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Updated on Wednesday, August 31 at 11:13 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Lesser Grey Shrike,©Tony Disley

31 Aug Greenway migrants ["Aborn, David" ]
31 Aug Pace Point Gulls and Terns [Ruben Stoll ]
31 Aug Least FL, warblers - Knox []
30 Aug Laughing Gull, Bairds and Western Sandpipers [Ruben Stoll ]
30 Aug New yard bird [van harris ]
30 Aug Re: Trees [Greg Tomerlin ]
30 Aug Re: Trees ["" ]
30 Aug Re: Trees [Greg Tomerlin ]
30 Aug Re: Reelfoot to Memphis Labor Day Weekend Birding Adventure [mrtcarr ]
30 Aug First of Season Birchwood Warblers [Charles Murray ]
29 Aug Buff-breasted Sandpipers at Eagleville Sod Farms ["Chloe Walker" ]
29 Aug Re: Trees []
29 Aug Trees [Jesse ]
29 Aug CANCELLED: Shorebird DVD viewing party [Jay S. ]
29 Aug Hamilton County Warblers [Hugh Barger ]
29 Aug Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 2016 ["Sumrall, Colin D" ]
29 Aug Latest Results of TBRC Voting [Ruben Stoll ]
28 Aug Davidson County-Radnor Lake - few warblers ["Ann Inouye" ]
29 Aug Re: Polk County []
28 Aug Fwd: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 2016 [Ruben Stoll ]
28 Aug Red Phalarope still present Aug 28, Cocke County ["LeGrand family" ]
28 Aug Sanderling yes [fndrbndr59 ]
28 Aug Tennessee August Big Day [Ruben Stoll ]
28 Aug Sanderling [Stephen Zipperer ]
28 Aug New Perry County Yard Birds [Ruben Stoll ]
28 Aug Re: Old Hickory Sanderling [Justin Hiltner ]
28 Aug Sanderling Snow Bunting Peninsula 8/28 ~0800 [Latour Paul ]
28 Aug Sanderling Snow Bunting Peninsula boat ramp 8/28 ~8am [Latour Paul ]
28 Aug Old Hickory Sanderling [Andy Lantz ]
28 Aug NTOS Fall Count [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
28 Aug Polk County [rick houlk ]
27 Aug Red Phalarope ["Ron Hoff" ]
27 Aug Migrating Nighthawks [Jay S. ]
27 Aug Black Terns at Old Hickory Lake, Davidson Co. [Jan Shaw ]
27 Aug Old Hickory Lake Sanderling [Michael Smith ]
27 Aug Coffee Co. golden plovers [Susan McWhirter ]
27 Aug Eagleville Sod Farm [Stephen Zipperer ]
27 Aug Looking for the Red Phalarope? [Bates Estabrooks ]
26 Aug warbler arrivals ["Richard Knight" ]
26 Aug Red Phalarope [RONALD D HOFF ]
26 Aug Red Phalarope Yes at Dutch bottoms this morning [Bates Estabrooks ]
26 Aug American Avocet [rick houlk ]
25 Aug American Avocet [rick houlk ]
25 Aug Swallow-tailed Kites in West Tennessee! ["Mark Greene" ]
25 Aug Eagle Bend hatchery - dowitcher ["Ron Hoff" ]
25 Aug Pickwick Dam Tailwaters [Martin Hall ]
25 Aug Swallow-tailed Kites still in Sequatchie Valley, Bledsoe County ["LeGrand family" ]
25 Aug Knoxville: Shorebird Identification DVD Viewing Party [Jay S. ]
25 Aug September KTOS Field Trips and Jay Walks [Jay S. ]
24 Aug Re: Red Phalarope? [Ruben Stoll ]
24 Aug Red Phalarope? [Bates Estabrooks ]
24 Aug Mississippi Kite in Washington Co. ["Richard Knight" ]
24 Aug NTOS FALL Count [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
24 Aug NTOS FALL Bird Count [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
24 Aug Re: Rankin Bottoms Tues evening 8/23: Wilson's Phalarope, Bairds and Buff-breasted Sandpipers, Ruddy Turnstone [michael sledjeski ]
24 Aug Rankin Bottoms Tues evening 8/23: Wilson's Phalarope, Bairds and Buff-breasted Sandpipers, Ruddy Turnstone ["Welsh, Christopher J E" ]
23 Aug Re: Dutch Bottoms Red Phalarope [Sara Smith ]
23 Aug Memphis Teal [Ruben Stoll ]
23 Aug Dutch Bottoms Red Phalarope [Ruben Stoll ]
23 Aug Montgomery Co. Miss. Kite [Steve Routledge ]
23 Aug Reelfoot to Memphis Labor Day Weekend Birding Adventure []
23 Aug Rankin Bottoms [Morton Massey ]
23 Aug Red Phalarope ["" ]
23 Aug Re: Red Phalarope [Ed Schneider ]
23 Aug Chestnut-sided Warbler: Nashville [Jim Arnett ]
23 Aug Red phalarope [Morton Massey ]
23 Aug Odd Duck ["Aborn, David" ]
23 Aug Red Phalarope ["" ]
23 Aug GHOW in backyard [Graham ]
23 Aug Rankin Shorebirds [michael sledjeski ]
23 Aug Mississippi Kite - Davidson Co. [Ed Schneider ]
23 Aug Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in Knox Co. [Jay S. ]
22 Aug No rare birds at Pits ["George's McNeil" ]
22 Aug Re: Update on indentity of Cades Cove Red Crossbills [Greg Tomerlin ]
22 Aug Re: Tricolored Heron/Spoonbill Shelby County []
22 Aug Re: Update on indentity of Cades Cove Red Crossbills [Stefan Woltmann ]

Subject: Greenway migrants
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 16:09:47 +0000
31 August 2016
Hamilton County, TN

The first day of fall migration banding a Greenway Farm got off to a good (and 
hot!) start. 


Banded:

Canada Warbler = 2
Black-and-white Warbler = 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee = 1
White-eyed Vireo = 1
Veery = 1

Seen:

Baltimore Oriole = 1
Yellow-throated Warbler = 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher = 4

David Aborn
Chattanooga, TN
Subject: Pace Point Gulls and Terns
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 11:00:53 -0500
August 31st, 2016
  Nice numbers of Gulls and Terns using Pace Point in Henry County at
current water levels on Kentucky Lake.
  The area averaged 400-500 Ring-billed Gulls and 80-100 Caspian Terns
while I was there this morning  (5:00-9:30 a.m.)
   2 first cycle LAUGHING GULLS were there all morning, and a third first
cycle bird and an adult passed through, making a total of four Laughing
Gulls.
  Around 8:30 a large group of medium-sized Terns arrived from the North
and fed over the lake for a while before settling in on the island.
  Best I could tell, there were 52 COMMON TERNS and 8 FORSTER'S TERNS in
the group. Most of them were still mostly in alternate plumage, with a few
entirely in basic plumage.
  2 of the 18 BLACK TERNS seen here yesterday were still hanging around.
  Other good birds at Pace were a flyover BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON at
dawn, and my FOS  SWAINSON'S THRUSH seen well with a group of passerines.

Good birding! Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Least FL, warblers - Knox
From: kde AT angst.engr.utk.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2016 10:07:34 -0400 (EDT)
Things were slow in the yard Wed morning (31 Aug, west Knox Co) until I 
turned the sprinkler on aimed at some hickory saplings.  Very quickly had 
a LEAST FLYCATCHER come in to bathe and dash through the streams.  Very 
fresh plumage, prominent eyering, very short primary projection, fairly 
broad bill mostly yellow underneath with a bit of a dark tip.  Spent about 
2-3 minutes bathing then disappeared.

A Red-eyed Vireo and the titmice and chickadees also came to bathe.

My FOF Chestnut-sided and Magnolia Warblers made quick passes through the 
yard but did not visit the sprinkler.


Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Laughing Gull, Bairds and Western Sandpipers
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 21:05:40 -0500
   August 30th, 2016
  I paddled out to the Duck River Islands to check for the Willets and
Marbled Godwit this afternoon.
  Negative on both, but there were several new arrivals in spite of
increasing water levels.
  Here is a connection for a complete checklist with some diagnostic but
poor quality photos attached.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Aug 30, 2016 8:56 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 30, 2016
To: 
Cc:

Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Humphreys, Tennessee, US
Aug 30, 2016 1:30 PM - 2:35 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Done by kayak via Tie Landing. 
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.2 30 species Wood Duck 7 Double-crested Cormorant 10 American White Pelican 42 Great Blue Heron 6 Great Egret 85 Turkey Vulture 6 Broad-winged Hawk 1 Semipalmated Plover 10 Photographed. Killdeer 1 Stilt Sandpiper 1 Photographed. Baird's Sandpiper 1 Photographed. Least Sandpiper 22 Photographed. Pectoral Sandpiper 15 Photographed. Semipalmated Sandpiper 10 Photographed. Western Sandpiper 6 Actual count, photographed. Spotted Sandpiper 1 Laughing Gull 1 Adult, photographed. Ring-billed Gull 14 Caspian Tern 35 Forster's Tern 1 Mourning Dove 1 Belted Kingfisher 1 White-eyed Vireo 1 American Crow 4 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 4 Bank Swallow 2 Barn Swallow 3 Eastern Bluebird 1 Northern Cardinal 2 Indigo Bunting 1 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ checklist/S31335385 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: New yard bird
From: van harris <shelbyforester1223 AT rittermail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 17:58:44 -0400 (EDT)
A Yellow-bellied Flycatcher drank from the bird bath on my deck in nw Shelby 
County today. Yard bird #152. 


Van Harris 
Millington, TN 
Subject: Re: Trees
From: Greg Tomerlin <cedarbees AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 15:34:02 -0500
​Thank you for adding this, Damien. I intended to conclude my reply with
that very same plea but forgot to. There are no Bradford pears on our
property, but they are everywhere around me. If you're in middle Tennessee
and want to see how invasive these pear trees can be, take a stroll around
the Greenway at Crooked Branch Park in Lakewood, Nashville Tennessee. It's
right along the Cumberland River​ and those bottoms are filled with those
Callary pear trees. Same thing on the Stones River Greenway along the
Stones River and probably every other river bottom nearby.

*Best, Greg*
*cedarbees AT gmail.com *


On Tue, Aug 30, 2016 at 3:03 PM,  wrote:

> Concerning Bradford Pears (and Cleveland Pears,  same species): DO NOT
> plant them for birds/wildlife.  Waxwings, Starlings and Robins,  among
> others,  do eat them and then spread the seeds everywhere.  The offspring,
> callery pears,  are extremely invasive and are spreading at an alarming
> rate throughout the area. They will likely become as uncontrollable as all
> the other invasives (privet,  mimosa,  etc.). Unlike Bradford's, callery
> pears have large thorns,  making control a painful and sometimes expensive
> (flat tires on equipment) endeavor.  They can turn a nice grass field
> (Grasshopper/Henslow's sparrow,  quail habitat) into a thorn scrub thicket
> in less than five years. They also tolerate fire well, so that is not a
> management option for grasslands. We (TVA) fight them constantly on our
> grasslands and, unfortunately, may be losing the war.
>
> Damien Simbeck
> Killen AL
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> ------------------------------
> On Tuesday, August 30, 2016 Greg Tomerlin  wrote:
> Just a note on attracting drupe- and fruit-loving birds. Keep your eyes on
> poke sallet along the roadside and brush piles this time of year. Cedar
> waxwings love those deep purple poke berries. Then long about November and
> December, before any hard freezes, cedar waxwings will eat those tiny pears
> on Bradford pear trees. I'm not sure if they like the pears or eat them out
> of necessity because they leave way more hanging than they eat, but they do
> eat some of them.
>
> And finally, our red mulberry tree attracts rose-breasted grosbeaks and
> cedar waxwings every spring. It also attracts robins, starlings and
> mockingbirds. The rose-breasted grosbeaks look like they've been in a
> fistfight after just a few minutes chomping on those juicy blueberries.
> Their beaks and faces look bloodied.
>
> *Best, Greg*
> *cedarbees AT gmail.com *
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 29, 2016 at 3:23 PM,  wrote:
>
>>
>> Just be sure to plant the native Red Mulberry and not the highly invasive,
>> non-native White Mulberry.
>>
>> Dean Edwards
>> Knoxville, TN
>>
>>
>>
>> On Mon, 29 Aug 2016, Jesse wrote:
>>
>> > If you have the room for it, I would like to suggest you plant a
>> Mulberry
>> > tree.  We have two in our yard and they are full of birds when berries
>> are
>> > ripe. Only problem is that if allowed to, the trees will cover a pretty
>> good
>> > area and may need to be cut back every few years.  Well worth the bother
>> > though if you like birds to be happy in your yard. We planted the first
>> one so
>> > birds would eat the berries instead of our pie cherries.  Works great
>> as both
>> > have fruit at same time.
>> >
>> > Jesse Livingston,
>> > North Old Troy Rd, Obion county
>> > Troy, TN
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: Trees
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 16:03:26 -0400
Concerning Bradford Pears (and Cleveland Pears, same species): DO NOT plant 
them for birds/wildlife. Waxwings, Starlings and Robins, among others, do eat 
them and then spread the seeds everywhere. The offspring, callery pears, are 
extremely invasive and are spreading at an alarming rate throughout the area. 
They will likely become as uncontrollable as all the other invasives (privet, 
mimosa, etc.). Unlike Bradford's, callery pears have large thorns, making 
control a painful and sometimes expensive (flat tires on equipment) endeavor. 
They can turn a nice grass field (Grasshopper/Henslow's sparrow, quail habitat) 
into a thorn scrub thicket in less than five years. They also tolerate fire 
well, so that is not a management option for grasslands. We (TVA) fight them 
constantly on our grasslands and, unfortunately, may be losing the war. 


Damien Simbeck
Killen AL

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

On Tuesday, August 30, 2016 Greg Tomerlin  wrote:

Just a note on attracting drupe- and fruit-loving birds. Keep your eyes on poke 
sallet along the roadside and brush piles this time of year. Cedar waxwings 
love those deep purple poke berries. Then long about November and December, 
before any hard freezes, cedar waxwings will eat those tiny pears on Bradford 
pear trees. I'm not sure if they like the pears or eat them out of necessity 
because they leave way more hanging than they eat, but they do eat some of 
them. 



And finally, our red mulberry tree attracts rose-breasted grosbeaks and cedar 
waxwings every spring. It also attracts robins, starlings and mockingbirds. The 
rose-breasted grosbeaks look like they've been in a fistfight after just a few 
minutes chomping on those juicy blueberries. Their beaks and faces look 
bloodied. 



Best, Greg
cedarbees AT gmail.com



On Mon, Aug 29, 2016 at 3:23 PM,  wrote:


Just be sure to plant the native Red Mulberry and not the highly invasive,
non-native White Mulberry.

Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN




On Mon, 29 Aug 2016, Jesse wrote:

> If you have the room for it, I would like to suggest you plant a Mulberry
> tree.  We have two in our yard and they are full of birds when berries are
> ripe. Only problem is that if allowed to, the trees will cover a pretty good
> area and may need to be cut back every few years.  Well worth the bother
> though if you like birds to be happy in your yard. We planted the first one 
so 

> birds would eat the berries instead of our pie cherries.  Works great as 
both 

> have fruit at same time.
>
> Jesse Livingston,
> North Old Troy Rd, Obion county
> Troy, TN

Subject: Re: Trees
From: Greg Tomerlin <cedarbees AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 14:01:37 -0500
Just a note on attracting drupe- and fruit-loving birds. Keep your eyes on
poke sallet along the roadside and brush piles this time of year. Cedar
waxwings love those deep purple poke berries. Then long about November and
December, before any hard freezes, cedar waxwings will eat those tiny pears
on Bradford pear trees. I'm not sure if they like the pears or eat them out
of necessity because they leave way more hanging than they eat, but they do
eat some of them.

And finally, our red mulberry tree attracts rose-breasted grosbeaks and
cedar waxwings every spring. It also attracts robins, starlings and
mockingbirds. The rose-breasted grosbeaks look like they've been in a
fistfight after just a few minutes chomping on those juicy blueberries.
Their beaks and faces look bloodied.

*Best, Greg*
*cedarbees AT gmail.com *


On Mon, Aug 29, 2016 at 3:23 PM,  wrote:

>
> Just be sure to plant the native Red Mulberry and not the highly invasive,
> non-native White Mulberry.
>
> Dean Edwards
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
>
> On Mon, 29 Aug 2016, Jesse wrote:
>
> > If you have the room for it, I would like to suggest you plant a Mulberry
> > tree.  We have two in our yard and they are full of birds when berries
> are
> > ripe. Only problem is that if allowed to, the trees will cover a pretty
> good
> > area and may need to be cut back every few years.  Well worth the bother
> > though if you like birds to be happy in your yard. We planted the first
> one so
> > birds would eat the berries instead of our pie cherries.  Works great as
> both
> > have fruit at same time.
> >
> > Jesse Livingston,
> > North Old Troy Rd, Obion county
> > Troy, TN
>
Subject: Re: Reelfoot to Memphis Labor Day Weekend Birding Adventure
From: mrtcarr <mrtcarr AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 18:19:11 +0000 (UTC)
 
|  
|  
|    |

  |
|  
| Hi Stephen,I apologize for sending the facebook message. I don't know what I 
was thinking. But I wanted you to know that my husband and I plan on coming to 
the big adventure this weekend and are looking forward to some good birding. I 
have never been on any of these adventures so I wanted to ask a few questions. 
My husband doesn't drive much anymore and we are both pretty much vehicle bound 
because of some health issues but it doesn't stop me from driving and birding 
from the car. Just wanted you to know that I won't be able to walk trails or 
anything. Does everyone follow one another to the different locations? There 
may be some of them that I'm not familiar with. If you could kind of give me an 
idea how you guys do this I would appreciate it.So excited about it and there 
is a cold front coming through Friday I think so that may help push them our 
way. 

Sincerely,Ruth Carr   |

  |
|  
|    |

  |

 |
|  
|    |         att.net Mail Stationery     |

  |

 

 On Tuesday, August 23, 2016 5:35 PM, "stczipperer AT gmail.com" 
 wrote: 

 

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: First of Season Birchwood Warblers
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 00:25:41 +0000
I only had enough time to do about one and one-half hours of birding in late 
morning around my property in Birchwood (Hamilton County) today. However, I did 
see three first-of-season migratory warblers. The first one I observed was a 
male Canada Warbler. Then a juvenile Chestnut-sided Warbler was noted. Finally 
I got about a two second look at a warbler that I could not identify with any 
certainty. I'm pretty confident that the bird was either a Connecticut Warbler 
or a Mourning Warbler because of the gray feathers on the head and throat. 
Either of these species would be a life bird for me! Maybe it will show up 
again tomorrow. Wishful thinking? 

Charles Murray
Birchwood, TN
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpipers at Eagleville Sod Farms
From: "Chloe Walker" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "chloebelle119" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 21:11:10 +0000 (UTC)
3 Buff-breasted Sandpipers seen at 3:30 P.M. today. Also present were 5 Least 
Sandpipers and 1 Semipalmated Sandpiper. 

Nolan WalkerMurfreesboro, TN
Subject: Re: Trees
From: kde AT angst.engr.utk.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:23:38 -0400 (EDT)
Just be sure to plant the native Red Mulberry and not the highly invasive, 
non-native White Mulberry.

Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN



On Mon, 29 Aug 2016, Jesse wrote:

> If you have the room for it, I would like to suggest you plant a Mulberry
> tree.  We have two in our yard and they are full of birds when berries are
> ripe. Only problem is that if allowed to, the trees will cover a pretty good
> area and may need to be cut back every few years.  Well worth the bother
> though if you like birds to be happy in your yard. We planted the first one 
so 

> birds would eat the berries instead of our pie cherries.  Works great as both
> have fruit at same time.
> 
> Jesse Livingston,
> North Old Troy Rd, Obion county
> Troy, TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Trees
From: Jesse <fernj1 AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:11:33 +0000
If you have the room for it, I would like to suggest you plant a 
Mulberry tree.  We have two in our yard and they are full of birds when 
berries are ripe. Only problem is that if allowed to, the trees will 
cover a pretty good area and may need to be cut back every few years.  
Well worth the bother though if you like birds to be happy in your yard. 
We planted the first one so birds would eat the berries instead of our 
pie cherries.  Works great as both have fruit at same time.

Jesse Livingston,
North Old Troy Rd, Obion county
Troy, TN
Subject: CANCELLED: Shorebird DVD viewing party
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 17:41:36 +0000
the shorebird DVD viewing party that was to take place at Ijams NAture Center 
in Knoxville has been cancelled. 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: Hamilton County Warblers
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 13:08:08 -0400
This morning I walked the Hardy trail on Lookout Mountain beginning at
Cravens House. The warblers seen were:

American redstart - female
Blackburnian - female
Canada - male
Chestnut-sided - first year?
Hooded - male

Also observed were several blue-gray gnatchatchers, at least 4 white-eyed
vireos, 2 scarlet tanagers, pileated woodpecker, a broadwinged hawk as well
as the expected resident birds- n. cardinals, chickadees, titmice, downy
woodpeckers, american robins and Carolina wrens

​Hugh Barger
Ooltewah​

-- 
Hugh Barger
Subject: Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 2016
From: "Sumrall, Colin D" <csumrall AT utk.edu>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 15:07:51 +0000
I am worried that if we do not send in at least three names we may not be asked 
t play next year. Does it hurt submitting Seth’s name this year and have him 
not picked because of the green factor? They are seeing Sarah at GSA so it 
makes little sense sending in her name. 


Colin
________________________________
Colin D. Sumrall PhD
Assistant Professor of Paleobiology
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
The University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996
csumrall AT utk.edu
(865) 974-0400

www.researchgate.net/profile/Colin_Sumrall




From: > on 
behalf of Ruben Stoll 

Reply-To: "birdchaserrws AT gmail.com"
Date: Sunday, August 28, 2016 at 7:27 PM
To: "tn-bird AT freelists.org"
Subject: [TN-Bird] Fwd: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 
2016 



  Marbled Godwit, Willets, etc. at the Duck River Unit.
 The map attached to this checklist is for Tie Landing, where I put in my 
kayak, and also in sight of the island that is currently hosting shorebirds. 

 The island can also be seen from Refuge RD. in the Duck River Unit, TNWR. 
(Both places very distant without a kayak. 

  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: >
Date: Aug 28, 2016 6:20 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 2016
To: >
Cc:

Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Humphreys, Tennessee, US
Aug 28, 2016 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.8 mile(s)
Comments:     Kayak from Tie Landing. 
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.2 30 species Wood Duck 6 Double-crested Cormorant 10 American White Pelican 24 Great Blue Heron 6 Great Egret 40 Turkey Vulture 2 Osprey 1 Bald Eagle 1 Killdeer 8 Marbled Godwit 1 Unmistakable ID. Photographed. Stilt Sandpiper 1 Least Sandpiper 5 Pectoral Sandpiper 6 Semipalmated Sandpiper 10 Western Sandpiper 2 Spotted Sandpiper 1 Greater Yellowlegs 1 Willet 4 Looked good for Western Willets. Present since yesterday. Lesser Yellowlegs 10 Ring-billed Gull 10 Caspian Tern 40 Black Tern 18 Mourning Dove 2 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 Pileated Woodpecker 1 American Crow 4 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3 Barn Swallow 1 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31298882 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Latest Results of TBRC Voting
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 06:05:22 -0500
  August 29th, 2016
  Current TBRC (Tennessee Bird Records Committee) members are Phillip
Casteel, Ron Hoff, Daniel Jacobson, David Kirschke, Chris Sloan, Ruben
Stoll and Terry Witt.

  Our job is to review submitted documentation, discuss and vote on it, and
update and maintain the official list of the birds of Tennessee.
  You can see the list, download documentation forms, see our bylaws, etc.
on the TBRC section of the TOS website.

  I also want to thank everyone who has taken the time to submit
documentation. It's not everyone's favorite task, but it is a very
important one.
  If you don't see your record on this list, that's because we are still
working on it, and it will be in the next report.

  Here are the results of the latest TBRC voting;

CINNAMON TEAL, 1 male found and photographed by Leo Schrock  at the New
Johnsonville WTP in Humphreys County on March 29th, 2013. Accepted 6-0

  PURPLE GALLINULE, found and photographed by Ruben Stoll at the Duck River
Unit, TNWR in Humphreys County on April 28th, 2013. Accepted 6-0

  SWALLOW-TAILED KITE, found and photographed by Ruth Schrock in
Lobelville, TN, Perry County on May 18th, 2015. Accepted 6-0

  BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, 2 immature birds found and photographed by Ruben
Stoll and Alan Troyer at Pickwick Dam in Hardin County on November 30th,
2016, and seen by many observers through at least December 18th, 2016.
Accepted 6-0

  LESSER GOLDFINCH, 1 male found and photographed by Mark Greene at the
Reelfoot Airpark Campground in Lake County on January 5th, 2016, and
accepted 6-0 as a first state record.

  SNOW BUNTING found and photographed by Mark Greene in a snow storm,  Hwy.
45W just North of jct. with Old Dyersburg Rd. in Gibson County on January
22nd, 2016, accepted 6-0

  YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD, 1st year male, found by Mark Greene on Trimble
Road in Dyer County on January 26th, 2016, accepted 6-0

  PAINTED BUNTING, female type, found and well-documented by Jamin Beachy
at 1235 Delano Rd. in Polk County on April 24th, 2016. Accepted 6-0

  Please send in documentation for any records you might have of species on
the review list that is found in the TBRC Section of the TOS website.

Thanks, Ruben Stoll, secretary for the TBRC. birdchaserrws AT gmail.com
Subject: Davidson County-Radnor Lake - few warblers
From: "Ann Inouye" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "cis_135" for DMARC)
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 21:56:40 -0500
Nashville, TN
Davidson County
8-28-2016, Sunday 

My husband and I walked around Radnor Lake this morning and were lucky to find 
a mixed flock of warblers while pausing at the new observation deck to see 
three River Otters We also saw mixed flock of warblers at two other locations. 
There were only one of each species that we saw. 

Warbler list:
Magnolia 
Black and white
Tennessee 
Nashville 
Hooded
Prothonotary 
American Redstart 

There has also been a Great Egret that has been hanging out where the small 
side creek meets Radnor Lake closest to the East Parking Lot. According to a 
park ranger the Great Egret arrived Tuesday evening, August 23. 


~~Ann Inouye 
     Nashville, TN


~~Ann 🌎
Subject: Re: Polk County
From: TenacBirder AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 02:18:39 +0000 (UTC)
Polk co., TN
Clemmer Ferry Rd.

We stopped by the farm pond Sunday at various times between 3:15 and 4:30. We 
did not 

see the American Avocet during that time frame. ~4:30 it had started to rain 
heavily 

so we decided to head for Cherohala Skyway. As we returned to the farm pond at 
7:50PM 

there was something white near the lower end of the pond. Turns out it was the 
American 

Avocet running around as if it was going to a fire!

Earlier we had also seen 5 Western Sandpipers on a small spit of land near the 
middle of 

the pond. The Western's were gone when we returned later and so was the spit of 
land. 

There must have been a lot of water runoff from the rain to have covered that 
much dry land. 


Cynthia and Jimmy Wilkerson
Hixson, Hamilton co., TN




----- Original Message -----
From: rick houlk 
To: TN-birds Listserv 
Sent: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 07:40:28 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: [TN-Bird] Polk County

American Avocet still present at Highway 411 and Clemmer Ferry Road as of 
Saturday at 4 pm. 


Rick Houlk
Polk County

Get Outlook for Android

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 2016
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 18:27:15 -0500
  Marbled Godwit, Willets, etc. at the Duck River Unit.
  The map attached to this checklist is for Tie Landing, where I put in my
kayak, and also in sight of the island that is currently hosting
shorebirds.
  The island can also be seen from Refuge RD. in the Duck River Unit, TNWR.
(Both places very distant without a kayak.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Aug 28, 2016 6:20 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Aug 28, 2016
To: 
Cc:

Waverly, 100 Tie Landing Ln, Humphreys, Tennessee, US
Aug 28, 2016 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.8 mile(s)
Comments:     Kayak from Tie Landing. 
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.2 30 species Wood Duck 6 Double-crested Cormorant 10 American White Pelican 24 Great Blue Heron 6 Great Egret 40 Turkey Vulture 2 Osprey 1 Bald Eagle 1 Killdeer 8 Marbled Godwit 1 Unmistakable ID. Photographed. Stilt Sandpiper 1 Least Sandpiper 5 Pectoral Sandpiper 6 Semipalmated Sandpiper 10 Western Sandpiper 2 Spotted Sandpiper 1 Greater Yellowlegs 1 Willet 4 Looked good for Western Willets. Present since yesterday. Lesser Yellowlegs 10 Ring-billed Gull 10 Caspian Tern 40 Black Tern 18 Mourning Dove 2 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 Pileated Woodpecker 1 American Crow 4 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3 Barn Swallow 1 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ checklist/S31298882 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Red Phalarope still present Aug 28, Cocke County
From: "LeGrand family" <elegrand AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 15:23:44 -0500
The Red Phalarope was still present Sunday around noon in (not on) the old 
concrete road in the bed of Douglas Lake. Using Ron and Dollyann’s excellent 
directions (attached below), Dan Combs and I checked from the bank on the way 
to Rankin Bottoms, but couldn’t find the bird or the Sanderlings (though we 
did find the immature Laughing Gull and the single Caspian and Forster’s 
Terns among the Ring-billed Gulls on the bar farther to the right). Upon 
returning an hour later, the apparent Red Phalarope flew up with a flock of 
Canada Geese from in between the two sections of concrete road. It flew left 
and disappeared at the concrete road. Upon slowly walking in the lake bed to 
the road, we found the bird hidden among the slabs in the road. We were able to 
get good looks as it probed around and then briefly swam beside the concrete 
road, demonstrating its phalaropeness (phalaropicity?). A Sanderling flew in, 
and two more were at the boat landing beside the 25E bridge. The Red Phalarope 
was still at the concrete road when we left. So, it might take some effort to 
find if it isn’t visible from the bank. The Wilson’s Phalarope was still 
present at Rankin Bottoms among only a few other shorebirds (scope definitely 
needed). 


 

Ed LeGrand

Cumberland Co., TN

From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of RONALD D HOFF 

Sent: Friday, August 26, 2016 2:56 PM
To: TN-birds Listserv 
Subject: [TN-Bird] Red Phalarope

 

TN-birders,

 

Dollyann and I found the Red Phalarope at Dutch Bottoms in Cocke Co. this 
afternoon at 3:30. The location is: go south from the bridge on 25E to the 
second business on the right. This small business is 0.2 miles past the sign 
for Emerald Pointe, which is on the left. The small store has a sign saying 
"Now serving Pepsi" on it. Park there and look behind the store. There is a 
remnant of a concrete road. On the right end of the concrete is where the 
Phalarope was, hanging out with 4 Sanderlings. There is a large concrete silo 
immediately to the left of the area. 


 

Great birding,

Ron Hoff and Dollyann Myers

Clinton, TN

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
 

Subject: Sanderling yes
From: fndrbndr59 <fndrbndr59 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 12:19:20 -0500
Davidson co 8-28-1611:00
Sanderling at Snow Bunting Peninsula still present when we left at 11:40. We 
just missed you Stephen! 

            Justin Nation             Wilson co 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S®6 active, an AT&T 4G LT smartphone
Subject: Tennessee August Big Day
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 11:11:26 -0500
  August 27th, 2016
  Alan Troyer and I did an August big day yesterday that started in our
area in Northeast Perry County to the Duck River Unit, TNWR, Humphreys
County, and ended in the Memphis area in Shelby County.

  Our more relaxed schedule from our July Big Day (16 hours, from 4 a.m. to
8 p.m., rather than the full 24 hours) shows in our species total. (130)
with many misses.

  Quite a few highlights still made the day enjoyable and successfull.

  Here are the ones I consider worth mentioning;


   GREEN-WINGED TEAL, resting on a sandbar in the Mississippi River, seen
from the North Treatment Plant. The only one of 7 waterfowl species that
was not anticipated.
  BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING DUCK, high count of 169 at TVA Lake at dusk.
  MISSISSIPPI KITE, juv. at Troyer Farm, good for Perry County. Many others
seen along route, with another high count for Humphreys County (16 at the
DRU)
  17 shorebird species, (the 18th wasn't counted, since we couldn't confirm
a possible PIPING PLOVER seen on a sandbar in the Mississippi River from
the North Treatment Plant. Small, very pale plover, with Killdeers and
doing the run-stop-pluck feeding of a plover, but in the afternoon heat
shimmer, too distant to see details. Bird disappeared when flushed by a
boat, and not seen again).
   BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, one in Big Stinky.
  AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER, one in Big Stinky.
  WILLET, 3 at the DRU on emerging mudflats in Kentucky Lake.
  STILT SANDPIPER, good numbers
  SANDERLING, one in Big Stinky.
  WESTERN SANDPIPER, several, scattered at the pits.
  DOWITCHER species, 1 at TVA Lake.

  CASPIAN TERN, several locations.
  BLACK TERN, several locations.
  FORSTER'S TERN, DRU.
  EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL, 3 singing at Stoll Farm.
  YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, Stoll Farm
  LEAST FLYCATCHER, Stoll Farm
  TRAILL'S FLYCATCHER, Ensley
  WESTERN KINGBIRD, Ensley
  WARBLING VIREO, Stoll Farm
  GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH, Arnold Cemetery rd, Hickman Co., calling before
daylight.

  15 warbler species, which equals our July Big Day, but Louisiana
Waterthrush, Cerulean, Blackburnian and Pine were replaced by WORM-EATING,
AMERICAN REDSTART, MAGNOLIA and CHESTNUT-SIDED, all from Stoll Farm.
  Other warblers not easily found were;
BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, Stoll Farm
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, Ensley
KENTUCKY WARBLER, Troyer Farm
HOODED WARBLER,  Troyer Farm
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, Troyer Farm

ORCHARD ORIOLE, Stoll Farm
BALTIMORE ORIOLE , Stoll Farm
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, flight calls heard pre-dawn as bird passed over the
Raptor Lookout.

  Here is the species list;
Black-bellied Whistling Duck
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Green-wingedTeal
Northern Bobwhite
Wild Turkey
Double-crested Cormorant
American White Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Mississippi Kite
Cooper's Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Black-necked Stilt
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Stilt Sandpiper
Sanderling
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Dowitcher species.
Ring-billed Gull
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Forster's Tern
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-dove
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-owl
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Eastern Whip-poor-will
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed woodpecker
Red-bellied woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Eastern Pewee
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Acadian Flycatcher
Traill's Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Western Kingbird
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Horned Lark
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Worm-eating Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Yellow-throatedWarbler
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Dickcissel
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow
Subject: Sanderling
From: Stephen Zipperer <stczipperer AT outlook.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 11:09:32 -0500




Subject: New Perry County Yard Birds
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 10:24:15 -0500
  August 27th and 28th, 2016
  Yesterday a KILLDEER was heard passing over my yard, calling, for #271
and my first yard shorebird ever. ( My yard has never had anything
resembling shorebird habitat).

  Later in the morning, Alan Troyer and I had a WARBLING VIREO  for #272.

  This morning a PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was seen foraging with Blue-winged,
Worm-eating, Chestnut-sided and Black-and-white Warblers for yard species
#273 and yard warbler #34. (That doesn't include Lawrence's or Brewster's
Warbler).
  A new small pond just over the property line may get the credit for the
Prothonotary showing up here for the first time in over 30 years.
  They are regular and common just a half mile down the road along Cane
Creek.
  Good birding, Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Re: Old Hickory Sanderling
From: Justin Hiltner <hiltnerj AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 09:37:12 -0500
Sanderling still present at 9:35am. Old Hickory Snow Bunting Peninsula.

First boat ramp moving clockwise around the peninsula.

-Justin Hiltner
Nashville, TN

On Sunday, August 28, 2016, Andy Lantz  wrote:

> The previously reported sanderling is currently feeding on a boat ramp on
> snow bunting peninsula. No terns present.
>
> Andy Lantz
> Davidson Co.
>
Subject: Sanderling Snow Bunting Peninsula 8/28 ~0800
From: Latour Paul <paullat AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 09:15:39 -0500

Latour Paul
paullat AT comcast.net



Subject: Sanderling Snow Bunting Peninsula boat ramp 8/28 ~8am
From: Latour Paul <paullat AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 09:09:58 -0500

Latour Paul
paullat AT comcast.net



Subject: Old Hickory Sanderling
From: Andy Lantz <dandypantz AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 13:32:01 +0000
The previously reported sanderling is currently feeding on a boat ramp on snow 
bunting peninsula. No terns present. 


Andy Lantz
Davidson Co.
Subject: NTOS Fall Count
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 02:50:35 -0500
Im still looking for volunteers in and around the Nashville area for the
annual NTOS Fall count on Saturday, SEPTEMBER 24TH.   With 9 different
locations there are various habitats and routes.  Please contact me at
routledges AT bellsouth.net if you are interested, have any questions or want
to sign up for specific route.

I thank you in advance for your volunteer spirit and your help with this
count.

<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
Southeastern Avian Research
Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
1515 N. Willow Bend Court
Clarksville, TN  37043
931-206-3517

Subject: Polk County
From: rick houlk <rhoulk AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 07:40:28 +0000
American Avocet still present at Highway 411 and Clemmer Ferry Road as of 
Saturday at 4 pm. 


Rick Houlk
Polk County

Get Outlook for Android
Subject: Red Phalarope
From: "Ron Hoff" <aves7000 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 21:08:20 -0400
TN-birders,

Just wanted to share a photo I took yesterday of the Red Phalarope at Dutch 
Bottoms, Cocke County. When I took this photo, the bird was less than 20 feet 
from us, feeding constantly, and couldn’t care less that we were standing 
there. Sweet! 


Great birding, 

Ron Hoff and Dollyann Myers
Clinton, TN
Subject: Migrating Nighthawks
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 23:54:09 +0000
Thirteen COMMON NIGHTHAWKS flew over my house in Knoxville tonight at 7:05. 
Then, at 7:32, thirteen more. Or were they the same ones circling back? Anyway, 
I've been seeing a few nighthawks here and there these past few days (I take my 
dinners outside during spring and fall migrations), but that was the biggest 
group so far. Hope next time it's thousands! 


Jay Sturner
Knox Co.

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Black Terns at Old Hickory Lake, Davidson Co.
From: Jan Shaw <jankshaw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 17:24:46 -0500
8-27-16

Mike Smith's Sanderling wasn't seen at Snow Bunting Peninsula this morning,
but Richard Connors and I had five Black Terns, a few Forster's Terns and
one possible Caspian Tern, plus one Osprey and two Great Egrets on Old
HIckory Lake today.

Jan Shaw
Nashville, TN
Subject: Old Hickory Lake Sanderling
From: Michael Smith <ms722 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 22:12:43 +0000 (UTC)
Snow Bunting Peninsula, Davidson Co. 8-27-16, 5:10 pm
Currently watching a Sanderling on one of the small boat ramps at snow bunting 
peninsula. 

Mike SmithHendersonville, TN

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Coffee Co. golden plovers
From: Susan McWhirter <snmcwhirter AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 15:53:08 -0600
The sod farm next to Bark Camp Barrens WMA, Coffee Co.,  has been very
unproductive for quite a while, but yesterday afternoon I had 5 American
Golden Plovers there.

Susan McWhirter
McMinnville, TN
Subject: Eagleville Sod Farm
From: Stephen Zipperer <stczipperer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 16:50:45 -0500
8/27/2016
Eagleville Sod Farm
Rutherford Co

Matt Erickson found 2 Buff-breasted Sandpipers and An Upland Sandpiper out
at the Eagleville Sod Farm this afternoon.  Chris Agee,  Victor Stoll,  and
I met up with him and saw the birds along with Least Sandpipers,  and
Horned Larks.

Good birding
Stephen Zipperer
Rutherford Co
Subject: Looking for the Red Phalarope?
From: Bates Estabrooks <wgpu AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 10:51:11 +0000
Adding to Ron's directions, here's some additional info. from my Tennessee 
Birding FB post, with a picture of the referenced business: 



https://www.facebook.com/groups/356185474468991/permalink/1144922292261968/


Please be reminded that this is private property.


Bates Estabrooks

Anderson County


Tennessee Birding Public Group | 
Facebook 

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Subject: warbler arrivals
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 21:23:39 -0400
I have seen a couple of northern warblers in the last few days:

Northern Waterthrush: 24 Aug in Washington Co, TN.

Tennessee Warbler: 26 Aug at Carver's Gap on Roan Mtn, Carter Co.

Signs of the season.

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: Red Phalarope
From: RONALD D HOFF <aves7000 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 19:55:43 +0000 (UTC)
TN-birders,
Dollyann and I found the Red Phalarope at Dutch Bottoms in Cocke Co. this 
afternoon at 3:30. The location is: go south from the bridge on 25E to the 
second business on the right. This small business is 0.2 miles past the sign 
for Emerald Pointe, which is on the left. The small store has a sign saying 
"Now serving Pepsi" on it. Park there and look behind the store. There is a 
remnant of a concrete road. On the right end of the concrete is where the 
Phalarope was, hanging out with 4 Sanderlings. There is a large concrete silo 
immediately to the left of the area. 

Great birding,Ron Hoff and Dollyann MyersClinton, TN

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Red Phalarope Yes at Dutch bottoms this morning
From: Bates Estabrooks <wgpu AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 14:10:54 +0000
The red phalarope was present this morning at 9:35 at Dutch bottoms. Near the 
concrete the old concrete roadbed to the left of the trailer park 


Bates Estabrooks


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Subject: American Avocet
From: rick houlk <rhoulk AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 11:02:10 +0000
The American Avocet is still present in Polk County as of 7 am

Rick Houlk
Polk County

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Subject: American Avocet
From: rick houlk <rhoulk AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 23:26:25 +0000
I had my first record of American Avocet in Polk County. Jen and I located the 
avocet on a small farm pond at Highway 411 and Clemmer Ferry Road. It was last 
seen about 6:00 this evening. 


Rick Houlk
Polk County

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Subject: Swallow-tailed Kites in West Tennessee!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 20:13:21 +0000 (UTC)
August 25, 2016Gibson County
This morning at about 9:10 am I was traveling south on Hwy 45W, just inside the 
city limits of Humboldt when I saw what I thought was a Mississippi Kite 
soaring up over the highway. I mentioned to my son to look at the kite. When I 
looked back up the bird was banking and I saw the deeply forked tail - whoa, 
not a MS Kite but a Swallow-tailed Kite! I pulled over and got a few poor but 
identifiable pics with my phone. We were on our way to an appointment so 
unfortunately I could not stay for better pictures or to follow the bird. There 
were 4 or 5 Mississippi Kites using the same general area. 

I came back to the area after lunch and found over a dozen Mississippi Kites in 
the general area but did not refind the Swallow-tailed Kite although it could 
easily still be in the area. 

Here's the link to my eBird entry with the poor pics:
Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) (1)
- Reported Aug 25, 2016 09:05 by Mark Greene
- US-TN-Humboldt-2859-2873 N Central Ave - 35.8521x-88.9173, Gibson, Tennessee
- 
Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.852148,-88.917304&ll=35.852148,-88.917304 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31244554
- Comments: "Adult seen soaring over Hwy 45W, loosely associating with MS 
Kites. Kite sized black & white raptor with deeply forked tail. Head was white. 
Photos taken." 


Last Thursday, August 18, I had an immature Swallow-tailed Kite on Barnes Road 
in Madison County. These are my 3rd and 4th Swallow-tailed Kites in West 
Tennessee. Last year, on June 16, I had one over Maness Swamp Refuge in 
northern Gibson County and on September 25, 1993, I had one over the Forked 
Deer River Bottoms along Hwy 45E in Weakley County.  

One of my favorite birds and always an exciting find anywhere in Tennessee!
Keep looking up!
Good birding!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TNGibson County
Subject: Eagle Bend hatchery - dowitcher
From: "Ron Hoff" <aves7000 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 15:21:36 -0400
TN-birders,

Dollyann & I went out to Eagle Bend fish hatchery in Anderson County today 
around noon. Wasn’t expecting much as there isn’t much habitat for 
shorebirds. There are a couple of empty ponds, but they are dry now and held no 
shorebirds. 


What shorebirds we had were seen in the grassy areas in between a couple of the 
ponds on the left as you drive in. These ponds are BEFORE the overhead power 
lines. You’ll have to look closely as the grass strips between the ponds 
aren’t mowed and the smaller peeps tend to disappear in the high grass. 


Best bird was a juvenile Short-billed Dowitcher, along with 1 Pectoral SP, 1 
Semipalmated SP, and a few juvenile Least Sandpipers. A couple of the Least 
were literally 5 feet from the car on the canvas apron of one of the ponds as 
we slowly rolled past, giving an outstanding look at the beauties. Drive VERY 
slowly and it is amazing that these birds will often tolerate a very close 
approach. 


Great birding,

Ron Hoff and Dollyann Myers
Clinton, TN
Subject: Pickwick Dam Tailwaters
From: Martin Hall <rmhall AT monsterbroadband.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 10:16:55 -0500
My wife and I are spending a few days camping below Pickwick Dam on the 
Tennessee River. I'm seeing all the expected birds such as Great Blue Herons, 
Great Egrets, Double Crested Cormorants, Ospreys, Ring-billed Gulls, Herring 
Gulls, Fish Crows and also 6-8 Caspian Terns. There was even a flight of White 
Pelicans that flew down the river. It's turning out to be a very enjoyable 
trip. 


Martin Hall
Lynchburg TN
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kites still in Sequatchie Valley, Bledsoe County
From: "LeGrand family" <elegrand AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 09:28:35 -0500
I checked to see if the Swallow-tailed Kites were still in the upper
Sequatchie Valley this morning (Aug 25, 2016). None were located where they
had usually perched (Lowe's Gap Rd. and Upper East Valley Rd. since August
4), but at 7:05 AM CDT there were two Swallow-tailed Kites perched in a dead
tree along Melvin Cross Rd. about 200 yards from Upper East Valley Rd in
Bledsoe County. They were not there when I drove back at 7:25 AM, nor were
any birds at the original location about three miles northeast a few minutes
later.

 

Ed LeGrand

Cumberland Co. , TN
Subject: Knoxville: Shorebird Identification DVD Viewing Party
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 02:22:36 +0000
Where: Ijams Nature Center in Knoxville
When: Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Hosts: Jay Sturner, Jimmy Tucker, and Barry Spruce

Join us for a special viewing of the Shorebird Identification DVD by Bob 
Hamblin. This video is 74 minutes long, and covers 52 species of shorebirds 
(plovers, sandpipers, turnstones, phalaropes, etc.), a good number of which are 
currently migrating through Tennessee. 


Meet inside Ijams Nature Center at 6:00 p.m. The video will start shortly after 
6:00 with one 10-minute intermission. Afterwards, we will talk a bit about 
shorebirds and where to find them in our area. At that time we will also 
schedule a field trip to Rankin Bottoms for anyone interested in seeing 
shorebirds in the wild. 


Note: Although this is a great introduction to shorebird identification, the 
content may be a bit dry for those with only a mild interest in the subject. 
Still, this diverse and beautiful group of birds is well worth getting to know. 
Some say that once you fall in love with shorebirds you may never go back to 
the woods! 


This is a free event. Participants may bring food and beverages. Light snacks 
will be available. 


Contact info:
Jay Sturner (865-244-7819), flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com
Jimmy Tucker (865-441-4429), Jtuck4478(at)gmail(dot)com


Jay Sturner, KTOS
Knoxville

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: September KTOS Field Trips and Jay Walks
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 00:46:16 +0000
Jay Walk: Sharp's Ridge

Where: Sharp's Ridge Memorial Park, Knox Co.
When: Thursday, September 1, 2016, 8 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Leader: Jay Sturner, 865-244-7819 (call/text), email: 
flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com 


Join me at this popular migration spot to look for early migrating warblers, 
vireos, flycatchers, tanagers, and more. Meet at the ranger station at 8:00 
a.m. For additional information and directions, see 
http://www.tnbirds.org/birdfinding/SharpsRidge.htm 


This is a free event. No registration is required, and you do not have to be a 
member of KTOS to attend. See you there! 



***


Jay Walk: Eagle Bend Fish Hatchery (RSVP required)

Where: Eagle Bend Fish Hatchery, Anderson Co.
When: Saturday, September 3, 2016, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Leader: Jay Sturner, 865-244-7819 (call/text), email: 
flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com 


Eagle Bend is a hotspot for migrating shorebirds (plovers, sandpipers, etc.) as 
well as other groups of birds. The grounds are closed to the public on weekends 
but arrangements have been made for a small group of birders to visit on this 
particular date. We will meet in the parking lot and carpool to the various 
ponds. 


Note: This field trip is only available to members of KTOS, and is limited to 
ten participants. Please contact Jay Sturner to reserve a spot. Details will be 
forwarded via email. Also, due to the unpredictability of the on-site manager's 
schedule, a last-minute cancellation, though unlikely, is possible. 



***


Birding with Friends

Where: Seven Islands State Birding Park, Knox Co.
When: Saturday, September 24, 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Leaders: Morton Massey (865-806-9967) and Jay Sturner (865-244-7819, 
call/text), email: flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com 


Meet in the main parking lot. From there we will walk about three miles through 
various habitats. Expect to encounter 50 or more species, both resident and 
migratory. All skill levels are welcome and encouraged to participate. 


This program is free to the public and open to all ages. No registration is 
required. See you there! 


Location:
Seven Islands State Birding Park
2809 Kelly Lane
Kodak, TN 37764

For additional information and directions to the park, see 
http://www.tnbirds.org/birdfinding/SevenIslands.htm 



***


Birding with Friends

Where: Seven Islands State Birding Park, Knox Co.
When: Wednesday, September 28, 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Leaders: Morton Massey (865-806-9967) and Jay Sturner (865-244-7819, 
call/text), email: flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com 


Meet in the main parking lot. From there we will walk about three miles through 
various habitats. Expect to encounter 50 or more species, both resident and 
migratory. All skill levels are welcome and encouraged to participate. 


This program is free to the public and open to all ages. No registration is 
required. See you there! 


Location:
Seven Islands State Birding Park
2809 Kelly Lane
Kodak, TN 37764

For additional information and directions to the park, see 
http://www.tnbirds.org/birdfinding/SevenIslands.htm 



Jay Sturner, KTOS
Knoxville=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Red Phalarope?
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 16:22:04 -0500
  The last time I saw the bird, the original map that Damien Simbeck posted
to tnbirds in his ebird attachment was still the most accurate one.
  That is taking 25E South from interstate  81 (as if you are going to
Rankin Bottoms) until you cross over Douglas Lake, which is the French
Broad River. After crossing the bridge, the road follows the lake shore,
and you see the island almost right away on your right  (less than a mile).
This island should be covered in Ring-billed Gulls and Terns.
  We just pulled over at the most logical wide shoulder along the road,
closest to the island, which also happened to be at the entrance to a small
trailer park.
  Damien's map should drop you right there.
  The folks that lived there were friendly and said they didn't mind
birders.
  Make sure you glass the shoreline to the left, as well as the 2 small
islands.
  I recommend going on to Rankin as well, via Rankin Hill Road, which is
the next left, I believe. The Phalarope could show up over there without
much effort, and there are many other good shorebirds over there right now.
  Good luck! Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
On Aug 24, 2016 2:41 PM, "Bates Estabrooks"  wrote:

> I was thinking of traveling up to Dutch Bottoms sometime in the next
> couple of days and was wondering about some details on where to find the
> Red Phalarope.
>
> Where is the best place to start looking? Where do you park? And how/where
> do you access the mudflats?
>
> Thanks very much.
>
> Bates Estabrooks
> Anderson County
>
> Get Outlook for Android 
>
Subject: Red Phalarope?
From: Bates Estabrooks <wgpu AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 19:40:58 +0000
I was thinking of traveling up to Dutch Bottoms sometime in the next couple of 
days and was wondering about some details on where to find the Red Phalarope. 


Where is the best place to start looking? Where do you park? And how/where do 
you access the mudflats? 


Thanks very much.

Bates Estabrooks
Anderson County

Get Outlook for Android
Subject: Mississippi Kite in Washington Co.
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:34:05 -0400
24 Aug 2016
Charlie Carson Rd, along the Nolichucky River
southern Washington Co., TN

Mississippi Kite - 1 juvenile  (also possibly an adult)
This is the 4th county record.

Two Miss. Kites in 2 days in East Tenn is remarkable (saw one 
yesterday at Rankin with Ruben & Victor Stoll).

This is a good year for Miss. & Swallow-tailed Kite dispersal in
East Tenn and western NC, so keep looking up.

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: NTOS FALL Count
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 11:25:04 -0500
Good Morning TN-birders
Id like to invite youespecially those who live in and around the Nashville
areato join NTOS for our Fall count on Saturday, SEPTEMBER 24TH.   With 9
different locations there are various habitats and routes.  Please contact
me at routledges AT bellsouth.net if you are interested, have any questions or
want to sign up for specific route.

I thank you in advance for your volunteer spirit and your help with this
count.
<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
           NTOS President

Subject: NTOS FALL Bird Count
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 10:04:59 -0500
Good Morning TN-birders
   Id like to invite youespecially those who live in and around the
Nashville areato join NTOS for our Fall count on Saturday, SEPTEMBER 24TH.
With 9 different locations there are various habitats and routes.  Please
contact me at routledges AT bellsouth.net if you are interested, have any
questions or want to sign up for specific route.

I thank you in advance for your volunteer spirit and your help with this
count.

Cheers!
<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
           NTOS President

Subject: Re: Rankin Bottoms Tues evening 8/23: Wilson's Phalarope, Bairds and Buff-breasted Sandpipers, Ruddy Turnstone
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 00:05:17 -0400
Chris mentioned that the Great Egrets are no longer roosting at Rankin Bottoms 
in Cocke county.. Leslie & I traveled under the Leadvale RR bridge yesterday 
and saw that the heronry is now located west of the tracks. We've seen the same 
pattern for years. When there's no longer water beneath the willow grove at the 
south end of the Rankin Bottoms embayment, the egrets, plus whatever Little 
Blue Herons and White Ibises are in the area, fly to roost farther down the 
river. As the lake recedes, they'll move from the Leadvale location to gather 
at night in the vicinity of the northern silo at Ten Islands, then the 
shoreline past the silo, then to a mudbar at Dutch Bottoms. At that point, with 
the nighttime temperature dropping into the 30s, nearly all the Great Egrets 
move on. A few may be present during warm spells through the winter, but 
numbers usually don't increase until late April. 


Michael Sledjeski
Del Rio TN



=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Rankin Bottoms Tues evening 8/23: Wilson's Phalarope, Bairds and Buff-breasted Sandpipers, Ruddy Turnstone
From: "Welsh, Christopher J E" <cwelsh AT utk.edu>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 03:41:21 +0000
Headed out to Rankin Bottoms, Cocke County, after work on Tuesday hoping to get 
close to some shorebirds in good light. Water levels well below 2 weeks ago. 
Road across flats mostly exposed - you could walk it with rubber boots. There 
were some shorebirds down that way, but most were along the water's edge the 
other direction. Still need a scope from shore. Shallow water made getting 
close in kayak more challenging. 


Good numbers of shorebirds although spread out along ~3/4 mile of mudflats. 
Highlights were the continuing Wilson's Phalarope and Ruddy Turnstone, several 
Baird's Sandpipers, 1 Buff-breasted Sandpiper, and 2 Sanderling. At 6:30 pm the 
Sanderling were up channel deep in mud flat and hard to see, but by 7:30-8:00 
pm nearly all the shorebirds had moved down across from the coal tipple. 


Numbers below and in e-bird checklist (see link below) are rough, but there 
were quite a few Killdeer and Pectoral and Least Sandpipers. Some decent photos 
are included in the e-bird checklist. 


Did not see Great Egrets going to roost at Rankin. They must have moved to 
another location, possibly downstream. 


Chris Welsh
Knoxville, TN

Canada Goose  300     Big flock
Great Blue Heron (Blue form)  17
Great Egret  40     Not roosting at Rankin
Little Blue Heron  2

Semipalmated Plover  20
Killdeer  120
Ruddy Turnstone  1     Cont
Stilt Sandpiper  6
Sanderling  2     Photos
Baird's Sandpiper  4
Least Sandpiper  150
Buff-breasted Sandpiper  1
Pectoral Sandpiper  80
Semipalmated Sandpiper  8
Western Sandpiper  4
Short-billed Dowitcher  11     7 together
Wilson's Phalarope  1     Cont.  Photos
Greater Yellowlegs  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  12

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31219310

Subject: Re: Dutch Bottoms Red Phalarope
From: Sara Smith <ssmith2685 AT att.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 21:46:51 -0400
Rueben,
Can you or Rick email me specifics on where you saw the Red Phalarope at Dutch 
Bottoms? 

Thanks!

Sara Smith
Ssmith2685 AT att.net

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 23, 2016, at 8:11 PM, Ruben Stoll  wrote:
> 
>   August 23rd, 2016
> Thanks to the prompt report by Damien Simbeck, Victor and I got good looks 
and diagnostic photos of a great lifer. (Red Phalarope) 

> The bird had been absent at 3 p.m., but we spent a great afternoon birding 
with Rick Knight at Rankin Bottoms, then succeeded in finding our target on the 
way back out at 6:30. 

> The island where the bird had been hanging was cleared of all birds by 
several local Red-necks, but we soon found it on the near shore, feeding 
alongside some peeps and Semipalmated Plover. 

>   Other highlights from the area were:
> Sanderling 4
> Ruddy Turnstone 1
> Short-billed Dowitcher 7
> Stilt Sandpiper 4
> Western Sandpiper 2
> Bairds Sandpiper 4
> Black Tern 56
> Caspian Tern 1
> Mississippi Kite 1
> Bank Swallow 2
> 
> Good birding! Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Memphis Teal
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:29:35 -0500
  The Teal from the pits that I reported on August 20th 2016 as a hybrid
Cinnamon x Blue-winged was reviewed by some of the regional experts, and my
photos were judged to be inconclusive.
  I am listing it as a Blue-winged/Cinnamon Teal for now.
  Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Dutch Bottoms Red Phalarope
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:11:31 -0500
  August 23rd, 2016
  Thanks to the prompt report by Damien Simbeck, Victor and I got good
looks and diagnostic photos of a great lifer. (Red Phalarope)
  The bird had been absent at 3 p.m.,  but we spent a great afternoon
birding with Rick Knight at Rankin Bottoms, then succeeded in finding our
target on the way back out at 6:30.
  The island where the bird had been hanging was cleared of all birds by
several local Red-necks, but we soon found it on the near shore, feeding
alongside some peeps and Semipalmated Plover.
  Other highlights from the area were:
Sanderling 4
Ruddy Turnstone 1
Short-billed Dowitcher 7
Stilt Sandpiper 4
Western Sandpiper 2
Bairds Sandpiper 4
Black Tern 56
Caspian Tern 1
Mississippi Kite 1
Bank Swallow 2

Good birding! Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Montgomery Co. Miss. Kite
From: Steve Routledge <sroutledge1957 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:01:58 -0500
8/23/16


The subject says it all. Finally, we saw a Mississippi Kite from our
yard this afternoon. One has been occasionally reported in the immediate
area, but we have always missed it....until today!!

New yard birds are always nice.

Steve and Cyndi Routledge
Clarksville, Montgomery Co.
Subject: Reelfoot to Memphis Labor Day Weekend Birding Adventure
From: <stczipperer AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 17:35:05 -0500
The second running of the Reelfoot to Memphis Labor Day Weekend Birding 
Adventure is a go. 


When:  September 3, 2016

Time:  7:00AM until we are done.

Where to Meet: Tiptonville. TN at the Marathon Gas Station at the South East 
corner of Carl Perkins Pkwy (TN-78) and Lake Dr. (TN-21). (7:00AM) 


Description: This is and all day event Birding event starting at Reelfoot Lake 
and continuing down the Mississippi Flyway to the Pits in Memphis. No club is 
sponsoring this event. There is no charge, no sponsors, no t-shirts, . This is 
just a bunch of birders/friends and acquaintances getting together to go 
birding along the Mississippi Flyway. All are welcome. You must provide your 
own meals, snack, water/drinks transportation, lodging, and what ever else you 
need for an all day birding Adventure. We will be glad to share our scopes and 
knowledge with all who participate. Remember this is late summer, it will 
probably be hot, buggy, sunny or possibly raining/storming. Come prepared. We 
do not have planned meal times or restroom breaks. We play most things by ear. 
Marathon Gas Station has Restrooms, snacks and drinks. This will be the first 
and last pit stop for a while. 


I have sent emails to those who have already contacted me and set up a Facebook 
page with the name listed above and have created an event page with all this 
same information. Even if you have not contacted me feel free to come. Be good 
if you let me know but like I said we play it by ear. Looking forward to seeing 
everyone and meeting new birders. 


This event will only be canceled if there is a natural disaster or extreme 
storm event for the day. Cancelation of the event will be posted here and on 
Facebook. 


Good birding
Stephen Zipperer
Rutherford Co.




Sent from Mail for Windows 10
Subject: Rankin Bottoms
From: Morton Massey <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 14:35:19 -0400
Rankin was active again this morning with White Ibis, Sanderlings, Baird's, a 
Buff-breasted plus all the other regular shorebirds. A peregrine flew in at 2pm 
trying to make a kill. Now there is nothing around but great egrets. 


Morton Massey
Knoxville TN


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Red Phalarope
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 12:17:15 -0400
Here's a link to my ebird checklist with poor photos attached. 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31210769

Damien Simbeck
Killen AL

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Subject: Re: Red Phalarope
From: Ed Schneider <ed.schneider AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 16:09:58 +0000
Wow! What is the age/state of molt?

Ed Schneider
Nashville

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 23, 2016, at 7:01 AM, (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC) 
> wrote: 



Currently watching a Red Phalarope feeding around an island at Emerald Pointe 
on Douglas Lake, Hwy 25E just south of the bridge. 


Damien Simbeck
Killen AL

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Subject: Chestnut-sided Warbler: Nashville
From: Jim Arnett <jimboa68 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 09:58:14 -0500
As I was finishing my walk at Radnor Lake in Nashville this morning, I came 
across a small active mixed flock approximately 30 yards up the trail from the 
west parking lot. I first spotted a Blue-winged Warbler followed quickly by a 
Chestnut-sided Warbler in fall plumage. It foraged relatively low for about a 
minute allowing great views. 


Good Birding!

Jim Arnett
Davidson  
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Subject: Red phalarope
From: Morton Massey <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 09:06:38 -0400
Reported about 30 minutes ago by Damien Simcox. If you go about a half mile 
east of bridge and park at entrance to rv park you will see two emerging 
islands. Bird was or right tip of left island amongst 30 black terns. Actively 
feeding along waters edge. Got pictures and long distance that I will put up on 
ebird. 


Morton Massey 
Knoxville, TN


Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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                         Cleveland, OH
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                          Rosedale, VA
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                        Clemson, SC
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Subject: Odd Duck
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 12:36:18 +0000
It is a Mallard with a condition known as angel wing. Bread has no nutritional 
value for ducks and geese, and if they are fed bread for too long, it causes a 
metabolic bone condition that results in the wings turning out to the side. The 
bird needs to be taken to a wildlife rehabber. 




David Aborn

Chattanooga, TN

________________________________________

From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org 
[tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of Lynne Davis 
[lynnedavis865 AT gmail.com] 


Sent: Monday, August 22, 2016 3:23 PM

To: tn-bird AT freelists.org

Subject: [TN-Bird] Odd duck



Monday morning, August 22, at Springbrook Park duck pond in Alcoa, Blount 
County, I saw two rather odd ducks in the crowd. They were smaller than the 
Mallards, with smaller bills and feet, and with outer wing feathers that turned 
out at an angle from the body. Both had dark green heads and typical 
Mallard-like blue wing bars, but one was mostly brown and the other mottled 
brown and white. 

Lynne Davis
Subject: Red Phalarope
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "tnbarredowl" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 08:01:06 -0400
Currently watching a Red Phalarope feeding around an island at Emerald Pointe 
on Douglas Lake, Hwy 25E just south of the bridge. 


Damien Simbeck
Killen AL

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Subject: GHOW in backyard
From: Graham <grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 11:37:21 +0000
Davidson County, 8/23/16

My property is virtually within the Warner Parks area, as it abuts the Hill
Field acquisition. We have Barred Owls galore and uncommon Screeches,
however a Great Horned Owl high in one of my trees at 5:30 this morning is
actually the first I've heard from my deck in all of 2016, and the first
that I've heard that's definitely in my actual yard, versus out in the
forest.

Graham Gerdeman
Subject: Rankin Shorebirds
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 00:24:32 -0400
Rankin Bottoms, Cocke County, 8/22/16
Douglas Lake is continuing to recede, the old RR bed across the roadbed is 
nearly exposed. Shorebirds of 14 species were dispersed along a mile of mudflat 
edge. We found 2 new species for the season: 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper and Baird's Sandpiper. Also seen: Wilson's Phalarope, 
Sanderling, Short-billed Dowitcher, and Stilt Sandpiper. Pectoral and Least 
Sandpipers were especially abundant. 

Complete list: https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31207249

Michael Sledjeski & Leslie Gibbens
Del Rio TN=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
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                          Rosedale, VA
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                        Clemson, SC
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Subject: Mississippi Kite - Davidson Co.
From: Ed Schneider <ed.schneider AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 04:08:25 +0000
Davidson Dr., West Nashville 8-22-16

8:26am, approximately where Davidson drive meets Charlotte pike, near River Rd.

First summer look diagnostic, soaring about 150' above as I dropped our 
daughter off at school. Her lifer MIKI. :) 


Ed Schneider
Nashville

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
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                          Rosedale, VA
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

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Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in Knox Co.
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 02:20:53 +0000
From the kitchen window this evening I caught sight of something yellowish 
flycatching in a mixed flock of chickadees and titmice. Turned out to be an 
immature YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER. Also in the mix was a female CHESTNUT-SIDED 
WARBLER. Later, a COMMON NIGHTHAWK made a silent flyover. 



The flycatcher was yard bird #97. Here's my eBird checklist: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31205998 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: No rare birds at Pits
From: "George's McNeil" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mcneilg20" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:31:21 -0500
Went to the Lagoon Pits after work and did NOT see the Spoonbill, Willet or 
Tri-colored Heron. There sure is a lot of water. Better luck next time. 


Georges 
Shelby County

Sent from Georges McNeil's iPhone 6s.
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                          Rosedale, VA
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Update on indentity of Cades Cove Red Crossbills
From: Greg Tomerlin <cedarbees AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 17:11:25 -0500
The saltbird moniker is interesting. Every two or three years I buy a
mineral block which I suspect is just a salt block with added minerals.
They sell them at TSC and look like the salt blocks that farmers put out
for cattle, but are a rusty red color. For years, the only birds that
consistently visit this thing are house finches. Winter and summer, if you
watch it for more than 10 or 15 minutes you're likely to see a house finch
or two. In fact, I can't name even one other species of bird that I've seen
on it.

Writing that last sentence just now sent up a red flag. Although I have not
seen evidence of conjunctivitis on a finch here at the house in years, I
wonder if I might be doing more harm than good with this? Once I put the
thing out it takes about two years to be consumed or melt into the ground.
I wouldn't think of putting a bird feeder out without cleaning it
thoroughly every month or so, but this thing is out there for up to 24
months and finches use it more than the deer do.

*Best, Greg*
*cedarbees AT gmail.com *


On Mon, Aug 22, 2016 at 2:42 PM, Jay S.  wrote:

>
> Also wanted to mention that Kristine Johnson, Supervisory Forester of the
> park, said, "We've seen red crossbills over the years at the Dan Lawson
> place likely because of salt licks put out in the past for cattle. They
> seem to crave salt for some reason. Another common name for them is
> 'saltbird'."
>
> Jay Sturner
> Knoxville
>
>
Subject: Re: Tricolored Heron/Spoonbill Shelby County
From: <dickpreston AT rittermail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 16:55:29 -0500
Monday, August 22nd
Ensley/TVA Lake
0615 - 1030

Juvenile Tricolored Heron present at TVA Lake at 7 AM. Many observers. Later 
found in one of the smaller south eastern lagoons at the “pits” at 9 AM. 
Roseate Spoonbill a no show. Shorebird numbers down substantially from 
yesterday. Twelve species present, but bulk of 3,500 birds were Least and 
Pectoral Sandpipers. 


Dick Preston
Munford (Tipton County)
Subject: Re: Update on indentity of Cades Cove Red Crossbills
From: Stefan Woltmann <stefan.woltmann AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 16:29:41 -0500
Jay,

That's super cool - thanks for looking into it and the update!

Best birding,

Stefan

On Mon, Aug 22, 2016 at 2:42 PM, Jay S.  wrote:

> Heard back from Matt Young at Cornell, and he confirmed that the Red
> Crossbills lingering around Dan Lawson cabin are indeed Type 1. That's the
> default type for the Appalachians but I wanted to be sure. Also, I think
> this information would be of interest to birders who keep life lists,
> because it is entirely possible that Type 1 will one day be recognized as a
> separate species.
>
> Also wanted to mention that Kristine Johnson, Supervisory Forester of the
> park, responded to my previous post about these crossbills and said, "We've
> seen red crossbills over the years at the Dan Lawson place likely because
> of salt licks put out in the past for cattle. They seem to crave salt for
> some reason. Another common name for them is 'saltbird'."
>
> Things that make you go Hmmm.
>
> Jay Sturner
> KnoxvilleNOTES TO SUBSCRIBER
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
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>                     tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________
>                 To unsubscribe, send email to:
>                  tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>             with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
> ______________________________________________________________
>   TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>        Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>         endorse the views or opinions expressed
>         by the members of this discussion group.
>
>          Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                  wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>                 ------------------------------
>                 Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                          Cleveland, OH
>                 -------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                           Rosedale, VA
>                --------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                         Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
>
>           Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>               web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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>
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>
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>
> _____________________________________________________________
>
>
>


-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu