
American Pipit
Cedar Waxwing
Pine Warbler
Yellow-Rumped Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Honorable mention: Golden Eagle at the Duck River Unit seen Friday

So there you have it! Thanks to everyone who travelled from far and wide to
join us this weekend. You really helped to make our winter meeting a
rousing success. Hope to see everyone (and all others) again very soon.
Mark your calendars for the first weekend in May for our Annual Spring
Meeting in Knoxville and for the first weekend in October for our Fall
Meeting for the very first time in Kingsport!!

Good Birding to One and All !!!

Steve and Cyndi Routledge
Clarksville/ Montgomery County
Subject: Great birding in the backyard
From: Sara Smith <ssmith2685 AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:41:42 -0500
This afternoon I had about 50-70 red winged blackbirds in a tree in my 
backyard. They all were calling and then suddenly, they all got quiet. A huge 
flock of grackles were kettling overhead (maybe 100). After they passed the red 
winged blackbirds started chattering again. Wow! I've never had grackles this 
early and never had that many red wings in my yard! 


Sara Smith
Talbott
Jefferson County, TN

Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Crockett and Obion Counties
From: Stephen Zipperer <stczipperer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 13:37:42 -0600
2/19/2017
Crockett and Obion Counties
Traveling

Friday 2/17/2017 I left out early from Murfreesboro to do some west
Tennessee birding before heading over to the TOS meeting at Paris Landing
State Park.  Birded Spence Rd in Crockett Co and got Snow Geese and various
duck species. I also spotted 4 Lesser Yellowlegs.  Also hit Bogota WMA and
found lots of sparrows and 1 Am. Tree Sparrow and a Harlan's type
Red-tailed Hawk. Went to North Garrett Sawmill Rd in Obion Co and found
previously reported Western Meadowlark.  New bird for Tennessee thanks to
everyone for reporting. Birded several other new counties. Three more
counties to bird in  West Tennessee and i will have bird them all. Great
day of birding.  Had a great time at the TOS meeting great seeing everyone.
Thanks to all who set it up.

Good birding

Stephen Zipperer
Rutherford Co
Subject: TOS Kentucky Lake field trip on Saturday
From: Greg Tomerlin <cedarbees AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 12:58:54 -0600
I had a grand time yesterday birding with the TOS crowd around Henry
County, TN on Saturday, 18 February 2017. Despite the cool, rainy beginning
at Paris Landing State Park, it was nice day to be out looking for birds
(aren't they all!).

This was my first time birding in Henry Co., so all the spots were new to
me and there were plenty of interesting birds to see. If I didn't forget
something, I saw 56 species and added 3 new birds to my life list. Great
fun!

Thank you Stephen Zipperer for heading up our group from the Lebanon
Chapter, and thank you to Steve & Cindy Routledge and all those who
organized the weekend and made arrangements for our lunch at the Visitors
Center at Britton Ford. And finally, thank you to the gentleman who
stopped, got out in the rain, and told me about the concrete viewing
platform at the State Park when we first started out yesterday morning. I
never got your name but, but I appreciate your assistance that morning and
again at Swamp Road.

Can we do it again next weekend?

Greg
‚Äč Tomerlin
Wilson County‚Äč
Subject: Old Hickory Lake Birding - Dunlin, all three Mergansers, Red-breasted Nuthatch
From: Michael Smith <ms722 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 15:52:54 +0000 (UTC)
Sunday, Feb 19, 2017
Old Hickory Dam Area, Davidson Co.
I met Phillip Casteel at Old Hickory Dam to see if we could relocate the 
Red-breasted Nuthatch found a couple of days earlier by Frank Fekel.  Bird 
activity was quite high, and lots of birds were singing on this mild, overcast 
morning.  About halfway down the nature trail, we lucked up on a calling 
Red-breasted Nuthatch along with a couple of singing Pine Warblers.  After 
leaving the woods, we headed over to the beach area, and found a lone female 
Red-breasted Merganser, and a pair of Hooded Mergansers, along with a 
continuing flock of Lesser Scaup. a lone Ring-necked Duck, and a couple of 
Northern Shoveler.  After leaving the point, we went over to Snow Bunting 
Peninsula and found a single female Common Merganser to complete the merganser 
trifecta.  As we stood on the point, we both heard a distinctive shorebird 
call, and then looked up to see a winter-plumaged Dunlin fly directly overhead. 
 Unfortunately, the bird did not stop and kept flying north over the lake. 
 Fifty-one total species were either seen or heard...great morning to be out. 

Mike SmithHendersonville, TN
Subject: Re: 50 Species in Birchwood Today
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 13:25:06 +0000
Correction! I failed to check-off an American Kestrel seen from Shadden Road in 
Meigs County yesterday, so fifty-one species were actually identified. 


Charles Murray

Birchwood, TN


________________________________
From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org  on behalf of 
Charles Murray  

Sent: Friday, February 17, 2017 8:33 PM
To: tn-bird AT freelists.org
Subject: [TN-Bird] 50 Species in Birchwood Today

Fifty species were identified in the Birchwood area today. Many were noted at 
the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge, the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park, or on Blythe 
Ferry Lane, all in Meigs County. Others were found at or near my home in 
Hamilton County. One highlight was 9 species of ducks. Species seen from the 
HWR viewing area were: Gadwall, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, 
Ring-necked, and Lesser Scaup. Ducks observed from CRMP were: Wood Duck, 
Mallard, Green-winged Teal, and Bufflehead. 


A Northern Harrier was seen at HWR, and a few Bald Eagles were seen both there 
and from the CRMP. A total of fewer than 100 Sandhill Cranes were noted at each 
of these two sites. The principal highlights from my home today were a 
Brown-headed Nuthatch, a Hermit Thrush, several Wild Turkeys, and several 
Purple Finches. 


Thanks to Libby Wolfe for identifying good spots to search, I was able to 
locate a first-of-year Fox Sparrow on Blythe Ferry Lane east of the Cherokee 
Removal Memorial Park property. 


Charles Murray
Birchwood, TN
Subject: 50 Species in Birchwood Today
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 01:33:52 +0000
Fifty species were identified in the Birchwood area today. Many were noted at 
the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge, the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park, or on Blythe 
Ferry Lane, all in Meigs County. Others were found at or near my home in 
Hamilton County. One highlight was 9 species of ducks. Species seen from the 
HWR viewing area were: Gadwall, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, 
Ring-necked, and Lesser Scaup. Ducks observed from CRMP were: Wood Duck, 
Mallard, Green-winged Teal, and Bufflehead. 


A Northern Harrier was seen at HWR, and a few Bald Eagles were seen both there 
and from the CRMP. A total of fewer than 100 Sandhill Cranes were noted at each 
of these two sites. The principal highlights from my home today were a 
Brown-headed Nuthatch, a Hermit Thrush, several Wild Turkeys, and several 
Purple Finches. 


Thanks to Libby Wolfe for identifying good spots to search, I was able to 
locate a first-of-year Fox Sparrow on Blythe Ferry Lane east of the Cherokee 
Removal Memorial Park property. 


Charles Murray
Birchwood, TN
Subject: Old Hickory Lake birds
From: Frank Fekel <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2017 13:15:31 -0600
Snow Bunting Peninsula and Old Hickory Dam Area
Davidson Co., TN
2017 Feb. 17

This lovely Friday I decided to drive up to the Old Hickory
Dam area on my lunch break. At Snow Bunting Peninsula
I looked for the mergansers that had been seen there for
several past weeks. I only could find a single RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER there. Moving next door to Old Hickory Dam
I walked the small forest next to the dam. I spotted a BROWN
CREEPER and both kinglets, and heard WINTER and CAROLINA WRENs.
Also singing were at least 2 PINE WARBLERs, but the best bird
was my first of the year RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, seen working
hard on a dead pine tree limb. A wonderful lunch break.

Frank Fekel
Bellevue, TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
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                          Rosedale, VA
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__________________________________________________________
         
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Ross & snow Geese Knox county
From: Mort <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 2017 13:14:00 -0500
There are three Snow and 2 Ross's Geese at Maloney road Park in Knox County 
today at 1pm. The snow geese were reported here two days ago by Cody Allen. 
Chris Welch reported two Ross's Geese at nearby Cherokee Farms two days ago. 
All 5 birds are feeding together. 


Morton Massey
Knoxville, TN


Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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                To unsubscribe, send email to:
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Snow goose
From: Randy Winstead <randywendy AT att.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 15:13:55 -0500
Snow goose at Louisville Point Park.  At a distance.

Randy Winstead
Maryville, Blount County

Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Tn Bird Checklist -Thanks.
From: "Stephen Greenfield" <stephengreenfield AT charter.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 14:48:56 -0500
Wow! Thanks to all who responded and the advice. I want to show my
appreciation with a story.
 
In March 1965 when I was twelve, at my request my father took me to my first
meeting of the Nashville TOS at Peabody College where I met "real"
birdwatchers, including Albert Ganier (one of the founders of the TOS),
Amelia Laskey (the Bluebird Lady) Katherine Goodpasture (Vanderbilt
University) and many others. My father introduced us to the crowd. After the
meeting was over I was greeted by everyone with open arms, and by the next
month I went on my first "real" bird watching field trip on the Spring Count
to Percy Warner Park.  That day, April 24, 1965, is still one of the top
five memorable days of my life for the awakening of a city boy to the
wonders of nature shared in good fellowship. I was hooked and until I left
for college I was a regular member and went on many field trips.
 
After that first TOS meeting on the way home my father, a good judge of
character, remarked, "That was the friendliest bunch of people I ever met."
 
Perhaps it's the love of nature and the excitement of sharing that love that
birders possess in abundance. It's a rare occurrence in this world to find
people who so willingly share their time, enthusiasm, and knowledge. I'm
happy to report it's still the same today as it was 52 years ago.
 
Stephen Greenfield
Cleveland, TN
Subject: Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards
From: Kevin Bowden <bnabirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 13:10:02 -0600
You can also download a copy of the most recent checklist (2013) from
www.tnwatchablewildlife.org and print or request copies from TWRA. Contact
information is also on the same website.

Kevin Bowden
Nashville, TN

On Tue, Feb 14, 2017 at 11:47 AM, Stephen Greenfield <
stephengreenfield AT charter.net> wrote:

> When I began bird watching in 1964 there were Tn Birds checklist cards
> that were perfect for your shirt-pocket but I ran out 30 years ago. Are
> those still made and where would I purchase them? Thanks in advance.
>
> Stephen Greenfield
>
>
Subject: Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "davchaffin" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 13:30:57 -0500
BTW, they are free.

David Chaffin

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

On Tuesday, February 14, 2017, Richard Blanton  wrote:

Stephen,

Your local TOS chapter will most likely have them. Where do you live?

Thanks,
Rick Blanton 
Johnson City, TN

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 14, 2017, at 12:47 PM, Stephen Greenfield 
 wrote: 


When I began bird watching in 1964 there were Tn Birds checklist cards that 
were perfect for your shirt-pocket but I ran out 30 years ago. Are those still 
made and where would I purchase them? Thanks in advance. 

 
Stephen Greenfield
 
Subject: Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "davchaffin" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 13:29:37 -0500
As an alternative, you can email a request to the address on the checklist & 
have them mailed to you. 


David Chaffin
Cleveland TN
Bradley Co

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

On Tuesday, February 14, 2017, Richard Blanton  wrote:

Stephen,

Your local TOS chapter will most likely have them. Where do you live?

Thanks,
Rick Blanton 
Johnson City, TN

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 14, 2017, at 12:47 PM, Stephen Greenfield 
 wrote: 


When I began bird watching in 1964 there were Tn Birds checklist cards that 
were perfect for your shirt-pocket but I ran out 30 years ago. Are those still 
made and where would I purchase them? Thanks in advance. 

 
Stephen Greenfield
 
Subject: Re: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards
From: Richard Blanton <zsleepyz72 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 18:10:46 +0000
Stephen,

Your local TOS chapter will most likely have them. Where do you live?

Thanks,
Rick Blanton
Johnson City, TN

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 14, 2017, at 12:47 PM, Stephen Greenfield 
> wrote: 


When I began bird watching in 1964 there were Tn Birds checklist cards that 
were perfect for your shirt-pocket but I ran out 30 years ago. Are those still 
made and where would I purchase them? Thanks in advance. 


Stephen Greenfield

Subject: Tennessee Bird Checklist Cards
From: "Stephen Greenfield" <stephengreenfield AT charter.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 12:47:16 -0500
When I began bird watching in 1964 there were Tn Birds checklist cards that
were perfect for your shirt-pocket but I ran out 30 years ago. Are those
still made and where would I purchase them? Thanks in advance.
 
Stephen Greenfield
 
Subject: A Pine Siskin at my Feeder!
From: Donna Ward <wardd9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 2017 10:37:49 -0600
Hello, Birders.

       Today and yesterday, (12th and 13th of February) I have observed one
Pine Siskin among about 30 Goldfinches and about 15 Purple Finches at my
feeders here in McKenzie, TN.  It is the only one I have seen this winter.
  (Donna Ward, McKenzie, TN., Carroll County)
Subject: Memphis TOS Meeting This Wednesday
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 13:20:37 -0600
Wed., Feb. 15 - Chapter meeting at 7:00 p.m., St. George's Episcopal
Church, 2425 S. Germantown Rd., Germantown, TN.  Chapter member Larry E.
McPherson presents "The Loggerhead Shrike." Refreshments served.

More info:  http://www.larryemcpherson.com/ & https://is.gd/mBflP9
Directions: http://mapq.st/1dEWrZk

Visit our website at http://birdmemphis.org

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: Re: Tennessee River 4-County Big Year
From: Randy Winstead <randywendy AT att.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 18:22:30 +0000 (UTC)
Impressive list. I enjoyed keeping up with your findings during the year.
Mine isn't nearly as impressive, but not too bad for my first year as an 
eBirder.  I had 182 species in Blount County.  I tried mostly, but not 
entirely successfully, to limit my exploits to Blount County so as to preserve 
space in my my life for other activities. 

Among the more notable species that I found were Least Bittern, American 
Bittern, Peregrine Falcon, Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Ruffed Grouse, 
White-winged Scoter, White-rumped Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Western 
Sandpiper, Black Tern, Sora, Common Raven, Marsh Wren, Swainson's Warbler, 
Sandhill Crane, Yellow-crowned Night-heron, and Red Crossbill.  A few others 
were rare for my area, including Canvasback, American White Pelican, and Little 
Blue Heron.  The year 2017 has started out well.  I've found Ross' Goose and 
Snow Goose, both rare for Blount County. 

My most notable misses thus far have been Pine Siskin, Fox Sparrow, and several 
warblers that I wasn't entirely ready for last spring (including 
Chestnut-sided, Blackburnian, Black-throated Blue, Cape May, and Bay-breasted). 

My intention, after retirement, was to give this a year or two to better learn 
the birds of the area.  After another year I'll probably tone things down 
dramatically.  It's definitely been fun.  Among other things, I had never 
seen a bald eagle in the county before last year.  Now I know that there are 
at least twenty in the county during the winter months.  It has been 
enjoyable. Happy birding! 

Randy WinsteadMaryville, Blount County

      From: Ruben Stoll 
 To: tn-bird AT freelists.org 
 Sent: Monday, February 13, 2017 9:11 AM
 Subject: [TN-Bird] Tennessee River 4-County Big Year
   
  Here are some of the totals I came up with for my time spent birding in my 4 
favorite Tennessee River Counties in 2016. (Humphreys, Henry, Hardin, and 
Perry). 

  
  Humphreys County 
  231 species, 14 of which I didn't see in any of the other 3 Counties;Tundra 
Swan 

Eurasian Wigeon 
Brown Booby 
Cattle Egret 
Glossy Ibis 
Black-necked Stilt 
Willet 
Upland Sandpiper 
Sanderling 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper 
Marbled Godwit 
Short-billed Dowitcher 
Wilson's Phalarope 
Olive-sided Flycatcher  Perry County 
220 species, 9 of which were seen in that County only;Anhinga 
Least Bittern 
Swainson's Hawk 
Black-billed Cuckoo 
Alder Flycatcher 
Connecticut Warbler 
Mourning Warbler 
Cerulean Warbler 
Black-headed Grosbeak  Hardin County
   209 species, 8 of which were seen in that County alone;Eared Grebe 
Virginia Rail 
Great Black-backed Gull 
Iceland Gull 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 
Loggerhead Shrike 
Brown-headed Nuthatch 
Western Meadowlark  Henry County 
  230 species, 7 of which were not seen in any of the other 3 Counties;Mute 
Swan 

Western Grebe 
Sabine's Gull 
Franklin's Gull 
Thayer's Gull 
Pomerine Jaeger 
Henslow's Sparrow  24 other species of interest that were found in only 2 of 
the 4 Counties were;Surf Scoter                    
Henry/Humphreys 

Black Scoter                  Henry/Hardin 
Red-throated Loon       Henry/Hardin 
Pacific Loon                  Henry/Hardin 
Common Merganser   Henry/Perry 
American Bittern          Perry/Humphreys 
Black-crowned Night-heron 
                                        
Henry/Humphreys 

Yellow-crowned Night-heron 
                                        
Perry/Humphreys 

American Avocet         Henry/Humphreys 
Black-bellied Plover     Perry/Humphreys 
Baird's Sandpiper         Henry/Humphreys
Western Sandpiper      Henry/Humphreys
Laughing Gull               Henry/Humphreys 
Least Tern                     Henry/Humphreys 
Common Tern              Henry/Humphreys 
Barn Owl                       Perry/Humphreys 
Least Flycatcher          Perry/Hardin 
Red-breasted Nuthatch Perry/Hardin 
Lapland Longspur        Henry/Hardin 
Canada Warbler           Perry/Hardin 
Lark Sparrow                Henry/Hardin 
Grasshopper Sparrow Henry/Hardin 
Leconte's Sparrow       Henry/Humphreys
Nelson's Sparrow         Henry/Perry 
Brewer's Blackbird       Henry/Hardin   The following 14 species of 
interest were found in 3 of the 4 Counties, and missed in 1 County, which is 
listed following the species name; (Hardin has most of the misses because of 
poor coverage).Greater Scaup                    Perry 

Sandhill Crane                    Hardin 
Dunlin                                  Hardin 

Long-billed Dowitcher       Perry 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher Hardin 
Fish Crow                            Perry 
Sedge Wren                        Hardin 
Marsh Wren                        Hardin 
Blue-winged Warbler         Humphreys 
Golden-winged Warbler     Humphreys 
Nashville Warbler              Hardin 
Cape-may Warbler             Hardin 
Wilson's Warbler                Hardin 
Pine Siskin                         Humphreys 
 
  The following 26 species are generally not easily found, but were seen in 
each of the 4 Tennessee River Counties in 2016;Greater White-fronted Goose 

Ross's Goose 
Redhead 
Red-breasted Merganser 
Golden Eagle 
Mississippi Kite 
Sora 
American Golden Plover 
Semipalmated Plover 
White-rumped Sandpiper 
American Woodcock 
Willow Flycatcher 
Blue-headed Vireo 
Philadelphia Vireo 
Bank Swallow 
Orange-Crowned Warbler 
Northern Waterthrush 
Magnolia Warbler 
Bay-breasted Warbler 
Blackburnian Warbler 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 
Blackpoll Warbler 
Black-throated Green Warbler 
Vesper Sparrow 
Lincoln's Sparrow 
Bobolink   These numbers are all my personal observations only. Other species 
were also seen in my four Counties by other people. 

  The following are 8 species that were reported but not seen by 
myself;Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Humphrey's 

White-winged Scoter   Humphrey's/Henry 
Red-necked Grebe          Humphrey's 
White Ibis                         Humphrey's 
White-faced Ibis              Humphrey's 
Yellow Rail                       Humphrey's 
Short-eared Owl              Hardin 
American Tree Sparrow Henry    My cumulative year total for all four 
Counties was 272 species. (Without the last 8 species athat were seen by 
others).    I would be interested in seeing how my 4-County year would 
compare with other people's data for other  parts of the State. I know Mark 
Greene has a pretty impressive list for 2016 in his 4 Mississippi River 
Counties. I'm wondering whether Rick Knight hasn't done a similar year in 
Northeast Tennessee?  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN 




   
Subject: Re: Tennessee River 4-County Big Year
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 15:52:39 +0000 (UTC)
That was an awesome run, and lots of great birds due to time spent in the 
field! Thanks for the detailed breakdown, puts a nice perspective on it all. 

Looking forward to seeing what Mark had in his four as well!
Good birding!
Michael ToddJackson, TN

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
 
 On Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 9:11 AM, Ruben Stoll wrote: 

  Here are some of the totals I came up with for my time spent birding in my 4 
favorite Tennessee River Counties in 2016. (Humphreys, Henry, Hardin, and 
Perry). 

  
  Humphreys County 
  231 species, 14 of which I didn't see in any of the other 3 Counties;

Tundra Swan 
Eurasian Wigeon 
Brown Booby 
Cattle Egret 
Glossy Ibis 
Black-necked Stilt 
Willet 
Upland Sandpiper 
Sanderling 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper 
Marbled Godwit 
Short-billed Dowitcher 
Wilson's Phalarope 
Olive-sided Flycatcher

  Perry County 
220 species, 9 of which were seen in that County only;

Anhinga 
Least Bittern 
Swainson's Hawk 
Black-billed Cuckoo 
Alder Flycatcher 
Connecticut Warbler 
Mourning Warbler 
Cerulean Warbler 
Black-headed Grosbeak

  Hardin County
   209 species, 8 of which were seen in that County alone;

Eared Grebe 
Virginia Rail 
Great Black-backed Gull 
Iceland Gull 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 
Loggerhead Shrike 
Brown-headed Nuthatch 
Western Meadowlark

  Henry County 
  230 species, 7 of which were not seen in any of the other 3 Counties;

Mute Swan 
Western Grebe 
Sabine's Gull 
Franklin's Gull 
Thayer's Gull 
Pomerine Jaeger 
Henslow's Sparrow

  24 other species of interest that were found in only 2 of the 4 Counties 
were; 


Surf Scoter                    Henry/Humphreys 
Black Scoter                  Henry/Hardin 
Red-throated Loon       Henry/Hardin 
Pacific Loon                  Henry/Hardin 
Common Merganser   Henry/Perry 
American Bittern          Perry/Humphreys 
Black-crowned Night-heron 
                                        
Henry/Humphreys 

Yellow-crowned Night-heron 
                                        
Perry/Humphreys 

American Avocet         Henry/Humphreys 
Black-bellied Plover     Perry/Humphreys 
Baird's Sandpiper         Henry/Humphreys
Western Sandpiper      Henry/Humphreys
Laughing Gull               Henry/Humphreys 
Least Tern                     Henry/Humphreys 
Common Tern              Henry/Humphreys 
Barn Owl                       Perry/Humphreys 
Least Flycatcher          Perry/Hardin 
Red-breasted Nuthatch Perry/Hardin 
Lapland Longspur        Henry/Hardin 
Canada Warbler           Perry/Hardin 
Lark Sparrow                Henry/Hardin 
Grasshopper Sparrow Henry/Hardin 
Leconte's Sparrow       Henry/Humphreys
Nelson's Sparrow         Henry/Perry 
Brewer's Blackbird       Henry/Hardin 

  The following 14 species of interest were found in 3 of the 4 Counties, and 
missed in 1 County, which is listed following the species name; (Hardin has 
most of the misses because of poor coverage). 


Greater Scaup                    Perry 
Sandhill Crane                    Hardin 
Dunlin                                  Hardin 

Long-billed Dowitcher       Perry 
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher Hardin 
Fish Crow                            Perry 
Sedge Wren                        Hardin 
Marsh Wren                        Hardin 
Blue-winged Warbler         Humphreys 
Golden-winged Warbler     Humphreys 
Nashville Warbler              Hardin 
Cape-may Warbler             Hardin 
Wilson's Warbler                Hardin 
Pine Siskin                         Humphreys 
 
  The following 26 species are generally not easily found, but were seen in 
each of the 4 Tennessee River Counties in 2016; 


Greater White-fronted Goose 
Ross's Goose 
Redhead 
Red-breasted Merganser 
Golden Eagle 
Mississippi Kite 
Sora 
American Golden Plover 
Semipalmated Plover 
White-rumped Sandpiper 
American Woodcock 
Willow Flycatcher 
Blue-headed Vireo 
Philadelphia Vireo 
Bank Swallow 
Orange-Crowned Warbler 
Northern Waterthrush 
Magnolia Warbler 
Bay-breasted Warbler 
Blackburnian Warbler 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 
Blackpoll Warbler 
Black-throated Green Warbler 
Vesper Sparrow 
Lincoln's Sparrow 
Bobolink 

  These numbers are all my personal observations only. Other species were also 
seen in my four Counties by other people. 

  The following are 8 species that were reported but not seen by myself;

Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Humphrey's 
White-winged Scoter   Humphrey's/Henry 
Red-necked Grebe          Humphrey's 
White Ibis                         Humphrey's 
White-faced Ibis              Humphrey's 
Yellow Rail                       Humphrey's 
Short-eared Owl              Hardin 
American Tree Sparrow Henry  

  My cumulative year total for all four 
Counties was 272 species. (Without the last 8 species athat were seen by 
others).  


  I would be interested in seeing how my 4-County year would compare with 
other people's data for other  parts of the State. I know Mark Greene has a 
pretty impressive list for 2016 in his 4 Mississippi River Counties. I'm 
wondering whether Rick Knight hasn't done a similar year in Northeast 
Tennessee? 


  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN 


  
Subject: Re: Ring-necked ducks
From: "Gary Baumgardner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "baumgrdner" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 09:12:20 -0500
I counted 12 Ring-necked ducks at the pond near Publix on Northshore Dr. in 
Knox county at 9:00 a.m. 


Susan Baumgardner
2/13/2017
Subject: Tennessee River 4-County Big Year
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 08:11:23 -0600
  Here are some of the totals I came up with for my time spent birding in
my 4 favorite Tennessee River Counties in 2016. (Humphreys, Henry, Hardin,
and Perry).

  Humphreys County
  231 species, 14 of which I didn't see in any of the other 3 Counties;

Tundra Swan
Eurasian Wigeon
Brown Booby
Cattle Egret
Glossy Ibis
Black-necked Stilt
Willet
Upland Sandpiper
Sanderling
Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Marbled Godwit
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Phalarope
Olive-sided Flycatcher

  Perry County
220 species, 9 of which were seen in that County only;

Anhinga
Least Bittern
Swainson's Hawk
Black-billed Cuckoo
Alder Flycatcher
Connecticut Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Cerulean Warbler
Black-headed Grosbeak

  Hardin County
   209 species, 8 of which were seen in that County alone;

Eared Grebe
Virginia Rail
Great Black-backed Gull
Iceland Gull
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Loggerhead Shrike
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Western Meadowlark

  Henry County
  230 species, 7 of which were not seen in any of the other 3 Counties;

Mute Swan
Western Grebe
Sabine's Gull
Franklin's Gull
Thayer's Gull
Pomerine Jaeger
Henslow's Sparrow

  24 other species of interest that were found in only 2 of the 4 Counties
were;

Surf Scoter                    Henry/Humphreys
Black Scoter                  Henry/Hardin
Red-throated Loon       Henry/Hardin
Pacific Loon                  Henry/Hardin
Common Merganser   Henry/Perry
American Bittern          Perry/Humphreys
Black-crowned Night-heron
                                        Henry/Humphreys
Yellow-crowned Night-heron
                                        Perry/Humphreys
American Avocet         Henry/Humphreys
Black-bellied Plover     Perry/Humphreys
Baird's Sandpiper         Henry/Humphreys
Western Sandpiper      Henry/Humphreys
Laughing Gull               Henry/Humphreys
Least Tern                     Henry/Humphreys
Common Tern              Henry/Humphreys
Barn Owl                       Perry/Humphreys
Least Flycatcher          Perry/Hardin
Red-breasted Nuthatch Perry/Hardin
Lapland Longspur        Henry/Hardin
Canada Warbler           Perry/Hardin
Lark Sparrow                Henry/Hardin
Grasshopper Sparrow Henry/Hardin
Leconte's Sparrow       Henry/Humphreys
Nelson's Sparrow         Henry/Perry
Brewer's Blackbird       Henry/Hardin

  The following 14 species of interest were found in 3 of the 4 Counties,
and missed in 1 County, which is listed following the species name; (Hardin
has most of the misses because of poor coverage).

Greater Scaup                    Perry
Sandhill Crane                    Hardin
Dunlin                                  Hardin
Long-billed Dowitcher       Perry
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher Hardin
Fish Crow                            Perry
Sedge Wren                        Hardin
Marsh Wren                        Hardin
Blue-winged Warbler         Humphreys
Golden-winged Warbler     Humphreys
Nashville Warbler              Hardin
Cape-may Warbler             Hardin
Wilson's Warbler                Hardin
Pine Siskin                         Humphreys

  The following 26 species are generally not easily found, but were seen in
each of the 4 Tennessee River Counties in 2016;

Greater White-fronted Goose
Ross's Goose
Redhead
Red-breasted Merganser
Golden Eagle
Mississippi Kite
Sora
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
White-rumped Sandpiper
American Woodcock
Willow Flycatcher
Blue-headed Vireo
Philadelphia Vireo
Bank Swallow
Orange-Crowned Warbler
Northern Waterthrush
Magnolia Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Vesper Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Bobolink

  These numbers are all my personal observations only. Other species were
also seen in my four Counties by other people.
  The following are 8 species that were reported but not seen by myself;

Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Humphrey's
White-winged Scoter   Humphrey's/Henry
Red-necked Grebe          Humphrey's
White Ibis                         Humphrey's
White-faced Ibis              Humphrey's
Yellow Rail                       Humphrey's
Short-eared Owl              Hardin
American Tree Sparrow Henry

  My cumulative year total for all four
Counties was 272 species. (Without the last 8 species athat were seen by
others).

  I would be interested in seeing how my 4-County year would compare with
other people's data for other  parts of the State. I know Mark Greene has a
pretty impressive list for 2016 in his 4 Mississippi River Counties. I'm
wondering whether Rick Knight hasn't done a similar year in Northeast
Tennessee?

  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Pine Siskin
From: "Tommie Rogers" <sundragon1 AT epbfi.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 08:55:50 -0500
A Pine Siskin visits my feeder this month.

A Carolina Wren has already constructed her nest in a window box here.

 

Tommie Rogers

Marion county
Subject: photographs
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 23:42:03 -0500 (EST)
I visited New Zealand from January 10-31, 2017. 

photographs of the expedition are available at 
www.flickr.com/photos/shelbyforester1223/sets/ 


Van Harris 
Millington, TN 
Subject: NTOS Monthly Meeting and Program Thursday Feb.16 Radnor
From: Daniel Shelton <dashelt100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2017 12:07:42 -0600
If you are in the Nashville area this Thursday, February 16, please join us
at the Radnor Lake State Natural Area Visitor's Center, 1160 Otter Creek
Rd, Nashville for our regular monthly meeting and program. We will gather
at 7:00 p.m. and the meeting will start at 7:15 p.m.


This month's program will be  *Honduras: Birding for Conservation* by Cyndi
and Steve Routledge.



A first of its kind rally for eco-tourism and a way to celebrate and
protect Honduras’ bird diversity were the hallmarks of their Honduran
visit.  With  740 spectacular bird species, rich tropical rain forests,
pristine Cloud Forests and ancient Mayan Ruins the country of Honduras is a
scenic and exciting birding destination.  Join Steve and Cyndi Routledge as
they share their conservation birding tour adventure and share not only
pictures of the beautiful wildlife but stories of how this tour
provided revenue,
opportunities and a deep and long-lasting impact for Honduras and its
 people.


Public welcomed. We would love to see you Thursday!

-- 
Danny Shelton
NTOS Programs Coordinator
Subject: Davidson Co. Orange-Crowned Warblers
From: Frank Fekel <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 10:45:31 -0600
River Plantation, Bellevue
Davidson Co., TN
2017 Feb. 11

It has been a good winter for me for sighting ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERs.
The very warm temperature this Saturday morning meant that my wife and
I were out front of our house doing a bit of clean up. I looked up at
my feeders and saw an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER eating the suet that we
put out. This bird has been coming off and on to eat the suet for
the past 2 weeks. Earlier in January I also found an ORANGE_CROWNED
at the Harpeth River Greenway, and spotted the one that has been
seen the past several winters in the woods at Old Hickory Dam.
Several CHIPPING SPARROWs are coming to my feeder as well.

Frank Fekel
Bellevue, TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
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       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Rusty blackbirds, 10-mile greenway, Knoxville
From: "Welsh, Christopher J E" <cwelsh AT utk.edu>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 15:17:08 +0000
Saw about 8 Rusty Blackbirds foraging on wet ground off 10-mile greenway about 
1/4 east of Lowes. 

Saturday Feb 11, 0925

Chris Welsh
Knoxville, TN

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Last reminder for head count for lunch at the TOS Winter Meeting
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2017 19:13:21 -0600
> Tn-Birdersä
> 
> This is the last reminder for letting me know if youĻll be joining us at the
> TN National Refuge VisitorĻs Center, where Joan Howe will be providing a
> barbecue lunch for a minimal charge of $5 per person for us during the TOS
> Winter Meeting on February 18th.  Everyone who is participating in the field
> trip (TOS members for not) on that day can partake in this delicious lunch.
> We Just need to provide Joan with an approximate head countäso please let me
> know if youĻre interested in having lunch there with us by return email no
> later than February 14th.
> 
> Thanks and we hope youĻll join us!
<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
Southeastern Avian Research
www.southeasternavianresearch.org



Subject: Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Feb 2017 01:10:38 +0000
With a favorable wind behind them, a number of Sandhill Cranes estimated to 
exceed 2,000 flew north over Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge in Meigs County at 
Birchwood between 5 and 6:15 PM today. When the wind calmed and dark was near, 
several hundred cranes landed on Hiwassee Island and nearby sandbars to 
apparently roost for the night. From the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park 
overlook, around 60 American White Pelicans were also seen on a Tennessee River 
sandbar. 



Charles Murray

Birchwood, TN
Subject: Great Lakes/ Keebler Rd
From: Kevin Brooks <brookskc AT goldmail.etsu.edu>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 18:11:08 -0500
I was out with Dr. Alsop's Ornithology and Ecology classes today. I'd like
to report a small flock of Horned Larks and three Eurasian Collared Doves
on Keebler Road in West Washington county. Later in the day we stopped by
the pond (Great Lakes) at Northeast State, and along with the continuing
Cackling Goose, there was also an American Black Duck present.

-- 
Kevin Brooks
Subject: Golden Eagle - Cumberland County
From: "Dowlen, Janet - NRCS-CD, Crossville, TN" <Janet.Dowlen AT tn.nacdnet.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 20:01:24 +0000
Hello all -
Golden Eagle sighted at a farm off Clint Lowe Rd in southern Cumberland Co. 
yesterday afternoon around 2 pm. 

Awesome sight...tried to attach pic. Poor quality work camera -Ricoh- w no good 
zoom lens... 

Happy birding!
Janet

Janet Dowlen
Cumberland County Soil Conservation District
314 Old Jamestown Hwy
Crossville, TN 38555





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Subject: Bald Eagle in Percy Warner Park on 7 February 2017
From: "Sandy Bivens" <sandybivens AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 13:38:54 -0600
An adult Bald Eagle was seen in Percy Warner Park on Tuesday, 7 February
2017 at 2:40pm.  It was on the ground eating an opossum in a field off Hwy
100 (between Old Hickory Blvd and Harpeth Trace).  It was seen and
photographed by several people.  Several cars were stopped on the along Hwy
100 observing and taking pictures.  

 

You can view pictures taken by Jo Fields on the Warner Park Nature Center
facebook page.  

 

Sandy Bivens

Warner Parks

Davidson County
Subject: Memphis TOS Field Trip This Saturday
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2017 22:11:10 -0600
Saturday, Feb. 11: Field trip to TVA and Robco Lakes led by Jay Walko. Meet
at the road by the TVA ash ponds by the Allen Steam Plant at 7:30 a.m.
Contact walko (at) bellsouth.net for more info.

More info: http://is.gd/s5vr2u
Directions: http://is.gd/V87DR 

Check out the MTOS website at http://birdmemphis.org

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: Baltimore Oriole at Nashville feeder
From: richard connors <didymops07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 16:53:15 -0600
2/08/2017

Gail Miller reports a Baltimore Oriole coming to feeder in her Green Hills,
SW Nashville neighborhood. Photos posted to TN Birding FB page.

Richard Connors
Nashville
Subject: Great Backyard Bird Count and eBird
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 13:37:59 -0600
Once again, my annual reminder. The Great Backyard Bird Count is run  
through eBird, and used the eBird system to compile and review the  
observations. Because of this, the screening filters that decide  
which birds will be flagged for review are set more conservatively  
during this time. This will affect all eBird submissions, not just  
those submitted through the GBBC portal.

What this means is that you will soon start to see more flags on  
common birds that are likely candidates for GBBC confusion, such as  
Purple Finches, Hairy and Red-headed Woodpeckers, non-Canada Geese,  
Winter Wrens, White-crowned Sparrows, etc. Please bear with this  
inconvenience, as it is a great help for the GBBC data. Many GBBC  
users are very new to birding, and are likely to assume that a wren  
in winter is a Winter Wren, all the reddish finches at their feeder  
are Purples, and a woodpecker with red on it head is a Red-headed  
Woodpecker. One of the main values of the GBBC is to get novice  
birders involved, and it also provides us reviewers with may  
"teachable moments" for these users.

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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______________________________________________________________
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       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                          ARCHIVES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: TOS WINTER MEETING - FEB. 17-19
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 13:31:49 -0600
Worth noting that this is the weekend of the Great Backyard Bird Count

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Herons at Looney Island
From: Lynne Davis <lynnedavis865 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2017 10:44:06 -0500
While walking the Cherokee Farm Greenway Monday (Feb 6) we saw eight Great
Blue Herons standing on nests at the upstream end of Looney Island in the
Tennessee River below Knoxville (Knox County).
Bob and Lynne Davis
Subject: Tennessee Birders by the Numbers: 2016 (Vol. 12)
From: kbreault <kbreault AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2017 00:33:42 +0000 (UTC)
Tennessee Birders by the Numbers: 2016 (Vol. 12)
Welcome to the Tennessee Birders by the Numbers (TBN) report for 2016, 
unfortunately a little late in getting it out this year. 2016 was a fantastic 
year for birders in Tennessee and this report like those of the last few years 
will also include data from the new year, 2017--up to the present. And indeed a 
fantastic year it was. Among the great TN birds in 2016 were: Lesser Goldfinch 
(found by Mark Greene), Townsend's Solitaire (Mark Greene), Iceland Gull (Mike 
Todd), Ruff (Mark Greene), White-winged Dove (Kristy Baker), Inca Dove (Damien 
Simbeck), Wood Stork (Bruce Dralle), Pomarine Jaeger (Ruben, Victor Stoll, Alan 
Troyer), Red Phalarope (Damien Simbeck), Sabine's Gull (Ruben Stoll, Mark 
Greene, different birds, places!), Brown Booby (Ruben Stoll), Northern Wheatear 
(Tony King), Bohemian Waxwing (Colin Sumrall), and Eurasian Wigeon ( Ruben & 
Victor Stoll). And, of course there were many others. At least those were the 
birds I was hoping to see if I had a chance. And I did get three of them! 

At the end of the report the "miscellaneous" category will include: a 
"southeastern" list (TN and NC, and all states south, SC, GA, AL, MS, FL), an 
all time World list, an all time Total Ticks list, and some personal lists and 
information on 45 years of birding. 


I. TN List (top 40)
As noted before the ABA continues to include Jeff Wilson's important results. 
Note that currently with 409 birds for TN (yes, the official list is now out of 
date), the 75% level is 307-- 19 ABA birders have reached that level. 

1. 388 Jeff Wilson2. 366 Micheal Todd3. 360 Clyde Blum4. 359 Mark Greene5. 357 
Terry Witt6. 355 Dollyann Myers7. 354 David Chaffin8. 353 Kevin Calhoon9. 352 
Tommie Rogers10. 342 Ron Hoff11. 341 Rick Knight12. 337 Gail & Steve 
Clendenen13. 329 Francis Fekel14. 327 Chris Sloan15. 326 Rick Waldrop16. 314 
Scott Somershoe17. 311 Ken Oeser19-t. 307 Thomas McNeil19-t. 307 David 
Trently20. 306 Kevin Breault21. 305 Stephen Zipperer22. 295 Morton Massey23. 
287 John O'Barr24. 284 Rack Cross26-t. 282 Darrel Wilder26-t. 282 Gail King27. 
281 Rick Shipkowski28. 280 Mike O'Malley29. 274 Joshua Stevenson30. 269 Q. 
Gray31. 264 Gary Brunvoll32. 258 Larry Peavler33. 255 Jon Mann35-t. 254 David 
Hollie35-t. 254 Gene Knight36. 251 Bruce Dralle37. 245 Jesse Pope38. 240 
Michael Bernard39. 237 Mike Resch40. 235 Leif Anderson 

II. TN Birders on State/Province Lists
Many TN birders are on the lists for other states and provinces and with the 
removal of thresholds we perhaps get a better picture of TN birding. The 
following list includes TN birders by the number of states/provinces in which 
they reported lists. Also included are the state/province abbreviations for 
those TN birders who are first among TN birders on these lists, and beginning 
with this year state/province abbreviations that are in parentheses are ones 
where the birder has achieved 50% of the state/province. So for example, David 
Chaffin has reported lists in 61 states/provinces, is the leading birder in 12 
states/provinces, and in 8 has achieved at least 50%. Note that I did not 
include areas, e.g., Hawaii, that are not in the official ABA area. Finally, 
note that TN birders have achieved the majority of birds in 35 different states 
and provinces. 

1. David Chaffin (61 states/provinces), (AK), (CA), DC, (KY), (ME), (MI), (OK), 
(SD), (WV), AB, NB, YT2. Kevin Breault (60), CT, ID, (IL), (IN), MA, MT, NH, 
NV, NY, OR, RI, UT, (VT), WI, WY, BC, (MB), NS, ON, PE, PQ, SK3. Rick Waldrop 
(57), (GA), (MD), (MN), (ND), (VA)4. Dollyann Myers (54)5. Ron Hoff (50)7-t. 
Steve Clendenen (49)7-t. Ken Oeser (49)8. Gail Clendenen (46), (AZ)9. David 
Trently (39), (PA), NF10. Mike O'Malley (37)11. Scott Somershoe (35), (CO)12. 
Gail King (33)13. Tommie Rogers (31), DE, (FL), (IA), (KS), (MO), (NE), WA14. 
Michael Todd (30)15. Francis Fekel (25)16. Kevin Calhoon (24) (NM), (OH), 
(SC)17. Rick Shipkowski (18)18. Stephen Zipperer (17)19. John O'Barr (13)20. 
Thomas McNeil (9)22-t. Clyde Blum (8)22-t. Joshua Stevenson (8)23. Darel Wilder 
(7)24. Jeff Wilson (6), (AL), (AR), (MS), (TN)26-t. Mark Greene (5)26-t. Rick 
Knight (5), (LA), (NC), (TX)27. Rack Cross (3) 

Changes for this year include: Steve Clendenen from 46 to 49 states/provinces, 
Scott Somershoe from 24 to 35, and first among TN birders in CO, Francis Fekel 
from 23 to 25, Rick Shipkowski from 6 to 18, Stephen Zippered from 8 to 17, 
Thomas McNeil from 8 to 9, and Tommie Rogers, now the leading TN birder in WA. 
Note that no TN birder is on the lists for Northwestern Territories, Nunavut 
and St. Pierre et Miquelon. 

III. ABA Area
The following are our TN birders on the ABA Area list, including totals and 
ranks in the top 100. 

1. Benton Basham 881 (4)2. David Chaffin 824 (21)3. Dollyann Myers 795 (59)4. 
Tommie Rogers 783 (82)5. Kevin Calhoon 776 (88)6. Rick Waldrop 7477. Clyde Blum 
7408. Gail & Steve Clendenen 7279. Rick Knight 71811-t. Michael Todd 70411-t. 
Darrel Wilder 70413-t. Kevin Breault 70113-t. Morton Massey 70114. Ron Hoff 
68915. Ken Oeser 68816. Terry Witt 68317. Rick Shipkowski 63518. David Trently 
63219. Francis Fekel 61520. Gail King 60721. Scott Somershoe 60322. Mike 
O'Malley 59323. Thomas McNeil 54624. Gary Brunvoll 51425. Stephen Zipperer 
40126. John O'Barr 328 

Major increases on the list this year were Dollyann Myers from 782 last year to 
795, Tommie Rogers from 771 to 783, Darrel Wilder from 681 to 704, Scott 
Somershoe from 510 to 603 (nothing like moving to the West!), and Stephen 
Zipperer from 332 to 401. I try to be as inclusive as I can on this list so if 
there are other TN birders on the ABA Area list please let me know. 

IV. Canada
As noted last year, not many TN birders go to Canada but that might be a 
mistake. Some of my best birding experiences were in Canada. I hope to go 
again, this time to Newfoundland and St. Pierre et Miquelon, not a lot of 
species but tons of birds given the colonies off the Avalon Peninsula. David 
Chaffin leads TN birders with 332 birds, followed by Kevin Breault at 331, Rick 
Waldrop at 263, Dollyann Myers 236, Ron Hoff 218, Kevin Calhoon 145, Mike 
O'Malley 96, David Trently 92, Scott Somershoe 60, and Gail King 23. The top of 
the Canada list is still held by Roger Foxall with 546. 

V. Lower Forty-Eight
This list includes all states with the exception of Alaska and Hawaii, and is 
highly correlated with the ABA Area list. Our leaders for 2016 are: David 
Chaffin at 769, Tommie Rogers at 761, Kevin Calhoon 753, Rick Waldrop 732, Gail 
& Steve Clendenen 727, and Clyde Blum 716. 

VI. United States
Our leaders here are: David Chaffin at 850, Dollyann Myers 827, Kevin Calhoon 
814, Clyde Blum 777, and Tommie Rogers 776. 

VII. AOU North
The AOU stands for the American Ornithological Union, established is 1883, and 
the AOU North is covered by the AOU checklist of North American birds, 
including North and Central America. This year our leaders are: Rick Waldrop 
with 1732 and a rank of 7, followed by Kevin Calhoon 1284, David Chaffin 1282, 
Clyde Blum 1040 and Gary Brunvoll 1021. 

VIII. AOU South
No change from last year, Rick Waldrop leads with 2314 birds and a fine rank of 
11, followed by Gary Brunvoll with 752, Gail King with 750, and David Chaffin 
at 525. 

IX. Mexico
No change on this list either this year. Dollyann Myers is at the top with 732 
birds and a rank of 25, followed by Clyde Blum with 685 (rank of 35), with Gail 
King at 660, Gary Brunvoll 591, Ron Hoff 579 and Rick Waldrop 567. 

X. Central America
Here Rick Waldrop leads with 909, followed by Dollyann Myers 693, Ron Hoff 630, 
Terry Witt 617, and David Trently 606. 

XI. West Indies & Caribbean
Rick Waldrop leads here too with 306, followed by Kevin Calhoon with 200, 
Dolyann Myers at 195, and Ron Hoff with 157. 

XII. Europe & Western Paleartic
Again the leader here is Rick Waldrop with 361, followed by Dollyann Myers 208 
and David Chaffin with 186. 

XIII. Asia
Ron Hoff leads here with 1865 and a great rank of 11, followed by Dollyann 
Myers at 1827, and Terry Witt with 1494. 

XIV. World
I think this is the most important of all bird lists, and Dollyann Myers and 
Ron Hoff continued to add birds in 2016. Dollyann now at 8141 (rank of 8), and 
Ron 8094 (rank of 9). Others are Terry Witt with 6476, and Rick Waldrop at 
5243. Note that Hugh Buck still leads the World with 9053 but has not been 
active since 2014--only about 900 birds between Buck and Dollyann & Ron! 

XV. North America
Rick Waldrop continues with his fantastic rank of 3 and 1756 birds on this 
list, followed by Dollyann Myers at 1531, Ron Hoff with 1390, Terry Witt 1331, 
and David Chaffin 1309.  

XVI. South America
On this list Dollyann and Ron have 2522 and 2519, respectively, with ranks of 
12 and 13. Rick Waldrop is at 2451 and a rank of 18, followed by Terry Witt 
with 2078. 

XVII. Africa
Dollyann and Ron lead on this list with 1658, followed by Terry Witt with 1287.
XVIII. Australasia
Here Dollyann and Ron have 987 and 978 birds, respectively, and ranks of 5 and 
6. 

XIX. Eurasia
No change this year on this list: Ron Hoff with 2071, followed by Dollyann 
Myers 2058, Terry Witt 1585, Rick Waldrop 1103, and David Chaffin 932. 

XX. Atlantic Ocean
Mike O'Malley remains on top on this list with 66 birds (rank of 24), followed 
by Dollyann Myers and Ron Hoff at 36 and 21, respectively. 

XXI. Pacific Ocean
Here Dollyann has 416 and Ron 401 with ranks of 18 and 20, followed by Francis 
Fekel at 160 and Rick Waldrop 118. 

XXII. Indian Ocean
Ron has a great rank of 3 on this list with 250 birds, followed by Dollyann 
with 241 and a rank of 6. 

XXIII. South Polar Region
No change this year on this list with Mike O'Malley with 25 birds (rank of 73), 
followed by Kevin Calhoon with 24, Dollyann Myers with 20, and Ron Hoff with 
18. 

XXIV. Millennium
This list includes all the birders who have been the most active in the ABA 
Area since the century began (specifically, this is the ABA Area list for the 
21st century). First on this list is Clyde Blum at 714 birds and a rank of 17, 
followed by Gail and Steve Clendenen with 690, Michael Todd with 672, David 
Chaffin at 663, Kevin Breault with 635, and Mike O'Malley at 402. 

XXV. Photographed ABA Area
Mike Todd leads this list with 668 (rank of 22), followed by Kevin Calhoon 654, 
Tommie Rogers 640, Ken Oeser 615, Clyde Blum 602, Ron Hoff with 511 (439 was 
his number last year!), and Mike O'Malley with 426. 

XXVI. Photographed World
Ron Hoff has a wonderful ranking of 2 on this list with 4264 birds, followed by 
Chris Sloan with 1794, Kevin Calhoon 1508, and Mike Todd at 1431. 

XXVII. World Families
Dollyann Myers and Ron Hoff are the leaders here with 232 families and a rank 
of 15, followed by Rick Waldrop with 166. The highest rank has 239 families. 

XXVIII. All Territories & Provinces
This list is quite similar to the Total Ticks list below and combines all the 
territories/provinces in Canada. Kevin Breault leads here with 1379 (rank of 
17), followed by David Chaffin 1073 (rank of 24) and Rick Waldrop with 594. 

XXIX. Total Ticks
The main focus of my birding for now 45 years (can it be!), Kevin Breault leads 
with 12,042 (rank of 3), followed David Chaffin at 11,730 (4), Rick Waldrop 
with 9049, Dollyann Myers 7729, Ron Hoff 6856, Ken Oeser 5360. David Trently 
5202, Gail & Steve Clendenen 4757, Michael Todd 3839, Rick Shipkowski 2325, 
Stephen Zippered 1125, and John O'Barr 804. Note that the all time Total Ticks 
list can be found below in the Miscellaneous category. 

XXX. Canadian Provinces
Eight TN birders are on the lists for 11 of 14 Canadian Provinces: David 
Chaffin, Kevin Breault, Rick Waldrop, Dollyann Myers, Ron Hoff, Francis Fekel, 
Mike O'Malley, and David Trently. Kevin Breault leads in British Columbia, 
Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island. 
David Chaffin leads in Alberta, New Brunswick and Yukon. David Trently leads in 
Newfoundland & Labrador. As noted above, no TN birders are on the lists for the 
Northwest Territories, Nunavut and St. Pierre et Miquelon. And note that St. 
Pierre et Miquelon is just a small ferry ride away from Newfoundland & 
Labrador. I bird a lot in Canada, and hope to do so again this year or the 
next, so contact me if you have any questions. 

XXXI. Annual Lists
On the ABA Area annual list for 2016 we have David Chaffin with 409, and 
Stephen Zipperer at 322. 

XXXII. Annual List for Tennessee
This year we have David Chaffin with 250, and Stephen Zipperer with 220.

XXXIII. Miscellaneous: the all time World list, Southern list, the all time 
Total Ticks list, and 45 years of birding 

A. The current World list includes birders who are still active but does not 
include some who have died or are not currently active. So this is the All Time 
World list (top 40). Note Dollyann Myers and Ron Hoff, ranks 14 and 15. The 
list indicates the year for the last activity. 

1. 9053 Hugh Black, 20152. 8942 Tom Gullick, 20113. 8825 Jon Hornbuckle, 20114. 
8765 Claes-Goran Cederlund, 20145. 8650 Peter Kaestner, 20166. 8601 Philip 
Rostron, 20117. 8595 Joe Thompson, 20168. 8552 Robert Walton, 20159. 8464 Bob 
Bates, 201410. 8449 Martin Edwards, 201111. 8402 Phoebe Snetsinger, 200112. 
8313 Ronald Huffman, 201613. 8230 Hans Jornvall, 201114. 8141 DOLLYANN MYERS, 
201615. 8094 RON HOFF, 201616. 8068 Alan Greesmith, 200917. 8060 John 
Williamson, 200618. 8041 Dave Sargeant, 201319. 7946 Ian Lewis, 201720. 7932 
Stephen F. Bailey, 201621. 7930 Keith Retton, 201622. 7865 George Winter, 
200723. 7860 Bernard Master, 201625-t. 7798 Elaine Nye, 201725-t. 7798 Pearl 
Jordan, 201126. 7777 Chuck Probst, 201627. 7774 David Narins, 201628. 7709 
James Plyler, 200029. 7686 John Gee, 200730. 7682 Jan Smith, 201631. 7664 Mark 
Van Beirs, 200732. 7663 Josep del Hoyo, 201433. 7662 Chris Doughty, 201734. 
7621 David Fisher, 201335. 7612 Ken Cole, 201736. 7534 John Danzenbaker, 
200737. 7532 Clyde Carter, 201138. 7520 Clayton Pollard, 199939. 7517 Daniel 
Gruneberg, 200940. 7460 John Hardister, 2016 

B. Over the years TBN has looked at various regional total ticks lists: the 
U.S. Census Bureau "East South Central Region," a list that includes Alabama, 
Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee, and a list of TN and KY and all states 
adjacent to those (the Local Group). As I noted last year a more useful list 
perhaps would be a southern one as most TN birders tend not to bird much in the 
north. So the following is that Southern list (top 20). It includes the states 
of: TN, NC, SC, GA, AL, MS and FL: 

1. 2551 Kevin Calhoon2. 2121 David Chaffin3. 2116 Rick Waldrop4. 1878 Kevin 
Breault5. 1802 Leif Anderson6. 1759 Thomas Heatley7. 1734 Mike Resch8. 1646 Don 
Chalfant9. 1633 Clyde Blum10. 1622 Michael Bernard11. 1574 Caroline Eastman12. 
1571 David Trently13. 1512 Paul Sykes15-t. 1486 Kent Davis15-t. 1486 David 
Narins16. 1449 Dollyann Myers17. 1440 Richard Rosche18. 1424 JPat Valentik20-t 
1410 Bill LaFramboise20-t 1410 Bill Lotz 

Note the number of TN birders on this list: 7, with the top four all TN 
birders, again an illustration of how much birding beyond the home patch is 
done by TN birders. 

C. 45 years of birding: personal stories.
2016 was my 45th year of birding so I thought I would look through my records 
to come up with some interesting (perhaps not so interesting) items. All 
information refers to ABA Area birds. 

1. I have birded in the 10 states in which I have lived: CA, IL, OH, MO, NY, 
OR, TN, TX, VT, WA. I have made 288 trips to states I did not live in at the 
time, which I call Out-of-State trips or OSTs. This is the list of the states 
with the most OSTs: 

AL: 18 tripsKY: 13AR: 14GA, IN: 11IL: 10MS: 9OK: 8FL, NC, TX, VA: 7
Alabama (AL) is so high because my daughter went to college there and currently 
lives there. The cost of all this birding for 45 years: I don't want to think 
about it! 

2. I was trying to estimate how many miles I have driven in my birding life, 
and frankly I have no way of knowing if this estimate is close to being right 
(I'll just say that I have little confidence in it), but I came up with 529,500 
miles. I never did keep track of air miles, but since I was a boy I have 
tracked miles on trains and recently reached 104,128 (all in U.S. and Canada). 
Best state to bird from a train (usually train birding is not very good since 
you can't hear birds), but North Dakota in spring is quite good for ducks, and 
other water birds on Amtrak's "Empire Builder" (schedules may have changed). My 
favorite mode of transportation for birding is boat, and since small vessels 
don't work for me anymore, cruise ships are my best way to go. Get a balcony 
room, take a seat, and watch the birds fly by. I was astounded by the number 
and variety of birds seen in the Gulf of Alaska in May, one of my most favorite 
birding trips ever. 

3. I keep track of life birds even though my focus has been on Total Ticks, and 
at this point I need 2 more Code 1 birds, 19 Code 2 birds, and 43 Code 3 birds. 
I should be able to pick up the remaining Code 1 birds in California when I go 
in spring. What about most needed birds? For me that would be common birds I am 
not likely to see because I probably won't get to the area where they can be 
found--specifically western AK. So three Code 2 birds: Arctic Loon (always look 
for the diagnostic white patch of the Arctic when you see Pacifics), Wood 
Sandpiper, and Bluethroat (fantastic bird in breeding season, for the next 
life). 

4. I also keep track of the number of states/provinces for which I have 50% or 
more of the birds. That total is now 17, with WV at 49.9%, followed by UT at 
49.3%, PA at 48.3%, LA at 48.2%, and NH at 48.0%. 

5. These are the (11) states in which I have seen the most life birds:
Texas 140Vermont 83Arizona 57Maine & Oregon 52Florida 34New York 32California 
31Illinois 28Alaska & Massachusetts 24 

TN is at a rank of 33 on this list with 3 life birds.
6. And by year (top ten): 
1972: 214 life birds (mainly Vermont, northeast--especially MA, NH and ME--and 
Texas)1974: 58 (Oregon, California, Washington)1973: 46 (Texas)1989: 40 
(Arizona)2015: 35 (Alaska, British Columbia)1993 and 1996: 27 (Florida and 
Texas)1994: 26 (California)1978: 25 (Oregon, Texas)1982: 23 (Washington) 

7. How much time to major milestones:
It took me one year to get to 200 life birds.Another two more years to get to 
300.Eight years later to get to 400.Eleven years more to get to 500.Another 
eleven years to get to 600.And thirteen more to get to 700. And, sadly, I don't 
expect to get to 800. 750 is now my tentative life goal for ABA Area life 
birds, but it will be very hard to get there at this point. 

8. On Total Ticks I had:
4381 in 20025000 in 2005
6000 in 20067000 in 20078000 in 20099000 in 201010,000 in 201311,000 in 
201512,000 in 2017 

Current goal is 13,000 by 2025--possible if not easy. Must be alive.
9. Life Birds by Month (three highest and lowest)
May 218June 155July 79
April 17September 13February 6
10. Most birds on a birthday, 1978
Barrrow's GoldeneyeMarbled GodwitPacific Slope FlycatcherMountain Bluebird
11. My Millennium list is limited (currently at 635) , because so many of my 
birds were identified in the last century. Should make a little more progress 
when I go to California in 2017. 

12. As a Total Tickers you are always seeing and listing common birds, but 
which are the most common? While I don't note the numbers of birds of the same 
species in a state/province, I have seen Amer. Robin in 60 states/ provinces, 
Euro. Starling, Amer. Crow, Mallard in 59, Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue 
Heron, Canada Goose, Rock Pigeon, Tree Swallow, Red-winged Blackbird, 
Brown-headed Cowbird, and Chipping Sparrow in 58. 

13. Next trips: LA, perhaps GA, CA and perhaps OR. Most needed trip: AB as in 
Alberta--had the entire trip planned and then got sick--and Newfoundland & 
Labrador and St. Pierre & Miquelon. 


That is all for Vol. 12 of TBN. Best of luck for 2017! I apologize in advance 
for any errors. Many numbers and calculations were involved! If I've made a 
mistake let me know and I'll make the change next year. And if I've made a big 
mistake I'll email the group asap.  

On a personal note I ended up with 484 annual Total Ticks for 2016 (556 was 
last year's total), visiting 19 states/provinces with 24 OSTs (23 last year). 
And general hopes for 2017? Professionally, my birding has recently become even 
more difficult as I was elected President of my academic association, and 
continue as Editor-in-Chief of a social science journal (not too bad my wife 
says for someone with aphasia). Well, there is always retirement I am told, but 
she says that would be the worst thing for me. There is something to the daily 
structure of being obligated to get up every day, get in the car, and drive to 
work. If only my office was at a National Wildlife Refuge in, say, Texas. But 
unlike what some people believe (even some of my academic colleagues), 
retirement is not equivalent to a quicker mortality. Humans are far more 
variable than that--and at the most important level of genetics. Yes, on 
average, I would agree couch potatoes are not advancing their health, but there 
have always been couch potatoes, even if NFL games are new. (I believe one is 
going on right now.) After all, the couch potatoes of the Paleolithic may have 
invented important tools, art, even astronomy it seems. But in general it is a 
good thing to keep moving (how much and what kind of movement is not well 
understood yet, despite what you may have read), and birding is not a bad life 
prescription. Yet, movement is only one ingredient in a healthy life. Another 
is having goals, something to get up in the morning to shoot for. Paleolithic 
man had goals more closely tied to basic needs but if you think they did not 
have a life list (at least a mental one) you would probably be mistaken. 
Indeed, the association of numbers with objects and places was the beginning of 
writing. Writing may have developed from bird listing. And of course modern 
birding is highly goal oriented. 

But isn't this all rather silly, this watching, recording, listing, monitoring 
of birds? Not very meaningful some would say. But is meaningfulness intrinsic? 
Meaning is simply a function of what we find meaningful. It is not an inherent 
property of an activity. Birding is as meaningful as anything else in life. And 
while some of us might not agree, stamp collecting, politics (I hate to say 
it), model trains, Lego, chess and so on are as meaningful as birding. 
Meaningfulness comes in many forms and derives from the meaning we as 
individuals attach to the activities we do. 

But there is an exception, however, one that is more importantly or 
characteristically human than others. Human progress. We are born to do better. 
And let's be clear, birders and chess players are not going to cure cancers, 
develop more efficient ways of using energy, or take us beyond the solar 
system. Suggesting your child or grandchild should get into STEM majors is not 
simply a way of helping them to get a better job when they graduate, but is a 
way of helping them and the rest of us go forward. The name of this game is 
discovery. That is what I tell my students and young people in general. 
Participate in the most important human activity, science. 

As always you can't list your ABA totals unless you are a member of the 
American Birding Association (www.americanbirding.org). It is still quite 
affordable and you get a great deal with the major magazine, "Birding," the new 
magazine called the "Birders Guide" series that takes on a specific topic in 
significantly detail every issue (travel, gear, listing/taxonomy, etc.), and a 
much better interactive site for listing. 

Always be good to birds and generous to birders of all stripes, totals and 
ranks! Good birding and good totaling! 

Kevin BreaultBrentwood, TN
mtweb.mtsu.edu/kbreault/ (sorry, I hope to update this soon)