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Updated on Wednesday, October 1 at 03:26 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Tri-colored Heron,©Shawneen Finnegan

1 Oct Greenway Farms banding ["Aborn, David" ]
1 Oct NTOS Radnor Wednesday Walk Results 10-01-14 [Kevin Bowden ]
1 Oct Rankin & Ten Islands [michael sledjeski ]
1 Oct Great Horned Owlets [Lynne Davis ]
1 Oct Great Horned Owl [Bill Holt ]
30 Sep Seven Islands Continues to Bird Well ["Morton Massey" ]
30 Sep Kentucky Lake birds - 30 Sept 14 [Scott Somershoe ]
30 Sep Re: 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake [Melinda Welton ]
29 Sep Re: 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake [Jonathan Gendzier ]
29 Sep October Events - Memphis Chapter TOS [Judy Dorsey ]
29 Sep KTOS Meeting Wednesday Oct. 1 [Billie Cantwell ]
29 Sep Update to report on Knoxville area migrants on Sunday: ["Welsh, Christopher J E" ]
29 Sep Knoxville area migrants on Sunday: Philadelphia Vireo, Lincoln's Sparrow, Red-headed Woodpecker ["Welsh, Christopher J E" ]
29 Sep Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers [Chris Sloan ]
29 Sep Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers [Michael Todd ]
29 Sep Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers [David B Coe ]
29 Sep Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers [michael sledjeski ]
29 Sep Soddy Mtn Hawk Watch week 3 summary []
28 Sep Elizabethton Fall Bird Count ["Richard Knight" ]
28 Sep Very Busy Yard!!! Morristown, Hamblen Co. ["Kirk Huffstater" ]
28 Sep Perry County Fall Bird Count [birdchaserrws ]
28 Sep Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers [michael sledjeski ]
28 Sep Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Harpeth River Greenway ["fekel" ]
28 Sep Bobolink [Chris Sloan ]
27 Sep Fall count [Terry Witt ]
27 Sep Ensley Bottoms 9/27/14 10:30 am - 12:00 noon [Virginia Reynolds ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Lyda Phillips ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN ["John Obarr" ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Scott Somershoe ]
26 Sep Early Morning Banding ["Tommie Rogers" ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Lyda Phillips ]
26 Sep Red-headed Woodpeckers ["David Patterson" ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Scott Somershoe ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Scott Somershoe ]
26 Sep Shady Valley birds ["Richard Knight" ]
26 Sep Slower at Greenway Farms ["Aborn, David" ]
26 Sep Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Scott Somershoe ]
26 Sep Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN [Billie Cantwell ]
26 Sep Radnor Lake: male Black-throated Blue Warbler ["fekel" ]
26 Sep Brainerd Levee 9/26 [Hugh Barger ]
25 Sep 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake [Melinda Welton ]
25 Sep Red-headed Woodpeckers in Sevier County []
24 Sep NTOS Radnor Walk ["Steve Routledge" ]
25 Sep Elizabethton Walkway - Blackpoll Warbler [Darrel Wilder ]
25 Sep Greenway visits ["Aborn, David" ]
25 Sep recent backyard birds - Knox []
25 Sep Surprised ["J.N. & Ella Howard" ]
25 Sep KTOS Newsletter and Meeting [Billie Cantwell ]
24 Sep Arizona trip photos ["" ]
24 Sep NTOS Wednesday Radnor walk ["Steve Routledge" ]
24 Sep Andy Jones of BBC -- Secretary of AOU ! ["Wallace Coffey" ]
24 Sep Still going strong ["Aborn, David" ]
24 Sep Re: Whigg Meadow Update? [Scott Somershoe ]
24 Sep Whigg Meadow Update? [Bates Estabrooks ]
24 Sep early birds -- White-crowned Sparrow and American Pipit ["fekel" ]
24 Sep Peregrine Falcon [Chandler Hendrick ]
23 Sep Re: TN-Bird] Take 2 :Hawk ID Question ["Kristy L. Baker" ]
24 Sep Soddy Mtn Hawk Watch (9-22,23) []
23 Sep Wood Ducks [Lynne Davis ]
24 Sep Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question []
23 Sep Raptor and Passerine Migrants - Murfreesboro ["Chloe Walker" ]
23 Sep Cove Lake SP - Philadelphia Vireo, Great Egrets [Carole Gobert ]
23 Sep Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question ["Chloe Walker" ]
23 Sep Discovery Wetlands:Murfreesboro, TN ["" ]
23 Sep Nashville Warbler: Pittman Center []
23 Sep Great Morning at Seven Islands ["Morton Massey" ]
23 Sep Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question [Bill Pulliam ]
23 Sep Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question ["Ford, Robert" ]
23 Sep Black-throated Blue at Radnor Lake, Davidson Co. [Jan Shaw ]
23 Sep Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question [Chris Sloan ]
23 Sep Take 2 :Hawk ID Question [Kristy L Baker ]
23 Sep An honor for shorebirds everywhere [Gaynell Perry ]
23 Sep Thrushes ["Tom Howe" ]
22 Sep South Africa photos [van harris ]
22 Sep Hawk ID Question ["Kristy L. Baker" ]
23 Sep GWWA in Sevier County and other Warblers and Thrushes: Finally []

Subject: Greenway Farms banding
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 19:57:47 +0000
1 October 2014
Hamilton County, TN

Banding is still relatively slow, at least compared to the last couple of 
weeks: 5 Wood Thrushes, 4 Swainson's Thrushes, 4 Magnolia warblers, 3 
Gray-cheeked Thrushes, and 1 each of American Redstart, House Wren, Hooded 
Warbler, Gray Catbird, and Indigo Bunting (FOS). There is a strong cold front 
coming through on Friday, so next week could bring more birds. 


David Aborn
Chattanooga, TN
Subject: NTOS Radnor Wednesday Walk Results 10-01-14
From: Kevin Bowden <bnabirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 12:59:21 -0500
Radnor Lake State Natural Area

Nashville-Davidson County, TN

21 birders enjoyed the fourth Radnor Walk of Fall 2014 on a beautiful day.
Highlights of the 35 species seen and heard were male Black-throated Blue
Warbler and Solitary Sandpiper. Magnolia Warbler continued to be the most
numerous Warbler species.

Leader: Danny Shelton

Complete species list:

Wood Duck 8

Wild Turkey 13

Pied-billed Grebe 1

Great Blue Heron 2

Black Vulture 5

Solitary Sandpiper 1

Chimney Swift 50+

Red-bellied Woodpecker 6

Downy Woodpecker 6

Hairy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 2

Pileated Woodpecker 1

Eastern Phoebe 2

White-eyed Vireo 1

Philadelphia Vireo 1

Blue Jay 5

American Crow 4

Carolina Chickadee 8

Tufted Titmouse 7

White-breasted Nuthatch 2

Carolina Wren 5

Eastern Bluebird 1

American Robin 3

Cedar Waxwing 40+

Black and White Warber 2

Tennessee Warber 2

Common Yellowthroat 1

Northern Parula 1

Magnolia Warbler 14+

Bay-breasted Warbler 1

Black-throated Blue Warbler 1

Palm Warbler 1

Black-throated Green Warbler 1

Northern Cardinal 10+

Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1



Kevin Bowden

Nashville, TN
Subject: Rankin & Ten Islands
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 10:50:02 -0400
Douglas Lake, Cocke county, 9/30/14, 6pm-8pm, by canoe from Leadvale boat ramp
Lake elevation: 975.8 ft. (Rankin Bottoms nearly drained; mudflats, broad 
shallows, plus wide open water at Ten Islands) 


Rankin Bottoms:
Great Egret - 70
Black-crowned Night-heron - 29
Peregrine Falcon - 1
Black-Bellied Plover

Ten Islands:
Canada Goose - 195
Green-winged Teal - 2 (FOS)
Double-crested Cormorant - 680
Great Egret - 120
Semipalmated Plover - 3
Sanderling - 3
Least Sandpiper - 28
White-rumped Sandpiper - 1
Baird's Sandpiper - 1
Tree Swallow - 2000+

Michael Sledjeski & Leslie Gibbens
Del Rio TN

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Great Horned Owlets
From: Lynne Davis <lynnedavis865 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 10:56:01 -0400
We have had young Great Horned Owls calling in our back woods almost every
night since September 18. They were especially loud last night, September
30. The sound is almost like a cat's distress call, like, "Yeow!" We had
never heard this before this year. Lyn Bales of Ijams Nature Center helped
with the ID.
Bob and Lynne Davis
Seymour, Sevier County
Subject: Great Horned Owl
From: Bill Holt <wjholtjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 08:14:32 -0400
There was a great horned owl calling across from my new office last night.
The office is at 2835 Northpoint Blvd, which on the end of Northpoint near
Hamill (gps will likely take you to Lowes  AT  Hwy 153). There is a wooded lot
across the street from the office and I think the owl was on that side of
the road. Heard but not seen and didn't have time to try and pinpoint the
exact location. There are also trees on the office side but I believe it
was across the street.

Bill
-- 
---------------------------
Bill Holt
Chattanooga, TN
Hamilton County
Subject: Seven Islands Continues to Bird Well
From: "Morton Massey" <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:58:09 -0400
This past Sunday, 9/28/14, Beth Schilling reported 58 species at Seven
Islands State Birding Park (Knox County).  This was fall bird count day and
I know Dean Edwards and others were  birding the park as well.  It was
clearly the best day of fall migration with some amazing numbers of some
warblers.

 

Tennessee Warblers - 49

Cape May - 9

Magnolias - 30

 

The same day about 20 of us participated in the last scheduled banding day
led by Mark Armstrong.  I think the final count was 85 birds captured of
which 5 had previously been banded.  Lots of Tennessee Warblers, Indigo
Buntings, Field Sparrows and Cardinals.  It was a really fun day and it was
very active from start to end.

 

Today, 9/30/14 I birded the park for most of the day and ended with 59
species. The number of warblers were down both in number and species but it
was still a productive day.   Some of the highlights were 3 Common
Nighthawks, 2 Great Horned Owls singing midday, a Black-crowned Night Heron
along the river, 9 warblers and a lone Chipping Sparrow.

 

Morton Massey

Knoxville, TN
Subject: Kentucky Lake birds - 30 Sept 14
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:23:31 -0500
I did the trip from Pace Point around to Paris Landing SP today. Highlights
below.

Bennett's Creek overlook, Big Sandy Unit TN NWR (Henry Co).
In the field below the overlook (most birds were in the grown up ditch on
the north side):
30+ indigo bunting
2 Swamp Sparrow
1 (prob. 2) Lincoln's Sparrow
1 Sedge Wren
1 Least Flycatcher and a second bird that I think is a Least as well (will
download photos later)
5 Bobolink in very dry the grassy field

Pace Point - (same loc. as above)
Ring-billed Gulls, 2 Am. White Pelicans, and not much else

Lakeview Manor Rd Bottoms - Henry Co.
2000+ Am White Pelicans loafing near mouth of the bay

Britton Ford Unit - TN TNWR (Henry Co)
Not much other than 4 Bobolink in the grassy patch (that probably has a
name) on the main road where we find lots of sparrows every winter.  It's
the only grassy/grown up field of reasonably decent habitat out here every
year and this is that ~2 acre patch.

Eagle Creek Bay - Henry Co.
12 Snowy Egret
3 Little Blue Herons
47 Forster's Terns
12 Pectoral Sandpipers
1 Stilt Sandpiper
Yellow-rumped Warbler (my first for the fall and the only time I'll ever
post about seeing a yellow-rumped!).

Paris Landing SP- Henry Co., birds on the island:
notables include:
79 Herring Gulls (nearly all adults, only 1 juv bird)
4 Lesser Black-backed Gulls (three 3rd winter birds, one in 2nd winter
plumage)

Cheers,
Scott Somershoe
Subject: Re: 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake
From: Melinda Welton <weltonmj AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:15:53 -0500
Jonathan
Thank you for your post. I expected that chimney was an active roost because
on my way to the Overton High School on the 25th I saw a few birds flying
low over the chimney at sunset.

What time were you there? Sunset last night was at 6:33pm. Most all of the
birds would have entered the chimney between 6:50 and 7:10, with the
majority dropping in during the last 5 minutes.

Interestingly, last night I checked a couple of roosts on West End Avenue.
First I went to the Royal Oaks Apartments which has an excellent looking
chimney. There were only a few birds flying around at 6:40 and only 3
individuals went into the chimney before 7pm, the others disappeared.
Usually, the numbers of birds would have continued to grow. So, I quickly
drove down to two other known roost sites at the West End Middle School and
the Wellington Arms Apartments. I was there before 7:10 and there were no
swifts to be seen.

Could the birds at those roosts have migrated in the last couple of days?
There is so much we don't know about these birds.

Jonathan, if you can go back to the Colonial Bread Co. during that window
between 6:50 and 7:10, I'd love to know how many birds are there. The best
way to count swifts is as they enter the chimney. I usually start counting
by groups of 5 and then switch to 10s as the birds pour in. If the roost is
huge, I count by groups of 25 birds.

Melinda Welton
Franklin, TN


> From: Jonathan Gendzier 
> Reply-To: 
> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:56:38 -0500
> To: Melinda Welton 
> Cc: tnbird 
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake
> 
> Tonight, just before dark, I watched large numbers of swifts - in the 
hundreds 

> - circling over 8th Avenue South where it intersects with Craighead. Many 
flew 

> down at the chimney of the Colonial Bread Co., but I did not see a single
> swift enter the chimney. Large groups of swifts were also heading off to the
> west and south (the direction of the high school).
> 
> Jonathan Gendzier
> Nashville 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:56 PM, Melinda Welton  wrote:
>> 
>> I may have found the source of the >50 Chimney Swifts seen skimming the
>> surface of Radnor Lake State Natural Area each morning for the last while.
>> John Overton High School on Franklin Road, east of Radnor, has a tall
>> chimney, >100', where 1,480 Chimney Swifts went to roost tonight night.
>> 
>> Sunset was at 6:38 Central Time. When I arrived at the school at 6:40 there
>> were just a few swifts in view but they were flying low and occasionally
>> over the chimney. The numbers continuously grew and the first swift went
>> into the chimney at 6:55. The numbers continued to swell until there was a
>> chittering vortex that funneled into the chimney like reverse smoke. The
>> show was over by 7:15.
>> 
>> Melinda Welton
>> Franklin, TN
>> 
>> 
>> =================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================
>> 
>> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
>> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
>> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
>> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
>> appear in the first paragraph.
>> _____________________________________________________________
>>      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>>                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
>> _____________________________________________________________
>>                To unsubscribe, send email to:
>>                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>>            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
>> ______________________________________________________________
>>  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>>       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>>        endorse the views or opinions expressed
>>        by the members of this discussion group.
>> 
>>         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>>                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>>                ------------------------------
>>                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>>                         Cleveland, OH
>>                -------------------------------
>>               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>>                          Rosedale, VA
>>               --------------------------------
>>               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>>                        Clemson, SC
>> __________________________________________________________
>> 
>>          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>>              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
>> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
>> 
>>                          ARCHIVES
>> TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/
>> 
>>                       MAP RESOURCES
>> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
>> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
>> 
>> _____________________________________________________________
>> 
>> 
> =================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
>       To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>                     tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________
>                 To unsubscribe, send email to:
>                  tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>             with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
> ______________________________________________________________
>   TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>        Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>         endorse the views or opinions expressed
>         by the members of this discussion group.
> 
>          Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                  wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>                 ------------------------------
>                 Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                          Cleveland, OH
>                 -------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                           Rosedale, VA
>                --------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                         Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
> 
>           Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>               web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
> 
>                           ARCHIVES
>  TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/
> 
>                        MAP RESOURCES
> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
> 
> _____________________________________________________________
> 
> 


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake
From: Jonathan Gendzier <jonathan.m.gendzier AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:56:38 -0500
Tonight, just before dark, I watched large numbers of swifts - in the hundreds 
- circling over 8th Avenue South where it intersects with Craighead. Many flew 
down at the chimney of the Colonial Bread Co., but I did not see a single swift 
enter the chimney. Large groups of swifts were also heading off to the west and 
south (the direction of the high school). 


Jonathan Gendzier
Nashville 



> On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:56 PM, Melinda Welton  wrote:
> 
> I may have found the source of the >50 Chimney Swifts seen skimming the
> surface of Radnor Lake State Natural Area each morning for the last while.
> John Overton High School on Franklin Road, east of Radnor, has a tall
> chimney, >100', where 1,480 Chimney Swifts went to roost tonight night.
> 
> Sunset was at 6:38 Central Time. When I arrived at the school at 6:40 there
> were just a few swifts in view but they were flying low and occasionally
> over the chimney. The numbers continuously grew and the first swift went
> into the chimney at 6:55. The numbers continued to swell until there was a
> chittering vortex that funneled into the chimney like reverse smoke. The
> show was over by 7:15.
> 
> Melinda Welton
> Franklin, TN
> 
> 
> =================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================
> 
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
>      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________ 
>                To unsubscribe, send email to:
>                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
>            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
> ______________________________________________________________
>  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
>       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>        endorse the views or opinions expressed
>        by the members of this discussion group.
> 
>         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>                ------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                         Cleveland, OH
>                -------------------------------
>               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                          Rosedale, VA
>               --------------------------------
>               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                        Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
> 
>          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
> 
>                          ARCHIVES
> TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/
> 
>                       MAP RESOURCES
> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
> 
> _____________________________________________________________
> 
> 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: October Events - Memphis Chapter TOS
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:01:16 -0500
Birding events hosted by the Memphis TOS chapter this month:

This Wed., Oct. 1
 - Field trip to Shelby Farms Greenline near the Wolf River with Van Harris
and Dick Preston. Meet at the Podesta Street entrance at Podesta & Boswell
at 7:30 a.m. Park on Boswell.
More info: http://is.gd/nxpXGV
Directions: http://mapq.st/1bUYyXq

This Sat., Oct. 4 - Field trip to W.C. Johnson Park boardwalk in
Collierville, TN. Meet at the parking lot by the boardwalk at 7:30 a.m. Jay
Walko is our guide.
More info: http://is.gd/atzQTo
Directions: http://goo.gl/maps/p7QlT

Wed., Oct. 8 - Field trip to Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park led by Dick
Preston. Meet at the park visitor center at 7:30 a.m.
More info: http://is.gd/Vba1wL
Directions: http://mapq.st/198HA3t

Wed., Oct. 15 - Chapter meeting at 7 p.m., St. George's Episcopal Church,
2425 S. Germantown Rd., Germantown, TN. Bill Reeves, TWRA Chief of
Biodiversity, will speak on Wildlife Viewing in Tennnessee: Programs,
Funding & Opportunities. Light refreshments served.
More info: http://applcc.org/Members/reeves-bill
Directions: http://mapq.st/1dEWrZk

Sun., Oct. 19 - Field Trip to Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge in
Turrell, AR. Meet at the refuge visitor center at 8:00 a.m. Birding from
car with some easy walking. Restroom facilities closed. Bring lunch if you
wish. Van Harris is our leader.
More info: http://is.gd/8oxq2B
Directions: http://binged.it/1bki2SE

Please visit us on the Web at http://birdmemphis.org

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: KTOS Meeting Wednesday Oct. 1
From: Billie Cantwell <bfcantwell AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:38:44 -0400
*The Ninety-Year History of KTOS *
Please join us on Wednesday, October 1 for the presentation:
"The Ninety-Year History of KTOS" by Vickie Henderson. In
honor of our club's 90th anniversary, Vickie delved into the club's
archives of early 20th century correspondence, newsletters, and
photographs as well as TOS materials in Nashville. She
compiled a PowerPoint presentation of the interesting information she
identified.
Learn about our early club members,their talents, and the legacy they left
behind.

Vickie is a member of KTOS, an artist, writer and naturalist.   In
2011, she wrote and illustrated "Discover Birds Activity
Book" published by the Tennessee Ornithological Society.   With
more than four thousand copies distributed to students around
the state, the book is designed to inspire the students' curiosity
and creativity while presenting facts about birds.

The meeting will be held in Room 118 of the University of
Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  6:45 PM.  For directions,
please visit the meetings page of on the KTOS website
at:  www.tnbirds.org/chapters/knoxvill/KTOS_Meetings.html.  
Subject: Update to report on Knoxville area migrants on Sunday:
From: "Welsh, Christopher J E" <cwelsh AT utk.edu>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 21:03:45 +0000
All,

I should have pointed out in my post that the Craig Cove "island" is on private 
land and not open to the general public. 


My apologies for not including that in the original post. I should have been 
more careful. 


Chris Welsh
Knoxville, TN

-----Original Message-----
From: Welsh, Christopher J E 
Sent: Monday, September 29, 2014 1:39 PM
To: 'tn-bird AT freelists.org'
Subject: Knoxville area migrants on Sunday: Philadelphia Vireo, Lincoln's 
Sparrow, Red-headed Woodpecker 


There seemed to be a big push of migrants around Knoxville on Sunday September 
28th. I was out for the Knox County fall count and saw a good variety of birds 
most places. 

Highlights: Wilson's Warbler at Sequoyah Park; Philadelphia Vireo (2) and 
Lincoln's Sparrow off Lyons Bend; and Red-headed Woodpecker at Johnson 
University. 


....

I spent almost 3 hrs on the Craig Cove "island" and ....

....

Chris Welsh
Knoxville chapter TOS
Knoxville, TN
Knox County


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Knoxville area migrants on Sunday: Philadelphia Vireo, Lincoln's Sparrow, Red-headed Woodpecker
From: "Welsh, Christopher J E" <cwelsh AT utk.edu>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 17:39:18 +0000
There seemed to be a big push of migrants around Knoxville on Sunday September 
28th. I was out for the Knox County fall count and saw a good variety of birds 
most places. 

Highlights: Wilson's Warbler at Sequoyah Park; Philadelphia Vireo (2) and 
Lincoln's Sparrow off Lyons Bend; and Red-headed Woodpecker at Johnson 
University. 


Started out walking the dogs at Sequoyah Park and had a flock of 60 or more 
Chimney Swifts buzzing over the water. Ran into one warbler flock that included 
3 Tennessee Warblers, a Redstart, 2 Magnolia Warblers, 3 Palm Warblers, and a 
Wilson's Warbler. 


Later at home I got good looks at a Philadelphia Vireo along with another 
Redstart, a Magnolia, and a Blackburnian Warbler, plus a Rose-breasted Grosbeak 
and a Swainson's Thrush. 


I spent almost 3 hrs on the Craig Cove "island" and was virtually never out of 
sight of a Magnolia Warbler. I tried hard not to double-count and ended up with 
14. Really, if I was ever out of sight of one, all I had to do was wait a few 
minutes and one would pop up. Also had another Philadelphia Vireo, 2 Tennessee 
Warblers, 2 Redstarts, Common Yellowthroat, Blackburnian, and Chestnut-sided 
Warblers. Seemed like constant activity thanks to all the Magnolias. There were 
5 Great Egrets in the cove. Highlight for me, along with the vireo, was finding 
a Lincoln's Sparrow. Took some time to get a good look at it, but worth the 
effort. The Lincoln's was about halfway to the river from the 2nd trail fork 
along the path (the left fork at that point that goes straight out through the 
old field, nearly-chest high goldenrod, brambles, and shrubs on both sides of 
the mowed path). 


Back at home at about 2:30 the bird bath was hopping. At one point there were 
two Tennessee Warblers and a Swainson's Thrush in the bath with a Magnolia 
Warbler, a Veery, and a Scarlet Tanager in the same binocular view waiting 
their turns. The Scarlet Tanager was a male that was almost completely molted 
out of scarlet with just a few hints of reddish left amongst the new greenish 
feathers on its back. I was wondering what would show up next when my dogs, 
thinking I was looking at a squirrel, dashed out of the house and scared 
everything off. 


Later I was out at Johnson University and saw an adult Red-headed Woodpecker 
fly into the tree line just west of the baseball field. Johnson University is 
not all that far as the crow (or woodpecker) flies from Seven Islands. 


This was one of the better fall warbler days I've had in Knox County.

Chris Welsh
Knoxville chapter TOS
Knoxville, TN
Knox County


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers
From: Chris Sloan <csloan1973 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:30:56 -0500
For what it's worth, I agree with Mike. Both look like Black-bellied to me
based on the photos. Particularly, the heavy bill base tapering to the tip
is a good structural clue.

Chris Sloan
Nashville, TN
On Sep 29, 2014 10:48 AM, "Michael Todd"  wrote:

> Friends,
>
> Photos, even pretty good ones, don't always accurately portray a bird. My
> impression, as Michael mentioned, was that both Plovers looked good for
> Black-bellied, just from the photos. If this bird was seen in flight or
> with a wing up, etc, and was clearly a Golden, I wouldn't be shocked. But,
> if I was sent those photos and someone just said what do you think.....I
> would think Black-bellied. The challenge of birding, got to love it! Birds
> can be so subjective from one observer to the next, structurally I think it
> is better for Black-bellied as well. I've found the extent of that dark
> smudge behind the eye to be pretty variable across the North American
> Pluvialis ( no experience with Eurasian Golden).
>
> Mike Todd
> McKenzie, Tn
>
>
>   On Monday, September 29, 2014 7:45 AM, michael sledjeski <
> mbsledjeski AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> Mike Todd emailed after my post yesterday.  He thinks the plover
> identified as American-Golden is a second Black-bellied, based on
> "indistinct cap, fairly short primaries, white bellies, very cold plumage
> tones".  Leslie and I called it a Golden based on finer head, neck and
> bill, plus the conspicuous smudge behind the eye.  The cap seemed darker in
> the flesh.
> I wanted to stay for better photos and watch for the black axillaries in
> flight, but we were already late for dinner with friends.
>
>
>
> Michael Sledjeski
> Del Rio TN
>
>
Subject: Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 08:47:55 -0700
Friends,

Photos, even pretty good ones, don't always accurately portray a bird. My 
impression, as Michael mentioned, was that both Plovers looked good for 
Black-bellied, just from the photos. If this bird was seen in flight or with a 
wing up, etc, and was clearly a Golden, I wouldn't be shocked. But, if I was 
sent those photos and someone just said what do you think.....I would think 
Black-bellied. The challenge of birding, got to love it! Birds can be so 
subjective from one observer to the next, structurally I think it is better for 
Black-bellied as well. I've found the extent of that dark smudge behind the eye 
to be pretty variable across the North American Pluvialis ( no experience with 
Eurasian Golden). 


Mike Todd
McKenzie, Tn



On Monday, September 29, 2014 7:45 AM, michael sledjeski 
 wrote: 

 


Mike Todd emailed after my post yesterday. He thinks the plover identified as 
American-Golden is a second Black-bellied, based on "indistinct cap, fairly 
short primaries, white bellies, very cold plumage tones". Leslie and I called 
it a Golden based on finer head, neck and bill, plus the conspicuous smudge 
behind the eye. The cap seemed darker in the flesh. 

I wanted to stay for better photos and watch for the black axillaries in 
flight, but we were already late for dinner with friends. 




Michael Sledjeski
Del Rio TN
Subject: Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers
From: David B Coe <davidbcoeauthor AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 10:37:36 -0500
Im going to weigh in and say that I agree with Mike Todd. In my opinion, this 
birds bill is too heavy for an American Golden Plover, and the belly is too 
white. I also agree the back color is too cool, but that could be a function of 
lighting and the quality of the image. The white on the belly, and especially 
the bill heft are more reliable. 


My $.02.
*****
David B. Coe
www.DavidBCoe.com
www.dbjackson-author.com

Now Available: 
THIEFTAKER, by D.B. Jackson
THIEVES' QUARRY, by D.B. Jackson
A PLUNDER OF SOULS, by D.B. Jackson





On Sep 29, 2014, at 7:43 AM, michael sledjeski  wrote:

> Mike Todd emailed after my post yesterday. He thinks the plover identified as 
American-Golden is a second Black-bellied, based on "indistinct cap, fairly 
short primaries, white bellies, very cold plumage tones". Leslie and I called 
it a Golden based on finer head, neck and bill, plus the conspicuous smudge 
behind the eye. The cap seemed darker in the flesh. 

> I wanted to stay for better photos and watch for the black axillaries in 
flight, but we were already late for dinner with friends. 

> 
> < AGPlover.jpeg>
> 
> Michael Sledjeski
> Del Rio TN
Subject: Re: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 08:43:03 -0400
Mike Todd emailed after my post yesterday. He thinks the plover identified as 
American-Golden is a second Black-bellied, based on "indistinct cap, fairly 
short primaries, white bellies, very cold plumage tones". Leslie and I called 
it a Golden based on finer head, neck and bill, plus the conspicuous smudge 
behind the eye. The cap seemed darker in the flesh. 

I wanted to stay for better photos and watch for the black axillaries in 
flight, but we were already late for dinner with friends. 



Michael Sledjeski
Del Rio TN
Subject: Soddy Mtn Hawk Watch week 3 summary
From: TenacBirder AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 01:10:15 +0000 (UTC)
Hawks seen this week include: 675 Broad-winged Hawks; 1 MISSISSIPPI KITE 
(juvenile); 

10 Sharp-shinned Hawks; 7 Cooper's Hawks; 5 Osprey; 1 Merlin; 1 American 
Kestrel; 

1 Northern Harrier; 3 Red-tailed Hawks; 3 Red-shouldered Hawks; and 3 Bald 
Eagles 

(1 adult/2 immature)for a total of 710 Raptors. 

Next week we will be on the lookout sporadically, you may want to call Jimmy at
423-305-2766 if you plan to visit. This past Saturday and Sunday were both 98% 
cloudy 

days. Monday 9/29 looks iffy due to predicted rain. If rain does close us down 
on 

Monday then I suspect Tuesday and/or Wednesday will be our last 2 good days of 
significant Broad-winged Hawk numbers. It's so late in September quite possible 
the 

big numbers have already passed us by this season. We can always be optimistic 
though, 

you just never know, it's kinda like Forest Gump's Momma's box of chocolates... 


Year-To-Date seen:
2846 Broad-winged Hawks
   1 Mississippi Kite
  24 Sharp-shinned Hawks
  16 Cooper's Hawks
   6 Osprey
   1 Merlin
   2 American Kestrel
   2 Peregrine Falcons
   2 Northern Harriers
   5 Red-tailed Hawks
   7 Red-shouldered Hawks
  15 Bald Eagles  (8 adult/7 immature)
   1 unidentified Buteo
------
2928 Total

also seen but not countable were 1 + 8= 9 Double Crested Cormorants
4+33+148+112= 297 migrating Monarch Butterflies

Keep Looking Up!
Jimmy & Cynthia Wilkerson
http://soddymountainhawkwatch.blogspot.com



=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
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                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Elizabethton Fall Bird Count
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:08:30 -0400
The 45th consecutive Elizabethton Fall Count was held on Sat., Sep. 27
with 32 observers in 8 parties covering Carter Co and parts of adjacent 
counties.

128 species were found, slightly above the average of 125 spp. over
the last 30 years. The all-time high on this count was 137 species in 1993. 

Included were 23 species of warblers, compared to an average of 22 warbler 
species for the last 20 years (range 16-27).

New to this count were Common Merganser, Red-necked Phalarope, and
Eastern Whip-poor-will, with 1 of each.  The Red-nk. Phalarope was the 7th
for the 5-county area of northeast Tenn.   

New high counts were tallied for Osprey (22) and Eastern Phoebe (76).

Notable sightings included:
Bald Eagle - 4
Am. Woodcock - 1
Caspian Tern - 6,  
N. Saw-whet Owl - 2   (found 8 of last 10 years)
Red-headed Woodpecker - 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 9
Merlin - 2
Peregrine Falcon - 1
Philadelphia Vireo - 4
Com. Raven - 28
Marsh Wren - 3
Gray-cheeked Thrush - 6
Hermit Thrush - 2
Orange-cr. Warbler - 1
Lincoln's Sparrow - 3
Summer Tanager - 1
Bobolink - 1

Thanks to all participants.

Rick Knight, compiler
Johnson City, TN
Subject: Very Busy Yard!!! Morristown, Hamblen Co.
From: "Kirk Huffstater" <kirkh_cg AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 18:42:46 -0400
I just got back in town after being gone for a couple weeks, and my yard has 
been HOPPING the past couple days, with lots of great birds! Here’s a summary 
of the best (at least for me), including 8 new yard birds, over the past couple 
days (sorry about the lack of sensible order within the list....too tired): 


Philadelphia Vireo (1)
Gray-cheeked Thrush (2)
Swainson’s Thrush (3)
Hooded Warbler (2)
Warbling Vireo (1)
Golden-winged Warbler (1)
Palm Warbler (2)
Pine Warbler (1)
Acadian Flycatcher (1)
Pileated Woodpecker (3)
American Redstart (5)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (1)
Gray Catbird (2)
Northern Parula (1)
Black-throated Green Warbler (2)
Magnolia Warbler (1)
Indigo Bunting (1)

Plus there’s a sparrow flock up my driveway I haven’t gotten to yet!

I’ve only been living in east TN for 8 months, but I’m loving it!!!

Cheers,
Kirk Huffstater

Morristown, TN

Subject: Perry County Fall Bird Count
From: birdchaserrws <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 15:43:32 -0500
Twelve people in 4 parties conducted the fourth annual Perry County Fall 
Migration Count yesterday, September 27th. 


The weather was okay, if not optimal, and we turned up a total of 125 species, 
including 29 Warblers, which is a high for this Count.  


Some of the worst misses were Canada Goose, Spotted Sandpiper, Kentucky Warbler 
and both Orioles. 


New for the count were:
Mallard 4 (Rare in Perry Co.)
A. White Pelican 15 (flyover)
Northern Harrier 1
Bobwhite 1
Least Flycatcher 2
Willow Flycatcher 1
Marsh Wren 1
Canada Warbler 1
Mourning Warbler 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1

A few early winter arrivals were:
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Savannah Sparrow 2
Swamp Sparrow 3

High counts were reported for the following species:
Eastern Screech-owl 8
Great Horned Owl 7
Eastern Whip-poor-Will 2
Philadelphia Vireo 7
Warbling Vireo 1
Veery 1
Gray-cheeked  Thrush 10
Swainson's Thrush 29
Gray Catbird 12
Tennessee Warbler 130
Magnolia Warbler 49
Bay-breasted Warbler 9
Ovenbird 3
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 570


Ruben Stoll
Centerville Tennessee. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless smartphone
Subject: Upper Douglas Lake - Plovers
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 11:18:54 -0400
Douglas Lake, Cocke county, 9/27/14, 4pm - 6pm. by canoe
Lake elev.: 977.3 ft  ( less mudflat at RB, more at TI)

The Rankin floodplain tapers down to the Leadvale railroad bridge, and another 
begins west of the bridge and continues south through the Ten islands region. 
At least, that's the arbitrary boundary we use. As the lake recedes from the 
current elevation, there will be broader habitat and more waterbirds in the Ten 
Islands. The area has been difficult to nearly impossible to view from shore; 
the newly expanded WMA will allow birding access to the Ten Islands shoreline 
from Brown Hollow Rd. 

The juvenile Black-bellied and American Golden Plovers were side-by-side for a 
moment, but the autofocus did not cooperate. 

 
Ten Islands:
Double-crested Cormorant -  160
Great Egret - 110
Blad Eagle - 1 juv.
Osprey - 1
Killdeer - 105
Least Sandpiper - 22
Pectoral Sandpiper - 24

Rankin Bottoms:
Double-cr. Cormorant - 300+
Great Egret - 65
Black-bellied Plover - (photo)
Am. Golden-Plover - 1 (photo)
Killdeer - 60
Lsr. Yellowlegs - 6
Pectoral Sandpiper - 14
Baird's Sandpiper - 1 (last fuzzy photo)
Stilt Sandpiper - 1

Am. Golden & Black-bellied Plovers 

Am. Golden Plover: 
  

Baird's Sandpiper:
 

Michael Sledjeski & Leslie Gibbens
Del Rio TN 
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Harpeth River Greenway
From: "fekel" <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 09:30:30 -0500
Harpeth River Greenway
Morton Mill Road,
Davidson Co., Bellevue, TN
2014 Sep. 28


Sunday morning I walked the Harpeth River Greenway under very
heavy overcast skies. Just past the HRMM 1 mile post I checked
out a couple birds that flew into the top of a tree. In addition
to a robin there was a second bird that made me click through it
characteristics to be sure it was not one of the numerous mockingbirds
in the area. But indeed, with its whitish head, pale pinkish orange
sides and lower breast plus very long thin forked tail, it was a 
SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER. I watched it for about 10 minutes as it
perched most of the time on a bare snag. I left to walk to the far
end of my walk and when I returned about 10-15 minutes later I could
not refind it.

Frank Fekel
Bellevue, TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
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_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
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______________________________________________________________
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       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Bobolink
From: Chris Sloan <csloan1973 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 09:14:59 -0500
Just flushed one with a flock of Red-winged Blackbirds from behind the
third tee at Westhaven Golf Course in Franklin.

Chris Sloan
Nashville, TN
Subject: Fall count
From: Terry Witt <terrywitt AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 15:54:20 -0700
Slow day here

Murfreesboro area count  total was 67 species
Migrants were few and far between
Best were a calling Greater Yellowlegs circling Gateway Pond, one adult 
Scissortail Flycatcher, and a scruffy Baltimore Oriole. 

(Not sure why my computer went to bold font)????

Thanks to my compadres - Scott Somershoe, Chad Smith, and Steve Zipperer.

Cheers

Terry Witt
Murfreesboro Tn
Subject: Ensley Bottoms 9/27/14 10:30 am - 12:00 noon
From: Virginia Reynolds <vbreynolds AT att.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 12:23:03 -0700
Changes in water level have altered the areas in which shore birds can be 
found. Poor photo of plovers available. 


Black-bellied Whistling Ducks 30+ (not including 15+ immatures) 

Greater-White-fronted Geese                             1
Wood Duck                                                      12
Mallard                                                               3
Northern Shoveler                                          106
Canvasback                                                       1
Great Blue Heron                                               4
Great Egret                                                        5
American Golden-Plover                                   2
Killdeer                                                             68+
Solitary Sandpiper                                              1
Greater Yellowlegs 24 (Seen in "Finger Pond" flock) 

Lesser Yellowlegs                                             29
Least Sandpiper                                             567+
peeps 400+ (Seen at TVA Pond, mostly Least Sandpipers) 

Pectoral Sandpiper                                           30
Mourning Dove                                                 15
Red-bellied Woodpecker                                   1 
Northern Mockingbird                                        2
European Starling                                               x
Eastern Meadowlark                                           1

Virginia Reynolds
Memphis, Shelby County
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Lyda Phillips <lydap AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 18:49:33 -0500
Fascinating, sad but you're right, has some really positive aspects. 

Lyda Phillips
(301) 518-7538 (cell)
www.lydaphillips.com
writerworking.blogspot.com/


Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 16:07:48 -0500
Subject: Re: [TN-Bird] Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: ssomershoe AT gmail.com
To: lydap AT hotmail.com
CC: bfcantwell AT gmail.com; tn-bird AT freelists.org

Lyda and all,The bird was probably not killed by being mowed over (maybe 
though). It likely died last Friday (last date of data transmission) and the 
mowing probably occurred this week. However there is certainly a chance it 
could have been ill and was dying in the tall weeds and then got mowed over 
last Friday, which could have killed the transmitter too. Either way, if it was 
on the ground in the weeds, it wouldn't have survived anyway unfortunately. The 
carcass was pretty far gone and mowed over, so not much to work with in terms 
of determining cause of death. 

I just spoke with the person that put the transmitter on the Osprey in MI. The 
bird had been acting odd for several days and they were concerned about it. 
Maybe she had chronic issues or was sick and starving, etc. Don't know. On the 
bright side, it's pretty uncommon to recover a bird/carcass like that, esp. 
after a week on the ground, so they were thrilled (and sad) to know the 
outcome. Actually getting a known outcome on something like this doesn't happen 
often. 

I'll send them the remains of the transmitter when I get it and they may be 
able to salvage some parts. It a shame to meet a follow researcher this way, 
but she was very appreciative of everyone's efforts down here and the quick 
response. We also discussed Osprey nesting and population recovery in MI 
(interesting issues they have) and our Golden eagles and tracking birds. She 
was thrilled to know a couple of our birds went through MI. 

Scott Somershoe


On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 3:26 PM, Lyda Phillips  wrote:



Is that how the bird died, getting mowed over? If not, any info on cause of 
death. 


Lyda Phillips
(301) 518-7538 (cell)
www.lydaphillips.com
writerworking.blogspot.com/


Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:56:58 -0500
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: ssomershoe AT gmail.com
To: bfcantwell AT gmail.com
CC: KnoxvilleTOS AT yahoogroups.com; tn-bird AT freelists.org

Somehow I sent that email without hitting a button. Anyway, Merikay Waldvogel 
found the bird and met with our Wildlife Officer Wayne Rich on site. They 
salvaged the transmitter, which is probably toast, but maybe parts can be used. 
Thanks all! 


Cheers,Scott Somershoe
On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell  wrote:
Can you help find this Osprey?Billie Cantwell Knoxville, TN

Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate Rachel, 
one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite transmitter. Her last 
recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: Lat/Lng: 36.13717 / 
-83.60917. The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final fix as being NE of 
Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little Jump Rapids. Although we 
don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have experienced a catastrophic 
event and is possibly lying somewhere on the ground near the river and in the 
general vicinity of those final coordinates . We are asking for your assistance 
in finding her and retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so 
eager to help us. 







Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving MichiganOsprey, MDNR, 
Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo, and USDA Wildlife Division. 
Attached are some photos including her last location and one of the birds 
wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide you to her. 






On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to search for 
Rachel. 






Sincerely,





Barb Jensen

Michigan Osprey

248-895-2681

www.michiganosprey.org 









 



 		 	   		  

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: "John Obarr" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "jonhop11@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:39:16 -0700
such a sad end to a beautiful bird. 


On Friday, September 26, 2014 4:26 PM, Lyda Phillips  wrote:
  


Is that how the bird died, getting mowed over? If not, any info on cause of 
death. 


Lyda Phillips
(301) 518-7538 (cell)
www.lydaphillips.com
writerworking.blogspot.com/




________________________________
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:56:58 -0500
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: ssomershoe AT gmail.com
To: bfcantwell AT gmail.com
CC: KnoxvilleTOS AT yahoogroups.com; tn-bird AT freelists.org


Somehow I sent that email without hitting a button. Anyway, Merikay Waldvogel 
found the bird and met with our Wildlife Officer Wayne Rich on site. They 
salvaged the transmitter, which is probably toast, but maybe parts can be used. 
Thanks all! 


Cheers,
Scott Somershoe


On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell  wrote:

Can you help find this Osprey?
>>Billie Cantwell 
>>Knoxville, TN
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate 
Rachel, one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite transmitter. 
Her last recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: Lat/Lng: 36.13717 / 
-83.60917. The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final fix as being NE of 
Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little Jump Rapids. Although we 
don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have experienced a catastrophic 
event and is possibly lying somewhere on the ground near the river and in the 
general vicinity of those final coordinates . We are asking for your assistance 
in finding her and retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so 
eager to help us. 

>> 
>>
>> 
>>Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving MichiganOsprey, 
MDNR, Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo, and USDA Wildlife 
Division. Attached are some photos including her last location and one of the 
birds wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide you to her. 

>>
>> 
>>On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to search 
for Rachel. 

>>
>> 
>>Sincerely, 
>>
>> 
>>Barb Jensen 
>>Michigan Osprey 
>>248-895-2681 
>>http://www.michiganosprey.org/  
>>
>> 
>>
>> 
>>
> 
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 16:07:48 -0500
Lyda and all,
The bird was probably not killed by being mowed over (maybe though).  It
likely died last Friday (last date of data transmission) and the mowing
probably occurred this week. However there is certainly a chance it could
have been ill and was dying in the tall weeds and then got mowed over last
Friday, which could have killed the transmitter too.  Either way, if it was
on the ground in the weeds, it wouldn't have survived anyway
unfortunately.  The carcass was pretty far gone and mowed over, so not much
to work with in terms of determining cause of death.

I just spoke with the person that put the transmitter on the Osprey in MI.
The bird had been acting odd for several days and they were concerned about
it.  Maybe she had chronic issues or was sick and starving, etc.  Don't
know.  On the bright side, it's pretty uncommon to recover a bird/carcass
like that, esp. after a week on the ground, so they were thrilled (and sad)
to know the outcome. Actually getting a known outcome on something like
this doesn't happen often.

I'll send them the remains of the transmitter when I get it and they may be
able to salvage some parts.  It a shame to meet a follow researcher this
way, but she was very appreciative of everyone's efforts down here and the
quick response.  We also discussed Osprey nesting and population recovery
in MI (interesting issues they have) and our Golden eagles and tracking
birds.  She was thrilled to know a couple of our birds went through MI.

Scott Somershoe



On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 3:26 PM, Lyda Phillips  wrote:

> Is that how the bird died, getting mowed over? If not, any info on cause
> of death.
>
> Lyda Phillips
> (301) 518-7538 (cell)
> www.lydaphillips.com
> writerworking.blogspot.com/
>
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:56:58 -0500
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
> From: ssomershoe AT gmail.com
> To: bfcantwell AT gmail.com
> CC: KnoxvilleTOS AT yahoogroups.com; tn-bird AT freelists.org
>
> Somehow I sent that email without hitting a button.  Anyway, Merikay
> Waldvogel found the bird and met with our Wildlife Officer Wayne Rich on
> site.  They salvaged the transmitter, which is probably toast, but maybe
> parts can be used.  Thanks all!
>
>
> Cheers,
> Scott Somershoe
>
> On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell 
> wrote:
>
> Can you help find this Osprey?
> Billie Cantwell
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
> Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate
> Rachel, one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite
> transmitter. Her last recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: 
*Lat/Lng: 

>  36.13717 / -83.60917*.  The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final
> fix as being NE of Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little
> Jump Rapids.  Although we don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have
> experienced a catastrophic event and is possibly lying somewhere on the
> ground near the river and in the general vicinity of those final
> coordinates .  We are asking for your assistance in finding her and
> retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so eager to help us.
>
>  Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving
>  MichiganOsprey, MDNR, Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo,
> and USDA Wildlife Division. Attached are some photos including her last
> location and one of the birds wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide
> you to her.
>
>  On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to
> search for Rachel.
>
>  Sincerely,
>
>  Barb Jensen
> Michigan Osprey
> 248-895-2681
> www.michiganosprey.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Early Morning Banding
From: "Tommie Rogers" <sundragon1 AT epbfi.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 17:29:14 -0400
This morning local banders, Lizzie and John Deiner, caught Wood Thrushes,
Gray-cheeked Thrushes, Hooded Warbler, White-eyed Vireo, and Ovenbird on
Trust property beside the TN river .  Observers enjoyed Velo coffee and
scones from the Farmer's Daughter.  (If you like scones, these are the
best.)

The banding station is located on beautiful property in the river gorge.  It
is prime nesting habitat for many Neotropical migrants.  

After returning home, I turned on the mister and enjoyed watching warblers
and thrushes showering in my yard.  Yesterday and today have brought a
variety of migrants.  Blackburnians, Black and Whites, Chestnut-sideds,
Hooded, Tennessees, Yellow-throated, Ovenbird, thrushes and tanagers have
soaked in the water.  Later, a M. dove came.  The dove's behavior was
amusing as it raised one wing at a time, allowing the water to flow beneath
the wings.  It reminded me of the Buff-breasted Sandpiper's mating displays.

 

Tommie Rogers

Marion county
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Lyda Phillips <lydap AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 15:26:40 -0500
Is that how the bird died, getting mowed over? If not, any info on cause of 
death. 


Lyda Phillips
(301) 518-7538 (cell)
www.lydaphillips.com
writerworking.blogspot.com/


Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:56:58 -0500
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: ssomershoe AT gmail.com
To: bfcantwell AT gmail.com
CC: KnoxvilleTOS AT yahoogroups.com; tn-bird AT freelists.org

Somehow I sent that email without hitting a button. Anyway, Merikay Waldvogel 
found the bird and met with our Wildlife Officer Wayne Rich on site. They 
salvaged the transmitter, which is probably toast, but maybe parts can be used. 
Thanks all! 

Cheers,Scott Somershoe
On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell  wrote:
Can you help find this Osprey?Billie Cantwell Knoxville, TN

Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate Rachel, 
one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite transmitter. Her last 
recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: Lat/Lng: 36.13717 / 
-83.60917. The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final fix as being NE of 
Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little Jump Rapids. Although we 
don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have experienced a catastrophic 
event and is possibly lying somewhere on the ground near the river and in the 
general vicinity of those final coordinates . We are asking for your assistance 
in finding her and retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so 
eager to help us. 







Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving MichiganOsprey, MDNR, 
Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo, and USDA Wildlife Division. 
Attached are some photos including her last location and one of the birds 
wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide you to her. 






On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to search for 
Rachel. 






Sincerely,





Barb Jensen

Michigan Osprey

248-895-2681

www.michiganosprey.org 









 



 		 	   		  
Subject: Red-headed Woodpeckers
From: "David Patterson" <dpatterson9328 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 15:05:33 -0400
Tuesday, September 23, 2014. 9-11 AM. Bauxite Ridge, Collegedale, Hamilton 
County, TN 


I estimate 20-40 Red-headed Woodpeckers along a half-mile trail on the ridge. 
This is my first sighting of Red-heads along this trail, which I have walking 
3-5 times per month for 10+ years. 


The trail runs from a large (~150 ft. dia. by ~50 ft. high) water tank at the 
end of Sun Kist Drive, to Apison, thru tall trees, mostly oak and hickory. Sun 
Kist drive is a short dead-end near Collegedale Academy and Middle School 


David Patterson
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:56:58 -0500
Somehow I sent that email without hitting a button.  Anyway, Merikay
Waldvogel found the bird and met with our Wildlife Officer Wayne Rich on
site.  They salvaged the transmitter, which is probably toast, but maybe
parts can be used.  Thanks all!


Cheers,
Scott Somershoe

On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell 
wrote:

> Can you help find this Osprey?
> Billie Cantwell
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
> Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate
> Rachel, one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite
> transmitter. Her last recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: 
*Lat/Lng: 

>  36.13717 / -83.60917*.  The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final
> fix as being NE of Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little
> Jump Rapids.  Although we don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have
> experienced a catastrophic event and is possibly lying somewhere on the
> ground near the river and in the general vicinity of those final
> coordinates .  We are asking for your assistance in finding her and
> retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so eager to help us.
>
>  Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving
>  MichiganOsprey, MDNR, Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo,
> and USDA Wildlife Division. Attached are some photos including her last
> location and one of the birds wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide
> you to her.
>
>  On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to
> search for Rachel.
>
>  Sincerely,
>
>  Barb Jensen
> Michigan Osprey
> 248-895-2681
> www.michiganosprey.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:55:02 -0500
Update:
The bird was found dead at this location.  Unfortunately the field it was
in was recently mowed, hence the bird and transmitter got mowed over.


On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell 
wrote:

> Can you help find this Osprey?
> Billie Cantwell
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
> Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate
> Rachel, one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite
> transmitter. Her last recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: 
*Lat/Lng: 

>  36.13717 / -83.60917*.  The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final
> fix as being NE of Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little
> Jump Rapids.  Although we don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have
> experienced a catastrophic event and is possibly lying somewhere on the
> ground near the river and in the general vicinity of those final
> coordinates .  We are asking for your assistance in finding her and
> retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so eager to help us.
>
>  Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving
>  MichiganOsprey, MDNR, Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo,
> and USDA Wildlife Division. Attached are some photos including her last
> location and one of the birds wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide
> you to her.
>
>  On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to
> search for Rachel.
>
>  Sincerely,
>
>  Barb Jensen
> Michigan Osprey
> 248-895-2681
> www.michiganosprey.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Shady Valley birds
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:52:22 -0400
26 Sep 2014
Shady Valley, Johnson Co., TN

warblers  (13 spp.)
Black-and-white - 1
Tennessee - 3
Nashville - 1
Com. Yellowthroat - 8
Am. Redstart - 3
Cape May - 1
Magnolia - 1
Bay-breasted - 3
Chestnut-sided - 1
Black-thr. Blue - 2
Palm - 3
Black-thr. Green - 1
Wilson's - 1

also
Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1
E. Wood-Pewee - 2
Yellow-thr. Vireo - 1
Blue-hd. Vireo - 3
Com. Raven - 1
Tree Swallow - 300 +
Marsh Wren - 1
Ruby-cr. Kinglet - 1
Lincoln's Sparrow - 2
Swamp Sparrow - 1
Scarlet Tanager - 2
Rose-br. Grosbeak - 5

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: Slower at Greenway Farms
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 18:18:35 +0000
26 September 2014
Hamilton County, TN

Banding was definitely slower at Greenway Farms this morning: 4 Hooded 
Warblers, 3 Magnolia Warblers, 3 Wood Thrushes, 2 Gray Catbirds, 1 Gray-cheeked 
Thrush, 1 American Redstart, 1 Tennessee Warbler, 1 Ovenbird, and 1 White-eyed 
Vireo. 


David Aborn
Chattanooga, TN
Subject: Re: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:32:20 -0500
All,
TWRA officials (wildlife officer, etc.) are going to go investigate.  This
is on private land and it'd be more appropriate (in my opinion) to have
agency personnel check this out.  Hopefully the transmitter just failed!
I'll pass along info, if we recover the bird and/or transmitter.

If you happen to have info on this bird, please contact me directly:
615-788-6436.

Thanks!
Scott Somershoe

On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Billie Cantwell 
wrote:

> Can you help find this Osprey?
> Billie Cantwell
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
> Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate
> Rachel, one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite
> transmitter. Her last recorded data fix shows the following coordinates: 
*Lat/Lng: 

>  36.13717 / -83.60917*.  The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final
> fix as being NE of Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little
> Jump Rapids.  Although we don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have
> experienced a catastrophic event and is possibly lying somewhere on the
> ground near the river and in the general vicinity of those final
> coordinates .  We are asking for your assistance in finding her and
> retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so eager to help us.
>
>  Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving
>  MichiganOsprey, MDNR, Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo,
> and USDA Wildlife Division. Attached are some photos including her last
> location and one of the birds wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide
> you to her.
>
>  On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to
> search for Rachel.
>
>  Sincerely,
>
>  Barb Jensen
> Michigan Osprey
> 248-895-2681
> www.michiganosprey.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Fwd: Michigan Osprey in TN
From: Billie Cantwell <bfcantwell AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:17:05 -0400
Can you help find this Osprey?
Billie Cantwell
Knoxville, TN


Thank you for your interest in helping our Michigan Osprey group locate
Rachel, one of our young Ospreys who is carrying a gps satellite
transmitter. Her last recorded data fix shows the following
coordinates:  *Lat/Lng:
 36.13717 / -83.60917*.  The mapping on Google Earth indicates this final
fix as being NE of Knoxville, along the Holston River and near the Little
Jump Rapids.  Although we don't know for certain her fate, Rachel may have
experienced a catastrophic event and is possibly lying somewhere on the
ground near the river and in the general vicinity of those final
coordinates .  We are asking for your assistance in finding her and
retrieving the satellite unit and are pleased you are so eager to help us.

 Tracking our migrating Ospreys is a team effort involving  MichiganOsprey,
MDNR, Huron Valley Audubon/Michigan Audubon, Detroit Zoo, and USDA Wildlife
Division. Attached are some photos including her last location and one of
the birds wearing the unit. I hope these help to guide you to her.

 On behalf of our Osprey partners I thank you for your willingness to
search for Rachel.

 Sincerely,

 Barb Jensen
Michigan Osprey
248-895-2681
www.michiganosprey.org
Subject: Radnor Lake: male Black-throated Blue Warbler
From: "fekel" <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 11:12:04 -0500
Radnor Lake State Natural Area
Davidson Co., TN
2014 Sept. 26

This Friday morning I birded Radnor Lake with Jan Shaw and Bertrand and
Janet Taylor. Having missed the recent female BLACK-THROATED BLUE at
Radnor, a species that is a relatively rare migrant in Davidson Co., I
was hoping redemption. We spent the vast majority of our time around the
dam as at least 2 mixed warbler flocks came through. In the first
one was a male BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER that was in the very
broad large tree just before the house by the dam. In all we found 12
species of warblers including a N. WATERTHRUSH, a YELLOW-THROATED
WARBLER plus 9 more species with MAGNOLIA WARBLERs still dominating the
sightings but NO YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERs yet.

Frank Fekel
Bellevue, TN
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Subject: Brainerd Levee 9/26
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:06:06 -0400
Water is still shrinking and birds are congregating to feed on the trapped
fish

16 Great Egrets
6 Great Blue Herons
1 Little blue heron still present
1 Snowy egret still present
2 lesser yellowlegs
First teal of the season, both green and blue-winged

Hugh Barger
Hamilton County
Subject: 1,500 swifts near Radnor Lake
From: Melinda Welton <weltonmj AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:56:47 -0500
I may have found the source of the >50 Chimney Swifts seen skimming the
surface of Radnor Lake State Natural Area each morning for the last while.
John Overton High School on Franklin Road, east of Radnor, has a tall
chimney, >100', where 1,480 Chimney Swifts went to roost tonight night.

Sunset was at 6:38 Central Time. When I arrived at the school at 6:40 there
were just a few swifts in view but they were flying low and occasionally
over the chimney. The numbers continuously grew and the first swift went
into the chimney at 6:55. The numbers continued to swell until there was a
chittering vortex that funneled into the chimney like reverse smoke. The
show was over by 7:15.

Melinda Welton
Franklin, TN


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
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       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
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        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Red-headed Woodpeckers in Sevier County
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 23:57:43 +0000 (UTC)
While driving in the northwest of Sevier County today, I found a family of 
Red-headed Woodpeckers, 2 adults, 2 juveniles at the corner of Pine Ridge Road 
and Porterfield Gap Road. In the SE corner of that intersection is stand of oak 
trees and the birds were in there, and visiting a dead snag with lots of cavity 
holes in it in the adjacent field. 


This makes the third family group I've seen in the county in the last year; 
maybe it's just a reflection of just getting out more, but seems to me, along 
with other incidental records of RHWO around the county recently that this bird 
may becoming more widespread. 



Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Subject: NTOS Radnor Walk
From: "Steve Routledge" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "eyerout@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:29:49 -0700

Wednesday September 24
Radnor Lake
Davidson County

32 birders enjoyed a gorgeous morning birding Radnor Lake today. 46 species and 
one taxa including 14 warblers were seen. Among the highlights : the elusive 
Black-throated Blue, one Hooded Warbler, several Magnolia Warblers, a lone 
sighting of an Orange-crowned warbler, and several American Redstarts. Below is 
the cumulative list: 


Wood Duck - 12
Mallard - 1
Blue-winged Teal - 3
Wild Turkey -10
Great Blue Heron
 -2
Green Heron -1
Barred Owl-1
Chimney Swift -42 (conservative)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird -2
Belted Kingfisher -1
Red-bellied Woodpecker-7
Downy Woodpecker-6
Northern Flicker-1
Pileated Woodpecker-1
Eastern Wood Pewee-8
Empidonax species -1
White-eyed Vireo-2
Red-eyed Vireo-1
Blue Jay-15
American Crow -10
Carolina Chickadee -15
Tufted Titmouse -9
White-breasted Nuthatch -4
Carolina Wren -9
Swainson's Thrush -1
Wood Thrush -1
American Robin -9
Cedar Waxwing - 47
Northern Waterthrush -1
Blue-winged Warbler -1
Black and White Warbler -2
Tennessee Warbler -9
Orange-crowned Warbler -1
Nashvile Warbler -4
Hooded Warbler -1
American Redstart -23
Northern Parula -3
Magnolia Warbler-17
Bay-breasted Warbler -3
Yellow Warbler -2
Chestnut-sided Warbler -1
Black-throated Blue Warbler -1
Black-throated Green Warbler -8
Summer Tanager -3
Northern Cardinal -11
Rose-breasted Grosbeak -3
American Goldfinch -3
We enjoyed meeting several new people today. Fun group all around!!
Steve and Cyndi Routledge
Clarksville/Montgomery County
Subject: Elizabethton Walkway - Blackpoll Warbler
From: Darrel Wilder <darrelw AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 13:15:51 -0400
25 September 2014
Elizabethton Walkway, Carter Co., TN

The morning started slowly but I intercepted a nice mixed-species flock in the 
small patch of low woods just down from the Riverside Pavilion on the way back. 
In the flock was a Blackpoll Warbler, just the second I've seen in the fall in 
TN, that provided great looks at close range for a couple of minutes. 


selected list:

Yellow-throated Vireo (2)
Philadelphia Vireo (1)
Red-eyed Vireo (1)
Gray-cheeked Thrush (1)
Swainson's Thrush (1)
Tennessee Warbler (1)
American Redstart (6)
Cape May Warbler (1)
Northern Parula (4)
Magnolia Warbler (3)
Bay-breasted Warbler (1)
Blackburnian Warbler (2)
Chestnut-sided Warbler (1)
BLACKPOLL WARBLER (1) - white under-tail coverts, very slight greenish cast to 
yellow breast and flanks, slight breast/flank streaking and prominent streaking 
on olive upperparts, 

 yellow feet and legs, a large slim-appearing warbler with deliberate foraging 
behavior 

Black-throated Green Warbler (1)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (5)



Darrel Wilder
Johnson City, TN










Darrel Wilder






Subject: Greenway visits
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 17:06:53 +0000
25 September 2014
Hamilton County, TN

I forgot to put in my post yesterday regarding visiting Greenway Farms to see 
my banding that on some Fridays I need to close early (~11:00) because I have a 
faculty meeting at noon, and tomorrow is one of those Fridays. In addition, the 
forecast for Monday (September 29) is calling for rain, so I may not be out 
there. 


David Aborn
Subject: recent backyard birds - Knox
From: sparverius AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 14:48:47 +0000 (UTC)
There's been a lot of stuff passing through the yard lately. Unfortunately, my 
schedule hasn't allowed me a lot of time to look. 


We've had a great year for soft mast this year with the Black Cherries being 
the most loaded I've ever seen them earlier this summer. At least 2 pair of 
Cedar Waxwings nested here during the bonanza. Muscadines were the big draw in 
late Aug - early Sept with several Baltimore Oriole sightings. Now the Black 
Gums are at peak bringing in tons of thrushes, thrashers, vireos, tanagers, 
woodpeckers, cardinals, grosbeaks, phoebes, starlings, squirrels, etc. Chestnut 
Oaks and hickories are having a good year, too. 


Some recent highlights, all from the yard and woods on Black Oak Ridge in west 
Knox Co, TN... 


Least Flycatcher, 1 on 25 Sept, very short primary extension, full broad 
eyering, and 'che-bek'-ing 

Warbling Vireo, 1 on 18 Sept and 20 Sept 
Philadelphia Vireo, 1 on 20 Sept, 1-2 on 24 Sept 
Gray-cheeked Thrush, FOS on 18 Sept, several since 
Golden-winged Warbler, 1 adult male on 19 Sept 
Tennessee Warbler, FOS on 7 Sept (late), seems to be in low numbers this year 
(bad year for Spruce Bud Worms up north?) 

Nashville Warbler, 1 on 20 Sept 
"Myrtle" Yellow-rumped Warbler, FOS on 24 Sept, first Sept record for the yard 
Bay-breasted Warbler, FOS 2 on 25 Sept 
Wilson's Warbler, 1 adult male on 10 Sept 
Scarlet Tanager, high count of 10+ on 24 Sept 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, FOS on 14 Sept 
Baltimore Oriole, latest sighting on 12 Sept 

Dean Edwards 
Knoxville, TN 



Subject: Surprised
From: "J.N. & Ella Howard" <birders3 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 08:52:21 -0400
Friends,
      Just for information, I was not intentionally birding yesterday, but
going to start dismantling our garden and starting noticing a lot of bird
activity and was able to see some birds we had not seen earlier this year
along with several we had seen.  The FOYs were:
          Yellow-bellied flycatcher (2)
          Grey Catbird
          Swainson's Thrush
          Summer Tanager
                                               I forgot the garden,
                                               J. N. Howard, Marion County
Subject: KTOS Newsletter and Meeting
From: Billie Cantwell <bfcantwell AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 07:40:57 -0400
Please join us on Wednesday, October 1 for the presentation:
"The Ninety-Year History of KTOS" by Vickie Henderson. In
honor of our club's 90th anniversary, Vickie delved into the club's
archives of early 20th century correspondence, newsletters, and
photographs as well as TOS materials in Nashville. She
compiled a PowerPoint presentation of the interesting
information she identified. Learn about our early club members,
their talents, and the legacy they left behind.
Vickie is a member of KTOS, an artist, writer and naturalist. In
2011, she wrote and illustrated "Discover Birds Activity
Book" published by the Tennessee Ornithological Society. With
more than four thousand copies distributed to students around
the state, the book is designed to inspire the students' curiosity
and creativity while presenting facts about birds.
The meeting will be held in Room 118 of the University of
Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. For directions,
please visit the meetings page of on the KTOS website
at: www.tnbirds.org/chapters/knoxvill/KTOS_Meetings.html. 


See attached newsletter for field trips.

Billie Cantwell
Knoxville, TN
Subject: Arizona trip photos
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "oeserscave@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 21:43:19 -0400
For anyone intersted, I posted my photos from a 9 day trip to Arizona 
the first week of this month.

Link is at:

http://picasaweb.google.com/Ken.Oeser/

The first album is: Arizona September 2014.

Ken Oeser
Hendersonville, TN


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: NTOS Wednesday Radnor walk
From: "Steve Routledge" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "eyerout@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:16:18 -0700
32 birders enjoyed a gorgeous morning birding Radnor Lake today. 46 species and 
one taxa including 14 warblers were seen. Among the highlights : the elusive 
Black-throated Blue, one Hooded Warbler, several Magnolia Warblers, a lone 
sighting of an Orange-crowned warbler, and several American Redstarts. Below is 
the cumulative list: 


Wood Duck - 12
Mallard - 1
Blue-winged Teal - 3
Wild Turkey -10
Great Blue Heron -2
Green Heron -1
Barred Owl-1
Chimney Swift -42 (conservative)
Runt-throated Hummingbird -2
Belted Kingfisher -1
Red-bellied Woodpecker-7
Downy Woodpecker-6
Northern Flicker-1
Pileated Woodpecker-1
Eastern Wood Pewee-8
Empidonax-1
White-eyed Vireo-2
Red-eyed Vireo-1
Blue Jay-15
American Crow -10
Carolina Chickadee -15
Tufted Titmouse -9
White-breasted
 Nuthatch -4
Carolina Wren -9
Swainson's Thrush -1
Wood Thrush -1
American Robin -9
Cedar Waxwing 
Subject: Andy Jones of BBC -- Secretary of AOU !
From: "Wallace Coffey" <jwcoffey AT tricon.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:00:26 -0400
 

This is a an exciting and historic time for the Bristol Bird Club!

 

One of our own,  Andy Jones who grew up in Kingsport,  TN, is soon to be
announced as the elected Secretary of the famous American Ornithologists'
Union which has served science since 1883.  The AOU has opened its annual
meeting and the 132nd Stated Meeting at Estes Park, Colorado thru 28
September 2014.

          

AOU members have voted and the ballot was closed in early August.  Andy was
nominated by an official process of the AOU and he was not opposed.   The
formal results of that vote will be announced  at the Estes Park meeting in
coming hours and the organization will then begin a scheduled process of
making election results known to the public in a series of announcements
that may take days or weeks. 

 

Andy Jones August 2014 headshot.jpgWhen Andy takes office, the Bristol Bird
Club will be proud that he becomes the second person from BBC to hold the
office of AOU Secretary.  Dr. Stephen M. Russell, who earned his Ph.D. in
ornithology from LSU in 1962, previously served in the office in the late
1980's and 1990's.  In 1950, Dr. Russell was a charter member and founder of
the Bristol Bird Club while a high school student at Abingdon, VA.  He later
served as president of the famous Cooper Ornithological Society.

In the 1990's BBC renamed itself the Bristol Bird Club -- Stephen M. Russell
Chapter of the Tennessee Ornithological Society.

 

The Cooper Ornithological Society (84th Stated Meeting), and the Society of
Canadian Ornithologists are jointly meeting with AOU at Estes Park as this
is written.

 

As Secretary,  Andy will obviously keep records of the meetings of the
American Ornithologists' Union and of its governing bodies and distribute
minutes and proceedings of the meetings. He will be served by a Recording
Secretary who will carry out many of those duties.   

 

However, the office is more significant and influential than the recording
process. He will also have responsibilities, with the President, for the
Annual Stated Meetings of AOU.  

 

His duties will include:

 

.      issues notices to members of the time and place of all meetings

.      maintains lists of members in the two classes of Fellows and the
class of Elective Members

.      maintains liaison with the office maintaining membership records and
inform the office of changes in members' addresses or membership status

.      maintains a record of committee assignments

.      is in charge of the corporate seal of the union 

.      with the President,  is responsible for the Stated Meeting in
coordination with the Committees on Local Arrangements and on Scientific
Program.

 

ANDREW W. JONES. William A. and Nancy R. Klamm Endowed Chair of Ornithology
and Curator of Ornithology, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.  Also
Director of Science, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and Adjunct
Faculty, Cleveland State University. Ph.D. 2006, University of Minnesota,
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior. Published in Auk, Condor,
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Molecular Phylogenetics and
Evolution, BioScience, Cotinga. AOU Member 1997, Elective Member 2009. His
research concerns geographic variation in birds, primarily using molecular
markers for comparative phylogeography and resolving evolutionary
relationships among species in diverse genera.

  

He became Recording Secretary for the AOU in 2009, and has served in that
role for the last five years.  During this time, he has been involved in all
Council meetings as well as the semi-monthly Executive Committee conference
calls.  This has been an opportunity for Andy to learn how the AOU is
structured, and to work with the volunteers who make the society function.
His role as Recording Secretary has been long-term training for the
Secretary position. As Secretary, Andy will play an active role in the
governance of the AOU, working with the elected officers and councilors as
well as the newly hired Executive Director.  

 

Wallace Coffey

Bristol, TN
Subject: Still going strong
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 18:25:10 +0000
24 September 2014
Hamilton County, TN

Banding at Greenway Farms continues to be very productive this fall; I had 18 
birds in 1 net during one check of the nets! There were several FOS migrants 
that showed up. The numbers for today are 12 American Redstarts, 9 Wood 
Thrushes, 8 Magnolia warblers, 6 Tennessee Warblers (FOS), 5 Swainson's 
Thrushes, 3 Gray-cheeked Thrushes, 3 Ovenbirds, 1 Gray Catbird, 1 
Black-throated-green Warbler (FOS), and 1 Blackburnian Warbler (FOS). Keep in 
mind that I have only been reporting fall migrants; you can add a handful of 
cardinals, Carolina Wrens, Brown Thrashers, etc. to each of the tallies I 
report. Also, I have had several people inquire about visiting the site. 
Greenway Farms is public property, so anyone can go out there, and I am happy 
to have people observe the banding. Just keep in mind that when I am really 
busy, as I have been the past few outings, my focus is on processing the birds 
safely and quickly, so I may not have time to let people get their fill of 
taking pictures, and it may take a moment before I am able to answer someone's 
questions. 


David Aborn
Chattanooga, TN
Subject: Re: Whigg Meadow Update?
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:23:32 -0500
I haven't received an update with a current total number of captures in
about a week, but we were on pace to more than double our total captures
from last year. We topped our 2013 totals for the month (550 birds) in only
13 days this year!

A couple weeks ago, I recaptured a Tennessee and a Cape May Warbler that
were banded at Whigg Meadow in 2011 and 2010, respectively. Returns of
migrants (not breeding or wintering within 100 mi of a banding site) are
extremely rare, with maybe 50 birds documented, ever.  This is the 15th(!!)
Tennessee and first Cape May (3rd Cape May according to the scant
literature) to return to Whigg.

It's been a very windy and often rainy at night (at least it was for the
first couple weeks) and we haven't caught any saw-whets in the limited
hours we've tried.  One was heard calling a dawn a couple weeks ago though.

This coming weekend is the last weekend for Whigg 2014, so don't wait to
visit this year!

I'll post more when I know more.  We'll also make a blog or something for
updates, but it's just something else on my to-do list!

Cheers,
Scott Somershoe

On Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 12:02 PM, Bates Estabrooks  wrote:

> On Sep. 9 Robin Barrow posted a status on the banding going on up at Whigg
> Meadow.
>
> Does anyone have a recent take on what's being seen/banded there?  Any Saw
> Whet Owls this year?
>
> I'm thinking of driving up there this coming Sat. morn.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Bates Estabrooks
> Anderson County
>
> *Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID*
>
Subject: Whigg Meadow Update?
From: Bates Estabrooks <wgpu AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 13:02:35 -0400
On Sep. 9 Robin Barrow posted a status on the banding going on up at Whigg 
Meadow. 


Does anyone have a recent take on what's being seen/banded there? Any Saw Whet 
Owls this year? 


I'm thinking of driving up there this coming Sat. morn. 

Thanks. 

Bates Estabrooks
Anderson County

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: early birds -- White-crowned Sparrow and American Pipit
From: "fekel" <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:34:04 -0500
Davidson Co., TN

Tuesday evening Sep. 23, I looked out my Bellevue front door to check 
the feeder for birds and deer (unfortunately the deer come up the bluff
and clean out the bird seed in the feeder as a appetizer). To my
surprise in addition to the usual species, I found a WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROW looking for seeds on the ground.  This is 4 days earlier
than the earliest record noted in "Birds of the Nashville Area"
Fourth Edition.

This morning, Wednesday Sep. 24, I stopped at the Walter S. Davis Blvd
marsh. The major lack of rain has resulted in its lake drying up
substantially and wet mud appearing where the lake usually is.
Unfortunately, it is too late to attract most shore birds but I did
find a single AMERICAN PIPIT searching the mud for food along with the
usual KILLDEER.

Frank Fekel
Bellevue, TN

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
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                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Peregrine Falcon
From: Chandler Hendrick <chandlerhendrick AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:08:51 -0400
Today, 9/24/14, I saw my first Peregrine fly over the top of the Sequatchie 
County Middle School. It disappeared behind the building, but it reappeared 
flying north. As a side note, the flock of European Starlings didn't appear to 
be as pleased to see it as I was to see it. 


Chandler Hendrick
Dunlap, TN
Sequatchie County


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: TN-Bird] Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: "Kristy L. Baker" <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 20:05:49 -0500
Hello - 

I honestly don't recall the bird flapping, so I cannot answer your question. 
The hawk was not in view long, and it just seemed like one fluid move. This is 
why I really think the hawk's back was facing me although I tried to convince 
myself differently. Otherwise the bird would have had to turn around on its way 
back up to go up and over/into the trees. 


As an additional note, if I were to walk the woods at the back of the property, 
it would take about 10 minutes to exit the woods into farm fields. 


We heard juvenile Red-tailed hawks toward the back of the property this summer. 
We also have Cooper Hawk visits. So, the suggestions of others are quite 
plausible. Although...the bird had a long/narrow tail. That would likely rule 
out Red-tailed. Based on suggestions, this leads back to the Cooper's or 
Harrier, right? 


I wish I could share more.  

Kristy Baker



TenacBirder AT comcast.net wrote:
>
>Kristy;
>
>From the information you submitted I am leaning toward a
>tentative identification for Cooper's Hawk.  Since you have
>described this raptor as a large hawk I would tend to lean
>toward a female bird.
>
>Could you add more information about the flight cadence?  Did
>this hawk flap slow to medium paced, or fast, or did you happen
>to notice the bird leaning left as it flapped then immediately
>leaning right to flap and repeat the left and right movements?
>
>I would be interested to know.
>
>Jimmy Wilkerson
>Hixson, Hamilton Co., TN
>
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: Kristy L Baker 
>To: TN-Bird 
>Sent: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:31:45 -0000 (UTC)
>Subject: [TN-Bird] Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
>
> Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again. I heard a jay 
scolding back into the woods. Soon other jays followed along with a lot of 
other very agitated birds. About 10 minutes later a large hawk swooped from the 
woods, along the fence line and back up. It was a large hawk, brownish with a 
white rump patch. I thought Northern Harrier and dismissed it. I then told 
myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and assumed it was a large 
Cooper's Hawk. 

>
>I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a Northern 
Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house. I had forgotten all about it, 
but I recall it as flying low over the trees. 

>
>We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision. Two sides of 
the property are along the woods with a large portion of the property in grass. 
Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier? It just doesn't feel like I should 
have. Any other bird with a white rump that it could have been? 

>
>Kristy Baker
>Rockvale TN
>Rutherford Count
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Subject: Soddy Mtn Hawk Watch (9-22,23)
From: TenacBirder AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:47:06 +0000 (UTC)
Please read on through to see what we saw on Tuesday.

Sept 23, 2014
Soddy Mtn 
Hamilton Co., TN

On Monday Sept 22 we saw 36 Broad-winged Hawks; 1 Northern Harrier;
4 Osprey; 1 Cooper's Hawk; 1 Red-shouldered Hawk and 2 immature
Bald Eagles.

Visitors and counters were: Harold Birch, Bill Haley, Jimmy & Cynthia;
Clay Seneker and Pete & Marg Krampe.  Pete & Marge have been several 
times over the last couple seasons.  Welcome Back!

----

Tuesday Sept 23 we saw 223 Broad-winged Hawks; 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks;
2 Cooper's Hawks and 1 MISSISSIPPI KITE.  I think Cynthia was the first
to shout out Mississippi Kite, followed by a confirmation by Harold Birch
and then by Mac McWhirter as he has seen several from their farm.  I was 
a skeptic to say the least.  Later after replaying in my mind numerous 
times I became more convinced.  After getting home and reviewing 4 Raptor
research books I was able to glean enough information that finally seals
the deal for me.  Cynthia and I have seen Ms Kites in Tennessee, Georgia,
Florida and especially in South Carolina.  I'm not sure why it took me so
long to come on board with the rest of the group.  I have seen Ms Kite from
Soddy Mtn before in 2003 when it was identified by Bill Haley when he and I
were alone on the lookout.  One or two days later Roi and Debby Shannon also
saw a Ms Kite, I think they too were on the lookout by themselves.

Visitors and counters today were Harold Birch, Jimmy & Cynthia, Susan & Mac
McWhirter who also brought with them Woody & Becky Woodiel, Woody was a long
time hawk watcher from long ago.  He also used to keep our grass mown so 
beautifully WELCOME BACK WOODY!  Counter Clay Seneker was about 30 minutes to 
late to see the Kite.

Keep Looking Up!
Jimmy And Cynthia Wilkerson
http://soddymountainhawkwatch.blogspot.com
 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
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______________________________________________________________
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       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Wood Ducks
From: Lynne Davis <lynnedavis865 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 20:30:17 -0400
Sept 22
Monday and Tuesday mornings, we saw Wood Ducks in a small pond along
Sevierville Pike in South Knoxville. Monday we just got a glance and
thought there were three birds. Tuesday, there was a male and three females.

This pond is on the property of New Prospect Presbyterian Church, and is a
permanent swampy pond right next to Sevierville Pike, a little south of
Prospect Road. Prospect Road is the road that goes to Anderson School. If
you are familiar with the South Knoxville Urban Wilderness, Anderson School
is the trailhead for Lost Chromosome Trail.

Lynne and Bob Davis
Knoxville, Knox County
Subject: Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: TenacBirder AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:01:56 +0000 (UTC)
Kristy;

From the information you submitted I am leaning toward a
tentative identification for Cooper's Hawk.  Since you have
described this raptor as a large hawk I would tend to lean
toward a female bird.

Could you add more information about the flight cadence?  Did
this hawk flap slow to medium paced, or fast, or did you happen
to notice the bird leaning left as it flapped then immediately
leaning right to flap and repeat the left and right movements?

I would be interested to know.

Jimmy Wilkerson
Hixson, Hamilton Co., TN


----- Original Message -----
From: Kristy L Baker 
To: TN-Bird 
Sent: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:31:45 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: [TN-Bird] Take 2 :Hawk ID Question

 Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again. I heard a jay 
scolding back into the woods. Soon other jays followed along with a lot of 
other very agitated birds. About 10 minutes later a large hawk swooped from the 
woods, along the fence line and back up. It was a large hawk, brownish with a 
white rump patch. I thought Northern Harrier and dismissed it. I then told 
myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and assumed it was a large 
Cooper's Hawk. 


I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a Northern 
Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house. I had forgotten all about it, 
but I recall it as flying low over the trees. 


We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision. Two sides of 
the property are along the woods with a large portion of the property in grass. 
Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier? It just doesn't feel like I should 
have. Any other bird with a white rump that it could have been? 


Kristy Baker
Rockvale TN
Rutherford Count
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Raptor and Passerine Migrants - Murfreesboro
From: "Chloe Walker" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "chloebelle119@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 18:56:16 -0500
The past few days have been very exciting in our yard (well, I guess any day 
that we find migrant here is a good day). 

 
On 9/21/14 we had:
 
Ovenbird - 1 (a new one for our yard)
Cliff Swallow - 1 (flyover; also a new one)
Broad-winged Hawk - 5 (South-bound)
American Kestrel - 1 (also South-bound)
...just to name a few.
 
9/22/14 seemed to be even better with...

30 South-bound Broad-wings
Another Kestrel
Wilson's Warbler - 1 (adult male)
2 Gray-cheeked and 2 Swainson's Thrushes, plus around 6 more unidentified 
thrushes that wouldn't cooperate (they were worse than the warblers!!) 

LOADS of TN and Magnolia Warblers 
American Redstart - only 1
Common Yellowthroat - 1 female 

And today (9/23/14) was good as well:

White-eyed Vireo - 1
Ovenbird - 1 (likely the same bird as previous)
American Redstart - 2
Continuing Gray-cheeked and Swainson's Thrushes
Osprey - 1 (South-bound; an absolute beauty!) 
one Red-tailed Hawk (also heading South)
And, again, an overwhelming number of Tennessees and Magnolias 
one first fall female Chesnut-sided Warbler

Good birding,

Chloe Walker
Murfreesboro, TN
Subject: Cove Lake SP - Philadelphia Vireo, Great Egrets
From: Carole Gobert <cpgobert AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 19:41:31 -0400
I had a wonderful few hours of birding at Cove Lake State Park in Campbell 
County today though I didn't start until 10:00 am. One of the first birds I saw 
was a Yellow-throated Warbler walking on the fence around the tennis court, 
gleaning insects. I had more killer looks at him (or possibly another) a couple 
of hours later in a big pine tree at the foot of the hill down from the 
restaurant. That tree was a gold mine. It also held a Philadelphia Vireo, a 
Prairie Warbler, a Pewee, a Palm Warbler, etc. But the Yellow-throated warbler 
was the most persistent; I must have viewed it half a dozed times as it moved 
around. And while I stood gazing up into the pine tree a Red-shouldered Hawk 
showed up and circled right over my head a few times. Two Great Egrets were 
working the lake and an Osprey put on a show. Just a great day to be there. I 
really must get to Cove Lake more often. 


39 species


Mallard  7

Double-crested Cormorant  5

Great Blue Heron (Blue form)  5

Great Egret  2

Green Heron  1

Turkey Vulture  3

Osprey  1

Red-shouldered Hawk  1

Killdeer  3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3

Belted Kingfisher  1

Red-bellied Woodpecker  3

Northern Flicker  1

Eastern Wood-Pewee  1

Eastern Phoebe  2

Philadelphia Vireo  1     Blue Jay  7

American Crow  3

Carolina Chickadee  3

Tufted Titmouse  3

White-breasted Nuthatch  1

Carolina Wren  12

Eastern Bluebird  1

Swainson's Thrush  2

American Robin  3

Gray Catbird  3

European Starling  14

Cedar Waxwing  8

Magnolia Warbler  1

Palm Warbler  2

Pine Warbler  1

Yellow-throated Warbler  2      (maybe 3)

Prairie Warbler  1

Eastern Towhee  1

Chipping Sparrow  2

Song Sparrow  1

Scarlet Tanager  1

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

American Goldfinch  2

 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19917947 


 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Carole Gobert, Knoxville


 


 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: "Chloe Walker" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "chloebelle119@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 16:25:46 -0700
 I've observed Cooper's Hawks in the past with their white undertail coverts 
"fluffed" (for lack of a better word) - almost appearing to have a fully white 
rump. I know I read somewhere (not sure where though...) that they do this 
either as a breeding display, or as a sign of defense or alarm. 

 
Chloe Walker
Murfreesboro, TN
http://www.chloesbirdingblog.blogspot.com/ 
  


On Tuesday, September 23, 2014 11:47 AM, Bill Pulliam  
wrote: 

  


Young Red-tails can have a fairly prominent white base to their brown, barred 
tails. 


We live in a mixed forest and open rural area. Harriers in migration will show 
up overhead, and sometimes low to the ground near the edges of the woods. 


Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN


On Sep 23, 2014, at 11:27 AM, Ford, Robert wrote:

Yep, harrier is a bird of field and marsh . . .thought I would share an 
interesting past observation though. A few years ago I was in the field, and on 
2 occasions in late winter/early spring, I flushed a harrier out of a small 
grassy patch in a small opening in thick forest a little before sunrise. I 
assumed roosting there, maybe in migration. But that's not to be "expected". 

>
>
>Bob Ford
>Haywood County, TN  
>
>
>On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 11:18 AM, Chris Sloan  wrote:
>
>A harrier is possible this time of year. They are migrating now and certainly 
should be passing through Tennessee. That said, harriers are field and marsh 
birds, not forest birds, so if it came out of the forest it is unlikely to have 
been harrier. If it truly had a white rump, then harrier is really the only 
option because it is the only raptor found here with a white rump. If it's 
possible that you just saw it from the side and maybe saw white undertail or 
vent, then more likely it was something else. 

>>
>>
>>
>>Chris Sloan
>>Nashville, TN
>>http://www.chrissloanphotography.com/
>>
>>
>>On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 6:31 AM, Kristy L Baker  
wrote: 

>>
>>Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again. I heard a jay 
scolding back into the woods. Soon other jays followed along with a lot of 
other very agitated birds. About 10 minutes later a large hawk swooped from the 
woods, along the fence line and back up. It was a large hawk, brownish with a 
white rump patch. I thought Northern Harrier and dismissed it. I then told 
myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and assumed it was a large 
Cooper's Hawk. 

>>>
>>>
>>>I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a Northern 
Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house. I had forgotten all about it, 
but I recall it as flying low over the trees. 

>>>
>>>
>>>We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision. Two sides 
of the property are along the woods with a large portion of the property in 
grass. Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier? It just doesn't feel like I 
should have. Any other bird with a white rump that it could have been? 

>>>
>>>
>>>Kristy Baker
>>>Rockvale TN
>>>Rutherford Count
>>
Subject: Discovery Wetlands:Murfreesboro, TN
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "Stczipperer@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 19:09:53 -0400
9/23/2014
Discovery Wetlands
Murfreesboro, TN
Traveling
 
Nice morning here in Murfreesboro.  Walked the Discovery Wetlands this  
morning. Best birds seen:
 
Magnolia Warblers
American Redstarts
N. Parula
2 Wilson's Warbler(Male)
White-eyed Vireo
Connecticut Warbler(First Winter) Life Bird.  Flew across back  boardwalk 
into underbrush I fussed it popped back up.  Complete brown hood,  pale 
yellow from hood to under tail coverts, white eyering. Olive brown on  top. 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Wetland is being drained for some reason lots of ground exposed maybe we  
will get some rails.  Who knows.
 
Good birding
 
Stephen Zipperer
Rutherford Co., TN
 
 
Subject: Nashville Warbler: Pittman Center
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 18:27:27 +0000 (UTC)
I had a first fall female Nashville Warbler this morning, in my yard, in a 
weedy overgrown area but with some visibility. under a deciduous tree canopy. 
It was feeding low to the ground on some tiny caterpillars. Too dense to get a 
photo, but it had a grayish head, olivish back, yellow underparts, eye ring, 
small pointed bill. New yard bird and new to me for Sevier County. NOT a Common 
Yellowthroat although they are around in some of the field hedgerows nearby. 


Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Subject: Great Morning at Seven Islands
From: "Morton Massey" <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 14:16:04 -0400
Best day yet(9/23/14) for migrants at Seven Islands State Birding Park (Knox
County) and the best location today was the weedy area just above the main
house.  Warblers were everywhere.  Highlights include;

 

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker

Bobolinks

8 Warblers including Golden-winged and Worm-eating

 

 

Sep 23, 2014

Seven Islands State Birding Park

Traveling

3.5 miles

270 Minutes

Observers: 1

All birds reported? Yes

Comments:  

Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.6

 

3 Great Blue Heron

10 Black Vulture

2 Turkey Vulture

1 Cooper's Hawk

2 Red-shouldered Hawk

2 Killdeer

1 Solitary Sandpiper -- Lower pond

10 Mourning Dove

34 Chimney Swift

3 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

2 Belted Kingfisher

1 Red-headed Woodpecker -- Juvenile with brownish head. White wing patches
and rump seen in flight. 

5 Red-bellied Woodpecker

3 Downy Woodpecker

2 Northern Flicker

1 Eastern Wood-Pewee

1 Acadian Flycatcher -- Above main house

3 Eastern Phoebe

1 Great Crested Flycatcher

4 White-eyed Vireo

1 Red-eyed Vireo

5 Blue Jay

6 American Crow

2 Tree Swallow

8 Carolina Chickadee

5 Tufted Titmouse

3 White-breasted Nuthatch

8 Carolina Wren

2 House Wren

4 Gray Catbird

4 Northern Mockingbird

4 Brown Thrasher

25 European Starling

2 Cedar Waxwing

1 Golden-winged Warbler -- Above main house

10 Tennessee Warbler

1 Chestnut-sided Warbler -- Above main house

9 Magnolia Warbler

1 Black-throated Green Warbler

5 Palm Warbler -- Not near as many as yesterday

1 Worm-eating Warbler -- Above main house

2 Common Yellowthroat

2 Eastern Towhee

4 Field Sparrow

1 Summer Tanager -- Above main house. Calling as usual

7 Northern Cardinal

2 Rose-breasted Grosbeak

4 Blue Grosbeak

5 Indigo Bunting

5 Bobolink -- At 4th power line pole past main barn, 30 yards from road. 

4 Common Grackle

60 American Goldfinch

8 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)

 

Morton Massey

Knoxville, TN

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:46:40 -0500
Young Red-tails can have a fairly prominent white base to their  
brown, barred tails.

We live in a mixed forest and open rural area.  Harriers in migration  
will show up overhead, and sometimes low to the ground near the edges  
of the woods.

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN

On Sep 23, 2014, at 11:27 AM, Ford, Robert wrote:

> Yep, harrier is a bird of field and marsh . . .thought I would  
> share an interesting past observation though.  A few years ago I  
> was in the field, and on 2 occasions in late winter/early spring, I  
> flushed a harrier out of a small grassy patch in a small opening in  
> thick forest a little before sunrise.  I assumed roosting there,  
> maybe in migration.  But that's not to be "expected".
>
> Bob Ford
> Haywood County, TN
>
> On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 11:18 AM, Chris Sloan  
>  wrote:
> A harrier is possible this time of year.  They are migrating now  
> and certainly should be passing through Tennessee.  That said,  
> harriers are field and marsh birds, not forest birds, so if it came  
> out of the forest it is unlikely to have been harrier.  If it truly  
> had a white rump, then harrier is really the only option because it  
> is the only raptor found here with a white rump.  If it's possible  
> that you just saw it from the side and maybe saw white undertail or  
> vent, then more likely it was something else.
>
>
> Chris Sloan
> Nashville, TN
> http://www.chrissloanphotography.com
>
> On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 6:31 AM, Kristy L Baker  
>  wrote:
> Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again.  I  
> heard a jay scolding back into the woods.  Soon other jays followed  
> along with a lot of other very agitated birds.  About 10 minutes  
> later a large hawk swooped from the woods, along the fence line and  
> back up.  It was a large hawk, brownish with a white rump patch.  I  
> thought Northern Harrier and dismissed it. I then told myself I  
> must have seen the front of the hawk and assumed it was a large  
> Cooper's Hawk.
>
> I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a  
> Northern Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house.  I had  
> forgotten all about it, but I recall it as flying low over the trees.
>
> We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision.   
> Two sides of the property are along the woods with a large portion  
> of the  property in grass.  Is it possible I seen a Northern  
> Harrier?  It just doesn't feel like I should have.  Any other bird  
> with a white rump that it could have been?
>
> Kristy Baker
> Rockvale TN
> Rutherford Count
>


Subject: Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: "Ford, Robert" <robert_p_ford AT fws.gov>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 12:27:43 -0400
Yep, harrier is a bird of field and marsh . . .thought I would share an
interesting past observation though.  A few years ago I was in the field,
and on 2 occasions in late winter/early spring, I flushed a harrier out of
a small grassy patch in a small opening in thick forest a little before
sunrise.  I assumed roosting there, maybe in migration.  But that's not to
be "expected".

Bob Ford
Haywood County, TN

On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 11:18 AM, Chris Sloan  wrote:

> A harrier is possible this time of year.  They are migrating now and
> certainly should be passing through Tennessee.  That said, harriers are
> field and marsh birds, not forest birds, so if it came out of the forest it
> is unlikely to have been harrier.  If it truly had a white rump, then
> harrier is really the only option because it is the only raptor found here
> with a white rump.  If it's possible that you just saw it from the side and
> maybe saw white undertail or vent, then more likely it was something else.
>
>
> Chris Sloan
> Nashville, TN
> http://www.chrissloanphotography.com
>
> On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 6:31 AM, Kristy L Baker 
> wrote:
>
>> * Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again.  I heard a
>> jay scolding back into the woods.  Soon other jays followed along with a
>> lot of other very agitated birds.  About 10 minutes later a large hawk
>> swooped from the woods, along the fence line and back up.  It was a large
>> hawk, brownish with a white rump patch.  I thought Northern Harrier and
>> dismissed it. I then told myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and
>> assumed it was a large Cooper's Hawk.  *
>>
>> *I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a
>> Northern Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house.  I had forgotten
>> all about it, but I recall it as flying low over the trees. *
>>
>> *We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision.  Two
>> sides of the property are along the woods with a large portion of the
>> property in grass.  Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier?  It just
>> doesn't feel like I should have.  Any other bird with a white rump that it
>> could have been?*
>>
>> *Kristy Baker*
>> *Rockvale TN*
>> *Rutherford Count*
>>
>
>
Subject: Black-throated Blue at Radnor Lake, Davidson Co.
From: Jan Shaw <jankshaw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 10:33:46 -0500
9-23-2014
Radnor Lake
Davidson Co.

This morning a female Black-throated Blue Warbler was seen briefly by me
and Susie Russenberger. She had seen it earlier along the dam road, and
then we saw it together low in the hackberry at the point in front of the
ranger house. It worked its way toward the spillway bridge, but we never
relocated it. Later on, Kevin Bowden, Jim Arnett and I enjoyed a flurry of
warblers, including a male Golden-winged,  that seemed to be fussing at
something down low at that same point. Great morning to be out.

barred owl
pewee
warbling vireo
red-eyed vireo
wood thrush
cedar waxwing
blue-winged warbler
golden-winged
Tennessee
Nashville
yellow warbler
chestnut-sided
magnolia
black-throated blue
black-throated green
yellow-throated
bay-breasted
black-and-white
redstart
summer tanager
rose-breasted grosbeak

Jan Shaw
Nashville, TN
Subject: Re: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: Chris Sloan <csloan1973 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 10:18:07 -0500
A harrier is possible this time of year.  They are migrating now and
certainly should be passing through Tennessee.  That said, harriers are
field and marsh birds, not forest birds, so if it came out of the forest it
is unlikely to have been harrier.  If it truly had a white rump, then
harrier is really the only option because it is the only raptor found here
with a white rump.  If it's possible that you just saw it from the side and
maybe saw white undertail or vent, then more likely it was something else.


Chris Sloan
Nashville, TN
http://www.chrissloanphotography.com

On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 6:31 AM, Kristy L Baker 
wrote:

> * Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again.  I heard a
> jay scolding back into the woods.  Soon other jays followed along with a
> lot of other very agitated birds.  About 10 minutes later a large hawk
> swooped from the woods, along the fence line and back up.  It was a large
> hawk, brownish with a white rump patch.  I thought Northern Harrier and
> dismissed it. I then told myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and
> assumed it was a large Cooper's Hawk.  *
>
> *I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a
> Northern Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house.  I had forgotten
> all about it, but I recall it as flying low over the trees. *
>
> *We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision.  Two
> sides of the property are along the woods with a large portion of the
> property in grass.  Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier?  It just
> doesn't feel like I should have.  Any other bird with a white rump that it
> could have been?*
>
> *Kristy Baker*
> *Rockvale TN*
> *Rutherford Count*
>
Subject: Take 2 :Hawk ID Question
From: Kristy L Baker <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 06:31:45 -0500
 Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again. I heard a jay 
scolding back into the woods. Soon other jays followed along with a lot of 
other very agitated birds. About 10 minutes later a large hawk swooped from the 
woods, along the fence line and back up. It was a large hawk, brownish with a 
white rump patch. I thought Northern Harrier and dismissed it. I then told 
myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and assumed it was a large 
Cooper's Hawk. 


I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a Northern 
Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house. I had forgotten all about it, 
but I recall it as flying low over the trees. 


We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision. Two sides of 
the property are along the woods with a large portion of the property in grass. 
Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier? It just doesn't feel like I should 
have. Any other bird with a white rump that it could have been? 


Kristy Baker
Rockvale TN
Rutherford Count
Subject: An honor for shorebirds everywhere
From: Gaynell Perry <gcperry1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 08:11:38 -0500
I thought TN-birders would want to know that David Allen Sibley, author of The 
Sibley Guide to Birds, has prepared a limited edition print to support 
shorebird conservation in the Lower Mississippi River Basin. 


It is a real honor for Mr. Sibley to prepare a custom print for this cause and 
donate a portion of the proceeds to Delta Wind Birds to support their shorebird 
habitat program in the region. The greater impact of Mr. Sibley's artwork will 
be to raise awareness of shorebird conversation efforts by groups throughout 
the region. 


Additional information, as well as an image of the print, can be found at Mr. 
Sibley's website: 

http://www.sibleyguides.com/2014/09/print-to-benefit-delta-wind-birds/

You can show your appreciation of Mr. Sibley's support of shorebird habitat by 
"Liking" the post on his Facebook page: 
https://www.facebook.com/DavidAllenSibley 


Gaynell Perry
Shelby County





Subject: Thrushes
From: "Tom Howe" <blountbirder AT nxs.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 07:26:12 -0400
Sept 23, 2014

Blount Co.                     

 

There was a good movement of thrushes last night. Between 6:30 to 6:45 this
morning I heard at least 30 Swainson's Thrushes and 4 Gray-cheeks.

Tom Howe

Alcoa
Subject: South Africa photos
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 23:15:22 -0500
​Photographs from trip that TOS members Chad Brown, Laura Crane and I made
to South Africa August 24 - September 3 are available at
www.flickr.com/photos/shelbyforester1223/sets/

Van Haris
Millington, TN
Subject: Hawk ID Question
From: "Kristy L. Baker" <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 21:28:56 -0500
Sunday afternoon I was watching birds from the porch again. I heard a jay 
scolding back into the woods. Soon other jays followed along with a lot of 
other very agitated birds. About 10 minutes later a large hawk swooped from the 
woods, along the fence line and back up. It was a large hawk, brownish with a 
white rump patch. I thought Northern Harrier and dismissed it. I then told 
myself I must have seen the front of the hawk and assumed it was a large 
Cooper's Hawk. 


I was reviewing some of my eBird listings and see that I recorded a Northern 
Harrier a couple of Januarys ago at the house. I had forgotten all about it, 
but I recall it as flying low over the trees. 


We have just under 2.5 acres at the back of a rural subdivision. Two sides of 
the property are along the woods with a large portion of the property in grass. 
Is it possible I seen a Northern Harrier? It just doesn't feel like I should 
have. Any other bird with a white rump that it could have been? 


Kristy Baker
Rockvale TN
Rutherford County 91L  
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Subject: GWWA in Sevier County and other Warblers and Thrushes: Finally
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 02:13:59 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday's frontal passage apparently brought with it the long sought after 
thrushes. I had 15 Swainson's and 2 Gray-cheeked in a short walk on Grassy 
Branch Road near the gap, here in Pittman Center. At a friends house near 
there, I found yet another GWWA, Bay-breasted, Cape May, N. Parula, Am. 
Redstart, Black-throated Green, and Tennessee warblers, 20+ Scarlet Tanagers, 5 
Summer Tanager (3 adult males). 


Closer to home at the foot of the ridge, Tennessee, Blackburnian, 
Chestnut-sided, Am. Redstart warblers, White-eyed Vireo, Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak. Great day of birding locally. 


I surpassed my personal goal of getting 180 species in Sevier County this year, 
am now at 181, and aiming higher! 


Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN