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Updated on Thursday, May 26 at 06:01 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Blue Cotinga,©BirdQuest

26 May Sequatchie Valley (Bledsoe County, TN): Scissor-tailed Flycatchers (6), Dickcissels (2), Loggerhead Shrike ["LeGrand family" ]
26 May 2 species of Godwits in Lake County!!! ["Mark Greene" ]
25 May Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge and Yuchi Refuge [Charles Murray ]
25 May Re: Nesting Birds [William Fissell ]
25 May Re: Nesting Birds [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
25 May Re: Nesting Birds [Stefan Woltmann ]
24 May May Field Trip Report [Tarcila Fox ]
24 May Re: Nesting Birds [Chellie Bowman ]
24 May White-winged Dove in Gibson County! ["Mark Greene" ]
24 May Nesting Birds [Chad Smith ]
24 May Mourning Warbler, Forest Hills Nashville [Marty DeHart ]
23 May Knox County Flycatchers [Jay S. ]
23 May Black Tern ["George's McNeil" ]
22 May Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers at the DRU [Ruben Stoll ]
22 May Hamblen Co. Birds ["Kirk Huffstater" ]
22 May Northeast Tennessee Bike Big Day, 29 April 2016 [David Kirschke ]
22 May OSFL - Bell's Bend [Graham ]
22 May Mourning at Westhaven [Chris Sloan ]
22 May Shelby Bottoms Connecticut Warbler-one is still there [Kevin Bowden ]
22 May Lebanon Chapter Birding the Basin - Wilson/Rutherford Co. - 21 May 2016 [Greg Tomerlin ]
21 May FOS Connecticut ["Aborn, David" ]
20 May Little Blue Heron at Sycamore Shoals [Kevin Brooks ]
19 May Yuchi Refuge [Charles Murray ]
19 May Olive-sided Flycatcher ["Richard Knight" ]
19 May Re: Crested Caracara, Gray, TN, 18 May 2016 [Scott Somershoe ]
19 May Connecticut Warbler at Shelby Bottoms [Frank Fekel ]
19 May Crested Caracara, Gray, TN, 18 May 2016 [Scott Somershoe ]
18 May Re: Birchwood Birding [Charles Murray ]
18 May Birchwood Birding [Charles Murray ]
18 May Aberrant Cardinal, Warren Co. [Susan McWhirter ]
17 May Perry County Anhingas, Least Bittern, Nelson's, etc. [Ruben Stoll ]
17 May Brown Pelican [Joy Wemmer ]
17 May Snowy Egrets at Amnicola Marsh Hamilton County [Dralle ]
17 May Chickamauga Dam sightings ["Aborn, David" ]
17 May Scissor-tailed Flycatcher [Kristy Baker ]
16 May Memphis TOS Events This Week [Judy Dorsey ]
16 May Mourning Warbler: Shelby Park and Bottoms, Nashville [Jim Arnett ]
16 May Nashville Spring Count results [Jan Shaw ]
16 May Elizabethton spring count ["Richard Knight" ]
15 May NTOS Regular Monthly Meeting this Thursday May 19 [Daniel Shelton ]
15 May Blue Grosbeak Louisville Park [Tony Watson ]
15 May NELSON'S SPARROW at the pits [Ruben Stoll ]
15 May Chattanooga TOS field trip to Reflection Riding, Arboretum, and Nature Center on 14 May 2016 ["Gary Lanham" ]
15 May Dickcissel and Bobolinks at Cherokee Farm in Knoxville [Jay S. ]
14 May Ensley Pitts May 14th Shelby County [Victor Stoll ]
14 May Bobolinks at Cherokee Farm, Knox Co. ["Welsh, Christopher J E" ]
14 May Fwd: [Bristol-Birds] Hawkins & Hancock Co. birding [Roy Knispel ]
14 May Attachments [David B Coe ]
14 May Red Headed Woodpeckers - Rutherford County [Deana Byrnes ]
14 May Common Merganser Females: Middle Prong, Sevier County: Comparison Photos []
14 May New Pair Common Mergansers: Middle Prong Little Pigeon, Pittman Center []
14 May Black-bellied Plovers and Plegadis at the DRU [Ruben Stoll ]
14 May Connecticut warbler at Cove Lake [RONALD D HOFF ]
14 May Rankin Black-bellied Plover, Peregrine [michael sledjeski ]
14 May Recent photos from TX [Michael Todd ]
13 May Avocets ["George's McNeil" ]
13 May Eagle Bend hatchery ["Ron Hoff" ]
13 May Mississippi Kites - Knox [angst ]
13 May Knoxville Snowy Egret ["Welsh, Christopher J E" ]
13 May Highlights From the past week [Ruben Stoll ]
13 May Bells Bends- Willow Flycatchers [Chris Agee ]
13 May Lifer Connecticut Warbler! [Victor Stoll ]
13 May Radnor Lake Mourning Warbler [richard connors ]
12 May Pine Siskins [Kristy Baker ]
12 May Red-shouldered Hawk chicks, Memphis, Shelby County, TN 2016-05-12 [Scott Heppel ]
11 May Rose-breasted Grosbeak []
11 May Sharp's Ridge - 5/11 [Shane Williams ]
11 May NTOS Radnor Lake Wednesday Walk Results- May 11 [Joshua Stevenson ]
11 May Cedar Waxwing Day [Lyda Phillips ]
11 May Common Mergansers in Pittman Center: NOT! []
10 May Fwd: Help with ID [John Mellon ]
10 May Re: Help with ID ["Alice Beth & Lew" ]
10 May Help with ID [John Mellon ]
10 May Obed Field Trip [Charles Nicholson ]
10 May Re: What Did I See? [Kristy Baker ]
10 May Rankin Waterbirds (5/7) [michael sledjeski ]

Subject: Sequatchie Valley (Bledsoe County, TN): Scissor-tailed Flycatchers (6), Dickcissels (2), Loggerhead Shrike
From: "LeGrand family" <elegrand AT frontiernet.net>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 17:54:53 -0500
Harry LeGrand and I checked out the usual sites for Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers and Dickcissels in the Sequatchie Valley (mostly northeast of
Pikeville) this morning and early afternoon (Thursday, May 26, 2016).

 

The interesting birds, with notes taken from eBird, were:

 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  6     All known sites where Scissor-tailed
Flycatchers have been seen in the upper valley were checked. Pair at Oxier
Hollow Rd./Lee Hollow Rd. (Melvin Crossroads Rd.) & Upper East Valley Rd.
Pair at Swafford Chapel & Cemetery (off Upper East Valley Rd).  Single at
Ninemile Cross Road apparently building nest on transformer (usual
location). Single along Upper East Valley Rd. 1/4 mile northeast of junction
with Old Dayton Rd. (New location for me.)

 

Dickcissel  2     All known sites for Dickcissel were checked (including
site along Wesley Chapel Rd. southwest of Rt. 31). One heard and seen
singing from top of tree at intersection of Oxier Hollow Rd./Lee Hollow Rd.
(Melvin Crossroads Rd.) and Upper East Valley Rd. (Known location from
previous years.) One heard repeatedly singing along Rt. 31 uphill from the
intersection of Old Dayton Rd. and Rt. 31. (New location).

 

Loggerhead Shrike  1     At Brushy Cemetery. Seen along fence behind
cemetery. Distant, requiring spotting scope to make ID (to see black mask,
black wings with small white spot). Seen in morning and again in early
afternoon. (Known location from previous years.)

 

Grasshopper Sparrow  2     One along Melvine Crossroad near intersection
with Upper East Valley Rd. One heard singing at Swafford Chapel & Cemetery.

 

Northern Bobwhite  4     Two heard singing at Brushy Cemetery. Pair flew
across road at Melvin Crossroads Rd. near Upper East Valley Rd.

 

Ed LeGrand

Cumberland Co., TN

 
Subject: 2 species of Godwits in Lake County!!!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 22:38:57 +0000 (UTC)
26 May 2016Lake County
Bad weather = Good Birds!!!!
I arrived at the Phillipy Pits just as it started to rain. I noted that the 
only shorebirds present were 2 Killdeer. Shortly afterwards, 12 Least 
Sandpipers and 6 Semipalmated Plovers dropped in. The rain kept getting heavier 
and the winds began to pick up and the storm moved in from the north. Just as I 
was about to pull away 3 large shorebirds dropped in - godwits! It was raining 
so hard that I was struggling to see them well but I thought I could see 2 
Marbled Godwits and 1 Hudsonian Godwit! I got a picture of the Hudsonian and 
then the rain slacked up just long enough for me to get a picture of the 
closest Marbled Godwit. Then the rain started pouring again. I got one distant 
pic of the 2nd Marbled as the rains came down. Just as the rains slacked up 
again, an adult Bald Eagle came soaring over the water and flushed the godwits 
as well as the Canada Geese and Mallards. They all flew off to the west towards 
the Mississippi River and could not be relocated. I came back a short time 
later and the geese and ducks had returned but there was no sign of the 
godwits. It's possible that they flew across the river into MO or north into 
KY. 


Pics can be seen on eBird.
Other birds of note today were a Ruddy Turnstone on Tiptonville Bar, a Common 
Tern on the MS River at Boothspoint in Dyer County, and a few Least Terns at 
Slough Neck Landing on the MS River in Lake County. 

A possible jaeger was also seen at the far south end of Tiptonville Bar but it 
was just too far away to do anything with and unfortunately could not be 
relocated for better looks. :( 

Good birding!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TN
Subject: Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge and Yuchi Refuge
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 21:46:45 -0400

Hugh Barger and I traveled Shadden Road and Blythe Ferry
Lane toward the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park early this morning. All of these
locations are at Birchwood in Meigs County. On the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge 
alongside 

Blythe Ferry Lane, highlights seen or heard included a Northern bobwhite,
common yellowthroat warblers, and yellow-breasted chats. From there we traveled
to Yuchi Refuge in Rhea County. Highlights at Yuchi included wild turkeys, a
solitary sandpiper, yellow-billed cuckoos, blue-gray gnatcatchers, a
grasshopper sparrow, at least two orchard orioles, and the following warblers:
at least 3 prothonotary warblers, common yellowthroats, prairie warblers,
yellow-breasted chats, and a Northern parula – the first I have ever seen.
Together, Hugh and I saw or heard at least 45 species of birds, 30 of these at
Yuchi Refuge.


Charles
Murray

Birchwood, TN

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: William Fissell <wfissell AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:54:14 -0500
agree with prior posters

not a weird post at all

important lesson to be relearned again and again- even apparently small
roads give cowbirds access to forest sepcies nests.

On Wed, May 25, 2016 at 11:46 AM, Stefan Woltmann  wrote:

> I don't think it's an odd post; and I think it IS important to highlight
> what a difficult time a lot of our birds have in a lot of our landscapes.
> And also important for people (preaching to the choir here, I know) to
> remember how important basic monitoring/demographic studies are - very hard
> to fund such studies these days because monitoring is not "sexy" or
> "cutting edge" science.
>
> Best,
>
> Stefan
>
> On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith 
> wrote:
>
>> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
>>
>>
>> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for
>> birds, photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I
>> didn't go looking for them, just happened upon them.  Of the four different
>> species I've observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.
>> Here's briefly what I observed:
>>
>>
>> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a
>> woody plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1
>> crushed Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty,
>> apparently raided by snake or some other predator.
>>
>>
>> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.
>> When found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1
>> big cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay
>> come along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
>>
>>
>> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet
>> up on the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll
>> be more successful than the others.
>>
>>
>> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
>> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought
>> back).
>>
>>
>> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for
>> nesting birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of
>> migrating here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all
>> to raise another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear
>> this is not ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the
>> birds being used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest
>> I've seen up close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success
>> rate for raising chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.
>> The woods are thick with cowbirds.  I hear them all the time, and it's
>> become an irritating mental image of bums looking to dump eggs in another
>> bird's nest.  Regarding jays, crows, or any other birds that eat young from
>> another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so much because it's nature's
>> way.  Even snakes have to do what they are programmed to do.  I guess my
>> hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.  I can't stand to see that this
>> problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder there's anything left besides
>> cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the
>> cowbird, too.
>>
>> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
>> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking
>> at these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible
>> on the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
>> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
>> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to
>> happen this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to
>> be successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests
>> completely, even after I've walked right into one.
>>
>> Chad Smith
>> Manchester, TN
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> Dept. of Biology, and
> Center of Excellence for Field Biology
> Austin Peay State University
> Clarksville, TN 37044
> 931-221-7772
> woltmanns AT apsu.edu
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:52:20 -0500
Here, hereŠI absolutely concur!

<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
Southeastern Avian Research
Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
1515 N. Willow Bend Court
Clarksville, TN  37043
931-206-3517

From:   on behalf of Stefan Woltmann

Reply-To:  
Date:  Wednesday, May 25, 2016 at 11:46 AM
To:  Tn Bird 
Subject:  [TN-Bird] Re: Nesting Birds

I don't think it's an odd post; and I think it IS important to highlight
what a difficult time a lot of our birds have in a lot of our landscapes.
And also important for people (preaching to the choir here, I know) to
remember how important basic monitoring/demographic studies are - very hard
to fund such studies these days because monitoring is not "sexy" or "cutting
edge" science.

Best,

Stefan

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith  wrote:
> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
> 
> 
> 
> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for birds,
> photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I didn't go
> looking for them, just happened upon them. Of the four different species I've 

> observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.  Here's briefly what
> I observed:
> 
> 
> 
> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a woody
> plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1 crushed
> Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty, apparently
> raided by snake or some other predator.
> 
> 
> 
> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.  When
> found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1 big
> cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay come
> along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
> 
> 
> 
> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet up 
on 

> the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll be more
> successful than the others.
> 
> 
> 
> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought 
back). 

> 
> 
> 
> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for nesting
> birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of migrating
> here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all to raise
> another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear this is not
> ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the birds being
> used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest I've seen up
> close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success rate for raising
> chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.  The woods are thick
> with cowbirds. I hear them all the time, and it's become an irritating mental 

> image of bums looking to dump eggs in another bird's nest.  Regarding jays,
> crows, or any other birds that eat young from another bird's nest, it doesn't
> bother me so much because it's nature's way. Even snakes have to do what they 

> are programmed to do.  I guess my hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.
> I can't stand to see that this problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder
> there's anything left besides cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is
> wiped out, so goes the cowbird, too.
> 
> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking at
> these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible on
> the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to happen
> this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to be
> successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests completely, even
> after I've walked right into one.
> 
> Chad Smith
> Manchester, TN
> 
> 



-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu



Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: Stefan Woltmann <stefan.woltmann AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 11:46:14 -0500
I don't think it's an odd post; and I think it IS important to highlight
what a difficult time a lot of our birds have in a lot of our landscapes.
And also important for people (preaching to the choir here, I know) to
remember how important basic monitoring/demographic studies are - very hard
to fund such studies these days because monitoring is not "sexy" or
"cutting edge" science.

Best,

Stefan

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith  wrote:

> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
>
>
> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for
> birds, photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I
> didn't go looking for them, just happened upon them.  Of the four different
> species I've observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.
> Here's briefly what I observed:
>
>
> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a
> woody plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1
> crushed Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty,
> apparently raided by snake or some other predator.
>
>
> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.
> When found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1
> big cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay
> come along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
>
>
> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet
> up on the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll
> be more successful than the others.
>
>
> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought
> back).
>
>
> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for
> nesting birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of
> migrating here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all
> to raise another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear
> this is not ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the
> birds being used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest
> I've seen up close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success
> rate for raising chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.
> The woods are thick with cowbirds.  I hear them all the time, and it's
> become an irritating mental image of bums looking to dump eggs in another
> bird's nest.  Regarding jays, crows, or any other birds that eat young from
> another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so much because it's nature's
> way.  Even snakes have to do what they are programmed to do.  I guess my
> hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.  I can't stand to see that this
> problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder there's anything left besides
> cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the
> cowbird, too.
>
> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking
> at these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible
> on the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to
> happen this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to
> be successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests
> completely, even after I've walked right into one.
>
> Chad Smith
> Manchester, TN
>
>
>


-- 
Stefan Woltmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Biology, and
Center of Excellence for Field Biology
Austin Peay State University
Clarksville, TN 37044
931-221-7772
woltmanns AT apsu.edu
Subject: May Field Trip Report
From: Tarcila Fox <tarcila AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 17:04:09 -0500
Saturday Morning, May 21st the Nashville chapter of TOS hosted a field trip to 
include Rutherford and Wilson county birds. The weather was pleasant with temps 
near 65 degrees, and though the skies darkened a couple of times most of the 
day was partly sunny. Chloe Walker led the group of eight birders. We began at 
the Discovery Wetlands, moved on to Lyle Creek Road both in Murfreesboro, 
Rutherford County, Tn. Then, we moved on to Alsup Mill Road, Spain Hill, Cedar 
Forrest Road, and the Nashville Speedway in Wilson County. 

On Cedar Forrest Road, we met other birders from the Lebanon chapter of TOS. 
They were looking at the Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, and from there would move 
to the end of the road for the Loggerhead Shrikes. 

Wildflowers found along the way were, Poison Hemlock, Yellow Goatsbeard (Oyster 
plant), Prairie Golden Aster, Glade Bluet, Great-blue Lobelia, and Drumhead 
(Crossleaf Milkwort). 


Our list of birds is below.

Canada Goose - 6
Mallard - 7
Wood Duck - 6
Double-crested Cormorant - 1
Great Blue Heron - 1
Wild Turkey - 2
Northern Bobwhite - 1
Black Vulture - 9
Turkey Vulture - 2
Red-tailed Hawk - 3
Cooper's Hawk - 2
Mourning Dove - 11
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1
Chimney Swift - 4
Downy Woodpecker - 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1
American Kestrel - 2
Great Crested Flycatcher - 3
Eastern Kingbird - 7
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2  
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4
Eastern Phoebe - 5
Loggerhead Shrike - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 1
White-eyed Vireo - 2
Blue Jay - 3
American Crow - 4
Barn Swallow - 11
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3
Carolina Chickadee - 1
Tufted Titmouse - 4
Carolina Wren - 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3
Swainson's Thrush - 1
Eastern Bluebird - 3
American Robin - 5
Northern Mockingbird - 13
Brown Thrasher - 3
Gray Catbird - 3
Cedar Waxwing - 32
European Starling - 28
Yellow Warbler - 1
Magnolia Warbler - 1
Canada Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 4
Northern Parula - 1
Prairie Warbler - 2
Grasshopper Sparrow - 5
Field Sparrow - 5
Chipping Sparrow - 1
Lark Sparrow - 3 plus at least 4 young 
Eastern Towhee - 5
Northern Cardinal - 5
Dickcissel - 3
Indigo Bunting - 10
Blue Grosbeak - 4
Eastern Meadowlark - 6
Red-winged Blackbird - 16
Common Grackle - 15
Brown-headed Cowbird - 3
Orchard Oriole - 3
House Finch - 1
American Goldfinch - 2

Thanks to all who came to share the fun. 
Tarcila 
tarcila AT bellsouth.net



Subject: Re: Nesting Birds
From: Chellie Bowman <chellie.bowman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:41:49 -0500
Chad,

Glad you sent your message. Let me start by saying that I totally
understand what you're feeling. And it must have been a poignant
realization to see firsthand just how precarious it is for nesting birds.
It saddens me that you saw so many in distress. However, I must point out
that your anger towards the cowbird seems a little misplaced. Their actions
are just as much "nature's way" as the crows and jays you mentioned. If
anything, the only reason why there are less nesting warblers and MORE
cowbirds than perhaps is "natural" is because humans are clearing land
everywhere. Cowbirds thrive on these forest edges and fields made plenty by
us. Therefore, if you're wanting to express some sort of moral outrage
against "bums" looking to "dump" things--look towards your fellow citizens
and their participation in destructive, capitalist practices. And then,
perhaps use that anger and energy in positive ways that work to counteract
these HUMAN bums. We are much more involved in the direct extinction of
those magnificent songbirds than the misunderstood cowbird. It is us who
have laid the foundation and opportunity for cowbirds to do their "natural"
thing. Sometimes I try to see the good in it--at least there is some life
that thrives and carries on in the ruins we've left.

Be well and fight the good fight,
Chellie Bowman

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Chad Smith  wrote:

> This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.
>
>
> It's been a different kind of spring.  Normally, I'm out looking for
> birds, photographing them, etc.  This year has been the year of nests.  I
> didn't go looking for them, just happened upon them.  Of the four different
> species I've observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three.
> Here's briefly what I observed:
>
>
> 1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a
> woody plant.  When found, female on nest.  Later observed three eggs (1
> crushed Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs).  Next visit, nest empty,
> apparently raided by snake or some other predator.
>
>
> 2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree.
> When found, bird on nest.  Later observed 4 four blue eggs.  Next visit, 1
> big cowbird chick, 1 blue egg remaining.  While there, I saw a Blue Jay
> come along, snatch the cowbird chick, and fly away.
>
>
> 3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet
> up on the side of a tree.  Don't know what was in there.  Hopefully, it'll
> be more successful than the others.
>
>
> 4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once.  Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2
> cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought
> back).
>
>
> The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for
> nesting birds.  To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of
> migrating here, building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all
> to raise another parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear
> this is not ripped off from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the
> birds being used while their own kind is slowly snuffed out.  Every nest
> I've seen up close this year has been parasitized or raided.  The success
> rate for raising chicks to adults must be low for many species of birds.
> The woods are thick with cowbirds.  I hear them all the time, and it's
> become an irritating mental image of bums looking to dump eggs in another
> bird's nest.  Regarding jays, crows, or any other birds that eat young from
> another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so much because it's nature's
> way.  Even snakes have to do what they are programmed to do.  I guess my
> hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective.  I can't stand to see that this
> problem is so rampant now.  It's a wonder there's anything left besides
> cowbirds!  Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the
> cowbird, too.
>
> Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already
> aware.  Nesting birds should be left alone.  It's possible that by looking
> at these nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible
> on the Ovenbird nest).  Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just
> happened to find them by chance.  I wanted to observe a little because I'd
> never done that before.  Everything pointed toward this being meant to
> happen this year.  I learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to
> be successful in nesting.  In the future, I will avoid nests
> completely, even after I've walked right into one.
>
> Chad Smith
> Manchester, TN
>
>
>
Subject: White-winged Dove in Gibson County!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 19:03:13 +0000 (UTC)
 blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px 
#715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white 
!important; } May 24, 2016Kenton, Gibson County side 

I was driving around the grain bins in Kenton when I saw an interesting looking 
dove perched on a power line with Mourning Doves & Eurasian Colllared-Doves. I 
noted the following: 

Dove slightly larger than nearby Mourning Doves with white wing patch along 
lower edge of folded wing when perched. When seen in flight the bird had white 
patches on upper wing contrasting with dark outer feathers of the wing. Bird 
was perched on a power line near the railroad tracks with other doves at Kenton 
Grain facility. I got one pic before the bird flushed into some nearby trees. 

Nemesis bird now checked off!
Good birding!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TNGibson County


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
 
Subject: Nesting Birds
From: Chad Smith <kingbird09 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 18:02:39 +0000
This is an odd post, but here goes anyway.


It's been a different kind of spring. Normally, I'm out looking for birds, 
photographing them, etc. This year has been the year of nests. I didn't go 
looking for them, just happened upon them. Of the four different species I've 
observed, I was able to get very detailed info on three. Here's briefly what I 
observed: 



1) Kentucky Warbler - nest about 1 foot off the ground in the fork of a woody 
plant. When found, female on nest. Later observed three eggs (1 crushed 
Kentucky Warbler egg, 2 cowbird eggs). Next visit, nest empty, apparently 
raided by snake or some other predator. 



2) Wood Thrush - 4 feet above ground in the fork of leaning young tree. When 
found, bird on nest. Later observed 4 four blue eggs. Next visit, 1 big cowbird 
chick, 1 blue egg remaining. While there, I saw a Blue Jay come along, snatch 
the cowbird chick, and fly away. 



3) Great Crested Flycatcher - only observed this nest hole once, 20 feet up on 
the side of a tree. Don't know what was in there. Hopefully, it'll be more 
successful than the others. 



4) Ovenbird - only observed this nest once. Five chicks (3 Ovenbirds, 2 
cowbirds, one of which was front and center to hog all the food brought back). 



The things I've seen this spring made me realize how tough it is for nesting 
birds. To think these little warblers go to all the trouble of migrating here, 
building a nest, sitting on eggs, bringing food, etc. all to raise another 
parasite that will mooch off future generations (I swear this is not ripped off 
from a Trump speech), it makes me feel sorry for the birds being used while 
their own kind is slowly snuffed out. Every nest I've seen up close this year 
has been parasitized or raided. The success rate for raising chicks to adults 
must be low for many species of birds. The woods are thick with cowbirds. I 
hear them all the time, and it's become an irritating mental image of bums 
looking to dump eggs in another bird's nest. Regarding jays, crows, or any 
other birds that eat young from another bird's nest, it doesn't bother me so 
much because it's nature's way. Even snakes have to do what they are programmed 
to do. I guess my hatred of the cowbird is purely subjective. I can't stand to 
see that this problem is so rampant now. It's a wonder there's anything left 
besides cowbirds! Ironically, if everything else is wiped out, so goes the 
cowbird, too. 


Before I get reprimanded for anything I said, just know that I'm already aware. 
Nesting birds should be left alone. It's possible that by looking at these 
nests, I may have led other things to discovering them (impossible on the 
Ovenbird nest). Again, I didn't go looking for any of these, just happened to 
find them by chance. I wanted to observe a little because I'd never done that 
before. Everything pointed toward this being meant to happen this year. I 
learned a lesson in how hard it is for these birds to be successful in nesting. 
In the future, I will avoid nests completely, even after I've walked right into 
one. 


Chad Smith
Manchester, TN
Subject: Mourning Warbler, Forest Hills Nashville
From: Marty DeHart <martydehart6 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 09:03:34 -0500
Singing at 9 AM on a brushy wooded hillside south of Radnor.
Subject: Knox County Flycatchers
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 14:51:17 +0000
Last Friday at Seven Islands State Birding Park I saw a Yellow-bellied 
Flycatcher in the woods near the river. Later on there was a Willow Flycatcher, 
singing, out in the open, also along the river (maybe this one will stay?). And 
this morning at Forks of the River WMA there was a singing Alder Flycatcher 
near mile marker 2.75 of the greenway. The Yellow-bellied and Alder are 
considered very uncommon for Knox County. 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: Black Tern
From: "George's McNeil" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mcneilg20" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 08:53:54 -0500
Had an adult Black Tern flying around the TE Maxson Lagoon Pits yesterday late 
afternoon. 


Georges McNeil
Shelby County

Sent from Georges McNeil's iPhone 6s.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers at the DRU
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:37:00 -0500
5-22-15
There were 7 Black-bellied and 156 Semipalmated Plovers in pool 2 this
afternoon. (Duck River Unit, TNWR, Humphreys County)
Also 4 Dunlin, 30 White-rumped and 117 Semipalmated Sandpipers.
That is a high count of Semipalmated Plovers for me, I believe. They were
seen by walking out towards pool 2 several hundred feet from the
headquarters.
  The pool level is lower than it's been all year, and had 10 shorebird
species, in spite of being rather late in the season.
Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Hamblen Co. Birds
From: "Kirk Huffstater" <kirkh_cg AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:42:29 -0400
This morning, my son and I went over to the previously mentioned location on 
the southeast shore of Cherokee Lake and easily found the adult, male 
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, which put on quite a show with its spontaneous, 
aerial acrobatics, harassment of an American Crow in the area, and close 
approaches/perching for photos. There were also many other species in the area, 
so it was an overall fruitful effort. 


This evening, between 7:50pm and 8:00pm, I had some great visitors bathing in 
my stream outside the kitchen window. Although most all of the migrant warblers 
have moved through as of this late date, a female Kentucky Warbler and 
beautiful male Canada Warbler both took baths this evening, which hopefully 
means they’re breeding in the woods behind the house. There was also a 
Swainson’s Thrush bathing in the stream, which also seems a bit late to me, 
but I’m sure it will not be breeding anywhere close to here. 


Good Birding,

Kirk Huffstater

Morristown, TN

303-345-5020



Subject: Northeast Tennessee Bike Big Day, 29 April 2016
From: David Kirschke <dlkirschke AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:01:20 -0400
Some may have seen Scott Somershoe's Facebook posts about his bike big day
yesterday in Colorado.  Scott and I had been talking about doing a big day
by bicycle for a few years before either of us actually tried one.  After I
moved back to Northeast Tennessee, Scott did one in he Nashville area and
was able to check off 106 species.  Since then I have been thinking about a
good route for both birds and biking in this area.  In mid April Tom McNeil
and I scouted a route that would start at Carver's Gap before dawn and end
up in Elizabethton or Johnson City, however far I made it before dark.  On
April 29th I started out at 0500 at Carver's Gap, rode over to Hampton
Creek Cove, then over Pond Mountain to Watauga Lake.  After the lake I was
headed towards Watauga Dam but got a flat on Siam Rd.  I was running late
so I headed to Elizabethton to finish out the day.  Before the flat I was
on track to break 100 species, but in the end finished with only 92
species.  I never really threatened Scott's mark, but it was fun combining
biking with birding.  More details here (http://tenbirdsblog.blogspot.com/)
if anyone is interested.  I am trying to figure out a better route for next
year - less cars and dogs, more birds, and no flats.  Anyone want to come
along?  : )

Thanks to Tom McNeil for all the help.

David Kirschke
Johnson City, TN
http://tenbirdsblog.blogspot.com/
Subject: OSFL - Bell's Bend
From: Graham <grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 19:33:46 +0000
Nashville, Davidson County
Bell's Bend Park
5-22-16

There was an Olive-Sided Flycatcher at Bell's Bend this morning, hunting
from a tall dead snag, along with typical late Spring activity.

Graham Gerdeman
Nashville
Subject: Mourning at Westhaven
From: Chris Sloan <csloan1973 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 12:23:35 -0500
One singing just now at the 11th tee.

Chris Sloan
Nashville, TN
www.chrissloanphotography.com
Subject: Shelby Bottoms Connecticut Warbler-one is still there
From: Kevin Bowden <bnabirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 12:13:19 -0500
Shelby Bottoms Greenway and Park
Nashville-Davidson Co. TN
22 May 2016


After hearing several reports of a Connecticut Warbler at Shelby Bottoms, I
ventured out early hoping the overnight change in weather for the better
had not encouraged too much movement overnight.

About a mile east of the Nature Center (by the bridge between the 1.00 and
1.25 mile marker) I heard a very loud Connecticut Warbler. It was hidden
deep in the thickets and tangle. It sang for several minutes and then
became quiet. No amount of my waiting produced the bird. So I reluctantly
continued on.

On my return trip 30 minutes later I heard the bird again in the same
location but on the opposite side of the trail. It was very close,  very
loud, and very insistent. Suddenly the bird moved up onto a branch.
Although it was partially obscured, it sat there and sang for about 5
minutes. Then it flew further back into the vegetation. After a few minutes
it began to sing again although I could not see bird. Then it stopped.

Its pattern was sing, silence, move, sing, move, silence, sing, silence-
all within a fairly small area.


Kevin Bowden
Nashville, TN
Subject: Lebanon Chapter Birding the Basin - Wilson/Rutherford Co. - 21 May 2016
From: Greg Tomerlin <cedarbees AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 07:49:19 -0500
Wilson County
21 May 2016

The John W Sellars – Lebanon Chapter of TOS gathered at Cedars of Lebanon
State Park on Saturday, 21 May 2016 for some early morning birding and a
cookout. We had a great turnout and the weather was perfect!

Shortly after 7:30 AM, Stephen Zipperer led some of our members to one of
the birding hotspots in Rutherford County for scissor-tailed flycatcher,
loggerhead shrike, and dicksissel. After getting close-ups of each of these
birds, they raced back to Wilson County where they saw lark sparrows and
grasshopper sparrows. Meanwhile, back at the park other members birded
among the ash, hickories, junipers and oaks. Highlights included the
Acadian flycatcher, redheaded woodpecker, summer tanager, yellow breasted
chat, common yellow throat, indigo bunting, white-eyed vireo and
yellow-throated vireo. A Swainson's thrush and wood thrush were  also heard.

About 11:00 AM, everyone came back to shelter #5 and a feast ensued.
Members brought side dishes, desserts, burgers, brats, and hotdogs. Jack
Zipperer brought his grill and did most of the cooking, and Greg did most
of the eating. In all, 23 members and family gathered for a wonderful day
in the park. Good birding, good food, and good friends.

Greg Tomerlin
Wilson County

John W Sellars - Lebanon Chapter
Tennessee Ornithological Society
website:  lebanonbirding.org
email:  lebanonbirding AT gmail.com
Subject: FOS Connecticut
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 15:41:22 +0000
21 May 2016
Hamilton County, TN

Outside the UTC library this morning there were a Veery and a Connecticut 
Warbler window casualties. Fortunately, they were both only stunned and flew 
off as I approached. 


David Aborn
Chattanooga, TN
Subject: Little Blue Heron at Sycamore Shoals
From: Kevin Brooks <brookskc AT goldmail.etsu.edu>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 11:17:21 -0400
I'm really cursing my lack of a camera these days, but there a Little Blue
Heron in the river islands at Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area in
Elizabethton.

-- 
Kevin Brooks
Subject: Yuchi Refuge
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 21:34:43 -0400

Highlights from a birding trip to Yuchi Refuge in Rhea
County today included: Warblers – prothonotary (at least 3 seen, FOS), hooded
(2 heard), common yellowthroat (several heard, FOS), prairie (several heard), 
and 

yellow-breasted chat (1 seen and several heard); also a female orchard oriole
(FOS), two or more yellow-billed cuckoos, and most surprising to me – a 
ring-necked 

duck. I recorded the majority of these while I was walking down the road from
gate 1 to the flooded bottoms area.
 

A little after noon, I stopped to tell TWRA Yuchi Manager,
Bernie Swiney, some of the highlights I’d seen. Bernie knows far more bird
songs than I do. While we were talking, Bernie noted the nearby songs of a
Northern parula warbler (I’ve never seen one), scarlet and summer tanagers, and
at least two species of vireos!

Charles
Murray

Birchwood, TN

 		 	   		  
Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 15:49:47 -0400
19 May 2016
Piney Flats Rd., at jct. with Cripple Cr. Rd.
Carter Co., TN

Olive-sided Flycatcher - 1, perched atop a snag as I drove by;
stopped & got scope views.

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: Re: Crested Caracara, Gray, TN, 18 May 2016
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 12:30:23 -0600
Guess I should have looked at the photos on my computer and not just my
phone.  The one photo I saw, when viewed on my phone, looked rough but
pretty good for caracara.  I was also only a little into my first cup of
coffee.  Seeing the second photo on my computer and bigger, and with some
other questions posed to me, I'm less sure of ID.  Could simply be a
Cooper's Hawk.  Need better photos!

Mmmm, crow.  Not the first time!

Cheers,
Scott Somershoe




>
> On May 19, 2016, at 10:56 AM, Scott Somershoe 
> wrote:
>
> I haven't seen a post yet, but a Crested Caracara was photographed by Dale
> Ledford yesterday (18 May 2016) in Gray, TN (Washington Co).  Blurry photos
> are available and on the TN Birding Facebook page, but the ID is pretty
> obvious. Potential first state record.
>
> The bird was not relocated this morning, but more searching will occur.
>
> Here are location details provided by Tom McNeill:
> "The location is Old Gray Station Road. Take the Gray Exit off I-26 and
> travel toward Tri-Cities Airport. Turn left at the Dairy Queen onto Old
> Gray Station Road. Bird was photographed somewhere around Spurgeon
> Lane/Crystal Springs subdivision/Red Lane.....near the two large silos."
>
> For those unaware, there have been a bunch of records of Crested Caracara
> in the northeast and eastern Canada over the last couple years. I believe
> photos of these birds have suggested a couple different individuals. I'd
> have to do some digging to confirm that.  I'm unsure how records committees
> have handled these birds as there are captive caracara and some are kept
> for falconry, but the ones photographed were not banded or tagged.
> Hopefully it'll be relocated with better photos!
>
> Honestly, it's about time someone found one in Tennessee!
>
> Cheers,
> Scott Somershoe
> Co-Author of *Birds of Tennessee: A New Annotated Checklist
> 
* 

> Littleton CO
>
>
Subject: Connecticut Warbler at Shelby Bottoms
From: Frank Fekel <fekel AT evans.tsuniv.edu>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 13:16:12 -0500
Shelby Bottoms
Nashville, Davidson Co., TN
2016 May 19
7-9 am

After being out of commission for the heart of migration the past 
several weeks, I finally got healthy enough to begin birding this
past Monday, and so the search was on for my yearly Connecticut
and Mourning Warblers. This week I've been flip-flopping between
Radnor Lake and Shelby Bottoms, and today was another visit to Shelby.

On the paved walking trail that parallels the Cumberland River I
walked about 150 yards past the the deck that overlooks the river
when I heard a singing CANADA WARBLER in deep cover. I stopped and
spent some time looking for the bird but had no luck. However, the
stop was very fortuitous as perhaps 5 minutes after I began looking
for the CANADA, a CONNECTICUT WARBLER decided to chime in and
sang 3 or 4 times right in the same area and perhaps 25 feet in
front of me. With a bit of work I got to see him, watched him
sing briefly, and a bit later saw him spend a minute or so preening.
An hour later, without finding a Mourning, I returned to the CANADA
spot, saw the CANADA briefly, and heard the CONNECTICUT sing once.
Ten minutes later, with no additional song, I left the area.

Frank Fekel
Bellevue, TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Crested Caracara, Gray, TN, 18 May 2016
From: Scott Somershoe <ssomershoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 11:56:21 -0600
I haven't seen a post yet, but a Crested Caracara was photographed by Dale
Ledford yesterday (18 May 2016) in Gray, TN (Washington Co).  Blurry photos
are available and on the TN Birding Facebook page, but the ID is pretty
obvious. Potential first state record.

The bird was not relocated this morning, but more searching will occur.

Here are location details provided by Tom McNeill:
"The location is Old Gray Station Road. Take the Gray Exit off I-26 and
travel toward Tri-Cities Airport. Turn left at the Dairy Queen onto Old
Gray Station Road. Bird was photographed somewhere around Spurgeon
Lane/Crystal Springs subdivision/Red Lane.....near the two large silos."

For those unaware, there have been a bunch of records of Crested Caracara
in the northeast and eastern Canada over the last couple years. I believe
photos of these birds have suggested a couple different individuals. I'd
have to do some digging to confirm that.  I'm unsure how records committees
have handled these birds as there are captive caracara and some are kept
for falconry, but the ones photographed were not banded or tagged.
Hopefully it'll be relocated with better photos!

Honestly, it's about time someone found one in Tennessee!

Cheers,
Scott Somershoe
Co-Author of *Birds of Tennessee: A New Annotated Checklist

* 

Littleton CO
Subject: Re: Birchwood Birding
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:11:45 -0400
I forgot to list two prairie warblers that were heard on Blythe Ferry
Lane on the way from the CRMP.



From: dro1945 AT hotmail.com
To: tn-bird AT freelists.org
Subject: [TN-Bird] Birchwood Birding
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:00:53 -0400






Forty-eight
species of birds were noted today, most at my residence in Birchwood (Hamilton
County) or at or near the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park or Hiwassee Wildlife
Refuge – both at Birchwood, but in Meigs County. Some highlights follow:

·        
Two Northern bobwhites were heard from the
gazebo at the HWR and another near Priddy Road which leads into the HWR.

·         Two hatchling
bald eagles were flexing their wings on a nest. Both their parents were nearby
in the same tree on the HWR.

·        
Four species of warblers were seen or heard. I
heard a hooded warbler at home. Two or three black-and-white warblers were
heard and one was seen near the ramp at the CRMP. A yellow-breasted chat was 
observed 

on the HWR near Blythe Ferry Lane. (Is this bird still considered a warbler?) 

·        
I heard a yellow-billed cuckoo at home and
another at the CRMP.

·        
I heard a wood thrush at home. 

·        
A female hairy woodpecker came to a peanut
butter suet feeder at home.

Charles
Murray

Birchwood, TN



 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: Birchwood Birding
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:00:53 -0400

Forty-eight
species of birds were noted today, most at my residence in Birchwood (Hamilton
County) or at or near the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park or Hiwassee Wildlife
Refuge – both at Birchwood, but in Meigs County. Some highlights follow:

·        
Two Northern bobwhites were heard from the
gazebo at the HWR and another near Priddy Road which leads into the HWR.

·         Two hatchling
bald eagles were flexing their wings on a nest. Both their parents were nearby
in the same tree on the HWR.

·        
Four species of warblers were seen or heard. I
heard a hooded warbler at home. Two or three black-and-white warblers were
heard and one was seen near the ramp at the CRMP. A yellow-breasted chat was 
observed 

on the HWR near Blythe Ferry Lane. (Is this bird still considered a warbler?) 

·        
I heard a yellow-billed cuckoo at home and
another at the CRMP.

·        
I heard a wood thrush at home. 

·        
A female hairy woodpecker came to a peanut
butter suet feeder at home.

Charles
Murray

Birchwood, TN



 		 	   		  
Subject: Aberrant Cardinal, Warren Co.
From: Susan McWhirter <snmcwhirter AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 11:20:12 -0600
On 5/16 I had very good look at a very strange Northern Cardinal: it had
absolutely no black on it. All other field marks were for an adult male
Cardinal - size, shape, color, cone-shaped bill, and full crest  - but the
bird had not even a hint of black on the face and below the bill.

Susan McWhirter
McMinnville
Subject: Perry County Anhingas, Least Bittern, Nelson's, etc.
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 22:38:39 -0500
  May 17th, 2016
  This afternoon I took a kayak two miles up the TN River, then hiked two
more (8 mile round trip) to Sugar Tree Bottoms, a private River bottom
along the Tennessee River in Perry County.
  I had a few nice birds through the afternoon. 17 species on the ebird
checklist were flagged as rare!
  Five ANHINGAS flew over a mile high headed East, but got close enough for
ID shots.
  Several WILLOW and 1 ALDER FLYCATCHER were seen in Willow scrub
alongside a marsh, and a NELSON'S SPARROW and LEAST BITTERN were both found
in the same marsh.
  Other "rare" birds were
Mallard 1
Hooded Merganser 1
Great Egret 3
Semipalmated Plover 11
Greater Yellowlegs 2
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
White-rumped Sandpiper 2
Pectoral Sandpiper 3
Semipalmated Sandpiper 245
Common Nighthawk 4
Savannah Sparrow 5
Bobolink 1
Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Brown Pelican
From: Joy Wemmer <joywmr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 22:45:08 -0400
May 15, 2016

While on  boat between Harrison Bay and Island Cove Marina, on east side
of the islands I spotted a brown pelican.  Also was able to get some photos
of
it.

Joy Wemmer
Chattanooga, TN
Hamilton County
Subject: Snowy Egrets at Amnicola Marsh Hamilton County
From: Dralle <bwdralle AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 18:39:39 -0400
This evening I observed two Snowy Egrets feeding with eight Great Egrets.

Bruce Dralle
Hamilton County

Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Chickamauga Dam sightings
From: "Aborn, David" <David-Aborn AT utc.edu>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 22:11:07 +0000
From: Aborn, David
Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 4:32 PM
To: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org
Subject: Chickamauga Dam sightings

17 May 2016
Hamilton County, TN

While checking nest boxes at Chickamauga Dam this afternoon, I saw a Brown 
Pelican, Ring-billed Gull, and a Lasse Scaup. 


David Aborn
Chattanooga, TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
From: Kristy Baker <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 16:27:07 -0500
I finally got my FOS (for TN) Scissor-tailed Flycatcher just now.  It was at 
the intersection of New Salem Hwy and Veterans Pkwy, Murfreesboro, Rutherford 
County.  


Kristy Baker
Rockvale, TN
Rutherford County

Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
Subject: Memphis TOS Events This Week
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2016 17:41:30 -0500
Memphis TOS Events This Week:


Wed., May 18 - Chapter meeting at 7:00 p.m., St. George's Episcopal Church,
2425 S. Germantown Rd., Germantown, TN. Dr. David Aborn, Associate
Professor of Biology at UT Chattanooga, presents a program on bird banding.
Refreshments served.
More info: https://is.gd/rzjT2w
Directions: http://mapq.st/1dEWrZk

Sun., May 22 - Trip to Overton Park in midtown Memphis
with Margaret Jefferson. Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the parking lot near the
pavilion at the East Parkway North entrance. This entrance is located very
close to Sam Cooper Blvd.
More info:  http://is.gd/OCuZsP
Directions: http://is.gd/uRxItF

Visit our website at http://birdmemphis.org

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: Mourning Warbler: Shelby Park and Bottoms, Nashville
From: Jim Arnett <jimboa68 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2016 16:59:38 -0500
This morning I heard at least one Mourning Warbler singing along the paved 
trail just above the river and a few hundred yards east of the Nature Center. 
For those who might be interested, last year 3 birds were observed in nearly 
the exact same spot on 5/17 and at least one bird was present on 5/18 (along 
with a Connecticut Warbler). So who knows, but maybe there will still be one 
around tomorrow. If it’s anything like today and you love Swainson’s 
Thrushes and Gray Catbirds, you’ll enjoy the walk even without a Mourning 
Warbler :). 


Jim Arnett
Davidson=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Nashville Spring Count results
From: Jan Shaw <jankshaw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2016 10:57:40 -0500
The Nashville Spring Count was held on April 30 and included parts of
Davidson, Cheatham, Williamson, Rutherford, and Wilson counties.
Thirty-seven observers in 13 parties totaled 161 species, which was 11 more
than last year. It was a day of intermittent rain and an unusually high
number of shorebirds with 13 species represented. The Snow Bunting
Peninsula area of Old Hickory Lake produced 1 Black-bellied Plover, 1
Semipalmated Plover, 30 American Avocets, 330 Willets, 1 Franklin's Gull,
and 1 Forster's Tern. The Percy Priest route which takes in Rutherford and
Wilson counties had 2 Caspian Terns, 2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, 1
Loggerhead Shrike, 2 Lark Sparrows, 10 Grasshopper Sparrows, 2 Dickcissels,
1 Bobolink, and 30 Pine Siskins. Other highlights included 1 Cattle Egret
and 1 Snowy Egret at Shelby Bottoms, 5 Ospreys (4 at Cheatham County), 7
Bank Swallows at Harpeth East, 31 warbler species with Tennessee Warbler
being the most abundant with 84, 12 Savannah Sparrows (11 at Shelby and 1
at Cheatham), and 1 LIncoln's Sparrow at Owls Hill. Thank you so much to
all who participated and to Scott Block, my co-compiler. Results from each
route can be found at the following site:

http://ntosfield.blogspot.com/p/bird-count-results.html

Canada Goose - 140
Wood Duck - 13
Mallard - 85
Blue-winged Teal - 22
Northern Shoveler - 9
Lesser Scaup - 1
Ruddy Duck - 2
Northern Bobwhite - 7
Wild Turkey - 114
Common Loon - 22
Pied-billed Grebe - 2
Horned Grebe - 1
Double-crested Cormorant - 91
Great Blue Heron - 35
Great Egret - 5
Snowy Egret - 2
Cattle Egret - 1
Green Heron - 6
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1
Black Vulture - 673
Turkey Vulture - 39
Osprey - 5
Sharp-shinned Hawk - 4
Cooper's Hawk - 4
Red-shouldered Hawk - 4
Broad-winged Hawk - 2
Red-tailed Hawk - 22
American Coot - 13
Black-bellied Plover - 1
Semipalmated Plover - 1
Killdeer - 22
American Avocet - 30
Spotted Sandpiper - 34
Solitary Sandpiper - 9
Willet - 330
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1
Least Sandpiper - 25
Pectoral Sandpiper - 4
Franklin's Gull - 1
Caspian Tern - 2
Forster's Tern - 4
Rock Pigeon - 48
Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3
Mourning Dove - 89
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 5
Eastern Screech-Owl - 2
Great Horned Owl - 3
Barred Owl - 11
Common Nighthawk - 2
Chuck-will's-widow - 2
Whip-poor-will - 8
Chimney Swift - 117
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 19
Belted Kingfisher - 13
Red-headed Woodpecker - 7
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 54
Downy Woodpecker - 26
Hairy Woodpecker - 3
Northern Flicker - 7
Pileated Woodpecker - 22
American Kestrel - 6
Eastern Wood-Pewee - 27
Acadian Flycatcher - 12
Least Flycatcher - 2
Eastern Phoebe - 31
Great Crested Flycatcher - 28
Eastern Kingbird - 52
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2
Loggerhead Shrike - 1
White-eyed Vireo - 65
Yellow-throated Vireo - 17
Blue-headed Vireo - 1
Warbling Vireo - 15
Red-eyed Vireo - 79
Blue Jay - 85
American Crow - 70
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 67
Purple Martin - 30
Tree Swallow - 10
Bank Swallow - 7
Barn Swallow - 98
Cliff Swallow - 240
Carolina Chickadee - 86
Tufted Titmouse - 113
White-breasted Nuthatch - 29
House Wren - 6
Carolina Wren - 60
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 96
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 5
Eastern Bluebird - 76
Veery - 11
Gray-cheeked Thrush - 4
Swainson's Thrush - 64
Wood Thrush - 34
American Robin - 92
Gray Catbird - 15
Northern Mockingbird - 69
Brown Thrasher - 20
European Starling - 338
Cedar Waxwing - 2
Ovenbird - 7
Worm-eating Warbler - 11
Louisiana Waterthrush - 15
Northern Waterthrush - 10
Blue-winged Warbler - 3
Black-and-white Warbler - 17
Prothonotary Warbler - 16
Tennessee Warbler - 84
Nashville Warbler - 4
Kentucky Warbler - 31
Common Yellowthroat - 50
Hooded Warbler - 12
American Redstart - 6
Cape May Warbler - 6
Cerulean Warbler - 5
Northern Parula - 39
Magnolia Warbler - 10
Bay-breasted Warbler - 12
Blackburnian Warbler - 11
Yellow Warbler - 18
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 16
Blackpoll Warbler - 48
Palm Warbler - 77
Pine Warbler - 4
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 40
Yellow-throated Warbler - 16
Prairie Warbler - 43
Black-throated Green Warbler - 22
Canada Warbler - 2
Wilson's Warbler - 1
Yellow-breasted Chat - 17
Eastern Towhee - 68
Chipping Sparrow - 46
Field Sparrow - 80
Lark Sparrow - 2
Savannah Sparrow - 12
Grasshopper Sparrow - 10
Song Sparrow - 30
Lincoln's Sparrow - 1
Swamp Sparrow - 13
White-throated Sparrow - 32
White-crowned Sparrow - 5
Summer Tanager - 75
Scarlet Tanager - 51
Northern Cardinal - 208
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 63
Blue Grosbeak - 12
Indigo Bunting - 108
Dickcissel - 3
Bobolink - 1
Red-winged Blackbird - 123
Eastern Meadowlark - 39
Common Grackle - 119
Brown-headed Cowbird - 104
Orchard Oriole - 36
Baltimore Oriole - 16
House Finch - 32
Pine Siskin - 30
American Goldfinch - 91
House Sparrow - 42

Total 161
Individuals 6401

Jan Shaw
Nashville, TN
Subject: Elizabethton spring count
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2016 10:51:08 -0400
The 73rd consecutive Elizabethton Spring Bird Count was held on 30 April
with favorable weather. The coverage area was Carter Co. and parts of 
adjacent Johnson, Sullivan, Unicoi, & Washington Cos.   59 observers in 
13 parties participated; both were record high numbers. 
We tallied 166 species, eclipsing the previous record of 161 set in 2005.
By comparison, the average number over the last 30 years was 147 species.

Highlights: American Golden-Plover and Fish Crow were new to the count.
Also notable: Hooded Merganser (hen with 2 young), Com. Merganser (lingering
pair), Virginia Rail, Black-billed Cuckoo, N. Saw-whet Owl, Peregrine Falcon,
Sedge Wren, and Cerulean Warbler.

Amazingly (given the history of this count), 21 species occurred in record 
high numbers for this count. The increased number of observers and parties 
certainly contributed to this.
The record highs were:  Canada Goose (653), Mallard (332), Wild Turkey (57),
Great Blue Heron (107), Yellow-cr. Night-Heron (14), Black Vulture (152),
Sora (4 - tie), Spotted Sandpiper (83), Barred Owl (12), N. Saw-whet Owl (3 - 
tie), 

Belted Kingfisher (30), Red-bellied Woodpecker (97), Warbling Vireo (20),
Red-eyed Vireo (257), Ovenbird (244), Worm-eating Warbler (39), 
Yellow-throated Warbler (44), Eastern Towhee (222), Scarlet Tanager (82), 
Orchard Oriole (42 - tie), and Baltimore Oriole (38).

Thanks to all participants for a great count.

The list:
Canada Goose  653
Wood Duck  85
Am. Wigeon  2  
Mallard  332
Blue-wg. Teal  6
Bufflehead  5
Hooded Merganser  3
Com. Merganser  2
N. Bobwhite  1
Ruffed Grouse  1
Wild Turkey  57
Com. Loon  1
Pied-billed Grebe  5
Horned Grebe  1
Dbl-cr. Cormorant  65
Great Blue Heron  107
Green Heron  16
Black-cr. Night-Heron  1
Yellow-cr. Night-Heron  14
Black Vulture  152
Turkey Vulture  212
Osprey  15
Bald Eagle  10
Sharp-shinned Hawk  2
Cooper's Hawk  7
Broad-wg. Hawk  16
Red-tailed Hawk  38
Virginia Rail  1
Sora  4
Am. Coot  3
Am. Golden-Plover  1
Killdeer  46
Spotted Sandpiper  83
Solitary Sandpiper  34
Gr. Yellowlegs  2
Lsr. Yellowlegs  2
Least Sandpiper  5
Pectoral Sandpiper  2
Bonaparte's Gull  1
Ring-billed Gull  7
Forster's Tern  7
Rock Pigeon  166
Eur. Collared-Dove  3
Mourning Dove  254
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  9
Black-billed Cuckoo  1
E. Screech-Owl  10
Great Horned Owl  6
Barred Owl  12
N. Saw-whet Owl  3
Com. Nighthawk  1
Chuck-will's-widow  10
E. Whip-poor-will  32
Chimney Swift  209
Ruby-thr. Hummingbird  31
Belted Kingfisher  30
Red-headed Woodpecker  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  97
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
Downy Woodpecker  37
Hairy Woodpecker  10
N. Flicker  33
Pileated Woodpecker  43
Am. Kestrel  19
Peregrine Falcon  1
E. Wood-Pewee  7
Acadian Flycatcher  12
Least Flycatcher  6
E. Phoebe  77
Great Crested Flycatcher  15
E. Kingbird  57
Loggerhead Shrike  1
White-eyed Vireo  12
Yellow-thr. Vireo  9
Blue-hd. Vireo  78
Warbling Vireo  20
Red-eyed Vireo  257
Blue Jay  320
Am. Crow  338
Fish Crow  1
Com. Raven  14
Horned Lark  2
Purple Martin  81
Tree Swallow  426
N. Rough-wg. Swallow  133
Barn Swallow  217
Cliff Swallow  807
Carolina Chickadee  173
Tufted Titmouse  166
Red-br. Nuthatch  16
White-br. Nuthatch  26
Brown Creeper  4
House Wren  45
Winter Wren  4
Sedge Wren  1
Carolina Wren  129
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  97
Golden-cr. Kinglet  5
Ruby-cr. Kinglet  4
E. Bluebird  157
Veery  13
Swainson's Thrush  2
Wood Thrush  138
Am. Robin  888
Gray Catbird  55
Brown Thrasher  45
N. Mockingbird  122
Eur. Starling  986
Cedar Waxwing  44
Ovenbird  244
Worm-eating Warbler  39
Louisiana Waterthrush  32
Golden-wg. Warbler  2
Black-and-white Warbler  90
Swainson's Warbler  6
Nashville Warbler  1
Kentucky Warbler  5
Com. Yellowthroat  27
Hooded Warbler  208
Am. Redstart  21
Cape May Warbler  4
Cerulean Warbler  2
N. Parula  56
Magnolia Warbler  3
Bay-breasted Warbler  2
Blackburnian Warbler  7
Yellow Warbler  15
Chestnut-sd. Warbler  36
Blackpoll Warbler  1
Black-thr. Blue Warbler  85
Palm Warbler  8
Pine Warbler  10
Yellow-rumped Warbler 62
Yellow-thr. Warbler  44
Prairie Warbler  5
Black-thr. Green Warbler  81
Canada Warbler  44
Yellow-br. Chat  8
E. Towhee  222
Chipping Sparrow  126
Field Sparrow  72
Savannah Sparrow  1
Grasshopper Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  276
Swamp Sparrow  5
White-thr. Sparrow  13
White-cr. Sparrow  11
Dark-eyed Junco  63
Summer Tanager  1
Scarlet Tanager  82
N. Cardinal  299
Rose-br. Grosbeak  30
Blue Grosbeak  6
Indigo Bunting  126
Bobolink  1
Red-wg. Blackbird  480
E. Meadowlark  142
Rusty Blackbird  2
Com. Grackle  477
Brown-hd. Cowbird  91
Orchard Oriole  42
Baltimore Oriole  38
House Finch  56
Pine Siskin  59
Am. Goldfinch  354
House Sparrow  80

##########################
compiler:
Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: NTOS Regular Monthly Meeting this Thursday May 19
From: Daniel Shelton <dashelt100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 20:16:56 -0500
If you are in the Nashville area this Thursday, you are welcomed to come to
the Nashville Chapter's regular monthly meeting at Radnor Lake State
Natural Area, 1160 Otter Creek Road, Nashville. We gather at 7:00 p.m. at
the visitor's center, and the meeting starts at 7:15 p.m.

Our program by Dr. Stefan Woltmann is:

*Five Years After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: What Have We Learned
About Seaside Sparrows *


In 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill unleashed an unprecedented
amount of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Some of that oil (in)famously washed
into the Louisiana marshes. Dr. Woltmann describes some of the insights he
and his colleagues have gained into the ecology of Seaside Sparrows since
beginning their studies in late 2011.


We'll see you there!


Danny Shelton

NTOS Programs Chairman
Subject: Blue Grosbeak Louisville Park
From: Tony Watson <twnurse2k AT att.net>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 18:04:18 -0400
Birded Louisville Park this morning. There was a pair of Blue Grosbeaks out in 
the open in a weedy lot on the right side of the road near the entrance. 


It was also a great place for swallows so close that no optics were needed! As 
we walked across the open areas of the park there were 20 to 30 swallows 
hunting insects and passing so close that one could hear the wing beats! Just 
magical. Great comparative looks at different species. 


Blue Grosbeak (pair)
Chimney Swift
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Rough Wing Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Red Tailed Hawk
Osprey
Cormorant
Chipping Sparrow
Turkey Vulture
Grackle 
Canada Geese
Mallards
Great Blue Heron
Phoebe 
Robin
Cardinal
Starling
Yellow Billed  Cuckoo (call only)

Tony Watson and Mark Alston
Blount County, TN
Louisville Park


Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: NELSON'S SPARROW at the pits
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 16:47:05 -0500
May 15, 2016
  Thanks to local photographer Jon Graham for pointing out a Virginia Rail,
many Soras and a Nelson's Sparrow at a marshy area close to the pits this
afternoon.
  Several of us got good looks at the sparrow, and there are also photos
taken by Jon.

Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN.
Subject: Chattanooga TOS field trip to Reflection Riding, Arboretum, and Nature Center on 14 May 2016
From: "Gary Lanham" <glanham AT epbfi.com>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 17:12:43 -0400
A CTOS field trip to RRA&NC on Saturday resulted in 60 taxa being recorded.
The trip was led by Starr Klein and Clyde Blum, and included Jennifer
Rydell, Hugh Barger, OJ Morgan, Kerry Autry, and Pixie and Gary Lanham.
Details:

TN, Hamilton-Chattanooga-ReflectionRidingA&NC - 35.007x-85.367, May 14, 2016
7:30 AM - 10:50 AM; Protocol: Traveling on foot;  4.0 mile(s); 52 to 66 F;
sunny; moderate SW winds  AT  5 to 20 mph.

 

Canada Goose  X

Wild Turkey  X

Great Blue Heron  X

Red-shouldered Hawk  X

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  X

Mourning Dove  X

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  X

Chimney Swift  X

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  X

Red-bellied Woodpecker  X

Downy Woodpecker  X

Pileated Woodpecker  X

Eastern Wood-Pewee  X

Acadian Flycatcher  X

Eastern Phoebe  X

Great Crested Flycatcher  X

Eastern Kingbird  X

White-eyed Vireo  X

Yellow-throated Vireo  X

Red-eyed Vireo  X

Blue Jay  X

American Crow  X

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  X

Tree Swallow  X

Barn Swallow  X

Cliff Swallow  X

Carolina Chickadee  X

Tufted Titmouse  X

White-breasted Nuthatch  X

Brown-headed Nuthatch  X

Carolina Wren  X

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  X

Eastern Bluebird  X

Swainson's Thrush  X

Wood Thrush  X

American Robin  X

Brown Thrasher  X

Northern Mockingbird  X

European Starling  X

Cedar Waxwing  X

Worm-eating Warbler  X

Kentucky Warbler  X

Common Yellowthroat  X

Hooded Warbler  X

Northern Parula  X

Blackpoll Warbler  X

Pine Warbler  X

Yellow-throated Warbler  X

Chipping Sparrow  X

Song Sparrow  X

Eastern Towhee  X

Summer Tanager  X

Scarlet Tanager  X

Northern Cardinal  X

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  X

Blue Grosbeak  X

Indigo Bunting  X

Brown-headed Cowbird  X

House Finch  X

American Goldfinch  X

 

Gary Lanham

Hamilton County

 
Subject: Dickcissel and Bobolinks at Cherokee Farm in Knoxville
From: Jay S. <yourcatoliver AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 16:13:37 +0000
Went to Cherokee Farm this morning to look for the BOBOLINKS Chris Welsh 
reported yesterday and found one male and one female (Kelly says "Thanks 
Chris!"). However, just before sighting those birds I heard the unmistakable 
song of a DICKCISSEL! I soon located him, and we watched the bird sing for 
about three minutes before a passing Sharp-shinned Hawk silenced the entire 
hillside. This may or may not be the lover of the female Chris thinks he saw 
yesterday, but hopefully we have a breeding pair! A rare treat for Knox County. 
Last year we had a pair at Seven Islands State Birding Park. 



FYI: The birds were seen and heard in the field immediately south of the large 
building. Also present was a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and two SAVANNAH SPARROWS 
further south just before the golf course. 



Here's my eBird checklist: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29676261 



Jay Sturner

Knoxville
Subject: Ensley Pitts May 14th Shelby County
From: Victor Stoll <victorjaystollnineteen80 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 20:41:48 -0500
Good numbers of shorebirds at the Pitts this evening
American Avocet 4
Black-necked Stilt-79
Greater Yellowlegs-2
Lesser Yellowlegs-55
Ruddy Turnstone-1
Wilson's Phalarope-4
Pectoral Sandpiper-150
White-rumped Sandpiper-44
Baird's Sandpiper-1
Spotted Sandpiper-17
Solitary Sandpiper-4
Least Sandpiper-1700
Semipalmated Sandpiper-550
Stilt Sandpiper-17
Western Sandpiper-1
Killdeer-24
Semipalmated Plover-1
Short-billed Dowitcher-3
Also 11 Least Terns on TVA Lake
Painted Bunting singing and flying around the Pitts
Good birding! Victor Stoll
Subject: Bobolinks at Cherokee Farm, Knox Co.
From: "Welsh, Christopher J E" <cwelsh AT utk.edu>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 23:41:23 +0000
Saw 4 Bobolinks (2M, 2F) at Cherokee Farm in Knoxville this evening saw out 
6:30 pm. Birds were between the JIAM Bldg and the golf course in tall grass. 
Males singing. 


Saw another bird that I wanted to call a female Dickcissel north of the 
building near where paved path comes down from road and joins bike path. Size 
and shape were right. Female blackbird chased it out of grass and I got brief 
look when landed atop tree. Yellowish wash on breast, but could not make out 
facial markings as it bobbed in the wind. It flew back down to the same spot it 
had been chased out of but stayed out of sight. Not sure enough to call it, but 
... 


Chris Welsh 
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co. 

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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_____________________________________________________________
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                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
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                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Fwd: [Bristol-Birds] Hawkins & Hancock Co. birding
From: Roy Knispel <rknispel AT charter.net>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 15:10:08 -0400
Glen asked me to forward this to TN-Birds.

Roy Knispel


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: 	[Bristol-Birds] Hawkins & Hancock Co. birding
Date: 	Sat, 14 May 2016 14:30:41 -0400 (EDT)
From: 	Glen Eller 
Reply-To: 	gleneller AT embarqmail.com
To: 	bristol-birds 



Today, May 15, Peter Range, Harry Lee Farthing and I birded in parts of 
Hawkins & Hancock Counties with some interesting sightings.  On highway 
70 in Hawkins Co. going over Clinch mountain towards Kyles Ford we 
stopped at 3-4 pulloffs going down the mountain and were treated to 3-5 
singing male Cerulean Warblers.  In the Kyles Ford WMA we had several 
Bob-white, lots of Prairie Warblers & Chats, white-eyed Vireos, Orchard 
Orioles and a single Blue Grosbeak.  Near the end of the WMA we found a 
colony of 40-50 Purple Martins.  On Chestnut Ridge Road we found a lot 
of the same species but added Yellow-throated Vireo, Blackpoll Warbler & 
Spotted Sandpipers.  On Alder Road we found several Yellow-billed 
Cuckoo's, La Water-thrush, Kentucky Warbler, Great-crested & Acadian 
Flycatchers.  To end our morning of great birding we stopped at the 
River Place Resturant for lunch and were treated to 3-4 Prothonotary 
Warblers.  Lots of good birds in an area that is seldom birded.

Glen Eller

Kingsport
Subject: Attachments
From: David B Coe <davidbcoeauthor AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 14:13:04 -0500
HI all,

As I have done in the past, I would request that attachments be limited in 
size. I love seeing your wonderful photos. I really do. But I live out in the 
sticks and have strict limits imposed on my bandwidth by my ISP. If you have a 
photo you want to share, I would request that you send a small and/or low 
resolution image, perhaps with a URL for looking at the full image. Getting 
several emails with attachments totaling two or four (or more) megabytes starts 
to gobble up my monthly allowance. 


Many thanks. And good birding!

Best,

David
*****
David B. Coe
www.DavidBCoe.com
www.dbjackson-author.com

Now Available: SPELL BLIND, by David B. Coe
HIS FATHER’S EYES, by David B. Coe
SHADOW’S BLADE, by David B. Coe

THIEFTAKER, by D.B. Jackson
THIEVES' QUARRY, by D.B. Jackson
A PLUNDER OF SOULS, by D.B. Jackson
DEAD MAN’S REACH, by D.B. Jackson




Subject: Red Headed Woodpeckers - Rutherford County
From: Deana Byrnes <deanabyrnes AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 12:56:09 -0500
We have had a pair of red headed woodpeckers hanging around our yard and
feeder for the past two days - attaching photos.  We have lived on this
property two years and this is the first time I've seen them here.

Deana Byrnes
Halls Hill Pike
Rutherford County
Subject: Common Merganser Females: Middle Prong, Sevier County: Comparison Photos
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 17:31:11 +0000 (UTC)
Here are two photos of the female Common Mergansers on the Middle Prong of the 
Little Pigeon River in Sevier County, the March female from inside the park, 
the May female from outside the park in Pittman Center. 


Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Sevier County 
Subject: New Pair Common Mergansers: Middle Prong Little Pigeon, Pittman Center
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 17:28:02 +0000 (UTC)
As crazy as this may seem, on Thursday March 12 in the rain, I observed a pair 
of Common Mergansers on the Middle Prong of the Little Pigeon River in Pittman 
Center, TN, about 1.6 - 2.0 miles downstream from the pair that arrived in 
March. They have been observed by others as well and seem to prefer the calm 
water between where Copeland and Webb Creek flow into the Middle Prong. 


After some careful study and comparison of photos of the female, this is indeed 
a new pair of Common Mergansers on the Middle Prong, perhaps with progeny from 
last years nesting. This pair stays together and seem very skittish, unlike the 
pair accustomed to lots of activity in Greenbrier, which now has only the 
female hanging around (I observed her this morning about 1.5 miles upriver from 
the Hwy 321 bridge on the Middle Prong). 


I will post comparison photos as well. 

Here's a photo of the May pair on the Middle Prong from Friday, March 13, in 
better weather. 


Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Sevier County 
Subject: Black-bellied Plovers and Plegadis at the DRU
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 11:44:25 -0500
May 14th, 2016
Duck River Unit, TNWR, Humphrey's County TN
  Victor Stoll, Alan Troyer and I stopped by the DRU this morning to check
up on the shorebirds.
  The shorebirds were there in similar numbers, but a few less species than
last time, along Refuge RD. first water on the right.
  Only a few Semipalmated and White-rumped Sandpipers around, down
considerably from last week, but still good numbers of Semipalmated Plovers
and Least Sandpipers.
  No Upland Sandpiper, Dowitchers, or Stilt Sandpipers, but an FOS bonus
was 11 newly arrived BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS in the freshly sprayed dead
grass across the levee.
  A PEREGRINE FALCON  came over and flushed the shorebirds, but didn't
catch any.
  About 11 a.m. 2 plegadis Ibis were seen circling over pool 1, then
eventually disappearing to the West, probably the same two GLOSSY IBIS
that have been present in the area recently, but we couldn't be sure.

Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Connecticut warbler at Cove Lake
From: RONALD D HOFF <aves7000 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 16:41:49 +0000 (UTC)
Birders,
Dollyann and I just saw a Connecticut Warbler at Cove Lake, in Campbell County 
at 12:20 pm. Go to last parking lot. Take the trail marked for "walkers", as 
opposed to "bikers". Go to where the 2 trails come close together. There is a 
sitting bench and garbage can here.The bird was seen and heard 50 yards before 
the bench. 

Thanks to Frank Bills and Sharon Bostick for the heads up.
Great birding,Ron Hoff & Dollyann MyersClinton, TNSent from Yahoo Mail on 
Android 
Subject: Rankin Black-bellied Plover, Peregrine
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 10:58:58 -0400
Rankin Bottoms, Cocke county, 5/13/16

We traveled the Rankin embayment and the west French Broad riverbank (where we 
saw a dozen Spotted Sandpipers) by canoe. In a quick fly-by, a Peregrine Falcon 
scattered the Yellowlegs. A tired-looking Black-bellied Plover appeared after 
sunset. 

Highlights:
Blue-winged Teal - 13
Red-breasted Merganser - 2
Great Egret - 6
Bald Eagle - 8
Osprey - 4
Black-bellied Plover - 1
Spotted Sandpiper - 14
Solitary Sandpiper - 3
Greater Yellowlegs - 10
Lesser Yellowlegs - 52
Least Sandpiper - 12
Short-billed Dowitcher -2
Peregrine Falcon - 1

Details at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29632311
Subject: Recent photos from TX
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 14:24:04 +0000 (UTC)
 If anyone is interested, I've posted a number of photos of a recent whirlwind 
trip to the Upper TX Coast, and then a quick jaunt thru the Edwards Plateau. I 
birded six days; four on the coast and two on the Plateau, with a respectable 
total of 242 species. The first few days I birded with a buddy from down 
there, and the last couple with a small group of fellow Tennesseans that flew 
in for the weekend! 

Trip was more successful than I had hoped, as I didn't expect a lifer at all. A 
couple of surprise calling Black Rails at Anahuac took care of that though. I 
had hoped for a new photo bird in King Rail, which cooperated nicely. Great to 
see some of the famous places I had only read about. 

Anyway, I have two separate galleries, with a lot of duplicate photos if the 
birds cooperated, especially on the coastal portion. The gallery is here: 
http://www.pbase.com/mctodd/tx_2016 

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Texas 2016 (Upper Coast and Hill Country) by Michael To...Texas 2016 (Upper 
Coast and Hill Country) :: Upper Texas Coast :: :: Edwards Plateau :: 
comment | share click on thumbnails for full image | 

|  |
| View on www.pbase.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


Good birding, and really jealous of everyone's posting here in TN this spring!! 
:") 

Mike ToddJackson, TNbirder1 AT bellsouth.netwww.pbase.com/mctodd
Subject: Avocets
From: "George's McNeil" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "mcneilg20" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 19:57:15 -0500
Went to the Maxson Pits late afternoon and a pleasure to see 2 American 
Avocets. Easy to find and cooperative. 


Bird On!
Georges McNeil
Shelby County

Sent from Georges McNeil's iPhone 6s.
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                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
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                          Rosedale, VA
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                        Clemson, SC
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Subject: Eagle Bend hatchery
From: "Ron Hoff" <aves7000 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 20:52:22 -0400
TN – birders,

Dollyann and I made a run out to the Eagle Bend stat fish hatchery in Anderson 
County this morning. Several of the ponds are drained and have decent shorebird 
habitat. Highlights were: 


Semipalmated Plover – 2
Spotted SP – 8
Solitary SP – 7
Lesser Yellowlegs – 2
Least SP – 29
White-rumped SP – 2
Pectoral SP – 2
Semipalmated SP – 2

Also 2 Great Egrets

Great birding,
Ron Hoff & Dollyann Myers
Clinton, TN
Subject: Mississippi Kites - Knox
From: angst <kde AT angst.engr.utk.edu>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 20:30:43 -0400

2 Mississippi Kites - young (2nd calendar year) birds with stripped tails and 
mottled underwing coverts. Seen from our deck on Black Oak Ridge in west Knox 
Co Friday night about 7:45 PM. Casually circled over the house allowing me to 
run inside for camera and get a few distant shots showing relevant ID points 
including short outer primary. Gradually worked NE along the ridge until out of 
sight. 


My second Knox Co record with the first being a very similar sighting (minus 
the circling and photos) on 25 May 2014. 


44 species from yard and neighborhood today.


Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN



=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
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                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Knoxville Snowy Egret
From: "Welsh, Christopher J E" <cwelsh AT utk.edu>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 23:21:43 +0000
Snowy Egret on downstream end of Looney Island now (7:20 pm Friday May 13). 
Visible from middle parking lot off Cherokee Blvd. 


Chris Welsh
Knoxville 
Knox county

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
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                          Rosedale, VA
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

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Subject: Highlights From the past week
From: Ruben Stoll <birdchaserrws AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 15:34:30 -0500
May 10th-13th, 2016 Hardin, Humphrey's and Maury Counties

May 10th, Bruton Branch, Hardin County
  Philadelphia Vireo 1
  Blackburnian warbler 1
  Blackpoll warbler 1
  Canada Warbler 2

May 10th, Pickwick State Park
  Hooded Merganser 2
  Pied-billed Grebe 2
  Caspian Tern 6
  Forster's Tern 2
  Peregrine Falcon 1
  Least Flycatcher 1
  Willow Flycatcher 1
  Fish Crow 5
  Brown-headed nuthatch 2 (Feeding babies)
  Magnolia warbler 2
  Bay-breasted warbler 3
  Rose-breasted Grosbeak 8
  Rose-breasted/Black-headed Grosbeak
(1 male seen flying only, crossing a backwater with a group of migrating
Rose-breasted. Extensive buffy-orange color seen, but unable to relocate
and confirm.)
  Baltimore Oriole 4

Savannah Bottoms, May 10th 2016
  Northern Bobwhite 3
  Traill's Flycatcher 1
  Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, 1 female.
  Blackburnian warbler 1
  Grasshopper Sparrow 4

Coffee Landing Road, May 10th
  Semipalmated Plover 21
  Lesser Yellowlegs 1
  Least Sandpiper 16
  White-rumped Sandpiper 6
  Semipalmated Sandpiper 4

Duck River Unit, Humphrey's County, May 12th
  Cattle Egret 2
  Yellow-crowned Night-heron 1
  Mississippi Kite 1
  Semipalmated Plover 4
  Greater Yellowlegs 4
  Lesser Yellowlegs 5
  Upland Sandpiper 1
  Stilt Sandpiper 2
  Least Sandpiper 35
  White-rumped Sandpiper 8
  Pectoral Sandpiper 1
  Semipalmated Sandpiper 85
  Short-billed Dowitcher 5 (shorebirds were all along Refuge RD, at the
first water on the right hand side. None were visible without walking in,
and we would have missed all of them if we hadn't seen the Upland fly in.)
  Great-horned Owl 1
  Common Nighthawk 24
  Chuck-wills-widow 1
  Whip-poor-will 1
  Bank Swallow 6
  Marsh Wren 1
  Lincoln's Sparrow 4
  Bobolink 2

Maury County Sherriff's Department, Colombia, TN, May 13th 2016

CONNECTICUT WARBLER 1 (Found in a brushy area behind the razor wire at the
impounded car lot, first heard, then located for decent looks.)

Ruben Stoll, Centerville TN
Subject: Bells Bends- Willow Flycatchers
From: Chris Agee <chrisageeinindia AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 11:49:02 -0500
Bells Bend
Davidson County
5/13/16 11 a.m
Had a group of about 30 Bobolinks fly over the road and land in a tree just 
past the park towards the sod farm. Two Willow Flycatchers in the scrubby 
Willows down the hill from the old house. Dickcissels, Orchard Orioles, Prairie 
Warblers, and lots of Yellowthroats and Indigo Buntings of course. 

Chris Agee
Smith County=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
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                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
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                         Cleveland, OH
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                          Rosedale, VA
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Lifer Connecticut Warbler!
From: Victor Stoll <victorjaystollnineteen80 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 10:07:24 -0500
After 2 days of fruitless searching in Nashville I gave up and went to work
at the prison in Columbia Tn Maury County. At 9:45 I heard a Connecticut
singing 100 yards away in a thicket at the edge of the impoundment lot! I
came charging off the roof where I was setting trusses,got Ruben out of the
skidsteer,and we squealed shoes over there. After one playback call it flew
out over me and landed right beside Ruben for killer looks! The myth has
been dispelled,they actually DO EXIST!
Subject: Radnor Lake Mourning Warbler
From: richard connors <didymops07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 09:46:35 -0500
May 13, 2016
Radnor Lake State Natural Area, Davidson Co. TN

This morning between aprox. 8:40 - 8:45AM I had a singing Mourning Warbler
by the Long Bridge, on the Lake trail. It was in the thicket we sometimes
call Kentucky Corner, behind bench #210. I did not see it, and didn't stay
to pester it into the open, but it sang several times clearly its CHEERY
CHEERY chorry chorry song, or slight variations of that.

Richard Connors
Nashville
Subject: Pine Siskins
From: Kristy Baker <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 12 May 2016 19:50:24 -0500
After not having any Pine Siskins since the end of April/first of May, I had 
three show up today.  I continue to have Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. 


Kristy Baker
Rutherford County



Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Droid
Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk chicks, Memphis, Shelby County, TN 2016-05-12
From: Scott Heppel <scott.heppel AT me.com>
Date: Thu, 12 May 2016 12:35:12 -0500
This pair of Red-Shouldered Hawk chicks are growing so fast. The nest is 
situated about 40 feet up in the fork of a large oak tree, in the front yard of 
one of our neighbors in East Memphis. We have been watching the nest and the 
adult hawks for more than five weeks, and first saw the young birds on May 5, 
2016. One of the adults is pictured below as it was feeding the chicks on May 
7. 


One block west of us, a pair of Cooper's hawks is nesting, but their nest is so 
screened by foliage that we can no longer see it, so we do not know if their 
eggs have hatched. We have had as many as a dozen Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at 
our feeders, but the last one departed on Sunday, May 8. On the plus side, 
Since May 4, we have had four Mississippi Kites that we see almost every 
morning. Two kites were perched within 100 meters of the Red-Shouldered Hawk 
nest this morning. The adult hawks apparently do not consider the kites to be 
any threat. 


Scott Heppel
Memphis
Shelby County
May 12, 2016

Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: <caroldenson1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 19:19:19 -0500
I’ve had the grosbeaks since April 23rd. I saw them every day until today. 
Yesterday, there was one female at my feeders. Although I didn’t have a lot 
in numbers comparatively, I have had more than usual this year. And it seems 
they have stayed longer than normal. Some years I may see one or two and they 
are gone. Not this year. 


Carol Williams
Smithville

Subject: Sharp's Ridge - 5/11
From: Shane Williams <shanehwilliams AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 18:30:56 -0400
Visited Sharp's Ridge (Knoxville) this afternoon after the morning rain. 
Mostly quiet but had a couple of productive spots including the far west 
end. Several warblers, including Chestnut-sided, female Blackburnian, 
and a pair of Blackpolls, were seen close from the start of one of the 
bike trails.

5/11/16
2:00 - 4:00pm:

American redstart - 2
Blackburnian warbler - 2 (m,f)
Blackpoll warbler - 3-4 (m,f)
Black-throated green warbler - 2-3
Chestnut-sided warbler - 1
Magnolia warbler - 1
Northern parula - 1
Pine warbler - 2

Red-breasted nuthatch - 1
Red-eyed vireo - 3
Scarlet tanager - 1 m
Swainson's? thrush - 1
Eastern wood pewee - 1
Indigo bunting - 1 m
Blue-gray gnatcatcher - 1
Chimney swift - lots today
Cedar waxwing - 20+
Red-tailed hawk - 1

Shane Williams
Knoxville, TN





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Subject: NTOS Radnor Lake Wednesday Walk Results- May 11
From: Joshua Stevenson <ifihadastick AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 17:23:29 -0400
Radnor Lake, Nashville, TN - Wed May 11, 2016 6:30am-11am
Approximately 20 birders turned out for the final Wednesday Walk at Radnor Lake 
this morning. Overall it was an excellent day both in species count and in 
overall numbers. The convenient weather we had come through last night probably 
had something to do with that. 88 Species were seen and a couple of our warbler 
counts tripped the eBird count filter (which is always my goal ;-) ). The day 
started a little earlier for me (around 6:30am) personally as the third warbler 
species I had of the morning was a CONNECTICUT Warbler- just off to the right 
barely 50 ft into the first trail from the west parking lot. Unfortunately, by 
the time others arrived we could not hear or see it again. At 7:30 after the 
group skulked around looking for the Connecticut, we went up the paved road and 
over the dam, spillway, and eventually to Grassy Point. The highlights of the 
day were definitely the 8 (at least) BLACKBURNIAN Warblers, which I believe 
most of the group got stunning elongated views of, a single GOLDEN-WINGED 
Warbler spotted by Jan Shaw, a WILSON's warbler, 3 CANADA Warblers, 15+ 
BAY-BREASTED Warblers, 8(ish) CHESTNUST SIDED Warblers, 12ish BLACKPOLL and 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN Warblers. Overall 25 species of Warbler were counted. 
Other highlights were all the expected thrush species and great views at more 
Philadelphia Vireos. Full list below. Great way to end the Radnor Wednesday 
season! 


NOTE: Full species list compiled from group sightings as well multiple 
individual sightings. 88 speciesCanada Goose 9Wood Duck 6Wild Turkey 
2Double-crested Cormorant 1Great Blue Heron 2Black Vulture 1Turkey Vulture 
6Sharp-shinned Hawk 1Cooper's Hawk 1Spotted Sandpiper 1Mourning Dove 
1Yellow-billed Cuckoo 3Barred Owl 1Chimney Swift 4Ruby-throated Hummingbird 
4Belted Kingfisher 1Red-bellied Woodpecker 2Downy Woodpecker 10Hairy Woodpecker 
1Northern Flicker 1Pileated Woodpecker 2Peregrine Falcon 1 Flyover- seen by one 
member of the group.Eastern Wood-Pewee 8Acadian Flycatcher 9Least Flycatcher 
1Eastern Phoebe 2Great Crested Flycatcher 1Eastern Kingbird 2White-eyed Vireo 
1Yellow-throated Vireo 1Philadelphia Vireo 4Red-eyed Vireo 15Blue Jay 6American 
Crow XNorthern Rough-winged Swallow 4Barn Swallow 8Carolina Chickadee XTufted 
Titmouse XWhite-breasted Nuthatch 4Carolina Wren 10Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 
XRuby-crowned Kinglet 1Eastern Bluebird 2Veery 1Gray-cheeked Thrush 1Swainson's 
Thrush 10Wood Thrush 6American Robin 2Northern Mockingbird 1Cedar Waxwing 
XOvenbird 1Louisiana Waterthrush 3Northern Waterthrush 2Golden-winged Warbler 1 
Light gray body, golden patch on wings and golden head, black throat and 
auricularsBlack-and-white Warbler 2Prothonotary Warbler 1Tennessee Warbler 
2Connecticut Warbler 1 Seen off of the trail from the West parking lot about 
50ft from the trailhead sign. On right side of the path, amongst thick 
understory. Spotted on right side of path about 10ft from railing. Was able to 
get a few decent looks at it as it moved into dense coverage- full slate gray 
head, throat and breast, with complete light-colored eyering, drab gray back. 
Saw 3-4 times briefly, then it went out of sight for a few minutes and I heard 
it sing a little further up the path.Kentucky Warbler 2Hooded Warbler 2American 
Redstart 5Cape May Warbler 1Northern Parula 4Magnolia Warbler 10Bay-breasted 
Warbler 15 Safe countBlackburnian Warbler 8 Accurate countYellow Warbler 
2Chestnut-sided Warbler 8Blackpoll Warbler 12Palm Warbler 3Yellow-rumped 
Warbler 6Yellow-throated Warbler 2Black-throated Green Warbler 12Canada Warbler 
3Wilson's Warbler 1Field Sparrow 2White-throated Sparrow 3Summer Tanager 
4Scarlet Tanager 1Northern Cardinal XRose-breasted Grosbeak 4Indigo Bunting 
1Red-winged Blackbird 2Common Grackle 2Brown-headed Cowbird 3Orchard Oriole 
1House Finch 2American Goldfinch XJoshua StevensonNashville, TN 


 		 	   		  
Subject: Cedar Waxwing Day
From: Lyda Phillips <lydap AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 11:19:50 -0500
Today is the annual backyard cedar waxwing festival here in East Nashville, 
where the cedar waxwings come by the dozens and strip the mulberry tree. I love 
it. Look forward to it. Been waiting for it. 


Lyda Phillips(301) 518-7538lydaphillips.comDavidson County


 		 	   		  
Subject: Common Mergansers in Pittman Center: NOT!
From: shaawitya AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 01:06:22 +0000 (UTC)
I just spoke with Dave Wilson, the man who reported the Common Merganser and 
chicks twice today and after quizzing him and looking at photos, he said what 
he saw was a female Wood Duck and her chicks, which have been seen here earlier 
this month. 


I apologize for the false information I passed on before confirming myself; but 
from his report early in the a.m., it sure sounded like a Common Merganser. 


Sorry, 

Keith Watson 
Pittman Center, TN 
Sevier County 

----- Original Message -----

From: shaawitya AT comcast.net 
To: "tn-bird"  
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 8:00:20 AM 
Subject: [TN-Bird] Common Mergansers in Pittman Center: with Chicks. 

I just learned from my wife via telephone that our neighbor Dave Wilson saw the 
female Common Merganser with 4 chicks this morning on the river by his house 
about 7:15 am. He went in to call me and lost sight of them. He and my wife 
Ruth are out looking for them and to get a photo. I'll post more details when I 
can. I'm on the road to Knoxville, as a passenger while composing. 


Keith Watson 
Pittman Center TN 
Sevier County 


Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App 
Subject: Fwd: Help with ID
From: John Mellon <jmellon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 20:43:25 -0400
Thanks for the help.   Grey catbird. 
John Mellon Chuckey greene tn 

-------- Original message --------
From: John Mellon  
Date: 05/10/2016  8:24 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: tn-bird  
Subject: [TN-Bird] Help with ID 

Help.  Cannot ID this bird.
John mellon Chuckey greene tn 
Subject: Re: Help with ID
From: "Alice Beth & Lew" <ablroyce AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 20:27:48 -0400
Gray catbird????

On Tue, May 10, 2016 at 8:24 PM, John Mellon  wrote:

> Help.  Cannot ID this bird.
>
> John mellon
> Chuckey greene tn
>
Subject: Help with ID
From: John Mellon <jmellon AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 20:24:07 -0400
Help.  Cannot ID this bird.
John mellon Chuckey greene tn 
Subject: Obed Field Trip
From: Charles Nicholson <cpnicholson53 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 20:16:44 -0400
I will be leading an NPS-sponsored bird walk on Sunday, May 15 at the Obed
Wild and Scenic River in Morgan County near Wartburg. Meet at 8 AM at Lilly
Bridge. The bird walk will end by noon. For more information on the Obed
WSR, see https://www.nps.gov/obed/index.htm or call 423-346-6294.

Chuck Nicholson
Norris, TN
Subject: Re: What Did I See?
From: Kristy Baker <kristybaker AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 16:15:47 -0500




Subject: Rankin Waterbirds (5/7)
From: michael sledjeski <mbsledjeski AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 May 2016 17:02:46 -0400
This didn't make it on to the list serve Sunday, so I'll try again to let folks 
know that birding has picked up at Rankin WMA. Scope or boat recommended. 

> Rankin Bottoms, Cocke County, 5/7/2016, 5-8pm, by canoe
> Douglas Lake elevation: 982.3 ft.
>  
> Rankin Bottoms finally flooded this week. There was a nice variety of FOS 
species in the grassy shallows. Most of the shorebirds were last seen heading 
north after sunset. 

>   
> Wood Duck - 7 
> Blue-winged Teal - 7
> Lesser Scaup - 1
> Great Blue Heron - 26
> Bald Eagle - 9 (2 adult)
> Osprey -2
> Greater Yellowlegs - 36
> Lesser Yellowlegs - 70
> WILLET - 2
> WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER - 3
> BAIRD'S SANDPIPER - 1
> Least Sandpiper - 15
> STILT SANDPIPER - 1
> LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER - 1 ( "peep" vocalization in flight)
> Ring-billed Gull - 22
> CASPIAN TERN - 1
> 
> Michael Sledjeski & Leslie Gibbens
> Del Rio TN
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
>