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Updated on Monday, June 27 at 04:14 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-bearded Manakin,©Dan Lane

27 Jun Savannah Sparrows- Claiborne Co 6/23 [Dan Snell ]
26 Jun A Swallow Six-Pack [Jay S. ]
24 Jun Little Blue Herons at Amnicola Marsh-Hamilton County [Dralle ]
23 Jun Osprey high counts [rick houlk ]
22 Jun Anhinga in Decaturville, TN [Ruben Stoll ]
22 Jun Cerulean Warbler presentation by Melinda Welton on 6 July at Warner Park Nature Center ["Sandy Bivens" ]
21 Jun Summer bird counts: Carter & Unicoi Cos. ["Richard Knight" ]
21 Jun Re: Osprey high counts [Scott Somershoe ]
21 Jun Osprey high counts [Bill Pulliam ]
20 Jun Ospreys at The Duck River Unit [Ruben Stoll ]
19 Jun NTOS June Field Trip Report [Cynthia Routledge ]
18 Jun Lark Sparrow, Marshall County 6-18-16 [Dan Snell ]
18 Jun Blue-headed Vireo and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in Hickman County [Ruben Stoll ]
18 Jun Re: Bachman's Sparrows, Hickman County [Bill Pulliam ]
16 Jun EBird Report - Beaverdam WMA , Jun 15, 2016 [Ruben Stoll ]
14 Jun Bachman's Sparrows, Hickman County ["" ]
14 Jun Trip Report: Ontario and Quebec [kbreault ]
13 Jun Re: Fayette County, Sunday June 12, 2016 - addendum [Larry Chitwood ]
13 Jun Fayette County, Sunday June 12, 2016 [Larry Chitwood ]
13 Jun NTOS Regular Monthly Meeting and Program June 16 Radnor Lake [Daniel Shelton ]
12 Jun NTOS nightbird fieldtrip, June 18 [Terry Witt ]
12 Jun Upcoming NTOS Field Trip [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
11 Jun Namibia-South Africa [van harris ]
9 Jun Hatchie NWR Haywood County, June 9, 2016 [Larry Chitwood ]
9 Jun Fwd: Re: Bird ID [Stefan Woltmann ]
9 Jun Re: Bird ID [Stefan Woltmann ]
9 Jun Bird ID [scpjmartin ]
9 Jun Painted Bunting [Larry Hollon ]
8 Jun Dickcissels: Sevier County, TN []
7 Jun Re: Painted Bunting today ["" ]
07 Jun Willow flycatcher - Rutherford County [Graham ]
06 Jun Re: Painted Bunting FOUND 6/6 8:50a [Kristy Baker ]
6 Jun KTOS Field Trip Announcement [Jay S. ]
6 Jun Painted Bunting [Stephen Zipperer ]
6 Jun Re: Painted Bunting FOUND 6/6 8:50a [Justin Hiltner ]
5 Jun Painted Bunting [Stephen Zipperer ]
5 Jun CTOS field trip to Hinch Mountain, Saturday, 4 JUN 2016 ["Gary Lanham" ]
5 Jun Results of Hamilton County Migration Count ["Tommie Rogers" ]
4 Jun Test [Tony Watson ]
3 Jun FOY ["J.N. & Ella Howard" ]
2 Jun Hatchie Birdfest - Haywood County [Larry Chitwood ]
1 Jun Brown Booby? [David B Coe ]
1 Jun Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at Walter Davis Marsh [Frank Fekel ]
31 May Re: OT: NC inland Brown Booby ["John O'Barr" ]
31 May Baby Turkey Vultures ["" ]
31 May OT: NC inland Brown Booby []
30 May Bachman's Sparrow, Lawrence County [Bill Pulliam ]
29 May Re: Mystery bird []
28 May mystery bird song ["Nita Heilman" ]
28 May Mystery bird ["J.N. & Ella Howard" ]
28 May Inca Dove and Great-Tailed Grackle at the pits [Victor Stoll ]
28 May Great-tailed Grackle in Memphis ["Tommie Rogers" ]
27 May Inca dove ["" ]
27 May Re: Rutherford County birds [Hugh Barger ]
27 May Rutherford County birds [Hugh Barger ]
27 May Nightjar Survey results (Benton County) [Shawna Ellis ]
27 May Henslow's Sparrow ["Damien J. Simbeck" ]
27 May Common nighthawks [Sara Smith ]
26 May Sequatchie Valley (Bledsoe County, TN): Scissor-tailed Flycatchers (6), Dickcissels (2), Loggerhead Shrike ["LeGrand family" ]
26 May 2 species of Godwits in Lake County!!! ["Mark Greene" ]
25 May Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge and Yuchi Refuge [Charles Murray ]
25 May Re: Nesting Birds [William Fissell ]
25 May Re: Nesting Birds [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
25 May Re: Nesting Birds [Stefan Woltmann ]
24 May May Field Trip Report [Tarcila Fox ]
24 May Re: Nesting Birds [Chellie Bowman ]
24 May White-winged Dove in Gibson County! ["Mark Greene" ]
24 May Nesting Birds [Chad Smith ]
24 May Mourning Warbler, Forest Hills Nashville [Marty DeHart ]
23 May Knox County Flycatchers [Jay S. ]
23 May Black Tern ["George's McNeil" ]
22 May Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers at the DRU [Ruben Stoll ]
22 May Hamblen Co. Birds ["Kirk Huffstater" ]
22 May Northeast Tennessee Bike Big Day, 29 April 2016 [David Kirschke ]
22 May OSFL - Bell's Bend [Graham ]
22 May Mourning at Westhaven [Chris Sloan ]

Subject: Savannah Sparrows- Claiborne Co 6/23
From: Dan Snell <dan_snell AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 21:13:07 +0000
06-23-16

Claiborne Co

Just immediately south of Cumberland Gap,TN

Hwy 63- west side of highway (Harrogate, TN)

LMU Fields (Lincoln Memorial University Fields)

Stop Point: N36.5711481 W-83.6540222


All,


During a brief stop along Highway 63, several countersinging Savannah Sparrows 
were heard. I am almost certain this species is nesting in this field right 
now. Also Grasshopper Sparrow (heard) and a Northern Harrier (seen) were noted 
at this spot- along with the plethora of Eastern Meadowlarks and Red-winged 
Blackbirds. This field really looks like a potentially good grassland migrant 
trap as well for Upland Sandpipers, Bobolinks, etc... 



all this was observed in the heat of the 2:45pm afternoon: 92 degrees F, 5-15 
mph winds (which usually greater than 10 mph winds deter some grassland species 
from singing). 



Hopefully someone that lives near here can do a follow up visit


Good Birding,


Dan Snell

Lynchburg, TN
Subject: A Swallow Six-Pack
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 21:08:02 +0000
This morning, just after sunrise, I observed all six species of swallow at 
Seven Islands State Birding Park in Knox County (Tree, Barn, Bank, Cliff, N. 
Rough-winged, Purple Martin). All were feeding over the river. It was truly a 
sight to behold. 



In total I had 67 species. Here's my eBird checklist: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30397501 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: Little Blue Herons at Amnicola Marsh-Hamilton County
From: Dralle <bwdralle AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 18:24:31 -0400
This evening there were two immature Little Blue Herons feeding with seven 
Great Egrets, three Great Blue Herons and four Green Herons at Amnicola Marsh. 

The marsh habitat looks good for waders.

Bruce Dralle 
Hamilton County TN

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Osprey high counts
From: rick houlk <rhoulk AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 13:01:51 +0000
On 08 April 2010 Captain Dave Anderson and I departed on the Blue Moon from 
downtown Chattanooga. We were taking the boat to B&B Marina on the Hiwassee 
River in Bradley County. It was just the two of us and we were cruising at 8-10 
mph. Plenty of time to count birds. We counted 82 Osprey on 40+ nests along the 
main channel of the Hiwassee and Tennessee rivers. The trip covered 47 miles 
and three counties. Hamilton, Meigs and Bradley. 


Rick Houlk
Polk County

Get Outlook for Android
Subject: Anhinga in Decaturville, TN
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 15:50:53 -0500
  June 22nd, 2016
  Victor and I saw an Anhinga spiralling up over our job site on Dunbar
Road in Decatur County this afternoon, and then head West.
  This was about 1:30 p.m.
  The bird disappeared to the West, and wasn't seen again.
  I have no idea whether the bird was a local summer resident, or just
passing through.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Cerulean Warbler presentation by Melinda Welton on 6 July at Warner Park Nature Center
From: "Sandy Bivens" <sandybivens AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 08:50:04 -0500
TN Birders,  you are all invited to attend this Cerulean Warbler
presentation by Melinda Welton at Warner Park next week.   

 

 

Cerulean Warbler: Vehicle for Exploring the Trials and Tribulations of
Migratory Songbirds 

Wednesday, July 6

7-8:30 p.m.

Registration required  - call 615-352-6299 or register online
www.nashville.gov/wpnc



 

Migration plays an important role in the annual cycle of all migrating
birds. Not only do they spend a significant part of the year traveling
between breeding and wintering grounds, they also cross geopolitical
boundaries in the process. Melinda Welton will describe the many challenges
faced by migrating songbirds using the Cerulean Warbler as a guide and
discussing the pivotal role Tennessee plays in its survival.

 

Presenter: Melinda Welton, Research Associate, Gulf Coast Bird Observatory

 

 

Sandy Bivens

Warner Park Nature Center

Davidson County

 
Subject: Summer bird counts: Carter & Unicoi Cos.
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:29:27 -0400
The Herndon Chapter of TOS conducts two Summer Bird Counts (SBC),
generally using Christmas Count methodology except that the coverage 
area is an entire county.  Summaries below, including most high elevation
specialties of the area.

Carter Co.
The 23rd annual SBC was held 18 June with 18 observers in 7 parties.
Strong winds were a problem for most of the day, causing a few missed
species and reduced numbers for others. Still, we managed 108 species,
just below the average of 112 for the previous 22 years (range = 105 to 121).
Highlights:
Ruffed Grouse - 2
Yellow-cr. Night-Heron - 1
Red-shouldered. Hawk - 1 (scarce in NE Tenn.)
Eur. Collared-Dove - 1
Alder Flycatcher - 2
Least Flycatcher - 2
Warbling Vireo - 1
Com. Raven - 3
Red-br. Nuthatch - 7
Brown Creeper - 1
Winter Wren - 6
Golden-cr. Kinglet - 8
Veery - 20
Hermit Thrush - 1
18 species of warblers
Swainson's Warbler - 2
Magnolia Warbler - 1
Blackburnian Warbler - 1
Black-thr. Blue Warbler - 23
Canada Warbler - 16
Rose-br. Grosbeak - 11
Blue Grosbeak - 5

Unicoi Co.
The 3rd annual SBC was held 12 June with 21 observers in 5 parties.
Birders tallied 112 species, compared to 110 and 111 on the two prior
counts.
Highlights:
N. Bobwhite - 1
Ruffed Grouse - 3
Bald Eagle - 4 
Red-shld. Hawk - 1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 3
Least Flycatcher - 6
Warbling Vireo - 1
Com. Raven - 6
Red-br. Nuthatch - 9
Brown Creeper - 2
Winter Wren - 1
Golden-cr. Kinglet - 13
Veery - 23
Hermit Thrush - 3
20 species of warblers
Swainson's Warbler - 4
Magnolia Warbler - 2
Blackburnian Warbler - 1
Black-thr. Blue Warbler - 25
Canada Warbler - 16
Rose-br. Grosbeak - 9
Blue Grosbeak - 3
Red Crossbill - 3

Thanks to all participants.

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
 
Subject: Re: Osprey high counts
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 08:31:52 -0600
Great stuff! Awesome to get a good count on nests around DRU. 

Chris and I didn't thoroughly go through eBird for high counts. It'd have taken 
3 more years to finish the first version of the book if we had! We pulled some 
records from eBird though. 


In 2012, when we did a statewide wading bird survey, I recorded locations of 
149 osprey nests, just from incidental sightings while out on rivers around the 
state. Very common in some places. Maybe I need to put some of those higher 
tallies in eBird. How I remember 149 nests from 2012 and don't remember what I 
did last week, I don't know. Fun stuff I guess. 


I'll add this to the update for the book!

Cheers,
Scott Somershoe 
Littleton CO

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 21, 2016, at 8:18 AM, Bill Pulliam  wrote:
> 
> Fantastic work by Ruben and crew on the Duck River Ospreys. Here are the high 
counts for Ospreys for Tennessee that are in eBird: 

> 
> 64 June 20, 2016 Duck River area
> 25 July 3, 2013 Jackson County, Cumberland River
> 23 August 13, 2014 Reelfoot Lake
> 20 June 30, 2010 Jackson County
> 15 July 3, 2015 Reelfoot Lake
> 15 August 2, 2013 Jackson County, Cumberland River
> 15 April 9, 2010 Hamilton County, Tennessee and Hiwassee Rivers
> 
> These counts, all in the last 6 years, are a testament to how dramatic the 
increase of this species has been in Tennessee! 

> 
> Bill Pulliam
> Hohenwald TN
> =================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================
> 
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
>     To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>                   tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________ To unsubscribe, 
send email to: 

> tn-bird-request AT freelists.org with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field. 

> ______________________________________________________________
> TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society Neither the 
society(TOS) nor its moderator(s) 

>       endorse the views or opinions expressed
>       by the members of this discussion group.
>        Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>               ------------------------------
>               Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                        Cleveland, OH
>               -------------------------------
>              Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                         Rosedale, VA
>              --------------------------------
>              Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                       Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
>                Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>             web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
> 
>                         ARCHIVES
> TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/
> 
>                      MAP RESOURCES
> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
> 
> _____________________________________________________________
> 
> 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Osprey high counts
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:18:30 -0500
Fantastic work by Ruben and crew on the Duck River Ospreys. Here are  
the high counts for Ospreys for Tennessee that are in eBird:

64 June 20, 2016 Duck River area
25 July 3, 2013 Jackson County, Cumberland River
23 August 13, 2014 Reelfoot Lake
20 June 30, 2010 Jackson County
15 July 3, 2015 Reelfoot Lake
15 August 2, 2013 Jackson County, Cumberland River
15 April 9, 2010 Hamilton County, Tennessee and Hiwassee Rivers

These counts, all in the last 6 years, are a testament to how  
dramatic the increase of this species has been in Tennessee!

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN
  
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Ospreys at The Duck River Unit
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 20:46:06 -0500
  Victor Stoll and I spent part of the afternoon surveying Osprey nests at
the DRU and adjacent areas in Humphreys and Benton Counties today, June
20th, 2016.
  We found several new nests in addition to the known ones, and had a total
of 22 active nests in the survey.
  The survey covered 9 miles, including Camden WMA and Pebble Isle Marina,
and produced 64 birds, most of which were adults. (The rest being large
juveniles that were either recently fledged, or nearly ready to fledge)
  Many of the nests had small young that were not counted.
  According to Sloan and Somershoe, the state high count is 15 birds on a
spring bird count in April 1987.
  Our count was over 4 times the old high count, and is still not
representing nearly the entire population of all the ospreys using the
area.
  Undoubtedly there are many nests in inaccessible locations that could be
found by boat.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: NTOS June Field Trip Report
From: Cynthia Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 10:59:15 -0400

> From: Tarcila Fox 
> Date: June 19, 2016 at 9:29:26 AM EDT
> Subject: NTOS June Field Trip Report
> 
> On Saturday night, June 18th, the moon was full and nineteen NTOS members met 
near the Nashville Super Speedway for an evening field trip. We had Nighthawks 
calling and flying at our meeting place and then Terry Witt led the group on to 
a location on Cedar Forrest Road very close to the Cedars of Lebanon State 
Park. The target birds were Owls and Goatsuckers. 

> 
> It was dusk when we arrived and there were more Nighthawks flying there. As 
we waited for darkness, we were almost immediately rewarded with the loud calls 
of a Whip-poor-will. We got excellent looks at it as if flew from one tree to 
another across the pull-off where we parked. We then began to hear 
Chuck-will’s-widows. We walked up and down the gravel road and with the help 
of Terry’s spotlight, we got close-up looks at a Male Chuck-will’s-widow. 
Terry pointed out that it was a male because it had more white on the outer 
tail feathers than the females. 

>  
> One owl was heard. Other interesting creatures were a Tarantula Wolf Spider 
and a Flat-backed Millipede, both of which were on the gravel road. 

> 
> It was great fun. I heard a couple say that they got life birds that night. 
Thanks to Terry and to everyone who came to make it a successful field trip. 

>  
> 1 Barred Owl
> 6 Common Nighthawk
> 8 Chuck-will’s-widow
> 4 Eastern Whip-poor-will
> 2 Eastern Towhee
> 1 Indigo Bunting
> 
> Tarcila Fox
> tarcila AT bellsouth.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Lark Sparrow, Marshall County 6-18-16
From: Dan Snell <dan_snell AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:08:29 +0000
Hi all,


An adult Lark Sparrow was seen between Belfast and Petersburg this morning 
6-18-16 in Marshall County. During the duration of the observation, the bird 
perched silently on a telephone wires. For more information about the sighting, 
I have submitted a checklist with pics to the e-bird website. 



Good Birding,


Dan Snell

Lynchburg,TN



Subject: Blue-headed Vireo and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in Hickman County
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 13:27:29 -0500
   A singing Blue-headed Vireo was seen at the Beaverdam WMA this morning
6-18-16, hanging in a dense stand of Pine trees.
  This is a very unusual date for this species in West Tennessee.
  I don't know whether it's a late Spring date, or early Fall, or possibly
even summer resident.
  Also in a clearcut nearby, a female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was seen
perched in a dead tree, then seen again 20 minutes later on the way back
out. (Same location).
  This was the only Hickman County record I was able to locate for this
species.
  The complete ebird checklist is attached with photos.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Jun 18, 2016 1:16 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Beaverdam WMA , Jun 18, 2016
To: 
Cc:

Beaverdam WMA , Hickman, Tennessee, US
Jun 18, 2016 6:25 AM - 8:55 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Victor Stoll and I were searching for Bachman's Sparrows
reported by Damien Simbeck. 
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.2 53 species Black Vulture 3 Turkey Vulture 7 Red-shouldered Hawk 2 Broad-winged Hawk 6 Two young birds were perched in the clearcut, two pairs of adults visible at one point later. (Circling). Red-tailed Hawk 3 Mourning Dove 17 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 3 Chimney Swift 5 Red-headed Woodpecker 11 Many pairs are nesting in the clearcuts. Red-bellied Woodpecker 4 Downy Woodpecker 3 Hairy Woodpecker 2 Northern Flicker 7 Good numbers are nesting in this area. Pileated Woodpecker 3 American Kestrel 4 Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 Acadian Flycatcher 1 Eastern Phoebe 3 Great Crested Flycatcher 2 Eastern Kingbird 9 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 1 A female was photographed sitting on a dead treetop in the clearcut.
Unmistakable bird, the size of a Kingbird with a pale blue-gray head and a long, deeply forked tail. (Not as long as that of a male) White-eyed Vireo 7 Yellow-throated Vireo 1 Blue-headed Vireo 1 Bird was seen at a distance sitting at the tip of a dead tree in a clearcut.
The white underparts shining in the sun, and the contrasting darker cap were seen (reminiscent of Eastern Kingbird, but much smaller) before the bird flew into a dense stand of medium-sized Pines and vanished.
I was fairly certain it was one of the 3 species of Solitary Vireo at this point, so we parked the truck and went in after it.
The bird was soon heard singing, then found loafing and preening for decent looks and photos.
The size and shape of a White-eyed Vireo with a white throat, contrasting slate-blue cap, and bold white spectacles. The back was a contrasting greenish color, unlike Cassin's or Plumbeous Vireos.
The bird also had bold white wingbars and bold yellowish fringes on the secondaries and tail-feathers.
The underside was white, with a yellow wash over the flanks.
Blue-headed Vireo is very rare in West Tennessee in June, and this is possibly a first Hickman County record for any date. Red-eyed Vireo 6 Blue Jay 4 American Crow 10 Carolina Chickadee 2 Tufted Titmouse 2 Carolina Wren 4 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 Eastern Bluebird 12 Wood Thrush 1 Brown Thrasher 6 Northern Mockingbird 1 Kentucky Warbler 2 Common Yellowthroat 10 Hooded Warbler 1 Northern Parula 3 Pine Warbler 21 Conservative estimate. Prairie Warbler 35 Very conservative number. Some were feeding fledglings. Yellow-breasted Chat 42 Counted singing. Very vocal in the morning. Chipping Sparrow 1 Field Sparrow 26 Numerous throughout the clearcuts. Eastern Towhee 28 The majority were males seen singing at top of dead trees. Always several in sight. Summer Tanager 10 Nearly all were singing males in the clearcuts. Scarlet Tanager 4 Northern Cardinal 4 Blue Grosbeak 3 Indigo Bunting 18 Brown-headed Cowbird 5 Orchard Oriole 7 American Goldfinch 18 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30282452 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Bachman's Sparrows, Hickman County
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 08:57:08 -0500
I've spent a lot of time in recent years looking and listening for  
Bachman's Sparrrows in Lewis, Hickman, and Perry County. This  
includes extensive clearcuts in Hickman just south of the spot where  
you found the birds. These searches have yielded only two singing  
males, one of which was apparently a transient because followup  
checks by me and the Stoll brothers yielded no more observations. It  
seems that the vast majority of seemingly good Bachman's habitat in  
this region is unoccupied.

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN


> Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:02:26 -0400
> From: ""  (Redacted sender  
> "tnbarredowl" for
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Bachman's Sparrows, Hickman County
>
> I found a large clear-cut this afternoon in south Hickman County  
> that looked like great Bachman's Sparrow habitat.  Since it was  
> 3:00, 90+ degrees and sun blistering down, I knew it would be  
> practically futile to try to locate some birds here.  I parked at  
> one of the former loading areas and walked a short way toward some  
> young pines and dead hardwood snags (formerly 10-15 year old  
> trees).  I flushed a sparrow that immediately flew into one of the  
> dead hardwoods.  I great look through binoculars made Bachman's  
> Sparrow identification easy.  I walked slowly toward this bird and  
> flushed a second bird.  It flew toward the first, but remained  
> lower in the vegetation.  I got a quick look at another adult  
> Bachman's before it dropped back into cover.  Based on their  
> behavior, I would guess a pair (male likely the first bird, using a  
> higher perch).  Neither bird sang.  I returned to my vehicle and  
> drove a few hundred feet further before flushing another sparrow  
> from the roadside.  It flew int
>  o a thicket of young hardwoods.  Almost immediately, two other  
> birds flew from the ground nearby and joined the first bird.  I got  
> a quick look with binoculars and was able to enjoy watching two  
> juveniles begging an adult for food.  Likely a female with young,  
> though males do feed recently fledged young, especially if the  
> territory's female is brooding the next batch of eggs.  I never  
> heard any Bachman's Sparrow sing, but given time of day and weather  
> conditions, I don't blame them.  Wish I had time to return early  
> one morning and walk some of the internal logging roads.  This site  
> would be big enough for 10+ territories!
>
> Here's a link to google map that shows the location.
> https://www.google.com/maps/dir/35.7063618,-87.5849114// 
>  AT 35.7025633,-87.5987301,5216m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en
>
> From the looks of the older aerial imagery of Google, and the looks  
> of the pine stands around this location, I would bet Hickman County  
> has had Bachman's Sparrows regularly for 20+ years.
>
> Damien Simbeck
> Killen, AL


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Subject: EBird Report - Beaverdam WMA , Jun 15, 2016
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 06:04:17 -0500
  Victor and I spent the last two evenings searching for Damien Simbeck's
Hickman County Bachman's Sparrows.
  June 14th and 15th, 2016.
  So far no luck with the Bachman's, but here is a checklist from the same
clearcut where they were seen, with some photos of confusing juvenile Field
Sparrows and Towhees.
  The Bachman's are extremely hard to locate, unless you just have good
luck like Damien did.
  Good birding, Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Jun 16, 2016 5:55 AM
Subject: eBird Report - Beaverdam WMA , Jun 15, 2016
To: 
Cc:

Beaverdam WMA , Hickman, Tennessee, US
Jun 15, 2016 5:47 PM - 8:12 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Victor Stoll and I were searching for Bachman's Sparrows that
were reported by Simbeck. 
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.2 44 species Northern Bobwhite 3 Wild Turkey 7 Great Blue Heron 1 Black Vulture 2 Red-shouldered Hawk 1 Red-tailed Hawk 1 Mourning Dove 42 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 7 Chimney Swift 11 Red-headed Woodpecker 12 Many birds visible. Count by Victor Stoll. Red-bellied Woodpecker 3 Downy Woodpecker 4 Hairy Woodpecker 2 Northern Flicker 9 Family of 6. 3 scattered adults. Pileated Woodpecker 3 American Kestrel 1 Eastern Phoebe 6 Great Crested Flycatcher 6 Eastern Kingbird 8 White-eyed Vireo 3 Red-eyed Vireo 1 Blue Jay 1 American Crow 4 Purple Martin 6 Barn Swallow 3 Carolina Wren 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 Eastern Bluebird 3 American Robin 2 Northern Mockingbird 1 Common Yellowthroat 7 Pine Warbler 23 Several family groups, many scattered birds. Very conservative number. Prairie Warbler 29 Numerous throughout, I tried to photograph them, got most of them. Very conservative number. Yellow-breasted Chat 21 Chipping Sparrow 1 Field Sparrow 43 Many adults, independent juveniles, and recently fledged young. Eastern Towhee 20 Summer Tanager 4 Scarlet Tanager 1 Northern Cardinal 1 Blue Grosbeak 1 Indigo Bunting 12 Orchard Oriole 3 American Goldfinch 5 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30251159 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Bachman's Sparrows, Hickman County
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:02:26 -0400
I found a large clear-cut this afternoon in south Hickman County that looked 
like great Bachman's Sparrow habitat. Since it was 3:00, 90+ degrees and sun 
blistering down, I knew it would be practically futile to try to locate some 
birds here. I parked at one of the former loading areas and walked a short way 
toward some young pines and dead hardwood snags (formerly 10-15 year old 
trees). I flushed a sparrow that immediately flew into one of the dead 
hardwoods. I great look through binoculars made Bachman's Sparrow 
identification easy. I walked slowly toward this bird and flushed a second 
bird. It flew toward the first, but remained lower in the vegetation. I got a 
quick look at another adult Bachman's before it dropped back into cover. Based 
on their behavior, I would guess a pair (male likely the first bird, using a 
higher perch). Neither bird sang. I returned to my vehicle and drove a few 
hundred feet further before flushing another sparrow from the roadside. It flew 
into a thicket of young hardwoods. Almost immediately, two other birds flew 
from the ground nearby and joined the first bird. I got a quick look with 
binoculars and was able to enjoy watching two juveniles begging an adult for 
food. Likely a female with young, though males do feed recently fledged young, 
especially if the territory's female is brooding the next batch of eggs. I 
never heard any Bachman's Sparrow sing, but given time of day and weather 
conditions, I don't blame them. Wish I had time to return early one morning and 
walk some of the internal logging roads. This site would be big enough for 10+ 
territories! 


Here's a link to google map that shows the location.

https://www.google.com/maps/dir/35.7063618,-87.5849114// AT 35.7025633,-87.5987301,5216m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en 


From the looks of the older aerial imagery of Google, and the looks of the pine 
stands around this location, I would bet Hickman County has had Bachman's 
Sparrows regularly for 20+ years. 


Damien Simbeck
Killen, AL
Subject: Trip Report: Ontario and Quebec
From: kbreault <kbreault AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 03:11:10 +0000 (UTC)
Trip Report: Ontario and Quebec


If you have been reading TN-Bird for the last ten years orso, you will know my 
main interest in birding is Total Ticking. Of course, TotalTicking is where you 
add up the birds you have seen in all the states andCanadian provinces, 64 
birding areas in total. The question for me has alwaysbeen what is the best or 
most efficient way to go about Total Ticking,and as you know the answers have 
generally found their way into my tripreports. The major targets for this trip 
were the provinces of Ontario andQuebec, and although I already had about 100 
birds for Quebec, my list forOntario was quite low. So the focus for this 
report is how do you bird (asa Total Ticker) the province of Ontario when you 
are new to the area or havefew birds? I will end with a few brief comments on 
Quebec. 



Ontario


The bird list for Ontario is quite high, 494 birds, thereare lots of birders in 
Ontario, and many very rare birds and vagrants have beenreported. The result is 
that in a 3-5 day trip you are unlikely to achieve 50%of the province, the gold 
standard for Total Ticking. Ontario is not Manitoba(the easiest place for Total 
Ticking as a percentage of the birds of the area),or Saskatchewan (#7), but #38 
(out of the 62 states and provinces reported in TennesseeBirders by the 
Numbers, Vol. 5--Nunavut and St. Pierre & Miquelon couldnot be included in the 
work but would likely be at the bottom, #63 & #64).Tennessee by contrast is 
#28, just about middle of the pack. For Ontario Ithink a good number to shoot 
for in 3-5 days is 175-180 (or about 35%), andwith luck and “good” weather 
(as with most birding in the east during migrationideal weather is calm winds 
following a strong cold front with rain), and youmay be able to do better than 
that. 



So where to go? Most U.S. birders go to Pt. Pelee, the southernmostpart of 
Ontario near Detroit. One problem with Pt. Pelee is that the bestbirding there 
is in the first two weeks of May (usually the second week), whilethe best 
birding in Ontario is near the end of the month. At that time 
knowledgeablebirders will still continue to go where the water is in Ontario, 
specificallythe many places along the northern shorelines of both Lake Erie and 
Ontario,and the best bet is to add Algonquin Provincial Park (PP) and Carden 
Plain (alsocalled Carden Alvar) to your plans. Since the premier places on the 
shore ofLake Erie are west of Toronto, the best places on Lake Ontario areeast 
of Toronto, and Algonquin PP and Carden Plain are north of the city,Toronto is 
an ideal central location for birding the province of Ontario. Ifyou are doing 
more than birding (what an idea), Toronto is a wonderfully safecity with lots 
to do and great food (and parks with some of the common owls—thebane of many 
Total Ticking trips). Of course, if you are interested in rareowls you will 
certainly want to get local information. Without that these birds shouldnot be 
on your Total Ticking target list. In general, you should not spend timechasing 
rare birds when you are Total Ticking. A Total Ticking target list shouldmainly 
be composed of the abundant, common and uncommon birds, and rare species 
shouldbe of lower priority unless they can be found in the same locations as 
theother birds. Finding rare birds on a Total Ticking trip is always exciting 
but,well, rare (the closest thing I had to a rare bird was a barely out of 
season Thayer’sGull in Ontario). The main exception here is for subsequent 
trips when you alreadyhave 50% of the birds of an area. Of course, many places 
have hotspots for rarebirds, but generally they are not for your first or 
second trip. Effectively,what that means is that all but the highest ranking 
Total Tickers should befocused on getting to 50%, leaving rare birds to the top 
tickers. For example, Ihave 16 states and provinces at 50%, and only about 12 
or so at 45-50%--a longway to go. Now, where was I? 



Yes, where to go. First, find yourself in Toronto in thelast week of May. 
Another nice thing about Toronto is that it is easy to getthere (Nashville has 
a direct flight), and good hotels are common. If you havethe time it is always 
better to drive, as you will be going through otherstates and provinces 
(depending on your plan) along the way. What is a good hotel for Total 
Ticking?Perhaps one that does not have the name of Trump on it! While there are 
a fewexceptions what you don’t want is a hotel in the downtown area, because 
gettingin and out of the downtown will take time, often lots of time. Of 
course, thisis generally not an issue in the mornings as you will want to get 
out before sunrise, but you really don’t want to spend time fighting the 
traffic atthe end of a long day of birding (certainly not at my age). And in 
general, takeextra time whenever you go out in Toronto. Toronto is a rapidly 
growing city (more than2.5 million pop. now, Atlanta by contrast is less than 
half a million), and asCanadians say there are only two seasons, winter and 
construction. Okay, so youare in Toronto in the last week of May, and you want 
instructions for where togo. I still suggest Clive Goodwin’s fine book, A 
Bird-Finding Guide to Ontario.While outdated in several respects (the 2nd 
edition is 1995), thebook is quite useful. (Especially helpful are the seasonal 
status tables,something often not found even in the best guides.) So there are 
three ways togo, east, west and north. Consider going west to the Hamilton 
Harbourarea, the Townsend/Jarvis Sewage Lagoons, Turkey Point PP, Backus Woods, 
LongPoint PP, Rondeau PP, St. Clair NWA, and Pt. Pelee (if you have the time). 
Manyof these locations will also have websites and maps, but the book is 
helpful inhaving one source. (Almost 500 pages, I copy out the information I 
need as itis always useful to pack lightly.) This trip takes you to all of the 
bestplaces west of Toronto and mainly on the northern shore of Lake Erie.Note 
that many of the parks will have fees. You can get one-day use permitsthat are 
good for most Ontario parks, or you can get a seasonal use permit, 
currently$125.00, for the entire summer season. As with all Total Ticking trips 
to a newarea your first day will be your best. The highest Big Day for Ontario 
was 200birds on May 29, 1999, not likely for a Total Ticker not familiar with 
thearea, but 200 is possible if you have multiple days, good weather, and 
ofcourse luck. 



If you have gone west on the first day, you nowhave two options on day two, 
either go east along Lake Ontario to Presqu’ile PPand Prince Edward Pt, or 
head north to Carden Plain and Algonquin PP. I don’t thinkit matters much 
which way you go, however if the weather has changed overnightit is probably 
better to go east as you will be more likely to pick upadditional migrants 
along the Lake Ontario shore. 



Algonquin PP is the oldest provincial park inCanada and one of the best (at 
this point my favorite park in Canada is stillRiding Mountain in Manitoba), 
roughly three hours northeast of Toronto. Andwhile Carden Plain is the first of 
the two on the way north, it is much better tobegin with Algonquin—and begin 
before sunrise. You will want to be at the park atleast for the dawn chorus. At 
least? While you can find some common owlselsewhere, you have a good chance for 
Saw-whets at Algonquin, uncommon yes but the second most common owl after 
Barred (get local informationfor current locations). Second, the park is 
popular and you will want to getthere early to bird and drive without having to 
deal with others of yourspecies. Of course, it is not as bad as the much 
smaller Radnor park inNashville. (There does not seem to be a time early enough 
at Radnor these days,as you can often find noisy people in groups bounding on 
the trails throughoutthe day—the walkers of the Radnor mall.)  I strongly 
recommend Birds of AlgonquinPark, 2012, by Ron Tozer, the former Park 
Naturalist, perhaps the finestbird book on a single natural area/park in North 
America (note, notinexpensive). The book reminds me of one of my all-time 
favorites that I pickedup on my first trip to Texas when I was teaching field 
ornithology as ateenager at a private secondary school, Roland Wauer’s Birds 
of Big BendNational Park and Vicinity, 1973 (younger birders may know the 
second editionwith the rather misleading title, A Field Guide to Birds of Big 
Bend,1996), but Tozer’s book is even better. The book, based on records that 
go backto the mid-1800s and 10,000 file cards with numerous sightings of birds 
on each(perhaps 200,000 data points or more), includes extensive discussion of 
all the278 birds on the park list (seasonal, historical and population status, 
andmigration and breeding arrival and departure records), and a checklist 
thatcombines all the relevant variables in one chart. The book also includes a 
nicemap, information on where to bird, and suitable photographs of the birds 
and thepark. Impressive does not begin to characterize this book and the effort 
thatwent into producing it. During the last week of May, there are about 125 
birds(and 22 warblers) in the park that are abundant to uncommon, and a total 
of 144breeding birds. (see note 1 below) 



Carden Plain (find good maps and recommended routes online) isa largely 
agricultural area, mainly cattle ranching, with mixed woodlands andgrassland 
species about 1.5 hours northeast of Toronto. Among the good birds ofthe area 
you should look for: Amer. & Least Bittern, Amer. Kestrel,Upland Sandpiper, 
Black Tern, Whip-poor-will, Black-billed Cuckoo, LoggerheadShrike, Sedge Wren, 
Eastern Bluebird, Golden-winged Warbler, Bobolink, Grasshopper,Henslow’s 
(rare), Vesper and Clay-colored Sparrow. About 110 birds are abundantto 
uncommon at Carden this time of year. 



On the third day go east for Presqu’ile PP and Prince EdwardPt., about 1.5 
and 2.25 hours away, respectively. Presqu’ile is especiallyuseful for both 
migrants and breeders. If you have the time, on the way backsee Darlington PP 
and McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve (exit 425 on Highway 401),and Oshawa Second 
Marsh (exit 419) on the Lake Ontario shore. 



If you have more than three days (generallyrecommended) your best bet is to go 
back to the same places, especially LongPoint PP, Presqu’ile PP, Carden Plain 
and Algonquin PP. But it will all dependon where your list is on the night of 
the third day. My experience in inlandeastern states and provinces is that you 
are likely to have the most difficulty with shorebirds. There are several 
workarounds for these problem birds. If ithas rained recently you will 
especially want to look at as many wet fields aspossible, but don’t forget 
the shoreline and the many beaches on the lakes (i.e.,plovers, godwits, 
Whimbrel, Dunlin, Semipalmated and Western Sandpipers, and Sanderling).Remember 
identifying shorebirds is less dependent on bird vocalizations (butstill 
helpful as shorebirds will fly from place to place along the lakeshore), sogood 
times for shorebirds can be middle or late in the day. And give yourself 
abreak, note that you are looking for abundant (a) to uncommon (u) birds, 
notrare birds. Thus, you should focus on these 20: Black-bellied (c), 
Amer.Golden- (u), and Semipalmated Plover (c), Killdeer (a), Greater (u) & 
LesserYellowlegs (c), Solitary (u), Upland (u), Spotted (c-u), Semipalmated 
(c), White-rumped(u) and Least Sandpiper (c), Red Knot (u), Sanderling (u), 
Dunlin (a-c), RuddyTurnstone (u), Whimbrel (u), Short-billed Dowitcher (c), 
Wilson’s Snipe (u),and Wilson’s Phalarope (u). If the weather cooperates 
(especially recent rain),and you visit numerous areas with appropriate habitat 
over 3-5 days, you willget most of these, and have a shot at something a little 
more rare. What wouldbe the next step up in rarity? Piping Plover, Hudsonian 
and Marbled Godwit,Western, Baird’s, Stilt and Buff-breasted Sandpiper. Of 
course, these are birdsmost Ontario birders will have on their lists, but 
consider yourself lucky ifyou get them. Finally, is there a Total Ticking rule 
for how much time you shouldspend in one state/province? The rule is always to 
go to the best places whenbirds are likely to be there. Thus, if you spend time 
trying to get just a fewmore birds, that is likely to be a mistake if by doing 
so you are losing out bynot going to another state/province. Consider this 
another version ofBOC—birding opportunity costs--where the cost is in the 
number of speciesconditioned by the scarcity of time. With limited time we have 
to make choices;the option we do not take is the cost. In Total Ticking and 
other forms of competitivebirding, the trick is to reduce those costs, e.g., 
adding more newstate/province birds compared to the alternative option. 



Quebec


Finally, brief comments on Quebec as I have already reportedon the province 
some years ago. Currently, there are 475 birds on the Quebec list. If Ontariois 
not Manitoba or Saskatchewan, Quebec is no Ontario. Quebec is #51 on thelist of 
the easiest states or provinces to go Total Ticking, i.e., among theworst 
places as a percentage of the birds of the area. Of course, that is notto say 
Quebec is the lowest, or even close to the lowest of Canadian provinces,because 
New Brunswick is at #58, Nova Scotia is #59, Yukon #60 and NorthwestTerritory 
at #62. With Alberta (#4), Manitoba (#1) and Saskatchewan (#7) allin the top 
10, clearly Canada has both some of the easiest and worst places togo Total 
Ticking. (If you are interested, the top states in the U.S. are: WI#2, MO #3, 
NJ #5, DE #6, OH #8, IA #9 and KY #10, and the bottom are RI #53, AZ#54, CA 
#55, FL #56, NV #57, and AK #61.) Most of the highest ranking Big Daysin Quebec 
occurred in late May or early June with about 165 or so birds. Asnoted before, 
there is lots of online birding information for Montreal, and Iwould especially 
suggest J. Cam Finlay’s Bird-Finding Guide to Canada, (McClelland& Stewart, 
2000), St. Timothe Marsh and agricultural lands in the area forshorebirds, and 
Mont-Tremblant. Tremblant is a special place with a list of 200or so birds, 
many boreal, breeding and migrant species at this time: Ruffed and 
SpruceGrouse, Northern Goshawk, Great-horned, Barred and Northern Saw-whet Owl, 
Black-backedWoodpecker, Olive-sided, Yellow-bellied and Alder Flycatcher, 
PhiladelphiaVireo, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, six species of thrush, including 
Bicknell’s(rare), a large variety of warblers, Lincoln’s, Fox and many 
other sparrows,and various finches, Pine (rare) and Evening Grosbeak, Red and 
White-wingedCrossbill, and Pine Siskin. Tremblant is found about two hours 
north of Montreal.Of course, to get the best out of the area you will want to 
be at the park atsunrise or earlier. 



Well, that’s it for this report. If you are interested ingoing to Ontario or 
Quebec I would be more than willing to help you out, andindeed I can help with 
many of the states and provinces in North America.Exceptions would be Alberta, 
Northwest Territories and Nunavut in Canada (ofthe three I only expect to go to 
Alberta). Of course, this was a Total Tickingreport but over the years a major 
interest of mine has been helping beginnersand intermediate birders progress. 



So let me change the topic and put on my professor hat to suggest three 
badhabits birders can fall into. One habit is to rely on others 
foridentification, a real problem when birding with a group. I tell my students 
toalways use their own words, and so for birding I would say make your 
ownidentifications and then compare them with what others have said. Questions 
toask more experienced birders should be based on your own identifications, 
notvariations on “what bird is that?” Should you come up with an 
identificationthat is different from what a more experienced birder has 
suggested, thereasonable question is, why is that bird not the bird I 
identified? Beginningbirders greatly desire the names of birds (you can’t 
list a bird without thename), and experienced birders are generally more than 
happy to provide thatinformation. However, from a pedagogical point of view 
that is not the best way tolearn or teach: beginners need to put in the 
required effort and experiencedbirders should teach for understanding, not 
simply providing students with thecorrect answers. As an experienced birder, be 
less forthcoming about identificationand more expansive about how you got to 
your identification. Questions like, “whatdo you think the bird is?” or 
“what bird does it sound like to you?” are a goodway to start the 
discussion, and an important and pointed way to suggest thatbirding begins with 
the study of birds. Another bad habit is the over reliance onguide books (or 
phone apps) in the field. The time for books or apps is at homebefore you set 
out, and that means you need to actually read the field guideand memorize it as 
if you were going to be tested (begin by focusing on similargroups of birds 
found in your area). Perhaps the worst habit is the over dependenceon 
binoculars. “How can binoculars be a bad habit?” If you want to progress 
quicklyin birding put down your binoculars and listen. Use this “trinary” 
rule (a rulewith three parts): listen first, try to identify by sound, and only 
then useyour binoculars. “But if I do that the bird might take off before I 
get mybinoculars on it.” Yes, but learning means that your failures today 
will besuccesses in the future. If you expect to be successful at the beginning 
youmay not be successful in the future. In everything you do in life effort is 
theessential ingredient. (At the same time, keep your eyes on the big 
picture.Effort is a resource that can be used effectively or squandered. Is 
that majorin English, art history or sociology going to give you what you want 
out oflife? Birding might be a good path to take but make it a 
well-consideredchoice.) And note that if your guide book should mainly be used 
at home, thesame is true for bird vocalizations: listen and memorize those 
before your tripto the field. What do you think? Many birders have thought 
about how best toteach birding and there is even a small literature on the 
topic. I am puttingtogether a new course on field ornithology and I welcome any 
comments. Anddon’t think that only expert birders can make useful 
suggestions, the oppositemight be the case as birding and the teaching of 
birding are different things. 



Of course, not everyone wants to be a student of birding orbirds. As a purely 
social activity birding has much to offer especially withregard to my own 
academic area of epidemiology: as a result of increased exerciseand social 
integration (the degree to which people are attached, bonded orconnected to 
others), birding should reduce your chances of morbidity andmortality. It does 
not get better than that! 



What’s next for this old ticker? Unfortunately, increasinglyslim pickings at 
this point. Having missed out several times for personalmatters, I badly want 
to get to Arizona in winter. Following that I especially needLouisiana and 
Texas during spring migration, California and Oregon, Alberta,and Newfoundland 
and St. Pierre & Miquelon. And beyond that, and if myhealth holds up, CO and OK 
will have to be in the mix as, with the exception ofAK, these are the only 
states now with less than 37% of the birds (37% is auseful standard for Total 
Tickers because 37% of all states/provinces = 10,000TTs or so). 



As I was driving home I realized that this is my 45thyear of birding. What an 
adventure it has been! Time for some summing up Isuppose—perhaps on my annual 
report, Tennessee Birders by the Numbers,in the new year. For now, and with 
mixed feelings at best, it is time for me toget back to my routine in the 
academy, edit my research journal, read SiddharthaMukherjee’s new book, The 
Gene (strong contribution I am told in thiscritically important and rapidly 
developing area), and plan my next trip. Butperhaps not in that order! 


Good birding and good totaling!


Kevin Breault

Brentwood, TN


mtweb.mtsu.edu/kbreault 


 
1. Appendix 2 of the book provides for a quantitativeanalysis of bird arrival 
and departure dates for two 25 year periods ofreporting, 1961-1985 and 
1986-2010, and allows for an assessment of whether thedifferences between the 
two periods are consistent with climate change. Forexample, the mean spring 
arrival date for Northern Waterthrush was May 8 in the1961-1985 period, but May 
3 for 1986-2010, a statistically significantdifference at the .0001 level. An 
examination of Appendix 2 indicates that ofthe 114 birds for which there were 
sufficient data for spring arrival for bothperiods, 82 birds or 71.9% show 
significantly earlier arrival dates in the mostrecent quarter century, 
1986-2010, supporting the notion that bird migrationhas been affected by 
climate change. For warblers, 19 of 23 (82.6%) showearlier arrival dates 
compared to the 1961-1985 period. 

Subject: Re: Fayette County, Sunday June 12, 2016 - addendum
From: Larry Chitwood <lmchitwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 09:50:05 -0500
Addendum to my original email.
I sent the list from my phone's eBird app which did not include birds
identified while leaving the area.
Please add the following:
1 Prothonotary Warbler
1 Grasshopper Sparrow
3 American Goldfinch

Larry Chitwood
Arlington, TN
On Jun 13, 2016 9:29 AM, "Larry Chitwood"  wrote:

> Great day of birding began at Wappanocca WR in Arkansas  and ended at Wolf
> River SMA in Fayette County.
>
> Of note was the abundance of Orchard Orioles, Bob White Quail and a life
> bird for me - Grasshopper Sparrow.
>
> Here's my eBird report.
> Ghost River SNA, Mineral Slough Section
> Jun 12, 2016; 3:51 PM
> Traveling 4.60 miles; 124 minutes.
>
> 6 Wood Duck
> X Northern Bobwhite
> 3 Great Blue Heron
> 1 Great Egret
> 4 Turkey Vulture
> 3 Mourning Dove
> X Chimney Swift
> 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
> 3 Great Crested Flycatcher
> 1 White-eyed Vireo
> 1 Blue Jay
> 7 American Crow
> 3 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
> 7 Barn Swallow
> 6 Eastern Bluebird
> 2 Northern Mockingbird
> 2 Common Yellowthroat
> 3 Yellow-breasted Chat
> 4 Eastern Towhee
> 5 Summer Tanager
> 2 Northern Cardinal
> 5 Indigo Bunting
> 2 Dickcissel
> 1 Eastern Meadowlark
> 8 Orchard Oriole
>
> Good Birding,
> Larry Chitwood
> Arlington, TN
>
Subject: Fayette County, Sunday June 12, 2016
From: Larry Chitwood <lmchitwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 09:29:38 -0500
Great day of birding began at Wappanocca WR in Arkansas  and ended at Wolf
River SMA in Fayette County.

Of note was the abundance of Orchard Orioles, Bob White Quail and a life
bird for me - Grasshopper Sparrow.

Here's my eBird report.
Ghost River SNA, Mineral Slough Section
Jun 12, 2016; 3:51 PM
Traveling 4.60 miles; 124 minutes.

6 Wood Duck
X Northern Bobwhite
3 Great Blue Heron
1 Great Egret
4 Turkey Vulture
3 Mourning Dove
X Chimney Swift
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
3 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 White-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
7 American Crow
3 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
7 Barn Swallow
6 Eastern Bluebird
2 Northern Mockingbird
2 Common Yellowthroat
3 Yellow-breasted Chat
4 Eastern Towhee
5 Summer Tanager
2 Northern Cardinal
5 Indigo Bunting
2 Dickcissel
1 Eastern Meadowlark
8 Orchard Oriole

Good Birding,
Larry Chitwood
Arlington, TN
Subject: NTOS Regular Monthly Meeting and Program June 16 Radnor Lake
From: Daniel Shelton <dashelt100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 08:14:03 -0500
If you are in the Nashville area this Thursday, please join us at the
Radnor Lake State Natural Area Visitor's Center, 1160 Otter Creek Rd,,
Nashville for our monthly meeting starting at 7:15. p.m. We will gather at
7:00 p.m.

Dr. John Niedzwiecki, Professor of Biology at Belmont University, will
present his program "Using Comparative Landscape Genetics to Quantify
Interisland Gene Flow in Darwin's Finches".  Dr. Niedzwiecki  recently
 worked on the migration of Darwin's Finches between islands in the
Galapagos, investigating connections with ecology as well as the
evolutionary consequences of migration.   One assumption persistent over
the last 100 years is that speciation occurred, with birds effectively
isolated on different islands, allopathic speciation.  His team was
interested if speciation may have occurred despite persistent gene flow
between islands. Dr. Niedzwiecki will present his data, and describe a
collecting trip to get a data set to test intraisland gene flow.

Danny Shelton
NTOS Programs Chairman
Subject: NTOS nightbird fieldtrip, June 18
From: Terry Witt <terrywitt AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 22:08:30 +0000 (UTC)
It will be helpful if anyone coming could drop me an e-mail
My cell is 615 849-5667 for late additions or cancellations
The meeting point of Tn 452 and US 231 can be easily accessed from Tn 840.
Keep your fingers crossed for a calm evening with no rain
Cheers
Terry WittMurfreesboro Tn
Subject: Upcoming NTOS Field Trip
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 14:10:38 -0500
Afternoon TN-birders

NTOS would cordially like to invite you to join us on June 18th for an
EVENING FIELD TRIP!
Wilson /Rutherford County with Terry Witt. Target birds Whips, Chucks and
Owls. We will meet at the intersection of Hwy 231 and TN 452 (Racetrack
Blvd) near the Wilson - Rutherford county line, at 8 PM. There is a spot
just a bit south of There where can leave extra vehicles safely. We will
then carpool to the birding areas.  We will be out until 10-11 PM looking
for all 3 regularly occurring Tennessee nightjars (we will at least hear
them), and should have a some chance of seeing/hearing 4 species of owls.
The main limiting factor is weather, rain and/or wind which may lower ones'
chances.  2016.  Bring mosquito repellant. Terry would like a headcount  so
please email him at: terrywitt AT bellsouth.net

Hope to see you there!

Tarcila 
tarcila AT bellsouth.net 


Subject: Namibia-South Africa
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 16:49:45 -0400 (EDT)
I have organized wildlife tours of Botswana, South Africa and Tanzania in 2013, 
2014 and 2015. I am currently organizing a tour of Namibia and South Africa for 
22 September - 6 October, 2017. Anyone interested may contact me at 
shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com for more information and an itinerary. 

Van Harris 
Millington, TN 
Subject: Hatchie NWR Haywood County, June 9, 2016
From: Larry Chitwood <lmchitwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 17:16:21 -0500
Hatchie HWR--O'Neal Lake, Haywood County, Tennessee;
Jun 9, 2016 2:51 PM - 5:27 PM
Protocol: Traveling
14.7 mile(s)

Mid-afternoon birding at Hatchie NWR.
Interesting to see 3 Barred Owls in the middle of the day.
Also saw 2 Little Blue Herons - first of season for me and first I've seen
at Hatchie NWR.

Also visited McCool Lake, Borrow Pit Lake, Heart Lake, and several spots
along Powell Rd.

36 species

Canada Goose  101
Double-crested Cormorant  2
Little Blue Heron  2
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  5
Killdeer  2
Mourning Dove  2
Barred Owl  3
Red-headed Woodpecker  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Acadian Flycatcher  3
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  3
White-eyed Vireo  5
Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  3
Purple Martin  X
Tree Swallow  X
Barn Swallow  X
Cliff Swallow  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Eastern Bluebird  4
Prothonotary Warbler  5
Swainson's Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  2
Northern Parula  2
Summer Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Blue Grosbeak  3
Indigo Bunting  6
Red-winged Blackbird  11
Common Grackle  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  12
House Sparrow  7

View this checklist online athttp://
ebird.org
/
ebird
/view/checklist/S30153347


Larry Chitwood
Arlington, TN
Subject: Fwd: Re: Bird ID
From: Stefan Woltmann <stefan.woltmann AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 15:18:02 -0500
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Stefan Woltmann 
Date: Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 3:17 PM
Subject: Re: [TN-Bird] Re: Bird ID
To: "Roy, W. Kelly" 
Cc: "scpjmartin AT gmail.com" 


Agreed European Starling!

My bad,

Stefan

On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 3:12 PM, Roy, W. Kelly  wrote:

> Looks like a starling to me. My 2 cents…
>
>
>
> Kelly Roy
>
> Knoxville
>
>
>
> *From:* tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org]
> *On Behalf Of *Stefan Woltmann
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 09, 2016 3:39 PM
> *To:* scpjmartin AT gmail.com
> *Cc:* tn-bird
> *Subject:* [TN-Bird] Re: Bird ID
>
>
>
> Hi Steve,
>
> That's a young Brown-headed Cowbird (and side note: the banding code is
> BHCO).
>
> Best birding,
>
> Stefan
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 2:32 PM, scpjmartin  wrote:
>
> Please assist with ID. I'm thinking either juvenile RWBL or BRCO
>
>
>
> [image: image1.JPG]
>
> Steve Martin
>
> Lynchburg,
>
> Moore County, TN
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> Dept. of Biology, and
> Center of Excellence for Field Biology
> Austin Peay State University
> Clarksville, TN 37044
> 931-221-7772
> woltmanns AT apsu.edu
>
>


-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu





-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird ID
From: Stefan Woltmann <stefan.woltmann AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:39:28 -0500
Hi Steve,

That's a young Brown-headed Cowbird (and side note: the banding code is
BHCO).

Best birding,

Stefan

On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 2:32 PM, scpjmartin  wrote:

> Please assist with ID. I'm thinking either juvenile RWBL or BRCO
>
> [image: image1.JPG]
>
> Steve Martin
> Lynchburg,
> Moore County, TN
>



-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu
Subject: Bird ID
From: scpjmartin <scpjmartin AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:32:24 -0500
Please assist with ID. I'm thinking either juvenile RWBL or BRCO



Steve Martin
Lynchburg, 
Moore County, TN
Subject: Painted Bunting
From: Larry Hollon <larryhol AT mac.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 13:07:11 -0500
For the past two days the Poole Knobs Field Trial Area has been closed. I spoke 
with a ranger today at noon and he said this is because a pond was re-stocked 
with fish and TWRA wanted to prohibit fishing in the pond. He said the site 
will re-open for dog trials on Saturday, June 11 and Sunday, June 12. Access is 
restricted to dog trials over the weekend. Public access will return to normal 
on Monday, June 13. 


Larry Hollon
Davidson County


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Dickcissels: Sevier County, TN
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2016 23:09:02 +0000 (UTC)
Today a visiting birder and I found two singing male Dickcissels near Kyker 
Ferry Road just north of the French Broad River in Sevier County. I have 
entered this data into ebird, but did not mark the exact location pending 
approval by the land owner to post. The location is very private and residents 
may not want a lot of birders in the area. I will post later when I learn more 
about posting the exact location. 


The two males were singing at the same time within 75 yards of each other and 
did not seem agonistic with each other, but both did appear to have established 
territories. Attached are two photos of the different males. There are other 
photos and a video posted on Facebook, Birds and Birding in Sevier County. In 
the video you can see one male singing and hear the other singing nearby. 


This record is the only one for Sevier County in ebird, and I am not sure if 
other records exist. If anyone knows of any records from the Migrant, that 
would be nice to know. 


Peace 

Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Sevier County 
Subject: Re: Painted Bunting today
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "oeserscave" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 10:24:47 -0400
Poole Knobs field trial areaJune 7Rutherford CountyJackie Corbin and I arrived 
at the 4-way intersection at 6:35 am, and another birder had been there an hour 
without seeing or hearing the Painted Bunting.  Jackie and I walked a little 
ways down each road, and meanwhile the other birder left.  At 7:20 I drove 
down to tell Jackie I was headed out, and on the way past the intersection 
spotted the Painted Bunting in a small dead shrub across from where we 
parked.  I went back and picked up Jackie and we returned.  The Painted 
Bunting sang from the small clump of bushes on the one corner, the power lines, 
and from treetops on the other sides of two roads.  Jan Shaw showed up around 
7:45 and was immediately able to see it.  I headed out at 7:50 to head to 
work.Ken OeserHendersonville, TN 
Subject: Willow flycatcher - Rutherford County
From: Graham <grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Jun 2016 02:54:42 +0000
Willow flycatcher
Percy priest WMA field trial area, Rutherford County
6-6-16

Bird was heard and seen by myself, Stephen Zipperer, and Joshua Stephenson
while we looked to relocate the Painted Bunting reported there. I counted
38 species, all told, but WIFL and PABU are the only newsworthy ones.
Photos of both birds in ebird.

Graham Gerdeman
Nashville
Subject: Re: Painted Bunting FOUND 6/6 8:50a
From: Kristy Baker <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 06 Jun 2016 12:11:29 -0500




Subject: KTOS Field Trip Announcement
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 17:11:39 +0000
Jay Walk: Birding in Greenback

Where: Greenback, Tennessee (Loudon Co.)
When: Sunday, June 12, 2016, 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Leaders: Janet McKnight and Jay Sturner (865-244-7819, call/text)

Join us in Greenback as resident Janet McKnight takes us to some of her 
favorite local birding spots, including the perimeter of the lush and birdy 
Wood Thrush Ridge, a part of her own property. We will meet at 8:15 AM in the 
parking lot of The Home Decor Resale Store, located in downtown Greenback at 
6710 Morganton Road. 


See you there!


Jay Sturner
Knoxville=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Painted Bunting
From: Stephen Zipperer <stczipperer AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 10:29:18 -0500
6/6/2016
Field Trials Area J Percy Priest Lake, Lavernge, Rutherford Co.

Bird was finally found again at the right side of the second intersection
of the field trials area. Thanks guys for calling me back after I had left.
Joshua Stevenson,  Graham Gerdeman,  Justin Hiltner. Sorry you missed it
Justin Nation.

Great seeing you guys.

Stephen Zipperer
Rutherford Co
Subject: Re: Painted Bunting FOUND 6/6 8:50a
From: Justin Hiltner <hiltnerj AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 08:59:36 -0500
We relocated the Painted Bunting in Rutherford County at the Percy Priest
WMA field trials area at THIS dropped pin:

Dropped Pin
near 399 Old Jones Mill Rd, La Vergne, TN 37086
https://goo.gl/maps/rCSFDef6egE2

turns out we were about a quarter mile from this spot for most of the
morning. David Arnold originally found the bird and clarified its location
on Facebook. It is the SECOND left turn within the WMA Field Trial area by
the large clump of native hydrangeas. We got good looks and photos and he
has been singing incessantly. (w/Josh Stevenson and Graham Gerdeman)

-Justin Hiltner
Davidson Co.

On Monday, June 6, 2016, fndrbndr59  wrote:

> Bird was not relocated this morning while I was there. Good seeing you
> Stephen and it was great to  meet you Graham Gerdeman  and Justin Hiltner.
>
>                Justin Nation
>
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S®6 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Stephen Zipperer  >
> Date: 06/05/2016 9:13 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: tn-bird  >
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Painted Bunting
>
> June, 5 2016
>
> David Arnold of Murfreesboro found a Painted Bunting at the Field Trials
> Area J Percy Priest Lake,  Lavernge,  Rutherford Co. He posted pictures on
> Tennessee Birding facebook page.  Found it at the first left hand turn
> heading toward the ponds.
>
> See everyone there in the morning
>
> Stephen Zipperer
> Rutherford Co
>
Subject: Painted Bunting
From: Stephen Zipperer <stczipperer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 21:13:50 -0500
June, 5 2016

David Arnold of Murfreesboro found a Painted Bunting at the Field Trials
Area J Percy Priest Lake,  Lavernge,  Rutherford Co. He posted pictures on
Tennessee Birding facebook page.  Found it at the first left hand turn
heading toward the ponds.

See everyone there in the morning

Stephen Zipperer
Rutherford Co
Subject: CTOS field trip to Hinch Mountain, Saturday, 4 JUN 2016
From: "Gary Lanham" <glanham AT epbfi.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 16:38:08 -0400
The Chattanooga Chapter of the TOS went on a field trip on Saturday, 4 JUN
2016, which crossed parts of 5 counties.  The 12 participants (led by Harold
Birch and Danny Gaddy) began at 0700 in Soddy Daisy (Hamilton County),
traveled up US 27 through Dayton to Spring City (Rhea), then to the top of
Hinch Mountain (3048', Cumberland), from there to US 127 in the Sequatchie
Valley (Bledsoe), then back to Hamilton County via Sequatchie County, ending
at 1600.  Weather: 70 to 80 F; sunny early, heavy clouds and rain late; wind
SW Beaufort 2 early, 4 to 5 late.  A total of 86 birds were identified; most
in Cumberland County (those seen only in another county noted):

Canada Goose (Sequatchie)

Northern Bobwhite (Bledsoe)

Great Blue Heron (Rhea)

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey (Rhea)

Cooper's Hawk

Red-shouldered Hawk

Broad-winged Hawk (Hamilton)

Red-tailed Hawk

Killdeer

Rock Pigeon (Bledsoe)

Eurasian-collared Dove (Rhea)

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo (8, Hinch Mtn & Bledsoe)

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Red-headed Woodpecker (Bledsoe)

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker (Bledsoe)

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel (Bledsoe)

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher

Eastern Phoebe

Great-crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird (Bledsoe)

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Bledsoe)

Loggerhead Shrike (Bledsoe)

White-eyed Vireo

Yellow-throated Vireo

Blue-headed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Northern rough-winged Swallow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Barn Swallow

Cliff Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

Wood Thrush

American Robin

Brown Thrasher

Northern Mockingbird

European Starling

Cedar Waxwing

Ovenbird

Worm-eating Warbler

Louisiana Waterthrush

Black-and-white Warbler

Kentucky Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Hooded Warbler

American Redstart

Cerulean Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Yellow-breasted Chat

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Field Sparrow (Bledsoe)

Grasshopper Sparrow (Bledsoe)

Song Sparrow

Scarlet Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak (Bledsoe)

Indigo Bunting

Dickcissel (Bledsoe)

Red-winged Blackbird

Eastern Meadowlark

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

Orchard Oriole (Bledsoe)

House Finch (Bledsoe)

American Goldfinch

House Sparrow

 

Gary Lanham, CTOS

Hamilton County
Subject: Results of Hamilton County Migration Count
From: "Tommie Rogers" <sundragon1 AT epbfi.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 07:58:30 -0400
The Hamilton County migration count was held on Saturday May 7.  Twenty-two
observers found 130 species which is a somewhat below the average for this
count.  It had been hot and dry with very little weather which probably did
not help the species count.

 

Some of the highlights included:

Gadwall

Northern Harrier

Merlin

Northern Bobwhite

2 Whip-poor-will

12 Chuck-wills-widow

Veery

Pine Siskin

28 species of warblers including Golden-winged, Cerulean, Nashville, and
Bay-breasted 

 

Thanks to everyone who helped with this count!

 

 

Kevin Calhoon

Assistant Curator of Forests

Tennessee Aquarium

 

 



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: Test
From: Tony Watson <twnurse2k AT att.net>
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 09:44:16 -0400
Message test

Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: FOY
From: "J.N. & Ella Howard" <birders3 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jun 2016 16:19:39 -0400
Greetings,
     Today I had a Great-crested Flycatcher for the first time in several
years, at least that we know of.  He sat on our garden fence and gave his
call several times and just a few feet from where I was - a great view.
                                 J. N. Howard, Marion County
Subject: Hatchie Birdfest - Haywood County
From: Larry Chitwood <lmchitwood AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 07:16:58 -0500
Lots of birding and activities this weekend in West Tennessee at the
Hatchie Birdfest in and around the Brownsville / Stanton area.
Follow the link for details and registration.
http://www.hatchiebirdfest.com/

Good Birding
Larry Chitwood
Arlington, TN
Subject: Brown Booby?
From: David B Coe <davidbcoeauthor AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 21:18:19 -0500
Im driving to NC tomorrow through the Hickory area. Does anyone know if the 
Booby was seen today? 

*****
David B. Coe
www.DavidBCoe.com
www.dbjackson-author.com

Now Available: SPELL BLIND, by David B. Coe
HIS FATHERS EYES, by David B. Coe
SHADOWS BLADE, by David B. Coe

THIEFTAKER, by D.B. Jackson
THIEVES' QUARRY, by D.B. Jackson
A PLUNDER OF SOULS, by D.B. Jackson
DEAD MANS REACH, by D.B. Jackson




Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at Walter Davis Marsh
From: Frank Fekel <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2016 10:10:59 -0500
Walter S. Davis Blvd Marsh
Nashville, Davidson Co., TN
2016 June 1

This Wednesday morning I stopped by the marsh next to Tenn. St. U. The
water in the lake is slowly evaporating and more mud is beginning to
show. On the far side of the lake next to the reeds there was an
immature YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON plus GREAT BLUE and GREEN HERONs.
This was my first sighting of a Yellow-crowned at the marsh this
year.

Frank Fekel
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
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                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: OT: NC inland Brown Booby
From: "John O'Barr" <jonhop70 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 19:32:59 -0400
Brown Booby continues, I photographed it at 5p.m..
On May 31, 2016 11:18 AM,  wrote:

>
> FYI, a Brown Booby is being reported about 140 miles into NC just east of
> Hickory.  About 3.5 hrs from Knoxville or 2.5 from Johnson City.  Details
> below and updates likely on CarolinaBirds listserv.
>
> Dean Edwards
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 09:11:22 -0400
> From: Dwayne Martin
> To: Carolinabirds AT duke.edu, FBC-Birds AT yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: Brown Booby - Lookout Shoals Lake Catawba/Iredell Counties
>
> We checked the Iredell County side and the Brown Booby can be seen much
> better from that side if it is on the rock.  To get to the Sharon Boat
> access area, take I-40 to exit 141 and go north on Sharon School Rd for 1.4
> miles and turn left onto Island Ford Rd.  Follow Island Ford Rd for 0.4
> miles and turn right onto Old Lion Rd and follow it to the end where to
> boat access is.  The Booby flew (presumably to feed) toward the Catawba
> County side and out of sight.  If you look for it from the Catawba County
> side, the rock it is favoring is the smaller rock ledge to the left of the
> large rock face that is most visible.
>
> Dwayne
> *************
> J. Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
>
>
> Catawba County Park Ranger
> Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
> http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
> http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
>
>
> On Tue, May 31, 2016 at 7:51 AM, Dwayne Martin wrote:
>
> > There is a Brown Booby at Lookout Shoals Lake ( lake between Lake Norman
> > and Lake Hickory). It can be seen on a rock face across from the boat
> > access in Catawba County. I'm going to check the boat access in Iredell
> > County in a bit to see if it can be seen from there. To get to the
> Catawba
> > side access take I-40 to exit 138 Oxford School Rd. Take Oxford School Rd
> > north for 2 mile until the stop sign at the T intersection. Turn right
> > and go to the end of the road where the boat access is.
> >
> > --
> > Dwayne
> > *************
> > J. Dwayne Martin
> > Hickory, NC
> >
> >
> > Catawba County Park Ranger
> > Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> > jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
> > http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
> > http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
> >
> >
> >
> =================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================
>
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
>       To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>                     tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________
>                 To unsubscribe, send email to:
>                  tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>             with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
> ______________________________________________________________
>   TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>        Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>         endorse the views or opinions expressed
>         by the members of this discussion group.
>
>          Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                  wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>                 ------------------------------
>                 Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                          Cleveland, OH
>                 -------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                           Rosedale, VA
>                --------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                         Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
>
>           Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>               web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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>
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>
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> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
>
> _____________________________________________________________
>
>
>
Subject: Baby Turkey Vultures
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "RJSJAS" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 17:12:39 -0400
A couple of weeks ago I notice a Turkey Vulture flying out of my empty  
barn. Noticed the same thing the next day. So I checked out the barn and found 

two eggs in one of the horse stalls. I waited a couple of weeks  to check 
on them and found both had hatched.  
 
I know all of us see dozens of Turkey Vultures daily in Tennessee,  but 
having one nest and hatching her young in my barn was a treat for  me.
 
Attached are pictures of eggs and young ones.
 
Robert
 
Robert J.  Sheehan
Hardeman  Co.
RJSJAS AT AOL.COM
Subject: OT: NC inland Brown Booby
From: kde AT angst.engr.utk.edu
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 11:17:42 -0400 (EDT)
FYI, a Brown Booby is being reported about 140 miles into NC just east of 
Hickory.  About 3.5 hrs from Knoxville or 2.5 from Johnson City.  Details 
below and updates likely on CarolinaBirds listserv.

Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN





---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 09:11:22 -0400
From: Dwayne Martin 
To: Carolinabirds AT duke.edu, FBC-Birds AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: Brown Booby - Lookout Shoals Lake Catawba/Iredell Counties

We checked the Iredell County side and the Brown Booby can be seen much
better from that side if it is on the rock.  To get to the Sharon Boat
access area, take I-40 to exit 141 and go north on Sharon School Rd for 1.4
miles and turn left onto Island Ford Rd.  Follow Island Ford Rd for 0.4
miles and turn right onto Old Lion Rd and follow it to the end where to
boat access is.  The Booby flew (presumably to feed) toward the Catawba
County side and out of sight.  If you look for it from the Catawba County
side, the rock it is favoring is the smaller rock ledge to the left of the
large rock face that is most visible.

Dwayne
*************
J. Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark


On Tue, May 31, 2016 at 7:51 AM, Dwayne Martin wrote:

> There is a Brown Booby at Lookout Shoals Lake ( lake between Lake Norman
> and Lake Hickory). It can be seen on a rock face across from the boat
> access in Catawba County. I'm going to check the boat access in Iredell
> County in a bit to see if it can be seen from there. To get to the Catawba
> side access take I-40 to exit 138 Oxford School Rd. Take Oxford School Rd
> north for 2 mile until the stop sign at the T intersection. Turn right
> and go to the end of the road where the boat access is.
>
> --
> Dwayne
> *************
> J. Dwayne Martin
> Hickory, NC
>
>
> Catawba County Park Ranger
> Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
> jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
> http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
> http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
>
>
>
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
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you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
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         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Bachman's Sparrow, Lawrence County
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 11:21:43 -0500
I found a single singing Bachman's Sparrow while running the  
Collinwood Breeding Bird Survey route this morning (5/30/2016), in  
the general vicinity of Loretto in Lawrence County. Damien Simbeck  
had the species on this route a few times in the Wayne County  
portion, but it has been over a decade since the last time.  I'm  
reluctant to post a detailed location for a bird that appears to be  
on territory right alongside a public road in this era of rampant use  
of playback.

The habitat the bird was in is a bit different from the large young  
pine-converted clearcuts where Damian found the bird regularly in the  
southwestern Highland Rim in the 1990s. This was a small pine stand  
several decades old, a portion of which had been cleared a few years  
ago, leaving a strip of tall pines between the clearing and an  
adjacent large field. The cleared area is now regrown with low brush  
and brambles. The bird was singing from the taller pines, about 15  
feet up. This is their typical behavior father south where they nest  
in open savannah-like pine woods.

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
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Subject: Re: Mystery bird
From: kde AT angst.engr.utk.edu
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 10:06:32 -0400 (EDT)
Given the description, time of year, and the length of time you've been 
hearing them (consistently for four weeks rules out a passing migrant), my 
guess would be either Blue-gray Gnatcatcher or young chickadees/titmice.

Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN




On Sat, 28 May 2016, J.N. & Ella Howard wrote:

> Birding friends,
>      We are long term birders, I am pretty good with identifying sounds and
> my wife has great eyes.  For the last four weeks until the last two days we
> have had a bird we can't find and one that makes a call we can't quite
> identify.  I think it has to be a warbler, but is not making a call that we
> are identifying.  It seems to go "zzz zzz zzz" with the third note dipping
> a step lower.  That is the total call.  We personally know some of you who
> would receive this note.  Maybe you recognize this call.  We think we
> should, but it is just a little different from one we immediately know.
> Would appreciate your suggestions although we may still not find it in
> these thick leaves.
>      On the plus side this afternoon an Ovenbird came to water in our
> backyard and while I was sitting on the front porch in late afternoon a
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo whom we have tried hard to see just came and perched
> on a limb a few feet in front of me, big bug in its mouth.
>      Good birding to all.
>                                          J. N. Howard, Fiery Gizzard Cove,
> Marion Co
> 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
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       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: mystery bird song
From: "Nita Heilman" <nrheilmanandcats AT charter.net>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 18:17:29 -0500
I'm not an expert but, I often hear Black throated Blue Warblers and Black 
throated Green Warblers that sing zee-zee-zee instead of a full song. 


Nita Heilman
Clarksville, Montgomery CoTn
May 28, 2016
Subject: Mystery bird
From: "J.N. & Ella Howard" <birders3 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 19:04:03 -0400
Birding friends,
     We are long term birders, I am pretty good with identifying sounds and
my wife has great eyes.  For the last four weeks until the last two days we
have had a bird we can't find and one that makes a call we can't quite
identify.  I think it has to be a warbler, but is not making a call that we
are identifying.  It seems to go "zzz zzz zzz" with the third note dipping
a step lower.  That is the total call.  We personally know some of you who
would receive this note.  Maybe you recognize this call.  We think we
should, but it is just a little different from one we immediately know.
Would appreciate your suggestions although we may still not find it in
these thick leaves.
     On the plus side this afternoon an Ovenbird came to water in our
backyard and while I was sitting on the front porch in late afternoon a
Yellow-billed Cuckoo whom we have tried hard to see just came and perched
on a limb a few feet in front of me, big bug in its mouth.
     Good birding to all.
                                         J. N. Howard, Fiery Gizzard Cove,
Marion Co
Subject: Inca Dove and Great-Tailed Grackle at the pits
From: Victor Stoll <victorjaystollnineteen80 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 16:32:16 -0500
Ruben and I left home at 2:30 a.m. and met Damien Simbeck at the
pits(Shelby Co) to try to relocate the Inca Dove he saw last night. We were
unable to find it,but between 1:00 and 2:00 p.m. David Chaffin stopped by
on his way to Phoenix and had a Great-tailed Grackle sitting on a
chain-link fence. He called me after seeing the bird drop down by some
puddles behind fresh dirt mounds. We got there 5 minutes later and started
searching through the Common Grackles. I saw a huge Grackle fly farther
back behind the fence and drop back down(from behind the dirt hump where
last seen) but several more hours of searching proved fruitless relocating
the bird.
Subject: Great-tailed Grackle in Memphis
From: "Tommie Rogers" <sundragon1 AT epbfi.com>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 15:15:26 -0400
David Chaffin reports a Great-tailed Grackle near the Memphis Pits area.
From Riverport Rd. coming into the earth complex, stay on the paved road and
look for a dirt pile with an excavated area and a fence.  The grackle was
perched on the fence.  Description: a  grackle larger than a Common with a
flat head and same color of body and head.  Male bird with short distance
between the yellow eye and the head crown.

Other birders are present and trying to relocate it.

 

 

Tommie Rogers

Chattanooga

 



---
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Subject: Inca dove
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 18:24:15 -0400
Just flushed an Inca Dove from the road at The Pits (Earth Complex) in Memphis. 
It was near the southeast most pond. 


Damien Simbeck
Killen AL

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Subject: Re: Rutherford County birds
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 10:48:38 -0400
Scissor-Tail from Thursday.

-- 
Hugh Barger
Subject: Rutherford County birds
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 10:43:33 -0400
Yesterday morning I stopped by Couch and Lytle Creek Rd. to check for the
scissor-tailed fly catchers that have been reported.  My first sightings
were two loggerhead shrikes at the end of Couch Rd. Moments later a
scissor-tail flew to a perch on the fence and began feeding.  It flew to a
nearer perch and posed nicely.  A second bird soon showed up farther down
the fence.  Driving on down Lytle Creek Rd. a third flycatcher was seen on
a utility wire.  It had to dodge a Cooper's hawk that flew in. An eastern
kingbird helped encourage the hawk to move on,
Driving on to Discovery Wetalnds in Murfreesboro I found two adult and one
immature yellow-crowned night-herons with the help of Greg Tomerlin.

-- 
Hugh Barger
Subject: Nightjar Survey results (Benton County)
From: Shawna Ellis <yodergoat AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 06:52:44 -0500
May 22, 2016
Big Sandy area, Benton County TN

On the night of May 22, our family participated in a survey of our
designated route for the Nightjar Survey Network(http://www.nightjars.org)
for the third time in four years. It was a night of bright moonlight and
calm wind, perfect for counting nightjars!

While our 10 year old carefully kept track of minutes, my husband and I
counted every nightjar heard during each minute of the 6 minute count
window for each of 10 stops which are one mile apart on our designated
survey route. That was a confusing sentence but sums up the method! Our
route begins very close to the Big Sandy portion of the TN National
Wildlife Refuge and follows Lick Creek road back toward the community of
Big Sandy.

I total, we had 35 nightjars, almost evenly split between
Chuck-will's-widows (18) and Whip-poor-wills (17).

This exceeded last year's total count by 5 and our 2013 count by 16. We
missed 2014.

For anyone interested in participating, the last date for our area in this
year's survey is May 29. See http://www.nightjars.org/ for more
information.

-Shawna Ellis
Paris, Henry County
Subject: Henslow's Sparrow
From: "Damien J. Simbeck" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 06:49:32 -0500
I was traveling through Lawrence County yesterday and decided to visit a site 
north of Ethridge where Henslow's Sparrows were found in 2011 (Jonestown Road). 
I found a scrub/weed field at 821 Jonestown Road and stopped. As soon as I 
turned off my motor, I heard a Henslow's Sparrow singing, fairly close to the 
road. It was down in the vegetation and not visible. I stayed about 5 minutes, 
hoping to see the bird. It sang the entire time, but never moved up into view. 
While I was waiting, a flash of white in front of me caught my eye. I looked up 
and got to enjoy the feeding antics of a male Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. He 
also stayed the entire time. The field had two signs posted: Private Property 
and Conservation Easement. After all these years, I got to add a species to my 
original home county list! 


Damien Simbeck
Killen 
ALNLD9%H$HDS*5kz2hH`0Da0_-jwejgjg!69cZ-jךm޾&آyl*v%mP؊|!m2ަޱNrۚ0N!T8!]j^j-ڂ:)mbf)+-)+צj)mۊ_祊l칻&ޱzf-v-~+-+a{.n+^Jy_]Lb^+(wo+ay7,y㫞+aZ 
ƥJ"z܍z+azazrL䧢jz+az+{kzu鞙+.Ȩ 


躓(uڶjYZq}S7n[\,+-j{L׫j+wr&ް)^ZӇ"֧zڽ娮WFu^T,+-j{L׫j+ 

kɩ•鬢tV+"^Mzxh"qRȞ,nȭya 
0v(r$*5 AT bmyb(ڭb?vDHDzy¢ 
ji0Xױjǝ쵫^^w緂'zh-&Wz{`%zfmƥ+r 
Subject: Common nighthawks
From: Sara Smith <ssmith2685 AT att.net>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 07:00:25 -0400
For the last three mornings, I have been accompanied by common nighthawks as I 
walk my dog. 

Sara Smith,
Talbott, Tn
Jefferson County

Sent from my iPad=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
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Subject: Sequatchie Valley (Bledsoe County, TN): Scissor-tailed Flycatchers (6), Dickcissels (2), Loggerhead Shrike
From: "LeGrand family" <elegrand AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 17:54:53 -0500
Harry LeGrand and I checked out the usual sites for Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers and Dickcissels in the Sequatchie Valley (mostly northeast of
Pikeville) this morning and early afternoon (Thursday, May 26, 2016).

 

The interesting birds, with notes taken from eBird, were:

 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  6     All known sites where Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers have been seen in the upper valley were checked. Pair at Oxier
Hollow Rd./Lee Hollow Rd. (Melvin Crossroads Rd.) & Upper East Valley Rd.
Pair at Swafford Chapel & Cemetery (off Upper East Valley Rd).  Single at
Ninemile Cross Road apparently building nest on transformer (usual
location). Single along Upper East Valley Rd. 1/4 mile northeast of junction
with Old Dayton Rd. (New location for me.)

 

Dickcissel  2     All known sites for Dickcissel were checked (including
site along Wesley Chapel Rd. southwest of Rt. 31). One heard and seen
singing from top of tree at intersection of Oxier Hollow Rd./Lee Hollow Rd.
(Melvin Crossroads Rd.) and Upper East Valley Rd. (Known location from
previous years.) One heard repeatedly singing along Rt. 31 uphill from the
intersection of Old Dayton Rd. and Rt. 31. (New location).

 

Loggerhead Shrike  1     At Brushy Cemetery. Seen along fence behind
cemetery. Distant, requiring spotting scope to make ID (to see black mask,
black wings with small white spot). Seen in morning and again in early
afternoon. (Known location from previous years.)

 

Grasshopper Sparrow  2     One along Melvine Crossroad near intersection
with Upper East Valley Rd. One heard singing at Swafford Chapel & Cemetery.

 

Northern Bobwhite  4     Two heard singing at Brushy Cemetery. Pair flew
across road at Melvin Crossroads Rd. near Upper East Valley Rd.

 

Ed LeGrand

Cumberland Co., TN

 
Subject: 2 species of Godwits in Lake County!!!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 22:38:57 +0000 (UTC)
26 May 2016Lake County
Bad weather = Good Birds!!!!
I arrived at the Phillipy Pits just as it started to rain. I noted that the 
only shorebirds present were 2 Killdeer. Shortly afterwards, 12 Least 
Sandpipers and 6 Semipalmated Plovers dropped in. The rain kept getting heavier 
and the winds began to pick up and the storm moved in from the north. Just as I 
was about to pull away 3 large shorebirds dropped in - godwits! It was raining 
so hard that I was struggling to see them well but I thought I could see 2 
Marbled Godwits and 1 Hudsonian Godwit! I got a picture of the Hudsonian and 
then the rain slacked up just long enough for me to get a picture of the 
closest Marbled Godwit. Then the rain started pouring again. I got one distant 
pic of the 2nd Marbled as the rains came down. Just as the rains slacked up 
again, an adult Bald Eagle came soaring over the water and flushed the godwits 
as well as the Canada Geese and Mallards. They all flew off to the west towards 
the Mississippi River and could not be relocated. I came back a short time 
later and the geese and ducks had returned but there was no sign of the 
godwits. It's possible that they flew across the river into MO or north into 
KY. 


Pics can be seen on eBird.
Other birds of note today were a Ruddy Turnstone on Tiptonville Bar, a Common 
Tern on the MS River at Boothspoint in Dyer County, and a few Least Terns at 
Slough Neck Landing on the MS River in Lake County. 

A possible jaeger was also seen at the far south end of Tiptonville Bar but it 
was just too far away to do anything with and unfortunately could not be 
relocated for better looks. :( 

Good birding!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TN
Subject: Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge and Yuchi Refuge
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 21:46:45 -0400

Hugh Barger and I traveled Shadden Road and Blythe Ferry
Lane toward the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park early this morning. All of these
locations are at Birchwood in Meigs County. On the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge 
alongside 

Blythe Ferry Lane, highlights seen or heard included a Northern bobwhite,
common yellowthroat warblers, and yellow-breasted chats. From there we traveled
to Yuchi Refuge in Rhea County. Highlights at Yuchi included wild turkeys, a
solitary sandpiper, yellow-billed cuckoos, blue-gray gnatcatchers, a
grasshopper sparrow, at least two orchard orioles, and the following warblers:
at least 3 prothonotary warblers, common yellowthroats, prairie warblers,
yellow-breasted chats, and a Northern parula  the first I have ever seen.
Together, Hugh and I saw or heard at least 45 species of birds, 30 of these at
Yuchi Refuge.


Charles
Murray

Birchwood, TN

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: William Fissell <wfissell AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:54:14 -0500
agree with prior posters

not a weird post at all

important lesson to be relearned again and again- even apparently small
roads give cowbirds access to forest sepcies nests.

On Wed, May 25, 2016 at 11:46 AM, Stefan Woltmann  wrote:

> I don't think it's an odd post; and I think it IS important to highlight
> what a difficult time a lot of our birds have in a lot of our landscapes.
> And also important for people (preaching to the choir here, I know) to
> remember how important basic monitoring/demographic studies are - very hard
> to fund such studies these days because monitoring is not "sexy" or
> "cutting edge" science.
>
> Best,
>
> Stefan
>
> On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith 
> wrote:
>
>> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
>>
>>
>> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for
>> birds, photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I
>> didn't go looking for them, just happened upon them.  Of the four different
>> species I've observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.
>> Here's briefly what I observed:
>>
>>
>> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a
>> woody plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1
>> crushed Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty,
>> apparently raided by snake or some other predator.
>>
>>
>> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.
>> When found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1
>> big cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay
>> come along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
>>
>>
>> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet
>> up on the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll
>> be more successful than the others.
>>
>>
>> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
>> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought
>> back).
>>
>>
>> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for
>> nesting birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of
>> migrating here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all
>> to raise another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear
>> this is not ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the
>> birds being used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest
>> I've seen up close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success
>> rate for raising chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.
>> The woods are thick with cowbirds.  I hear them all the time, and it's
>> become an irritating mental image of bums looking to dump eggs in another
>> bird's nest.  Regarding jays, crows, or any other birds that eat young from
>> another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so much because it's nature's
>> way.  Even snakes have to do what they are programmed to do.  I guess my
>> hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.  I can't stand to see that this
>> problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder there's anything left besides
>> cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the
>> cowbird, too.
>>
>> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
>> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking
>> at these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible
>> on the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
>> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
>> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to
>> happen this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to
>> be successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests
>> completely, even after I've walked right into one.
>>
>> Chad Smith
>> Manchester, TN
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> Dept. of Biology, and
> Center of Excellence for Field Biology
> Austin Peay State University
> Clarksville, TN 37044
> 931-221-7772
> woltmanns AT apsu.edu
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:52:20 -0500
Here, hereI absolutely concur!

<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
Southeastern Avian Research
Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
1515 N. Willow Bend Court
Clarksville, TN  37043
931-206-3517

From:   on behalf of Stefan Woltmann

Reply-To:  
Date:  Wednesday, May 25, 2016 at 11:46 AM
To:  Tn Bird 
Subject:  [TN-Bird] Re: Nesting Birds

I don't think it's an odd post; and I think it IS important to highlight
what a difficult time a lot of our birds have in a lot of our landscapes.
And also important for people (preaching to the choir here, I know) to
remember how important basic monitoring/demographic studies are - very hard
to fund such studies these days because monitoring is not "sexy" or "cutting
edge" science.

Best,

Stefan

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith  wrote:
> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
> 
> 
> 
> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for birds,
> photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I didn't go
> looking for them, just happened upon them. Of the four different species I've 

> observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.  Here's briefly what
> I observed:
> 
> 
> 
> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a woody
> plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1 crushed
> Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty, apparently
> raided by snake or some other predator.
> 
> 
> 
> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.  When
> found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1 big
> cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay come
> along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
> 
> 
> 
> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet up 
on 

> the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll be more
> successful than the others.
> 
> 
> 
> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought 
back). 

> 
> 
> 
> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for nesting
> birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of migrating
> here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all to raise
> another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear this is not
> ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the birds being
> used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest I've seen up
> close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success rate for raising
> chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.  The woods are thick
> with cowbirds. I hear them all the time, and it's become an irritating mental 

> image of bums looking to dump eggs in another bird's nest.  Regarding jays,
> crows, or any other birds that eat young from another bird's nest, it doesn't
> bother me so much because it's nature's way. Even snakes have to do what they 

> are programmed to do.  I guess my hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.
> I can't stand to see that this problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder
> there's anything left besides cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is
> wiped out, so goes the cowbird, too.
> 
> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking at
> these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible on
> the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to happen
> this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to be
> successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests completely, even
> after I've walked right into one.
> 
> Chad Smith
> Manchester, TN
> 
> 



-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu



Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: Stefan Woltmann <stefan.woltmann AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:46:14 -0500
I don't think it's an odd post; and I think it IS important to highlight
what a difficult time a lot of our birds have in a lot of our landscapes.
And also important for people (preaching to the choir here, I know) to
remember how important basic monitoring/demographic studies are - very hard
to fund such studies these days because monitoring is not "sexy" or
"cutting edge" science.

Best,

Stefan

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith  wrote:

> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
>
>
> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for
> birds, photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I
> didn't go looking for them, just happened upon them.  Of the four different
> species I've observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.
> Here's briefly what I observed:
>
>
> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a
> woody plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1
> crushed Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty,
> apparently raided by snake or some other predator.
>
>
> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.
> When found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1
> big cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay
> come along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
>
>
> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet
> up on the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll
> be more successful than the others.
>
>
> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought
> back).
>
>
> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for
> nesting birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of
> migrating here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all
> to raise another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear
> this is not ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the
> birds being used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest
> I've seen up close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success
> rate for raising chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.
> The woods are thick with cowbirds.  I hear them all the time, and it's
> become an irritating mental image of bums looking to dump eggs in another
> bird's nest.  Regarding jays, crows, or any other birds that eat young from
> another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so much because it's nature's
> way.  Even snakes have to do what they are programmed to do.  I guess my
> hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.  I can't stand to see that this
> problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder there's anything left besides
> cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the
> cowbird, too.
>
> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking
> at these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible
> on the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to
> happen this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to
> be successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests
> completely, even after I've walked right into one.
>
> Chad Smith
> Manchester, TN
>
>
>


-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu
Subject: May Field Trip Report
From: Tarcila Fox <tarcila AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 17:04:09 -0500
Saturday Morning, May 21st the Nashville chapter of TOS hosted a field trip to 
include Rutherford and Wilson county birds. The weather was pleasant with temps 
near 65 degrees, and though the skies darkened a couple of times most of the 
day was partly sunny. Chloe Walker led the group of eight birders. We began at 
the Discovery Wetlands, moved on to Lyle Creek Road both in Murfreesboro, 
Rutherford County, Tn. Then, we moved on to Alsup Mill Road, Spain Hill, Cedar 
Forrest Road, and the Nashville Speedway in Wilson County. 

On Cedar Forrest Road, we met other birders from the Lebanon chapter of TOS. 
They were looking at the Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, and from there would move 
to the end of the road for the Loggerhead Shrikes. 

Wildflowers found along the way were, Poison Hemlock, Yellow Goatsbeard (Oyster 
plant), Prairie Golden Aster, Glade Bluet, Great-blue Lobelia, and Drumhead 
(Crossleaf Milkwort). 


Our list of birds is below.

Canada Goose - 6
Mallard - 7
Wood Duck - 6
Double-crested Cormorant - 1
Great Blue Heron - 1
Wild Turkey - 2
Northern Bobwhite - 1
Black Vulture - 9
Turkey Vulture - 2
Red-tailed Hawk - 3
Cooper's Hawk - 2
Mourning Dove - 11
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1
Chimney Swift - 4
Downy Woodpecker - 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1
American Kestrel - 2
Great Crested Flycatcher - 3
Eastern Kingbird - 7
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2  
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4
Eastern Phoebe - 5
Loggerhead Shrike - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 1
White-eyed Vireo - 2
Blue Jay - 3
American Crow - 4
Barn Swallow - 11
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3
Carolina Chickadee - 1
Tufted Titmouse - 4
Carolina Wren - 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3
Swainson's Thrush - 1
Eastern Bluebird - 3
American Robin - 5
Northern Mockingbird - 13
Brown Thrasher - 3
Gray Catbird - 3
Cedar Waxwing - 32
European Starling - 28
Yellow Warbler - 1
Magnolia Warbler - 1
Canada Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 4
Northern Parula - 1
Prairie Warbler - 2
Grasshopper Sparrow - 5
Field Sparrow - 5
Chipping Sparrow - 1
Lark Sparrow - 3 plus at least 4 young 
Eastern Towhee - 5
Northern Cardinal - 5
Dickcissel - 3
Indigo Bunting - 10
Blue Grosbeak - 4
Eastern Meadowlark - 6
Red-winged Blackbird - 16
Common Grackle - 15
Brown-headed Cowbird - 3
Orchard Oriole - 3
House Finch - 1
American Goldfinch - 2

Thanks to all who came to share the fun. 
Tarcila 
tarcila AT bellsouth.net



Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: Chellie Bowman <chellie.bowman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:41:49 -0500
Chad,

Glad you sent your message. Let me start by saying that I totally
understand what you're feeling. And it must have been a poignant
realization to see firsthand just how precarious it is for nesting birds.
It saddens me that you saw so many in distress. However, I must point out
that your anger towards the cowbird seems a little misplaced. Their actions
are just as much "nature's way" as the crows and jays you mentioned. If
anything, the only reason why there are less nesting warblers and MORE
cowbirds than perhaps is "natural" is because humans are clearing land
everywhere. Cowbirds thrive on these forest edges and fields made plenty by
us. Therefore, if you're wanting to express some sort of moral outrage
against "bums" looking to "dump" things--look towards your fellow citizens
and their participation in destructive, capitalist practices. And then,
perhaps use that anger and energy in positive ways that work to counteract
these HUMAN bums. We are much more involved in the direct extinction of
those magnificent songbirds than the misunderstood cowbird. It is us who
have laid the foundation and opportunity for cowbirds to do their "natural"
thing. Sometimes I try to see the good in it--at least there is some life
that thrives and carries on in the ruins we've left.

Be well and fight the good fight,
Chellie Bowman

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith  wrote:

> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
>
>
> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for
> birds, photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I
> didn't go looking for them, just happened upon them.  Of the four different
> species I've observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.
> Here's briefly what I observed:
>
>
> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a
> woody plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1
> crushed Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty,
> apparently raided by snake or some other predator.
>
>
> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.
> When found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1
> big cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay
> come along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
>
>
> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet
> up on the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll
> be more successful than the others.
>
>
> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought
> back).
>
>
> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for
> nesting birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of
> migrating here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all
> to raise another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear
> this is not ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the
> birds being used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest
> I've seen up close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success
> rate for raising chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.
> The woods are thick with cowbirds.  I hear them all the time, and it's
> become an irritating mental image of bums looking to dump eggs in another
> bird's nest.  Regarding jays, crows, or any other birds that eat young from
> another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so much because it's nature's
> way.  Even snakes have to do what they are programmed to do.  I guess my
> hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.  I can't stand to see that this
> problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder there's anything left besides
> cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the
> cowbird, too.
>
> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking
> at these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible
> on the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to
> happen this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to
> be successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests
> completely, even after I've walked right into one.
>
> Chad Smith
> Manchester, TN
>
>
>
Subject: White-winged Dove in Gibson County!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 19:03:13 +0000 (UTC)
 blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px 
#715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white 
!important; } May 24, 2016Kenton, Gibson County side 

I was driving around the grain bins in Kenton when I saw an interesting looking 
dove perched on a power line with Mourning Doves & Eurasian Colllared-Doves. I 
noted the following: 

Dove slightly larger than nearby Mourning Doves with white wing patch along 
lower edge of folded wing when perched. When seen in flight the bird had white 
patches on upper wing contrasting with dark outer feathers of the wing. Bird 
was perched on a power line near the railroad tracks with other doves at Kenton 
Grain facility. I got one pic before the bird flushed into some nearby trees. 

Nemesis bird now checked off!
Good birding!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TNGibson County


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
 
Subject: Nesting Birds
From: Chad Smith <kingbird09 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 18:02:39 +0000
This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.


It's been a different kind of spring. Normally, I'm out looking for birds, 
photographing them, etc. This year has been the year of nests. I didn't go 
looking for them, just happened upon them. Of the four different species I've 
observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three. Here's briefly what I 
observed: 



1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a woody 
plant. When found, female on nest. Later observed three eggs (1 crushed 
Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs). Next visit, nest empty, apparently 
raided by snake or some other predator. 



2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree. When 
found, bird on nest. Later observed 4 four blue eggs. Next visit, 1 big cowbird 
chick, 1 blue egg remaining. While there, I saw a Blue Jay come along, snatch 
the cowbird chick, and fly away. 



3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet up on 
the side of a tree. Don't know what was in there. Hopefully, it'll be more 
successful than the others. 



4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once. Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2 
cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought back). 



The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for nesting 
birds. To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of migrating here, 
building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all to raise another 
parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear this is not ripped off 
from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the birds being used while 
their own kind is slowly snuffed out. Every nest I've seen up close this year 
has been parasitized or raided. The success rate for raising chicks to adults 
must be low for many species of birds. The woods are thick with cowbirds. I 
hear them all the time, and it's become an irritating mental image of bums 
looking to dump eggs in another bird's nest. Regarding jays, crows, or any 
other birds that eat young from another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so 
much because it's nature's way. Even snakes have to do what they are programmed 
to do. I guess my hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective. I can't stand to 
see that this problem is so rampant now. It's a wonder there's anything left 
besides cowbirds! Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the 
cowbird, too. 


Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already aware. 
Nesting birds should be left alone. It's possible that by looking at these 
nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible on the 
Ovenbird nest). Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just happened to 
find them by chance. I wanted to observe a little because I'd never done that 
before. Everything pointed toward this being meant to happen this year. I 
learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to be successful in nesting. 
In the future, I will avoid nests completely, even after I've walked right into 
one. 


Chad Smith
Manchester, TN
Subject: Mourning Warbler, Forest Hills Nashville
From: Marty DeHart <martydehart6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 09:03:34 -0500
Singing at 9 AM on a brushy wooded hillside south of Radnor.
Subject: Knox County Flycatchers
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 14:51:17 +0000
Last Friday at Seven Islands State Birding Park I saw a Yellow-bellied 
Flycatcher in the woods near the river. Later on there was a Willow Flycatcher, 
singing, out in the open, also along the river (maybe this one will stay?). And 
this morning at Forks of the River WMA there was a singing Alder Flycatcher 
near mile marker 2.75 of the greenway. The Yellow-bellied and Alder are 
considered very uncommon for Knox County. 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: Black Tern
From: "George's McNeil" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mcneilg20" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 08:53:54 -0500
Had an adult Black Tern flying around the TE Maxson Lagoon Pits yesterday late 
afternoon. 


Georges McNeil
Shelby County

Sent from Georges McNeil's iPhone 6s.
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Subject: Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers at the DRU
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:37:00 -0500
5-22-15
There were 7 Black-bellied and 156 Semipalmated Plovers in pool 2 this
afternoon. (Duck River Unit, TNWR, Humphreys County)
Also 4 Dunlin, 30 White-rumped and 117 Semipalmated Sandpipers.
That is a high count of Semipalmated Plovers for me, I believe. They were
seen by walking out towards pool 2 several hundred feet from the
headquarters.
  The pool level is lower than it's been all year, and had 10 shorebird
species, in spite of being rather late in the season.
Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Hamblen Co. Birds
From: "Kirk Huffstater" <kirkh_cg AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:42:29 -0400
This morning, my son and I went over to the previously mentioned location on 
the southeast shore of Cherokee Lake and easily found the adult, male 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, which put on quite a show with its spontaneous, 
aerial acrobatics, harassment of an American Crow in the area, and close 
approaches/perching for photos. There were also many other species in the area, 
so it was an overall fruitful effort. 


This evening, between 7:50pm and 8:00pm, I had some great visitors bathing in 
my stream outside the kitchen window. Although most all of the migrant warblers 
have moved through as of this late date, a female Kentucky Warbler and 
beautiful male Canada Warbler both took baths this evening, which hopefully 
means they’re breeding in the woods behind the house. There was also a 
Swainson’s Thrush bathing in the stream, which also seems a bit late to me, 
but I’m sure it will not be breeding anywhere close to here. 


Good Birding,

Kirk Huffstater

Morristown, TN

303-345-5020



Subject: Northeast Tennessee Bike Big Day, 29 April 2016
From: David Kirschke <dlkirschke AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:01:20 -0400
Some may have seen Scott Somershoe's Facebook posts about his bike big day
yesterday in Colorado.  Scott and I had been talking about doing a big day
by bicycle for a few years before either of us actually tried one.  After I
moved back to Northeast Tennessee, Scott did one in he Nashville area and
was able to check off 106 species.  Since then I have been thinking about a
good route for both birds and biking in this area.  In mid April Tom McNeil
and I scouted a route that would start at Carver's Gap before dawn and end
up in Elizabethton or Johnson City, however far I made it before dark.  On
April 29th I started out at 0500 at Carver's Gap, rode over to Hampton
Creek Cove, then over Pond Mountain to Watauga Lake.  After the lake I was
headed towards Watauga Dam but got a flat on Siam Rd.  I was running late
so I headed to Elizabethton to finish out the day.  Before the flat I was
on track to break 100 species, but in the end finished with only 92
species.  I never really threatened Scott's mark, but it was fun combining
biking with birding.  More details here (http://tenbirdsblog.blogspot.com/)
if anyone is interested.  I am trying to figure out a better route for next
year - less cars and dogs, more birds, and no flats.  Anyone want to come
along?  : )

Thanks to Tom McNeil for all the help.

David Kirschke
Johnson City, TN
http://tenbirdsblog.blogspot.com/
Subject: OSFL - Bell's Bend
From: Graham <grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 19:33:46 +0000
Nashville, Davidson County
Bell's Bend Park
5-22-16

There was an Olive-Sided Flycatcher at Bell's Bend this morning, hunting
from a tall dead snag, along with typical late Spring activity.

Graham Gerdeman
Nashville
Subject: Mourning at Westhaven
From: Chris Sloan <csloan1973 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 12:23:35 -0500
One singing just now at the 11th tee.

Chris Sloan
Nashville, TN
www.chrissloanphotography.com