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Updated on Saturday, July 4 at 09:04 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Mikado Pheasant,©BirdQuest

4 Jul Warner Park sightings ["Ashley Heeney" ]
3 Jul Cattle Egrets - Dickson county [Graham ]
3 Jul Ibis and little blue herons - Hamilton County [Hugh Barger ]
3 Jul Immature White Ibis Chattanooga [Stephany McNew ]
2 Jul Herons [Tom Howe ]
2 Jul Results of KTOS Jay Walk at Eastbridge Business Park ["Jay Sturner" ]
1 Jul Re: Recent photos from NC pelagics [Kevin Breault ]
1 Jul Recent photos from NC pelagics [Michael Todd ]
1 Jul Recent photos from NC pelagics [Michael Todd ]
30 Jun Sightings Report 30 june 2015, Ensley Bottoms/Pits & TVA, Memphis, Shelby County [John Walko ]
30 Jun Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Hamilton County [Hugh Barger ]
12 Sep Re: Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska [Tony Watson ]
30 Jun Re: Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska [Michael Todd ]
30 Jun Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska [kbreault ]
29 Jun Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer ["Reese, Carol" ]
29 Jun Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer ["Reese, Carol" ]
29 Jun Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer [Heather Larkin Vogler ]
29 Jun Re: White Ibis and others ["james tucker" ]
29 Jun Chat, Tanager, Bunting at water drip (photo), Henry County [Shawna Ellis ]
29 Jun Mississippi Kites ["Ashley Heeney" ]
29 Jun KTOS Jay Walk Announcement: Eastbridge Business Park ["Jay Sturner" ]
29 Jun Henry County Mississippi Kites [Shawna Ellis ]
29 Jun Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer []
28 Jun White Ibis and others []
28 Jun White ibis Hamilton county [Hugh Barger ]
27 Jun White-throated Sparrow Clarksville ["Nita Heilman" ]
27 Jun Nesting Red-headed woodpeckers, Cades Cove, GSMNP, Blount County ["" ]
27 Jun Re: White Ibis ["John Obarr" ]
27 Jun Immature Little Blue Heron and Yellow-crowned Night Heron Hamilton County ["Libby Wolfe" ]
27 Jun White Ibis still present ["Mark Greene" ]
27 Jun White Ibis ["Tommie Rogers" ]
26 Jun White-throated sparrow at Nashville [Daniel Shelton ]
26 Jun Hamilton Co. White Ibis [scgwc ]
26 Jun Re: Discover Birds Activity Book [Cynthia Anne Routledge ]
26 Jun Discover Birds Activity Book [Judy Dorsey ]
26 Jun Re: Interesting Mexican-like Chickadee, Murfreesboro [Kevin Breault ]
25 Jun Merlin ["Ashley Heeney" ]
25 Jun Unusual behavior of a prothonotary Warbler? ["Nancy Moore" ]
25 Jun Interesting Mexican-like Chickadee, Murfreesboro ["Daniel Estabrooks" ]
25 Jun White Ibis - Hamilton Co [tim jeffers ]
25 Jun Re: Found the "Clay Pits" location in eastern AR - correction! ["Mark Greene" ]
25 Jun Found the "Clay Pits" location in eastern AR! ["Mark Greene" ]
25 Jun Historical eBird location reporting [Bill Pulliam ]
24 Jun Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR [Gaynell Perry ]
24 Jun Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR [Stephen Zipperer ]
24 Jun Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR [Michael Todd ]
24 Jun Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR ["John J. Walko" ]
24 Jun Results of KTOS field trip to Seven Islands State Birding Park (Knox Co.) ["Jay Sturner" ]
24 Jun Dickcissel at Seven Islands [Morton Massey ]
24 Jun Looking for a location in Eastern AR ["Mark Greene" ]
23 Jun Merlin ["Ashley Heeney" ]
23 Jun In need of KTOS field trips (non-KTOS members welcome) ["Jay Sturner" ]
23 Jun Information request: Dickson Co Anhinga []
22 Jun CORRECTION KTOS field trip reminder ["Jay Sturner" ]
22 Jun KTOS field trip reminder ["Jay Sturner" ]
22 Jun Results of KTOS Jay Walk in the Smokies ["Jay Sturner" ]
22 Jun Barred Owls []
21 Jun Re: Observations - Warner Park - Davidson Cty [Chris Sloan ]
21 Jun Re: Observations - Warner Park - Davidson Cty [Graham ]
20 Jun Observations - Warner Park - Davidson Cty ["Ashley Heeney" ]
20 Jun Re: big Knoxville oil tanker company now has Vickie Henderson art work on back [Lyda Phillips ]
20 Jun big Knoxville oil tanker company now has Vickie Henderson art work on back ["Wallace Coffey" ]
20 Jun Birding Meigs County and Hamilton County at Birchwood [Charles Murray ]
20 Jun Dickcissel in Washington Co ["Richard Knight" ]
20 Jun KTOS Field Trip Reminder ["Jay Sturner" ]
20 Jun Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing? ["Steve Routledge" ]
20 Jun Results from NTOS Field Trip ["Chloe Walker" ]
19 Jun Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing? ["Ron Hoff" ]
19 Jun Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing? [Richard Blanton ]
19 Jun US Open bird song [richard connors ]
19 Jun Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing? ["Mcdonald, Kenneth" ]
19 Jun Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing? [Bob Ford ]
19 Jun Lauderdale & Dyer Counties ["Mark Greene" ]
19 Jun Macedonia Bottoms Heronry - bad news ["Mark Greene" ]
18 Jun Oak Ridge birds [Thomas Miko ]
18 Jun KTOS Jay Walk Announcement: Barflies of the Smokies ["Jay Sturner" ]

Subject: Warner Park sightings
From: "Ashley Heeney" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "acheeney@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 09:00:30 -0500
Good morning,

Highlights at sunrise (around 6:20) this morning (July 4) at Warner Park, 
Davidson County off Nature Center entrance: 


Male (adult) Kentucky Warbler 'hopping' along stream bank just East of Natchez 
Trace Trailhead, off the blue Harpeth River Trail, giving agitated 
vocalization. 


It flew West and I then heard his traditional song. 

On paved trail above the trailhead, observed a female (adult) Summer Tanager 
singing and then a male (adult Summer Tanger joined her on the same branch. 


Ashley Heeney
Nashville
Davidson County


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Cattle Egrets - Dickson county
From: Graham <grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 18:55:23 -0500
My mother reported in a text to me half a dozen Cattle Egrets "in the
pasture with Phil Hayes's cows." These are family friends. The pasture she
is referring to are the cow fields on either side of Hwy 96 in Dickson,
just before it dead ends into Hwy 70. It is getting dark fast, but I expect
the birds are easy to see from the road - my mother would have seen them
from her car.

I have never seen a Cattle Egret in Dickson County and I do not see a
record on ebird.

Graham Gerdeman
Nashville
Subject: Ibis and little blue herons - Hamilton County
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 14:52:25 -0400
The immature white ibis was still present at Brainerd levee today about 1
PM,  Also 3 immature little blue herons were present in the same pool as
the ibis.

-- 
Hugh Barger
Subject: Immature White Ibis Chattanooga
From: Stephany McNew <stephmcnew AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 11:22:39 -0400
The immature White Ibis was still at Brainerd Levee in Hamilton County 
yesterday evening at 6 pm. Coming from the parking area behind the gas station, 
it was about 100 ft before the 1.0 mile marker. It was feeding alongside a 
Great Egret. There was also an immature Little Blue Heron. 

Stephany McNew
Knoxville, TN 
Knox Co. 

Sent from my iPhone=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Herons
From: Tom Howe <blountbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 23:18:32 -0400
7-2-15
Blount County

Yesterday evening at 8:25 pm an adult Yellow-crowned Night-Heron and a
Green Heron were feeding at the edge of the Duck Pond along Lodge St. We
have not seen them along Pistol Creek near the spillway this year they
nested last year.

Tom Howe
Alcoa
Subject: Results of KTOS Jay Walk at Eastbridge Business Park
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 18:12:03 +0000 (UTC)
Though we didn't see a Loggerhead Shrike as hoped, yesterday's walk at 
Eastbridge Business Park in Knoxville yielded an impressive 51 species! 
Highlights include a family of turkeys walking down a service road, decent 
looks at a shy Grasshopper Sparrow, a lifer Yellow-breasted Chat for one 
birder, lots of Prairie Warblers singing up and down Eastbridge Blvd, and every 
species of local swallow. All that and I was miraculously tick-free when I got 
home! 

 
Thank you to everyone who came along. It was fun.
 
Here's my checklist from the hike (which includes a few
species not seen by the others): 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24114315 

 
Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Recent photos from NC pelagics
From: Kevin Breault <Kevin.Breault AT mtsu.edu>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 19:05:17 +0000
I would certainly have to agree. I would also add that Brian's trips have 
immensely added to our understanding of the pelagic birds of the area, e.g., 
Fea's Petrel, Bermuda Petrel, and Herald's Petrel, among others. In addition, 
his trips are quite inexpensive compared to cruising, and if you are a 
competitive birder the trips are essential. While some of the birds Brian has 
seen can be found from cruise ships it is likely you will need his help if you 
want to significantly add to your list. Needless to say, as with cruising, 
these trips are not for everyone. The lack of comfort and seasickness will 
always be an issue for some. Fortunately, as soon as you are back on land the 
motion discomfort will quickly fade. The only significantly medical issue is 
for those who have dehydration problems, such as people who have had 
colectomies. For most people, motion sickness is not a medical concern. For 
many beginning and intermediate level birders, pelagic birding is the next step 
up, an "alien environment" as Mike says, an "undiscovered country." I would 
strongly recommend going. You will see great birds, you may even contribute to 
the science of these birds, and you will be helping to sustain an important 
birding tradition. 

Kevin Breault
Brentwood
________________________________
From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of 
Michael Todd [birder1 AT bellsouth.net] 

Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2015 8:44 AM
To: TN-Birds Bird; BIRDKY Freelists
Subject: [TN-Bird] Recent photos from NC pelagics

Friends,

For anyone who might be interested, I've uploaded a LOT of photos from a trip 
to NC in late May/early June. I did the last 6 days in a row on the spring 
blitz Brian Patteson (Seabirding) runs every year. Weather was great, though 
wind was lacking several days. Diversity was exceptional most days, with 15 or 
more pelagic species seen. I have broken the images down by day, so many 
species are shown multiple times, randomly. It is haphazard this way, but you 
can almost follow along on the trip. 


I had a very small target list (European Storm-Petrel, Bermuda Petrel, 
White-tailed Tropicbird), and feel lucky to have had White-tailed Tropicbird on 
2 of the 6 days, for an ABA bird. There was only one Bermuda seen all spring, 2 
days before we started, and no European Storm-Petrels at all. The very last day 
was the most exciting rarity wise, with Fea's Petrel finally (they had several 
early in the spring) and great looks at both White-tailed and Red-billed 
Tropicbird's. It was an exceptional spring for jeagers and Arctic Tern off NC, 
at times we had all 3 jaegers behind the boat at once! 


I drove over with a friend from TX, (and met fellow TN birder Rick Shipkowski 
on the boat for a couple of days) so I have a few photos posted from 
landbirding along the way, including my first ever trip to the Roan Mountain 
area which was great. 


Many here are familiar with Brian's trips off the Outer Banks, heck we even 
have a couple of TN Birders who guide for Brian when they go! But, if you've 
never been, and handle boats well at all, it is a must. These trips are a 
fascinating way to get out to what is essentially an alien environment for us. 
Also, as far as east coast trips go especially, the run out is a lot shorter 
due to the Gulf Stream coming in very close to the Outer Banks, often you have 
to run several hours just to get out to where you start birding. 


For those with time on your hands.....the gallery is here:
NC trip spring 2015 by Michael Todd




[image]











NC trip spring 2015 by Michael Todd
NC trip spring 2015


View on www.pbase.com

Preview by Yahoo





Good Birding!!

Michael Todd
McKenzie, TN
birder1 AT bellsouth.net
www.pbase.com/mctodd
Subject: Recent photos from NC pelagics
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 13:44:18 +0000 (UTC)
 Friends,
For anyone who might be interested, I've uploaded a LOT of photos from a trip 
to NC in late May/early June. I did the last 6 days in a row on the spring 
blitz Brian Patteson (Seabirding) runs every year. Weather was great, though 
wind was lacking several days. Diversity was exceptional most days, with 15 or 
more pelagic species seen. I have broken the images down by day, so many 
species are shown multiple times, randomly. It is haphazard this way, but you 
can almost follow along on the trip. 

I had a very small target list (European Storm-Petrel, Bermuda Petrel, 
White-tailed Tropicbird), and feel lucky to have had White-tailed Tropicbird on 
2 of the 6 days, for an ABA bird. There was only one Bermuda seen all spring, 2 
days before we started, and no European Storm-Petrels at all. The very last day 
was the most exciting rarity wise, with Fea's Petrel finally (they had several 
early in the spring) and great looks at both White-tailed and Red-billed 
Tropicbird's. It was an exceptional spring for jeagers and Arctic Tern off NC, 
at times we had all 3 jaegers behind the boat at once! 

I drove over with a friend from TX, (and met fellow TN birder Rick Shipkowski 
on the boat for a couple of days) so I have a few photos posted from 
landbirding along the way, including my first ever trip to the Roan Mountain 
area which was great. 

Many here are familiar with Brian's trips off the Outer Banks, heck we even 
have a couple of TN Birders who guide for Brian when they go! But, if you've 
never been, and handle boats well at all, it is a must. These trips are a 
fascinating way to get out to what is essentially an alien environment for us. 
Also, as far as east coast trips go especially, the run out is a lot shorter 
due to the Gulf Stream coming in very close to the Outer Banks, often you have 
to run several hours just to get out to where you start birding. 

For those with time on your hands.....the gallery is here: NC trip spring 2015 
by Michael Todd 

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| NC trip spring 2015 by Michael ToddNC trip spring 2015  |
|  |
| View on www.pbase.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

  Good Birding!!
Michael ToddMcKenzie, TNbirder1 AT bellsouth.netwww.pbase.com/mctodd
Subject: Recent photos from NC pelagics
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 13:44:18 +0000 (UTC)
 Friends,
For anyone who might be interested, I've uploaded a LOT of photos from a trip 
to NC in late May/early June. I did the last 6 days in a row on the spring 
blitz Brian Patteson (Seabirding) runs every year. Weather was great, though 
wind was lacking several days. Diversity was exceptional most days, with 15 or 
more pelagic species seen. I have broken the images down by day, so many 
species are shown multiple times, randomly. It is haphazard this way, but you 
can almost follow along on the trip. 

I had a very small target list (European Storm-Petrel, Bermuda Petrel, 
White-tailed Tropicbird), and feel lucky to have had White-tailed Tropicbird on 
2 of the 6 days, for an ABA bird. There was only one Bermuda seen all spring, 2 
days before we started, and no European Storm-Petrels at all. The very last day 
was the most exciting rarity wise, with Fea's Petrel finally (they had several 
early in the spring) and great looks at both White-tailed and Red-billed 
Tropicbird's. It was an exceptional spring for jeagers and Arctic Tern off NC, 
at times we had all 3 jaegers behind the boat at once! 

I drove over with a friend from TX, (and met fellow TN birder Rick Shipkowski 
on the boat for a couple of days) so I have a few photos posted from 
landbirding along the way, including my first ever trip to the Roan Mountain 
area which was great. 

Many here are familiar with Brian's trips off the Outer Banks, heck we even 
have a couple of TN Birders who guide for Brian when they go! But, if you've 
never been, and handle boats well at all, it is a must. These trips are a 
fascinating way to get out to what is essentially an alien environment for us. 
Also, as far as east coast trips go especially, the run out is a lot shorter 
due to the Gulf Stream coming in very close to the Outer Banks, often you have 
to run several hours just to get out to where you start birding. 

For those with time on your hands.....the gallery is here: NC trip spring 2015 
by Michael Todd 

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| NC trip spring 2015 by Michael ToddNC trip spring 2015  |
|  |
| View on www.pbase.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

  Good Birding!!
Michael ToddMcKenzie, TNbirder1 AT bellsouth.netwww.pbase.com/mctodd
Subject: Sightings Report 30 june 2015, Ensley Bottoms/Pits & TVA, Memphis, Shelby County
From: John Walko <walko AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 21:51:58 -0500
TVA Allen Fossil (Steam) Plant ash ponds, Shelby, Tennessee, US
Jun 30, 2015 5:10 PM - 5:20 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments: Quick stop after work prior to going down to the Pits. Hazy, 87 
degrees no breeze. 

8 species
Canada Goose  8
Black-necked Stilt  1
Killdeer  18
Least Sandpiper  4
Least Tern (Interior) 61 3 looked like they were on nests on the far sand/mud 
bar, one rose up and showed two eggs. With the Mississippi River almost to 
flood stage this week the Terns are looking for replacement habitat for nesting 
this year. 

Mourning Dove  6
European Starling  90
Red-winged Blackbird  35
View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24109449 


Ensley Bottoms, Maxson Wastewater Lagoons(The Pits)/Earth Complex, Shelby, 
Tennessee, US 

Jun 30, 2015 5:20 PM - 7:20 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.5 mile(s)
Comments: Dry levees dry trails drove the CRV all over today. High light of the 
day was three Painted Buntings, 2 males and one female down in the SE corner 
singing with some Indigoes, Bl. grosbeaks and cardinals. 87 degrees hazy no 
breeze., lots of biting black flies. 

29 species
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  39
Canada Goose  17
Mallard  27
Northern Bobwhite 2 Calling along the western cut fields both spotted and 
photographed. 

Great Egret  1
Green Heron  1
Black-necked Stilt  32
Killdeer  27
Least Sandpiper  1
Least Tern  3
Mourning Dove  45
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
Common Nighthawk  1
American Kestrel  1
Blue Jay  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 73 Have pictures on the wire huge flock down by 
the intermodal facility both sides of road around the drainage culvert. 

Barn Swallow  23
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  450     huge flocks spread throughout the complex
Yellow-breasted Chat  1
Northern Cardinal  5
Blue Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  3
Painted Bunting  3,     2 males 1 female SE Corner back behind pit 5
Dickcissel  23
Red-winged Blackbird  85
Eastern Meadowlark  7
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24109572 



John "Jay" Walko
Collierville, TN
www.pbase.com/jwalko



Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Hamilton County
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:07:29 -0400
The bird, which was first reported to me on 6/27 by Libby Wolfe, was seen
again today by Janice Chadwell and myself.  Located in a drainage ditch
near the Uptain Bldg. on Greeway View Dr. in Chattanooga.

-- 
Hugh Barger
Subject: Re: Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska
From: Tony Watson <twnurse2k AT att.net>
Date: Sat, 12 Sep 2015 08:31:19 -0400
I have had similar experiences on Caribbean cruises. I noticed that flying fish 
would launch themselves out if the ships wake. Then I noticed that masked and 
brown boobies would soar on the ship's pressure wave about 6 feet off of the 
bow of the ship. This would let them see down both sides of the ship. When they 
saw a fish they would turn completely upside down in a dive and chase the fish. 
So fun to watch. I have also seen tropic birds from the ship. If you go on a 
cruise be sure to take your optics. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 29, 2015, at 11:35 PM, Michael Todd  wrote:
> 
> Friends,
> 
> I wholeheartedly second what Kevin has said. I had hoped to do one of the CA 
to AK cruises this year, but didn't work out. I did a repositioning cruise from 
San Diego to Vancouver last spring, and it was fantastic. This was on a 
mid-size Holland America ship, and we didn't get a room with a balcony, instead 
we just spent the whole day (every day) out on deck. Kevin's version would be 
more comfortable I'm sure, as it was cool the whole trip. 

> 
> These cruises are a great way to get far enough out to have a good chance at 
those birds that really require a grueling run to try and get to on one day 
trips off the west coast, in particular the Pterodroma trifecta of 
Cook's/Murphy'/Hawaiian. I've done this both ways, and both have their merits, 
but leisurely watching the petrels thru your scope is a nice option to bouncing 
around on a smaller boat. Photo ops/views were at least as good as I got in the 
traditional method. 

> 
> Cruise ship birding is definitely something I see happening again in my 
future! 

> 
> Good Birding!!
> 
> Mike Todd
> McKenzie, TN
> birder1 AT bellsouth.net
> Galleries by Michael Todd
>  
>  
> 
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
> Galleries by Michael Todd
> :: About me :: :: Airshows :: :: NC trip spring 2015 :: :: Spring 2015 :: :: 
India 2015 (Western Ghats) :: :: Winter 2014-2015 :: :: Brazil (work) Trip 2014 
:: :: I... 

> View on www.pbase.com
> Preview by Yahoo
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Monday, June 29, 2015 9:49 PM, kbreault  wrote:
> 
> 
>  
> Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska
> As a graduation present for my daughter and one of her friends, I decided 
that a non-birding part of our recent Northwest/Alaska trip would be a cruise 
from Vancouver, BC to Alaska. Of course, in birding preparation is the critical 
element and I tried to do everything possible to increase birding opportunities 
on the ship, even if it turned out that the birding was not good. So I got a 
balcony cabin on the port (left, facing forward), which is the ocean side on 
trips north to AK. I also made sure my cabin was as close to the bow as 
possible, and that it was not too high up. Having a scope is also very useful. 
The stable platform of a large ship easily allows scopes (anything more than 
about 25-30x will generally not be useful depending on wave movement). But 
despite the preparation I was not optimistic. My understanding was that birding 
would be poor (I had heard that you can’t see a thing on cruise ships, birds 
don’t get close to large ships, that cruise ships don’t go in areas that 
are productive of birds, etc.), and that was certainly okay with me as this was 
the non-birding part of the larger trip. My goal was simply to pick up a 
handful of state/province birds and leave the serious birding to when we landed 
in Alaska. And I could not have been more wrong! 

> At the beginning of the voyage I was not happy with the large size of the 
ship (a “midsize” vessel among cruise ships), but it turned out that 
smaller ships (“expedition” ships) take an even more inner “Inside 
Passage” route that begins near Klemtu and continues to Porcher Island in 
British Columbia. That means less pelagic birding than if you sail the Queen 
Charlotte Sound (Cape Scott to Cape St. James) as did my ship. So to begin, the 
birding was fairly slow going in BC waters and in the Inside Passage in AK (in 
AK the Inside Passage goes from Fox Point north to Skagway and then west to 
Glacier Bay and Cape Spencer), but once in Queen Charlotte Sound and Hecate 
Strait the birding was pretty productive with lots of the usual stuff including 
many Sooty Shearwaters. (The very common Sooty was my first pelagic bird for 
the trip but it was first seen being harassed by gulls from my hotel room in 
Vancouver!) Much more productive was the sailing after Glacier Bay, and by far 
the best birding was after Yakutat Bay (Hubbard Glacier) in the Gulf of Alaska. 
The captain had warned me that seas in the Gulf were likely to be 7’-9’ but 
it turned out the seas were rarely above 2’. And since ice and fog kept us 
out of much of Yakutat Bay (and so we were not able to see Hubbard Glacier), 
the captain slowed the ship a bit for the trip in the Gulf. Great conditions 
for birding--if birds were present. 

> And the birding was great! All told, many species, many hundreds of 
individuals, including albatrosses, Fulmars, petrels, storm-petrels, loons, 
cormorants, ducks, gulls, terns, jaegers, alcids (including the two puffins my 
wife and daughter wanted to see), and an unusual assortment of land birds that 
shared some of the ride—notably a Peregrine Falcon that landed on the balcony 
directly above mine, a resting Gray-cheeked Thrush, and a very anxious and 
“cheewing” (calling) Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch that we may have picked up on 
the Inside Passage. The birds, including the albatrosses, were often very close 
to the ship (as little as 15-20 meters—although many alcids and ducks were 
even closer and may have been quite surprised by the leviathan in their midst). 
Many of the birds also gave great views as they seemed to want to fly along 
with the ship. One, a Short-tailed Shearwater, was no more than ten feet from 
my balcony rail for an extended amount of time. The only thing I could compare 
it to was the behavior of some gulls, or seeing pelagic birds at the American 
Museum of Natural History in New York when I was young—a museum view of a 
very alive pelagic! Now, I have not birded off Monterey or similar places in 
CA, so I don’t know how that would compare but it might be difficult to top 
this trip. And note that in the past on pelagic trips I have often been wet, 
too cold or too hot, and sometimes sick from motion sickness. None of that on 
this trip. And when I did get cold I could just close my sliding balcony door 
and watch from the comfort of my cabin. Another important upside was that 
unlike the typical pelagic trip where you may have 6-8 hours of good birding on 
a day trip, I estimate that I birded for about 45-50 hours, and I could have 
done more. Note that at this time of year the Gulf of Alaska has 20 or so hours 
of daylight. In addition, rather than rushing around for my next birding 
destination, or calculating the amount of time I had left at my current 
location versus the time I could spend at the next location versus the 
likelihood of picking up the remaining birds I still needed (much of this, I 
admit, is the insanity of Total Ticking), I could comfortably rest on the ship 
knowing that an ever changing set of birds were easily available. All I had to 
do was look out. In fact, as I write this I realize that this was the only 
Total Ticking trip in which I felt I could relax. (Of course, my wife calls my 
Total Ticking trips “vacations,” but typically I work much harder on them 
than I do on my regular job!) But the feeling on this trip was disconcerting at 
first. I found myself thinking: “How can I not be looking at the water?” It 
was similar to the kind of feeling you have when as a novice birder you are 
disappointed you don’t have the opportunity to spend time on every bird that 
vocalizes or flies by. Finally, one important downside to birding on a cruise 
ship is that you are less likely to hear birds at a distance—the ship does 
not stop for wildlife. And while you will get more views of the upper parts of 
birds, in general that will not significantly increase your ability to identify 
them. For that, preparation again is the important thing. Or rather, that and 
having numerous chances to view the birds as was possible on this trip. 

> Of course, cruising is not for everyone. Cruises can be very expensive 
especially if you want the kind of accommodations that are best suited for 
birding. It is true that you can cruise with the Queen Mary or most ships 
without spending an arm and a leg if you can accept the lowest level of 
accommodation, but at least for me seeing the water from your cabin is 
important (important for birding, but important too for the entire experience). 
Many cruise ships in the U.S. also have a kind of Las Vegas sensibility that 
can be off-putting for some. The casino (thankfully, the only place on the ship 
where you were allowed to smoke), the auctions involving the worst art you are 
ever likely to see, the overpriced and tackiest jewelry, and the ubiquitous 
food were rather unusual for us. However, the quality of food was surprisingly 
good with fine vegetarian and Indian fare among the choices. (By far the 
largest minority group on the ship was South Asians.) There were also several 
very good specialty and upscale restaurants on the ship. Perhaps the most 
curious food on this Alaskan trip was that all the salmon came from the 
Atlantic Ocean. The non-birders with us loved the hot tubs, the very close 
views of the (2) glaciers in Glacier Bay, the nature lectures by the park 
rangers at Glacier Bay National Park (somewhat on the sentimental side I 
thought), and the excursions—especially whale watching, kayaking, and 
helicopter trips to a glacier. And the birding wasn’t that bad on some of 
these excursions. On the trip to see Humpback Whales I had 23 species of water 
birds (and three breaching whales). We also saw other marine mammals on the 
trip: Steller Seal Lions, Harbor Seals, Killer Whales, Dall Porpoises, Pacific 
White-Dolphins, and Sea Otters. 

> So, I did not think I would ever say this but I am now convinced: at some 
times and on some routes, a trip on a cruise ship might be a great way to bird. 
Trips out of south Florida and San Diego or Los Angeles might be worth 
exploring. I have heard there is one with an excursion at Catalina Island. I 
need that jay! Given the sheer number of birds in the Gulf of Alaska, this 
might be a good trip for beginners to intermediate level birders, as they would 
likely leave the ship with a significantly greater appreciation for and 
understanding of pelagic birds. Of course, having a mentor with a beginner is 
the best bet. For the competitive birder, Total Tickers and the like, it is not 
clear to me that this cruise is a necessary part of the itinerary. Indeed, only 
one bird, Mottled Petrel, on my checklist of the area came close to indicating 
that northern Bay of Alaska should be a target destination, and the bird can be 
seen in the outer Aleutians. 

> One last thought. My professional interest is in epidemiology and the last 
thing you want is to spend all that money only to get sick on a cruise ship. 
Some basic rules are worth repeating. Don’t leave home without enough of your 
regular medications for the trip. Don’t get on board if you are sick, think 
you are getting sick or have a chronic illness that may cause you to get sick 
on the ship. Medical help will be limited and you may be many hours away from 
the help you need. Use wipes that contain hydrogen peroxide to clean your room 
thoroughly at the beginning of the trip and when needed or if illness breaks 
out on board. Use hand sanitizers and wash your hands often every day. Use 
sunscreen liberally. Bring antihistamine medication (e.g., Zyrtec) even if you 
do not have known allergies. Bring medicine for motion sickness that you have 
tried before you sail. The expression is: view the ship like a city. My ship 
had 3,000 people on it including about a third who were ship employees, so be 
aware of your surroundings and be appropriately careful. And of course, if you 
drink to excess you may find yourself in it (hoping that another birder will 
see you bobbing along with the alcids). 

> With regard to my non-birding but duly graduated and gainfully employed (yes, 
yes, yes!) daughter, we left her and her friend shortly after the cruise and 
set out for a more usual birding trip in Alaska. Thus, I thought TN birders 
might be interested in this somewhat unusual way of getting there. Let me know 
if you have any questions. I also put together a checklist of birds of northern 
Gulf of Alaska in May if anyone is interested. As always, good birding and good 
totaling! 

> Kevin Breault
> Brentwood, TN
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 03:35:46 +0000 (UTC)
Friends,
I wholeheartedly second what Kevin has said. I had hoped to do one of the CA to 
AK cruises this year, but didn't work out. I did a repositioning cruise from 
San Diego to Vancouver last spring, and it was fantastic. This was on a 
mid-size Holland America ship, and we didn't get a room with a balcony, instead 
we just spent the whole day (every day) out on deck. Kevin's version would be 
more comfortable I'm sure, as it was cool the whole trip. 

These cruises are a great way to get far enough out to have a good chance at 
those birds that really require a grueling run to try and get to on one day 
trips off the west coast, in particular the Pterodroma trifecta of 
Cook's/Murphy'/Hawaiian. I've done this both ways, and both have their merits, 
but leisurely watching the petrels thru your scope is a nice option to bouncing 
around on a smaller boat. Photo ops/views  were at least as good as I got in 
the traditional method. 

Cruise ship birding is definitely something I see happening again in my future!
Good Birding!!
Mike ToddMcKenzie, TNbirder1 AT bellsouth.netGalleries by Michael Todd
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     On Monday, June 29, 2015 9:49 PM, kbreault  wrote:
   

   Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to AlaskaAs a graduation present for my 
daughter and one of herfriends, I decided that a non-birding part of our recent 
Northwest/Alaska tripwould be a cruise from Vancouver, BC to Alaska. Of course, 
in birding preparationis the critical element and I tried to do everything 
possible to increasebirding opportunities on the ship, even if it turned out 
that the birding wasnot good. So I got a balcony cabin on the port (left, 
facing forward), which isthe ocean side on trips north to AK. I also made sure 
my cabin was as close tothe bow as possible, and that it was not too high up. 
Having a scope is alsovery useful. The stable platform of a large ship easily 
allows scopes (anythingmore than about 25-30x will generally not be useful 
depending on wave movement).But despite the preparation I was not optimistic. 
My understanding was that birdingwould be poor (I had heard that you can’t 
see a thing on cruise ships, birdsdon’t get close to large ships, that cruise 
ships don’t go in areas that areproductive of birds, etc.), and that was 
certainly okay with me as this was thenon-birding part of the larger trip. My 
goal was simply to pick up a handful ofstate/province birds and leave the 
serious birding to when we landed in Alaska.And I could not have been more 
wrong!At the beginning of the voyage I was not happy with the largesize of the 
ship (a “midsize” vessel among cruise ships), but it turned outthat smaller 
ships (“expedition” ships) take an even more inner “InsidePassage” 
route that begins near Klemtu and continues to Porcher Island inBritish 
Columbia. That means less pelagic birding than if you sail the QueenCharlotte 
Sound (Cape Scott to Cape St. James) as did my ship. So to begin, thebirding 
was fairly slow going in BC waters and in the Inside Passage in AK (inAK the 
Inside Passage goes from Fox Point north to Skagway and then west toGlacier Bay 
and Cape Spencer), but once in Queen Charlotte Sound and HecateStrait the 
birding was pretty productive with lots of the usual stuff includingmany Sooty 
Shearwaters. (The very common Sooty was my first pelagic bird forthe trip but 
it was first seen being harassed by gulls from my hotel room inVancouver!) Much 
more productive was the sailing after Glacier Bay, and by farthe best birding 
was after Yakutat Bay (Hubbard Glacier) in the Gulf of Alaska.The captain had 
warned me that seas in the Gulf were likely to be 7’-9’ but itturned out 
the seas were rarely above 2’. And since ice and fog kept us out of muchof 
Yakutat Bay (and so we were not able to see Hubbard Glacier), the captainslowed 
the ship a bit for the trip in the Gulf. Great conditions for birding--ifbirds 
were present.And the birding was great! All told, many species, many hundredsof 
individuals, including albatrosses, Fulmars, petrels, storm-petrels, 
loons,cormorants, ducks, gulls, terns, jaegers, alcids (including the two 
puffins mywife and daughter wanted to see), and an unusual assortment of land 
birds thatshared some of the ride—notably a Peregrine Falcon that landed on 
the balconydirectly above mine, a resting Gray-cheeked Thrush, and a very 
anxious and “cheewing”(calling) Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch that we may have 
picked up on the InsidePassage. The birds, including the albatrosses, were 
often very close to theship (as little as 15-20 meters—although many alcids 
and ducks were even closerand may have been quite surprised by the leviathan in 
their midst). Many of thebirds also gave great views as they seemed to want to 
fly along with the ship.One, a Short-tailed Shearwater, was no more than ten 
feet from my balcony railfor an extended amount of time. The only thing I could 
compare it to was the behaviorof some gulls, or seeing pelagic birds at the 
American Museum of Natural Historyin New York when I was young—a museum view 
of a very alive pelagic! Now, I havenot birded off Monterey or similar places 
in CA, so I don’t know how that wouldcompare but it might be difficult to top 
this trip. And note that in the past onpelagic trips I have often been wet, too 
cold or too hot, and sometimes sickfrom motion sickness. None of that on this 
trip. And when I did get cold Icould just close my sliding balcony door and 
watch from the comfort of mycabin. Another important upside was that unlike the 
typical pelagic trip whereyou may have 6-8 hours of good birding on a day trip, 
I estimate that I birdedfor about 45-50 hours, and I could have done more. Note 
that at this time ofyear the Gulf of Alaska has 20 or so hours of daylight. In 
addition, ratherthan rushing around for my next birding destination, or 
calculating the amountof time I had left at my current location versus the time 
I could spend at thenext location versus the likelihood of picking up the 
remaining birds I still needed(much of this, I admit, is the insanity of Total 
Ticking), I could comfortablyrest on the ship knowing that an ever changing set 
of birds were easily available.All I had to do was look out. In fact, as I 
write this I realize that this wasthe only Total Ticking trip in which I felt I 
could relax. (Of course, my wifecalls my Total Ticking trips “vacations,” 
but typically I work much harder on themthan I do on my regular job!) But the 
feeling on this trip was disconcerting atfirst. I found myself thinking: “How 
can I not be looking at the water?” It wassimilar to the kind of feeling you 
have when as a novice birder you aredisappointed you don’t have the 
opportunity to spend time on every bird that vocalizesor flies by. Finally, one 
important downside to birding on a cruise ship isthat you are less likely to 
hear birds at a distance—the ship does not stop forwildlife. And while you 
will get more views of the upper parts of birds, ingeneral that will not 
significantly increase your ability to identify them. Forthat, preparation 
again is the important thing. Or rather, that and havingnumerous chances to 
view the birds as was possible on this trip.Of course, cruising is not for 
everyone. Cruises can be veryexpensive especially if you want the kind of 
accommodations that are bestsuited for birding. It is true that you can cruise 
with the Queen Mary or mostships without spending an arm and a leg if you can 
accept the lowest level of accommodation,but at least for me seeing the water 
from your cabin is important (importantfor birding, but important too for the 
entire experience). Many cruise ships inthe U.S. also have a kind of Las Vegas 
sensibility that can be off-putting forsome. The casino (thankfully, the only 
place on the ship where you were allowedto smoke), the auctions involving the 
worst art you are ever likely to see, theoverpriced and tackiest jewelry, and 
the ubiquitous food were rather unusualfor us. However, the quality of food was 
surprisingly good with fine vegetarianand Indian fare among the choices. (By 
far the largest minority group on theship was South Asians.) There were also 
several very good specialty and upscalerestaurants on the ship. Perhaps the 
most curious food on this Alaskan trip wasthat all the salmon came from the 
Atlantic Ocean. The non-birders with us lovedthe hot tubs, the very close views 
of the (2) glaciers in Glacier Bay, thenature lectures by the park rangers at 
Glacier Bay National Park (somewhat onthe sentimental side I thought), and the 
excursions—especially whale watching,kayaking, and helicopter trips to a 
glacier. And the birding wasn’t that bad onsome of these excursions. On the 
trip to see Humpback Whales I had 23 speciesof water birds (and three breaching 
whales). We also saw other marine mammalson the trip: Steller Seal Lions, 
Harbor Seals, Killer Whales, Dall Porpoises,Pacific White-Dolphins, and Sea 
Otters.So, I did not think I would ever say this but I am now convinced:at some 
times and on some routes, a trip on a cruise ship might be a great wayto bird. 
Trips out of south Florida and San Diego or Los Angeles might be 
worthexploring. I have heard there is one with an excursion at Catalina Island. 
Ineed that jay! Given the sheer number of birds in the Gulf of Alaska, 
thismight be a good trip for beginners to intermediate level birders, as they 
wouldlikely leave the ship with a significantly greater appreciation for and 
understandingof pelagic birds. Of course, having a mentor with a beginner is 
the best bet. Forthe competitive birder, Total Tickers and the like, it is not 
clear to me thatthis cruise is a necessary part of the itinerary. Indeed, only 
one bird,Mottled Petrel, on my checklist of the area came close to indicating 
thatnorthern Bay of Alaska should be a target destination, and the bird can be 
seenin the outer Aleutians.One last thought. My professional interest is 
inepidemiology and the last thing you want is to spend all that money only to 
getsick on a cruise ship. Some basic rules are worth repeating. Don’t leave 
homewithout enough of your regular medications for the trip. Don’t get on 
board ifyou are sick, think you are getting sick or have a chronic illness that 
maycause you to get sick on the ship. Medical help will be limited and you may 
bemany hours away from the help you need. Use wipes that contain 
hydrogenperoxide to clean your room thoroughly at the beginning of the trip and 
whenneeded or if illness breaks out on board. Use hand sanitizers and wash 
yourhands often every day. Use sunscreen liberally. Bring antihistamine 
medication(e.g., Zyrtec) even if you do not have known allergies. Bring 
medicine formotion sickness that you have tried before you sail. The expression 
is: view theship like a city. My ship had 3,000 people on it including about a 
third whowere ship employees, so be aware of your surroundings and be 
appropriately careful.And of course, if you drink to excess you may find 
yourself in it (hoping thatanother birder will see you bobbing along with the 
alcids).With regard to my non-birding but duly graduated andgainfully employed 
(yes, yes, yes!) daughter, we left her and her friend shortlyafter the cruise 
and set out for a more usual birding trip in Alaska. Thus, I thoughtTN birders 
might be interested in this somewhat unusual way of getting there.Let me know 
if you have any questions. I also put together a checklist of birdsof northern 
Gulf of Alaska in May if anyone is interested. As always, good birdingand good 
totaling!Kevin BreaultBrentwood, TN 


  
Subject: Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to Alaska
From: kbreault <kbreault AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 02:49:28 +0000 (UTC)
  Trip Report: Birding by Cruise to AlaskaAs a graduation present for my 
daughter and one of herfriends, I decided that a non-birding part of our recent 
Northwest/Alaska tripwould be a cruise from Vancouver, BC to Alaska. Of course, 
in birding preparationis the critical element and I tried to do everything 
possible to increasebirding opportunities on the ship, even if it turned out 
that the birding wasnot good. So I got a balcony cabin on the port (left, 
facing forward), which isthe ocean side on trips north to AK. I also made sure 
my cabin was as close tothe bow as possible, and that it was not too high up. 
Having a scope is alsovery useful. The stable platform of a large ship easily 
allows scopes (anythingmore than about 25-30x will generally not be useful 
depending on wave movement).But despite the preparation I was not optimistic. 
My understanding was that birdingwould be poor (I had heard that you can’t 
see a thing on cruise ships, birdsdon’t get close to large ships, that cruise 
ships don’t go in areas that areproductive of birds, etc.), and that was 
certainly okay with me as this was thenon-birding part of the larger trip. My 
goal was simply to pick up a handful ofstate/province birds and leave the 
serious birding to when we landed in Alaska.And I could not have been more 
wrong!At the beginning of the voyage I was not happy with the largesize of the 
ship (a “midsize” vessel among cruise ships), but it turned outthat smaller 
ships (“expedition” ships) take an even more inner “InsidePassage” 
route that begins near Klemtu and continues to Porcher Island inBritish 
Columbia. That means less pelagic birding than if you sail the QueenCharlotte 
Sound (Cape Scott to Cape St. James) as did my ship. So to begin, thebirding 
was fairly slow going in BC waters and in the Inside Passage in AK (inAK the 
Inside Passage goes from Fox Point north to Skagway and then west toGlacier Bay 
and Cape Spencer), but once in Queen Charlotte Sound and HecateStrait the 
birding was pretty productive with lots of the usual stuff includingmany Sooty 
Shearwaters. (The very common Sooty was my first pelagic bird forthe trip but 
it was first seen being harassed by gulls from my hotel room inVancouver!) Much 
more productive was the sailing after Glacier Bay, and by farthe best birding 
was after Yakutat Bay (Hubbard Glacier) in the Gulf of Alaska.The captain had 
warned me that seas in the Gulf were likely to be 7’-9’ but itturned out 
the seas were rarely above 2’. And since ice and fog kept us out of muchof 
Yakutat Bay (and so we were not able to see Hubbard Glacier), the captainslowed 
the ship a bit for the trip in the Gulf. Great conditions for birding--ifbirds 
were present.And the birding was great! All told, many species, many hundredsof 
individuals, including albatrosses, Fulmars, petrels, storm-petrels, 
loons,cormorants, ducks, gulls, terns, jaegers, alcids (including the two 
puffins mywife and daughter wanted to see), and an unusual assortment of land 
birds thatshared some of the ride—notably a Peregrine Falcon that landed on 
the balconydirectly above mine, a resting Gray-cheeked Thrush, and a very 
anxious and “cheewing”(calling) Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch that we may have 
picked up on the InsidePassage. The birds, including the albatrosses, were 
often very close to theship (as little as 15-20 meters—although many alcids 
and ducks were even closerand may have been quite surprised by the leviathan in 
their midst). Many of thebirds also gave great views as they seemed to want to 
fly along with the ship.One, a Short-tailed Shearwater, was no more than ten 
feet from my balcony railfor an extended amount of time. The only thing I could 
compare it to was the behaviorof some gulls, or seeing pelagic birds at the 
American Museum of Natural Historyin New York when I was young—a museum view 
of a very alive pelagic! Now, I havenot birded off Monterey or similar places 
in CA, so I don’t know how that wouldcompare but it might be difficult to top 
this trip. And note that in the past onpelagic trips I have often been wet, too 
cold or too hot, and sometimes sickfrom motion sickness. None of that on this 
trip. And when I did get cold Icould just close my sliding balcony door and 
watch from the comfort of mycabin. Another important upside was that unlike the 
typical pelagic trip whereyou may have 6-8 hours of good birding on a day trip, 
I estimate that I birdedfor about 45-50 hours, and I could have done more. Note 
that at this time ofyear the Gulf of Alaska has 20 or so hours of daylight. In 
addition, ratherthan rushing around for my next birding destination, or 
calculating the amountof time I had left at my current location versus the time 
I could spend at thenext location versus the likelihood of picking up the 
remaining birds I still needed(much of this, I admit, is the insanity of Total 
Ticking), I could comfortablyrest on the ship knowing that an ever changing set 
of birds were easily available.All I had to do was look out. In fact, as I 
write this I realize that this wasthe only Total Ticking trip in which I felt I 
could relax. (Of course, my wifecalls my Total Ticking trips “vacations,” 
but typically I work much harder on themthan I do on my regular job!) But the 
feeling on this trip was disconcerting atfirst. I found myself thinking: “How 
can I not be looking at the water?” It wassimilar to the kind of feeling you 
have when as a novice birder you aredisappointed you don’t have the 
opportunity to spend time on every bird that vocalizesor flies by. Finally, one 
important downside to birding on a cruise ship isthat you are less likely to 
hear birds at a distance—the ship does not stop forwildlife. And while you 
will get more views of the upper parts of birds, ingeneral that will not 
significantly increase your ability to identify them. Forthat, preparation 
again is the important thing. Or rather, that and havingnumerous chances to 
view the birds as was possible on this trip.Of course, cruising is not for 
everyone. Cruises can be veryexpensive especially if you want the kind of 
accommodations that are bestsuited for birding. It is true that you can cruise 
with the Queen Mary or mostships without spending an arm and a leg if you can 
accept the lowest level of accommodation,but at least for me seeing the water 
from your cabin is important (importantfor birding, but important too for the 
entire experience). Many cruise ships inthe U.S. also have a kind of Las Vegas 
sensibility that can be off-putting forsome. The casino (thankfully, the only 
place on the ship where you were allowedto smoke), the auctions involving the 
worst art you are ever likely to see, theoverpriced and tackiest jewelry, and 
the ubiquitous food were rather unusualfor us. However, the quality of food was 
surprisingly good with fine vegetarianand Indian fare among the choices. (By 
far the largest minority group on theship was South Asians.) There were also 
several very good specialty and upscalerestaurants on the ship. Perhaps the 
most curious food on this Alaskan trip wasthat all the salmon came from the 
Atlantic Ocean. The non-birders with us lovedthe hot tubs, the very close views 
of the (2) glaciers in Glacier Bay, thenature lectures by the park rangers at 
Glacier Bay National Park (somewhat onthe sentimental side I thought), and the 
excursions—especially whale watching,kayaking, and helicopter trips to a 
glacier. And the birding wasn’t that bad onsome of these excursions. On the 
trip to see Humpback Whales I had 23 speciesof water birds (and three breaching 
whales). We also saw other marine mammalson the trip: Steller Seal Lions, 
Harbor Seals, Killer Whales, Dall Porpoises,Pacific White-Dolphins, and Sea 
Otters.So, I did not think I would ever say this but I am now convinced:at some 
times and on some routes, a trip on a cruise ship might be a great wayto bird. 
Trips out of south Florida and San Diego or Los Angeles might be 
worthexploring. I have heard there is one with an excursion at Catalina Island. 
Ineed that jay! Given the sheer number of birds in the Gulf of Alaska, 
thismight be a good trip for beginners to intermediate level birders, as they 
wouldlikely leave the ship with a significantly greater appreciation for and 
understandingof pelagic birds. Of course, having a mentor with a beginner is 
the best bet. Forthe competitive birder, Total Tickers and the like, it is not 
clear to me thatthis cruise is a necessary part of the itinerary. Indeed, only 
one bird,Mottled Petrel, on my checklist of the area came close to indicating 
thatnorthern Bay of Alaska should be a target destination, and the bird can be 
seenin the outer Aleutians.One last thought. My professional interest is 
inepidemiology and the last thing you want is to spend all that money only to 
getsick on a cruise ship. Some basic rules are worth repeating. Don’t leave 
homewithout enough of your regular medications for the trip. Don’t get on 
board ifyou are sick, think you are getting sick or have a chronic illness that 
maycause you to get sick on the ship. Medical help will be limited and you may 
bemany hours away from the help you need. Use wipes that contain 
hydrogenperoxide to clean your room thoroughly at the beginning of the trip and 
whenneeded or if illness breaks out on board. Use hand sanitizers and wash 
yourhands often every day. Use sunscreen liberally. Bring antihistamine 
medication(e.g., Zyrtec) even if you do not have known allergies. Bring 
medicine formotion sickness that you have tried before you sail. The expression 
is: view theship like a city. My ship had 3,000 people on it including about a 
third whowere ship employees, so be aware of your surroundings and be 
appropriately careful.And of course, if you drink to excess you may find 
yourself in it (hoping thatanother birder will see you bobbing along with the 
alcids).With regard to my non-birding but duly graduated andgainfully employed 
(yes, yes, yes!) daughter, we left her and her friend shortlyafter the cruise 
and set out for a more usual birding trip in Alaska. Thus, I thoughtTN birders 
might be interested in this somewhat unusual way of getting there.Let me know 
if you have any questions. I also put together a checklist of birdsof northern 
Gulf of Alaska in May if anyone is interested. As always, good birdingand good 
totaling!Kevin BreaultBrentwood, TN 
Subject: Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer
From: "Reese, Carol" <jreese5 AT utk.edu>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 22:33:58 +0000
I meant that the ants were fed directly to the youngster.


"There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot.”
— Aldo Leopold

Carol Reese
Ornamental Horticulture Specialist
Western Region Extension
605 Airways Blvd.
Jackson, TN 38301

731-425-4767 Office / 731-343-4898 Mobile
jreese5 AT utk.edu  
west.tennessee.edu
Facebook page: 
utgardensjackson 

[https://ag.tennessee.edu/marketing/EmailLogos/UT%20EXTENSION_4c.jpg]

From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Reese, Carol 

Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 5:30 PM
To: heatherlarkin42 AT gmail.com
Cc: tn-bird AT freelists.org
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer

I think, that the adults consume the ants and then regurgitate them, so perhaps 
that was the problem? 


"There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot.”
— Aldo Leopold

Carol Reese
Ornamental Horticulture Specialist
Western Region Extension
605 Airways Blvd.
Jackson, TN 38301

731-425-4767 Office / 731-343-4898 Mobile
jreese5 AT utk.edu  
west.tennessee.edu
Facebook page: 
utgardensjackson 

[https://ag.tennessee.edu/marketing/EmailLogos/UT%20EXTENSION_4c.jpg]

From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org 
[mailto:tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] On Behalf Of Heather Larkin Vogler 

Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 5:25 PM
To: likebird AT epbfi.com
Cc: tn-bird AT freelists.org
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer

I thought ants killed hummers? I just read an article by a hummingbird rescue 
person that described the agonizingly slow death of a baby hummingbird who had 
been fed ants (because the people who found her thought she needed "protein".) 
The rescue person said that the baby's sac (?) was clogged with ants and she 
was unable to take in the nectar from the dropper. I am now entirely confused! 
Can you please clarify? 


Thanks so much!
Heather Larkin Vogler
Cheatham County



'Whether you think you can, or think you can't, either way, you are correct.'
(paraphrased from Henry Ford)

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 10:42 AM, 
> wrote: 

Birders,
This morning I saw a Hummer doing something I have seldom seen, gleaning. I 
have a 10' sunflower plant with many blooms and it is mostly full of 
Goldfinches. I looked out this morning and there was a female Hummer gleaning a 
stalk and I could see the tiny, tiny ants she was licking up with her long 
tongue. (The Sunflower is just a couple of feet from a window) That was very 
amazing for me! 

Linda Kelly
Chattanooga
Hamilton Co.

Subject: Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer
From: "Reese, Carol" <jreese5 AT utk.edu>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 22:30:17 +0000
I think, that the adults consume the ants and then regurgitate them, so perhaps 
that was the problem? 


"There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot.”
— Aldo Leopold

Carol Reese
Ornamental Horticulture Specialist
Western Region Extension
605 Airways Blvd.
Jackson, TN 38301

731-425-4767 Office / 731-343-4898 Mobile
jreese5 AT utk.edu  
west.tennessee.edu
Facebook page: 
utgardensjackson 

[https://ag.tennessee.edu/marketing/EmailLogos/UT%20EXTENSION_4c.jpg]

From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [mailto:tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] On 
Behalf Of Heather Larkin Vogler 

Sent: Monday, June 29, 2015 5:25 PM
To: likebird AT epbfi.com
Cc: tn-bird AT freelists.org
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer

I thought ants killed hummers? I just read an article by a hummingbird rescue 
person that described the agonizingly slow death of a baby hummingbird who had 
been fed ants (because the people who found her thought she needed "protein".) 
The rescue person said that the baby's sac (?) was clogged with ants and she 
was unable to take in the nectar from the dropper. I am now entirely confused! 
Can you please clarify? 


Thanks so much!
Heather Larkin Vogler
Cheatham County



'Whether you think you can, or think you can't, either way, you are correct.'
(paraphrased from Henry Ford)

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 10:42 AM, 
> wrote: 

Birders,
This morning I saw a Hummer doing something I have seldom seen, gleaning. I 
have a 10' sunflower plant with many blooms and it is mostly full of 
Goldfinches. I looked out this morning and there was a female Hummer gleaning a 
stalk and I could see the tiny, tiny ants she was licking up with her long 
tongue. (The Sunflower is just a couple of feet from a window) That was very 
amazing for me! 

Linda Kelly
Chattanooga
Hamilton Co.

Subject: Re: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer
From: Heather Larkin Vogler <heatherlarkin42 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 17:24:34 -0500
I thought ants killed hummers?  I just read an article by a hummingbird
rescue person that described the agonizingly slow death of a baby
hummingbird who had been fed ants (because the people who found her thought
she needed "protein".)  The rescue person said that the baby's sac (?) was
clogged with ants and she was unable to take in the nectar from the
dropper.  I am now entirely confused!  Can you please clarify?

Thanks so much!
Heather Larkin Vogler
Cheatham County



*'Whether you think you can, or think you can't, either way, you are
correct.'*
*(paraphrased from Henry Ford)*

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 10:42 AM,  wrote:

> Birders,
> This morning I saw a Hummer doing something I have seldom seen, gleaning.
> I have a 10' sunflower plant with many blooms and it is mostly full of
> Goldfinches.  I looked out this morning and there was a female Hummer
> gleaning a stalk and I could see the tiny, tiny ants she was licking up
> with her long tongue. (The Sunflower is just a couple of feet from a
> window)  That was very amazing for me!
> Linda Kelly
> Chattanooga
> Hamilton Co.
>
Subject: Re: White Ibis and others
From: "james tucker" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "jtuck4478@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 13:05:21 -0700




Subject: Chat, Tanager, Bunting at water drip (photo), Henry County
From: Shawna Ellis <yodergoat AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 14:17:08 -0500
We have a simple water drip set up near our feeding station. It is
comprised of a 2 gallon jug suspended by a shepherd's hook over a concrete
birdbath basin on the ground. A couple of holes in the jug make for a
nicely timed dripping, and it only needs to be filled twice a day. Simple
but very effective!

We've had a wide variety of birds coming to this since we have had it up
(2012), including some that are usually fairly secretive. The water drip
has been a wonderful improvement to the birding in our yard... I would
encourage everyone to do something like this. We use an electric de-icer to
keep water in winter as well, although of course we must forego the
dripping.

I'm sharing this photo because I thought it was an interesting trio of
birds (and colors) to be at the water together. We commonly have two
species using it at one time, but three species is out of the
norm...especially three that are so strikingly and contrastingly colored!

Please excuse the poor photo quality as it was taken through a closed and
possibly smudgy window.

Yellow-breasted Chat, Summer Tanager, Indigo Bunting

-Shawna Ellis
Paris, Henry County
Subject: Mississippi Kites
From: "Ashley Heeney" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "acheeney@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 13:31:47 -0500
We also had a Mississippi Kite, on Saturday. It was flying West over Traceside 
Development in Davidson County off Hwy 100 near Pasquo. 


Observed Bluebirds, feeding young in nest box on Bluebird Trail, as well as 
Blue Grosbeak pairs (in tree and on road to the Harpeth River drop in), 
Chat(s), Baltimore Oriole, Field Sparrow(s) . . . at Hidden Lake, Kingston 
Springs, Davidson County. 


Observed N Parula(s) - male and female (Hidden Springs Trail), Pileated 
Woodpecker, Ovenbird, and Yellow Throated Vireo (outside park office) at Cedars 
of Lebanon, Wilson County. 


Kingbird family on fences at Steeplechase, Warner Park, Davidson County. 
Eastern Whippoorwills on perimeter of Warner, in evening, last week. 


Prairie Warblers at Hidden Lakes, Shelby Bottoms, Davidson County, and the 
Cedars. Bobwhite at Shelby. 


White Throated Vireos, Indigo Bunting(s), Eastern Towhee(s), Hairy and Downy 
Woodpeckers, Carolina Wren, many White eyed Vireo(s) at all parks named. 


Ashley Heeney
Davidson County


> On Jun 29, 2015, at 12:05 PM, Shawna Ellis  wrote:
> 
> We've seen Mississippi Kites near our yard on Friday, Saturday and Sunday 
(6-26 through 6-28). Friday was a brief fly-over by one bird, but on Saturday 
and Sunday two adults sat for extended periods in a prominent dead tree. This 
same tree has been used occasionally as a perch/preening spot by MIKIs in the 
past couple of years. It is also where we saw a Merlin several weeks ago. Love 
that dead tree! 

> 
> Shawna Ellis
> Paris, Henry County
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: KTOS Jay Walk Announcement: Eastbridge Business Park
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 17:36:25 +0000 (UTC)
Where: Eastbridge Business Park, Knox County
When: Wednesday, July 1, 2015, 8:00 a.m.
Leader: Jay Sturner, 865-244-7819
flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com
 
Join me this Wednesday for a Jay Walk (a short, impromptu
field trip) at the Eastbridge Business Park in northeast Knox County. We will
meet at the dead end of Eastbridge Blvd a few minutes before 8:00 a.m. Birds I
expect to see include Eastern Kingbird, Prairie Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat, 
Grasshopper 

Sparrow, Blue Grosbeak, Indigo Bunting, and Orchard Oriole, among others. If
we're lucky we may also encounter Loggerhead Shrike, a species I've seen here
in the past.
 
This will be a short bird walk, about two hours or so. Bring
snacks and water as needed. Also note that we will be out in the open for the
duration of the walk, so a hat and sunscreen are recommended.
 
This is a free event. No RSVP required, and you do not have
to be a member of KTOS to attend.
 
Address: Eastbridge Blvd & Mascot Road, Knoxville, TN  37806
GPS: 36.069221,-83.7323856 or 36°04'09.2"N 83°43'56.6"W
 
More information can be found at 
http://www.knoxdevelopment.org/BusinessParks/EastbridgeBusinessPark.aspx 

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
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            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Henry County Mississippi Kites
From: Shawna Ellis <yodergoat AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 12:05:06 -0500
We've seen Mississippi Kites near our yard on Friday, Saturday and Sunday
(6-26 through 6-28). Friday was a brief fly-over by one bird, but on
Saturday and Sunday two adults sat for extended periods in a prominent dead
tree. This same tree has been used occasionally as a perch/preening spot by
MIKIs in the past couple of years. It is also where we saw a Merlin several
weeks ago. Love that dead tree!

Shawna Ellis
Paris, Henry County
Subject: Interesting viewing of Ruby-throated Hummer
From: likebird AT epbfi.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 11:42:48 -0400 (EDT)
Birders,
This morning I saw a Hummer doing something I have seldom seen, gleaning. I 
have a 10' sunflower plant with many blooms and it is mostly full of 
Goldfinches. I looked out this morning and there was a female Hummer gleaning a 
stalk and I could see the tiny, tiny ants she was licking up with her long 
tongue. (The Sunflower is just a couple of feet from a window) That was very 
amazing for me! 

Linda Kelly
Chattanooga
Hamilton Co.
Subject: White Ibis and others
From: TenacBirder AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 19:07:44 +0000 (UTC)
28 June 2015
Brainerd Levee, Hamilton Co.

The immature White Ibis was still present today.  A few minutes
before noon we also saw an immature Little Blue Heron in the same 
pond with the Ibis, two Great Egrets, a Great Blue Heron and
numerous Killdeer were also observed.

Most likely this is the same Little Blue Heron we saw yesterday
from farther up the levee near Walmart.  Both were immature
birds.

Jimmy & Cynthia Wilkerson
Hixson, Tn
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: White ibis Hamilton county
From: Hugh Barger <hughbarger AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 10:51:11 -0400
Bird Still at Brainerd levee June 28

Hugh Barger
Sent from my iPhone
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: White-throated Sparrow Clarksville
From: "Nita Heilman" <nrheilmanandcats AT charter.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 21:36:46 -0500
Clarksville, Tn
Montgomery Co
June 27, 2015

I have had a White-throated Sparrow calling and feeding under my feeders here 
in Clarksville for at least 3 weeks. Unfortunately, it is missing most of the 
feathers on neck and back half of it's head. The bird has probably been here 
longer, but I first noticed it on June 7. 


Nita Heilman
Subject: Nesting Red-headed woodpeckers, Cades Cove, GSMNP, Blount County
From: "" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "birdglass44@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 20:35:16 -0400
This morning I observed two adult Red-headed woodpeckers gathering and carrying 
food near the bridge on Hyatt Lane. After about 15 minutes I observed an adult 
feeding a juvenile. This is the first time I've seen Red-headed woodpeckers 
feeding young and first I've known them to nest in Cades Cove. My other 
observations have been during the fall and winter, and only when there is a 
large amount of acorns. Later I saw three adults on a single snag and another 
about 100 yards away. 


Warren Bielenberg
maryville
Subject: Re: White Ibis
From: "John Obarr" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "jonhop11@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 17:18:53 -0700
White Ibis continues at Brainerd levee as of 5p.m..
Subject: Immature Little Blue Heron and Yellow-crowned Night Heron Hamilton County
From: "Libby Wolfe" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "leica2bird@aol.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 19:26:35 -0400
Today after seeing the immature White Ibis at the Brainerd Levee on Shallowford 
Road, I decided to check another part of the levee system which is located on 
Brainerd Road at Greenway View Drive. There I found an immature Little Blue 
Heron. Other birds seen were 4 Green Herons, 19 Wood Ducks, Eastern Kingbirds, 
Orchard Oriole, Red Shouldered Hawks, and Redheaded Woodpeckers. 



Next I drove down Greenway View Drive to check a ditch located at Uptain Road, 
and Greenway View. Sometimes a Yellow-crowned Night-Heron hangs out at this 
location, and the adult bird was there around 4:10 pm. 



Libby Wolfe
Ooltewah, Tn
Subject: White Ibis still present
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake@yahoo" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 21:40:46 +0000 (UTC)
June 27, 2015Brainerd Levee, Hamilton co.
The immature White Ibis was still present as of 4:00 pm this afternoon along 
with 2 Great Egrets, 2 Great Blue Herons, 2 Green Herons, and 20+ Killdeer. 

Good birding,
Mark GreeneTrenton, TN
Subject: White Ibis
From: "Tommie Rogers" <sundragon1 AT epbfi.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 13:57:20 -0400
The immature White Ibis is still behind Boyd Buchanan school beside the
Brainerd Levee in Chattanooga today along with two Great Egrets.

Tommie Rogers
Subject: White-throated sparrow at Nashville
From: Daniel Shelton <dashelt100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 19:18:24 -0500
I was surprised to see a White-throated Sparrow out the window of the Qdoba
restaurant on West End as I was finishing up my lunch. It was foraging in
the bushes between Qdoba and the Cathedral. I took a very poor photo with
my cell phone (attached).

Danny Shelton
Nashville, Davidson County
Subject: Hamilton Co. White Ibis
From: scgwc <scgwc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 19:20:01 -0400
    
We saw the immature White Ibis on the Brainard Levee behind Boyd Buchanan 
School from 6:45 pm until it flew out of sight to the SW at 6:57.Thank you to 
the previous reporters!Steve & Gail Clendenen Farragut, Knox County  



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Discover Birds Activity Book
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge <routledges AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 16:10:21 -0500
Thanks Judy and Dick!

And a reminder to all TnBirdersyou too can participate in this wonderful
program and spread the love of birds to the children in your communities.
If youre interested obtaining some books please feel free to contact me and
I can make it happen!

<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
Southeastern Avian Research
Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
1515 N. Willow Bend Court
Clarksville, TN  37043
931-206-3517

From:  Judy Dorsey 
Reply-To:  
Date:  Friday, June 26, 2015 at 3:26 PM
To:  Tn Bird 
Subject:  [TN-Bird] Discover Birds Activity Book

 Posting for Dick Preston:
 
Subject: Discover Birds Activity Book
 
June 25, 2015
 
The  Birders Guide to Conservation and Community  is a publication of the
American Birding Association. The May 2015 issue has a wonderful article
about Cyndi Routledge, Vickie Henderson and the Discover Birds Activity
Book they were instrumental in producing. Kudos to Cyndi and Vickie. You
can view the article at: www.aba.org/birdersguide/.
  More information is available on
Vickies blog: www.discoverbirds.blogspot.com
 . The entire book can be downloaded
at: www.tnbirds.org/education.html  .
 
Dick Preston
Munford, TN
Tipton County
------------

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN

Subject: Discover Birds Activity Book
From: Judy Dorsey <judydorsey AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:26:38 -0500
 Posting for Dick Preston:

*Subject:* Discover Birds Activity Book

June 25, 2015

The  “Birder’s Guide to Conservation and Community”  is a publication of
the American Birding Association. The May 2015 issue has a wonderful
article about Cyndi Routledge, Vickie Henderson and the “Discover Birds
Activity Book” they were instrumental in producing. Kudos to Cyndi and
Vickie. You can view the article at: www.aba.org/birdersguide/.
 More information is available on
Vickie’s blog: www.discoverbirds.blogspot.com. The entire book can be
downloaded at: www.tnbirds.org/education.html.

Dick Preston
Munford, TN
Tipton County
------------

Judy Dorsey
Hickory Withe, TN
Subject: Re: Interesting Mexican-like Chickadee, Murfreesboro
From: Kevin Breault <Kevin.Breault AT mtsu.edu>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:12:34 +0000
And I need a Mexican Chickadee! There is a considerable amount of scientific 
work on chickadees, e.g., Ken Otter, ed., Ecology and Behavior of Chickadees 
and Titmice: An Integrated Approach, Oxford Univ., 2007. This is a book of 18 
chapters on the topic. Contacting some of the authors might be a good way of 
getting into this literature. Let us know what you find. I hope to see my 
Mexican Chickadee at the end of the year on my first winter trip to AZ and NM. 

Kevin Breault
Brentwood, TN
________________________________
From: tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org [tn-bird-bounce AT freelists.org] on behalf of 
Daniel Estabrooks [dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org] 

Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2015 3:14 PM
To: TN-Birds Bird
Subject: [TN-Bird] Interesting Mexican-like Chickadee, Murfreesboro

Flat Rock Cedar Glades & Barrens SNA
Rutherford County
6/25/2015

Before anyone sees my title and freaks out, I did NOT see a Mexican Chickadee 
in Tennessee! 


However, I did see a very interesting Carolina Chickadee that I wanted to talk 
about a little... 


At the very back end of the blue loop trail at Flat Rock, I ran across a family 
group of 3 Carolina Chickadees. Two of them were typical-looking, but the third 
had a black bib that extended much farther down its chest (compared to the 
other two) and dark gray underparts (unlike the typical pale creamy color of a 
Carolina). It basically looked like a classic Mexican Chickadee. 


Now, I'm confident it wasn't a Mexican because a) that would be essentially 
impossible, since Mexican Chickadee is one of the most sedentary of all North 
American passerines, and b) its call was textbook Carolina. But here's why I 
find it interesting: Genetically, Mexican Chickadee is very similar to Carolina 
and is generally considered to be its closest relative. (Carolina & Mexican 
form a superspecies, as do Black-capped and Mountain. Black-capped and Carolina 
are not each other's closest relatives, despite looking almost identical.) 


So seeing this bird got me thinking... Carolina & Mexican chickadees presumably 
arose from a common ancestor at some point in the past. So it's within the 
realm of possibility that, given the right accumulation of mutations over 
several generations, a chickadee that looks Mexican could arise from a 
population of pure Carolinas. And that's probably what happened in this case. 


Fascinating stuff! :-)

Daniel Estabrooks
Winter Haven, FL
Subject: Merlin
From: "Ashley Heeney" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "acheeney@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 21:37:40 -0500
I saw the Merlin again this morning and land on the ground. Its right wing is 
injured, so I guess that is why it didn't go north? It is able to fly however. 
I could catch it with help but not sure where to take it in Nashville. It looks 
pretty healthy so maybe I should let nature take its course? 


Ashley Heeney
Davidson Cty

=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Unusual behavior of a prothonotary Warbler?
From: "Nancy Moore" <jaybird AT bluebasin.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:33:00 -0500
Reelfoot Lake, Tn., 
Lake Co. Tn.
Blue Basin Cove

Today I had a dead prothonotary warbler in front of a Atrium door. Another
prothonotary came to it and pecked at its eye. Amazing to see.... Is this usual
for most birds?   It was two males so maybe it was a territorial action.......
even with it being dead?  

Nancy Moore
Subject: Interesting Mexican-like Chickadee, Murfreesboro
From: "Daniel Estabrooks" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "hyla514@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:14:07 +0000 (UTC)
Flat Rock Cedar Glades & Barrens SNARutherford County6/25/2015
Before anyone sees my title and freaks out, I did NOT see a Mexican Chickadee 
in Tennessee! 

However, I did see a very interesting Carolina Chickadee that I wanted to talk 
about a little... 

At the very back end of the blue loop trail at Flat Rock, I ran across a family 
group of 3 Carolina Chickadees. Two of them were typical-looking, but the third 
had a black bib that extended much farther down its chest (compared to the 
other two) and dark gray underparts (unlike the typical pale creamy color of a 
Carolina). It basically looked like a classic Mexican Chickadee. 

Now, I'm confident it wasn't a Mexican because a) that would be essentially 
impossible, since Mexican Chickadee is one of the most sedentary of all North 
American passerines, and b) its call was textbook Carolina. But here's why I 
find it interesting: Genetically, Mexican Chickadee is very similar to Carolina 
and is generally considered to be its closest relative. (Carolina & Mexican 
form a superspecies, as do Black-capped and Mountain. Black-capped and Carolina 
are not each other's closest relatives, despite looking almost identical.) 

So seeing this bird got me thinking... Carolina & Mexican chickadees presumably 
arose from a common ancestor at some point in the past. So it's within the 
realm of possibility that, given the right accumulation of mutations over 
several generations, a chickadee that looks Mexican could arise from a 
population of pure Carolinas. And that's probably what happened in this case. 

Fascinating stuff! :-)
Daniel EstabrooksWinter Haven, FL
Subject: White Ibis - Hamilton Co
From: tim jeffers <tim.a.jeffers AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 10:03:14 -0400
6/25/15 - Dan Jacobson reported a White Ibis at the Brainerd Levee behind
Boyd Buchanan HS this morning at 7:30.  It was still there at 9:30 AM.

Tim Jeffers
Hamilton Co
Subject: Re: Found the "Clay Pits" location in eastern AR - correction!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 14:00:33 +0000 (UTC)
Elaine Foust that first suggested the location to the clay pits is a geologist 
and birder from Clarksville, TN not AR. Sorry about that and thanks again! 

Mark GreeneTrenton, TN
 
   
   
 
Subject: Found the "Clay Pits" location in eastern AR!
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 13:33:24 +0000 (UTC)
Hey everyone,
Thanks to Elaine Foust from AR (and later Gaynell Perry from Memphis), I have 
discovered the location of the "Clay Pits" that Jeff Wilson referred to in some 
of his field notes and posting to TN-Birds. Here is Elaine's email to 
me:==========================================================================================================Mr. 
Greene, Being a geologist by profession, I do know there is an area just east 
of Edmonson, AR that is known as the Clay Pits.  It is so named on a 
topographic map.  There is a clay mining company there just on the right side 
of the road just east of Edmonson on Mounds Road.  The pits are between Mounds 
Road and East Lassiter Road.  I am not sure that this is Jeff’s Clay Pits 
but there is not any other clay mining in the eastern portion of Arkansas that 
I know of. The rough longitude of the site is 90 deg. 17’ 17.132” and 
latitude is 35 deg. 6’ 27.478”. I hope this will help you out on your 
quest. Elaine 
Foust=====================================================================================I 
want to thank everyone that replied both on the list and off with suggestions 
and words of encouragement - I appreciate them all! 

Good birding!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TN
Subject: Historical eBird location reporting
From: Bill Pulliam <littlezz AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 07:34:02 -0500
Mark and all others engaged in the noble task of entering historical  
data into eBird --

Reported locations in eBird should be as accurate as is reasonably  
possible. In the case of historical observations, allowances have to  
be made. If you can't track down an accurate location, it is fine to  
submit the records with just a county level location and a note in  
the checklist comments explaining why a more accurate location could  
not be used. That also makes them relatively easy to revisit and  
revise in the future if you do ever find out what the "Clay Pits"  
were. Many old records for early and late arrivals, vagrants,  
specimens, etc. have no better location than just the county. Better  
to have these records entered at the county level than not entered at  
all!

Note that this is not an excuse for using sloppy and vague locations  
in your present-day eBird reports!

Bill Pulliam
Hohenwald TN
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
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                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR
From: Gaynell Perry <gcperry1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:26:34 -0500
Hi Mark,

There's a clay mine in Crittendon County, AR, east of Edmondson that’s been 
in operation for decades by Big River Industries. 


For location, just select “clay” under commodity on this website 
http://www.geology.ar.gov/minerals/mining_map.htm 
 


Zoom in on satellite to see what the site looks like.

So glad you are entering Jeff’s historic records. Thoroughly enjoyed your 
article on the Long-billed Murrelet! 


Good luck!
Gaynell Perry
Shelby County



Subject: Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR
From: Stephen Zipperer <stczipperer AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:21:25 -0500
I googled clay pits west Memphis and got and epa document about a reclaimed
industrial landfill on the river at the end of South 8th Street. Says its
subject to flooding November thru May. Its right on the river.

Just a thought. Probably not it, but thought i'd mention it.

Stephen Zipperer

On Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 2:55 PM, Michael Todd  wrote:

> Mark/Jay,
>
> Could be wrong, but I'm not really thinking it is Benwood. I birded there
> numerous times with Jeff over several years and he never referred to the
> area as that. That being said, I was birding with Jeff a lot in the 05
> timeframe and don't remember him mentioning the Clay Pits.
>
> Mike
>
>
>
>   On Wednesday, June 24, 2015 1:52 PM, John J. Walko 
> wrote:
>
>
> Mark,
>
> Could it be Benwood Lake area? Used to be a lake now a yearly flooded duck
> hunt area.
> It's just down the road(I-55) exit right before you get to the Wappanocca
> exit at Turrell.
> I've been there in the 2011 spring flood time period with him.
>
> Or what about the flooded farm fields on the west side of West Memphis in
> the fall/winter/spring.
>
> Also did you record some old records yesterday and accidently put in 2015,
> because Jeff showed up in a "historical record" for this week.
>
> --------------------------------------------
> On Wed, 6/24/15, Mark Greene  wrote:
>
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Looking for a location in Eastern AR
> To: "TN-Birds Bird" 
> Date: Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 8:56 AM
>
> Hello,
> I am still in the process of
> entering the late Jeff R. Wilson's bird records into
> eBird. I'm up to mid 2005 so I'm making great
> progress but I've still got a ways to go as much as the
> "Ol' Coot" birded! :o)
> He keeps making reference a
> location in eastern AR called the "Clay Pits" just
> across the river from Memphis where he had shorebird and
> waterfowl sightings from time to time. Do y'all have any
> idea where the specific location of this area is? I never
> went there with Jeff and I've asked a few others and
> they weren't familiar with the location either. Any help
> is appreciated.
> You can contact me
> off the list if you wish at the email address
> below.
> Thanks!
> Mark GreeneTrenton, TNgreenesnake AT yahoo.com
>
>
> =================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================
>
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
>       To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>                     tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________
>                 To unsubscribe, send email to:
>                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>             with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
> ______________________________________________________________
>   TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>         endorse the views or opinions expressed
>         by the members of this discussion group.
>
>         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>                 ------------------------------
>                 Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                         Cleveland, OH
>                 -------------------------------
>               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                           Rosedale, VA
>               --------------------------------
>               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                         Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
>
>           Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>               web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
>
>                           ARCHIVES
> TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/
>
>                       MAP RESOURCES
> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 19:55:01 +0000 (UTC)
Mark/Jay,
Could be wrong, but I'm not really thinking it is Benwood. I birded there 
numerous times with Jeff over several years and he never referred to the area 
as that. That being said, I was birding with Jeff a lot in the 05 timeframe and 
don't remember him mentioning the Clay Pits.  

Mike 


 On Wednesday, June 24, 2015 1:52 PM, John J. Walko  
wrote: 

   

 Mark,

Could it be Benwood Lake area? Used to be a lake now a yearly flooded duck hunt 
area. 

It's just down the road(I-55) exit right before you get to the Wappanocca exit 
at Turrell. 

I've been there in the 2011 spring flood time period with him.

Or what about the flooded farm fields on the west side of West Memphis in the 
fall/winter/spring. 


Also did you record some old records yesterday and accidently put in 2015, 
because Jeff showed up in a "historical record" for this week. 


--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 6/24/15, Mark Greene  wrote:

 Subject: [TN-Bird] Looking for a location in Eastern AR
 To: "TN-Birds Bird" 
 Date: Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 8:56 AM
 
 Hello,
 I am still in the process of
 entering the late Jeff R. Wilson's bird records into
 eBird. I'm up to mid 2005 so I'm making great
 progress but I've still got a ways to go as much as the
 "Ol' Coot" birded! :o)
 He keeps making reference a
 location in eastern AR called the "Clay Pits" just
 across the river from Memphis where he had shorebird and
 waterfowl sightings from time to time. Do y'all have any
 idea where the specific location of this area is? I never
 went there with Jeff and I've asked a few others and
 they weren't familiar with the location either. Any help
 is appreciated.
 You can contact me
 off the list if you wish at the email address
 below.
 Thanks!
 Mark GreeneTrenton, TNgreenesnake AT yahoo.com
 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
      Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
        Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                        Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
              Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
              --------------------------------
              Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
        
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                      MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________




  
Subject: Re: Looking for a location in Eastern AR
From: "John J. Walko" <walko AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 11:51:30 -0700
Mark,

Could it be Benwood Lake area? Used to be a lake now a yearly flooded duck hunt 
area. 

It's just down the road(I-55) exit right before you get to the Wappanocca exit 
at Turrell. 

I've been there in the 2011 spring flood time period with him.

Or what about the flooded farm fields on the west side of West Memphis in the 
fall/winter/spring. 


Also did you record some old records yesterday and accidently put in 2015, 
because Jeff showed up in a "historical record" for this week. 


--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 6/24/15, Mark Greene  wrote:

 Subject: [TN-Bird] Looking for a location in Eastern AR
 To: "TN-Birds Bird" 
 Date: Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 8:56 AM
 
 Hello,
 I am still in the process of
 entering the late Jeff R. Wilson's bird records into
 eBird. I'm up to mid 2005 so I'm making great
 progress but I've still got a ways to go as much as the
 "Ol' Coot" birded! :o)
 He keeps making reference a
 location in eastern AR called the "Clay Pits" just
 across the river from Memphis where he had shorebird and
 waterfowl sightings from time to time. Do y'all have any
 idea where the specific location of this area is? I never
 went there with Jeff and I've asked a few others and
 they weren't familiar with the location either. Any help
 is appreciated.
 You can contact me
 off the list if you wish at the email address
 below.
 Thanks!
 Mark GreeneTrenton, TNgreenesnake AT yahoo.com
 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Results of KTOS field trip to Seven Islands State Birding Park (Knox Co.)
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 18:05:44 +0000 (UTC)
The temperature rose quickly during the bird walk at Seven
Islands State Birding Park this morning, but that didn't stop twenty
participants from sweating their way across 3.5 miles and finding 52 species!
Birds were everywhere, including a singing Dickcissel (a rare species for Knox
County) and an Orchard Oriole nest full of hungry babies! It was fun to watch
the parents come and go. Here's our checklist from the hike: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24037366 

 
Join us next month (July 22) for another great walk at Seven
Islands State Birding Park. Hope to see you there!
 
Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________ 
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org 
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Dickcissel at Seven Islands
From: Morton Massey <massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 11:35:10 -0400
20 birders showed up for Seven Islands first monthly bird walk (Knox County) 
this morning 6/24/2105. The highlight was seeing the dickcissel that had been 
previously reported 3 days ago. 


If you go out to Seven islands there is now a large map inside the barn at the 
parking lot where bird sightings can be indicated. I marked the location today 
on the dickcissel. It was basically seen half way between the maintenance barn 
and the green (unoccupied house) along the road. The bird was working out in 
the field and was moving around a lot. We also had a singing grasshopper 
sparrow in the same area. 


Morton Massey
Knoxville. 


Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Morton Massey 
> Date: June 24, 2015 at 11:25:17 AM EDT
> To: Morton Massey 
> Subject: eBird -- Seven Islands State Birding Park -- Jun 24, 2015
> 
> MortMassey
> Jun 24, 2015
> Seven Islands State Birding Park
> Traveling
> 3.5 miles
> 188 Minutes
> Observers: 20
> All birds reported? Yes
> Comments:  
> Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
> 15 Canada Goose
> 2 Northern Bobwhite
> 10 Great Blue Heron
> 1 Green Heron
> 1 Black Vulture
> 1 Turkey Vulture
> 1 American Kestrel
> 6 Mourning Dove
> 2 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
> 3 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
> 4 Red-bellied Woodpecker
> 1 Northern Flicker
> 3 Eastern Phoebe
> 3 Eastern Kingbird
> 1 White-eyed Vireo
> 2 Blue Jay
> 4 American Crow
> 2 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
> 2 Purple Martin
> 24 Tree Swallow
> 15 Barn Swallow
> 1 Carolina Chickadee
> 2 Tufted Titmouse
> 4 Carolina Wren
> 1 House Wren
> 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
> 4 Eastern Bluebird
> 1 Wood Thrush
> 2 American Robin
> 5 Northern Mockingbird
> 2 Brown Thrasher
> 2 European Starling
> 1 Cedar Waxwing
> 4 Prothonotary Warbler
> 4 Common Yellowthroat
> 7 Yellow-breasted Chat
> 11 Eastern Towhee
> 1 Chipping Sparrow
> 12 Field Sparrow
> 1 Grasshopper Sparrow
> 2 Song Sparrow
> 3 Summer Tanager
> 6 Northern Cardinal
> 1 Blue Grosbeak
> 10 Indigo Bunting
> 1 Dickcissel -- Yellow chest with black throat marking. Singing and moving 
around a lot. Between maintenance barn and green house in open field. Picture 
to follow. 

> 10 Red-winged Blackbird
> 7 Common Grackle
> 20 Brown-headed Cowbird
> 2 Orchard Oriole
> 8 American Goldfinch
> 1 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Looking for a location in Eastern AR
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 13:56:21 +0000 (UTC)
Hello,
I am still in the process of entering the late Jeff R. Wilson's bird records 
into eBird. I'm up to mid 2005 so I'm making great progress but I've still got 
a ways to go as much as the "Ol' Coot" birded! :o) 

He keeps making reference a location in eastern AR called the "Clay Pits" just 
across the river from Memphis where he had shorebird and waterfowl sightings 
from time to time. Do y'all have any idea where the specific location of this 
area is? I never went there with Jeff and I've asked a few others and they 
weren't familiar with the location either. Any help is appreciated. 

You can contact me off the list if you wish at the email address below.
Thanks!
Mark GreeneTrenton, TNgreenesnake AT yahoo.com
Subject: Merlin
From: "Ashley Heeney" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "acheeney@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 18:30:42 -0500
In Percy Warner Park last park last night at dusk, I caught a glimpse of a hawk 
or falcon diving into a tree and the way it flew made me think "Merlin." 
However, I could not locate it in the tree. 


I am sitting on my patio, surrounded by woods, off Vaughn's Gap Road near Hwy 
100 and to my joy, a Merlin just zipped out of the woods. 


On Sunday, I saw a Kestrel perched at the Nashville airport, on McGavock road 
near Currey Road. I also saw a Kestrel teetering over Steeplechase at Warner 
Park that morning. 


Ashley Heeney
Davidson Cty

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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: In need of KTOS field trips (non-KTOS members welcome)
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 18:10:24 +0000 (UTC)
Hello everyone,
 
I'd like to add a few KTOS field trips to the calendar for
July. Currently the only thing scheduled is a walk at Seven Islands on
Wednesday July 22. I know July is slow for birding and really hot but getting
out early and seeing what we can see is still fun.
 
Let me know if you're interested in doing a field trip, especially
if you've done them in the past. Anywhere is fine, any day of the week is fine,
any time of day or night is fine. There are always birds to see! Also keep in
mind that high altitude locations tend to be cooler and are great options.
Also, short field trips in conjunction with an event, say a bird talk at a
nature center, a picnic by the river, a visit to a museum, are all great ideas.
Even a crossover field trip with another chapter or institution is doable.
Anything goes! So send me your ideas and we'll make them happen.
 
Yrs,
Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com
 
P.S. – It is not mandatory that a person be a KTOS member to
lead or attend a bird walk. We encourage and appreciate anyone who is ready and
willing to share their passion for birds with others.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
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        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Information request: Dickson Co Anhinga
From: <ifihadastick AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 00:26:10 +0000
If the individual who reported the Anhinga yesterday in Dickson county is on 
this listserv, I would like to request details regarding accessibility of the 
location. Is it private property? It appears to be on the map. If so, do they 
allow visitors? 



Thanks, 


ifihadastick AT hotmail.com


Joshua Stevenson

Davidson County


Sent by Outlook for Android
Subject: CORRECTION KTOS field trip reminder
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 19:31:21 +0000 (UTC)
My apologies, the start time for the Seven Islands walk is 8:15 a.m., not 7:30 
(as originally planned). 


Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
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                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
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                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: KTOS field trip reminder
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 19:21:27 +0000 (UTC)
Field Trip: Monthly Seven Islands State Birding Park Walks
 
Where: Seven Islands State Birding Park, Knox Co.
When: Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Leaders: Morton Massey, 865-806-9967 (cell) and Jay Sturner,
865-244-7819, flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com
 
Meet at the main parking lot at the entrance of the
park. This is a monthly walk held on the 4th Wednesday of the month and is
open to all birders. Many species from a variety of habitats will be seen.
 
This is a free event. No RSVP required, and you do not have
to be a member of KTOS to attend.
 
Additional info and directions to Seven Islands: 
http://www.tnbirds.org/birdfinding/SevenIslands.htm 

 
 
Posted by Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co. 
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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_____________________________________________________________ 
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        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
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                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Results of KTOS Jay Walk in the Smokies
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 18:51:42 +0000 (UTC)
Six of us had an intoxicating time on yesterday's Jay Walk
(Barflies of the Smokies) on the Forney Ridge Trail to Andrews Bald
(technically NC, I realize). Though we didn't see or hear any of our target 
flycatchers 

(no big surprise), and opted not to drink beer (kidding), the hike was one of
the most memorable to date. Credit for that not only goes to Mother Nature, but
to the participants of the walk as well. Everyone was so full of excitement and
curiosity! It made for a really enjoyable experience, and allowed me to reach a
higher level of potential as a naturalist and field trip leader!
 
A few highlights:
 
Great views of the Milky Way as Jimmy Tucker and I drove up
to Clingmans Dome (we got to the Smokies extra early to listen for Saw-whet
Owls and to catch the sunrise).
 
Finding salamanders along the trail, including a Jordan's
(Red-cheeked) and Blue Ridge Spring Salamander, the later of which was found by
Jimmy as it meandered across the trail!
 
Purple-fringed Orchids (the closer I looked the more
gorgeous they got, eventually leading to a search and rescue mission to find my
eyes after they popped out of my head and rolled down the mountain).
 
A few Flame Azaleas still in bloom on Andrews Bald.
 
The view of the surrounding mountains from Andrews Bald.
 
The BIRDS: A Chestnut-sided Warbler, singing emphatically
atop a beautiful spruce set against a background of rolling white clouds and
long stretches of bright blue sky. Winter Wrens singing in the cool, damp
darkness of the spruce-fir forest, right near the trail! (We stopped, of
course, to soak it all in.) Loads of Dark-eyed Juncos, Golden-crowned Kinglets,
Black-capped Chickadees, Red-breasted Nuthatches, a few Veerys, some
Black-throated Blue Warblers, a Brown Creeper, and lots more, including a
Common Raven and two Hermit Thrushes along Clingmans Dome Road on our way to
the trailhead (others in the group saw a Black Bear and her cubs).
 
Aside from the overall experience, my favorite aspect of the
morning was getting to hear ALL THREE of my favorite birds singing their hearts
out (Hermit Thrush, Winter Wren, and Brown Creeper). Nice!
 
Here's our checklist from the hike: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23999012 

 
 
Posted by Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
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_____________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society 
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
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Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Barred Owls
From: TenacBirder AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 02:47:54 +0000 (UTC)
21 June 2015
Hixson, Tn

At 















At ~ 10:25 pm we had a fledgling begging call of a Barred Owl heard from our 
deck. 

Cynthia was also able to get a small flash light beam on one of the adults.  We
came in very soon as we didn't want to disturb their feeding/teaching class.

Jimmy & Cynthia Wilkerson
Hixson, Hamilton Co., TN



















`
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

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        by the members of this discussion group.
 
         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________
         
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_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Observations - Warner Park - Davidson Cty
From: Chris Sloan <csloan1973 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 09:27:41 -0500
There are a couple of nesting pairs at Westhaven Golf Course too. PM me if you 
want specifics. 


Chris Sloan
Nashville, TN
www.chrissloanphotography.com

> On Jun 21, 2015, at 7:53 AM, Graham  wrote:
> 
> Ashley - are those Baltimore orioles nesting? I live just up the hill in 
Harpeth Trace and would love more precise location for that tree where you've 
seen them. 

> 
> Please email me - grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> 
>> On Sat, Jun 20, 2015, 9:17 PM Ashley Heeney  
wrote: 

>> Hello all,
>> 
>> I bird Warner Parks/Vaughns Gap Road daily (West Nashville/Davidson Cty in 
Middle Tenn), at different times of day for two to three hours, and this 
evening as the sun was beginning to set, just before roosting time, proved to 
be especially hopping, many birds in male/female pairs. 

>> 
>> While common, I believe, to the parks, there were larger numbers tonight - 
and more active and vocal - of all species compared to other times of day, by 
my observation. 

>> 
>> All birds were observed within 1.5 miles of the Hwy 100 entrance. In no 
particular order: 

>> 
>> Summer Tanager
>> Great Horned Owl (calling, not seen)
>> Eastern Bluebird(s)
>> Ruby Throated Hummingbird(s)
>> Brown Thrasher(s) (only on Vaughns Gap Rd, in woods by creek)
>> Barred Owl
>> Great Crested Flycatcher(s)
>> Acadian Flycatcher (heard)
>> Blue gray Gnatcatcher
>> Cardinal(s) (numerous pairs)
>> Indigo Bunting
>> Baltimore Oriole(s) (in same oak tree as Bunting and Summer Tanager)
>> Blue Jay(s)
>> Carolina Wren(s)
>> Kentucky Warbler (only heard - did not ID by sight)
>> Prothonatary Warbler  (only heard - did not ID by sight)
>> Other Warblers - possible Common Yellowthroat(s) way high up & flying so 
could not ID enough to verify 

>> Waterthrush in creek (getting too dark at this point to ID species)
>> Wild Turkey(s)
>> Black Vulture(s)
>> American Robin(s)
>> Carolina Chickadee(s)
>> Pileated Woodpecker(s)
>> White-breasted Nuthatch
>> House and Gold Finch(es)
>> Field Sparrow(s) in field ("needs mowed," but wish the park wouldn't)
>> Eastern Towhee (singing, only got glimpse)
>> Northern Mockingbird(s)
>> 
>> The best part, is that I walk to the park from home and a male and female 
bluebird pair "followed" me over traffic, across Hwy 100 (the beautiful male 
even stopped at the stop sign) and up to 50 feet from my doorstep. No mealworms 
here, but very buggy! 

>> 
>> Peace,
>> 
>> Ashley Heeney
>> Davidson Cty
>> 
>> 
>> NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER
>> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
>> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
>> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
>> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
>> appear in the first paragraph.
>> _____________________________________________________________
>>       To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>>                     tn-bird AT freelists.org.
>> _____________________________________________________________
>>                 To unsubscribe, send email to:
>>                  tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>>             with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
>> ______________________________________________________________
>>   TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>>        Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>>         endorse the views or opinions expressed
>>         by the members of this discussion group.
>> 
>>          Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>>                  wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>>                 ------------------------------
>>                 Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>>                          Cleveland, OH
>>                 -------------------------------
>>                Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>>                           Rosedale, VA
>>                --------------------------------
>>                Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>>                         Clemson, SC
>> __________________________________________________________
>> 
>>           Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>>               web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
>> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
>> 
>>                           ARCHIVES
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>> 
>>                        MAP RESOURCES
>> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
>> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
>> 
>> _____________________________________________________________
Subject: Re: Observations - Warner Park - Davidson Cty
From: Graham <grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 12:53:44 +0000
Ashley - are those Baltimore orioles nesting? I live just up the hill in
Harpeth Trace and would love more precise location for that tree where
you've seen them.

Please email me - grahamgerdeman AT gmail.com

Thanks!

On Sat, Jun 20, 2015, 9:17 PM Ashley Heeney 
wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I bird Warner Parks/Vaughns Gap Road daily (West Nashville/Davidson Cty in
> Middle Tenn), at different times of day for two to three hours, and this
> evening as the sun was beginning to set, just before roosting time, proved
> to be especially hopping, many birds in male/female pairs.
>
> While common, I believe, to the parks, there were larger numbers tonight -
> and more active and vocal - of all species compared to other times of day,
> by my observation.
>
> All birds were observed within 1.5 miles of the Hwy 100 entrance.  In no
> particular order:
>
> Summer Tanager
> Great Horned Owl (calling, not seen)
> Eastern Bluebird(s)
> Ruby Throated Hummingbird(s)
> Brown Thrasher(s) (only on Vaughns Gap Rd, in woods by creek)
> Barred Owl
> Great Crested Flycatcher(s)
> Acadian Flycatcher (heard)
> Blue gray Gnatcatcher
> Cardinal(s) (numerous pairs)
> Indigo Bunting
> Baltimore Oriole(s) (in same oak tree as Bunting and Summer Tanager)
> Blue Jay(s)
> Carolina Wren(s)
> Kentucky Warbler (only heard - did not ID by sight)
> Prothonatary Warbler  (only heard - did not ID by sight)
> Other Warblers - possible Common Yellowthroat(s) way high up & flying so
> could not ID enough to verify
> Waterthrush in creek (getting too dark at this point to ID species)
> Wild Turkey(s)
> Black Vulture(s)
> American Robin(s)
> Carolina Chickadee(s)
> Pileated Woodpecker(s)
> White-breasted Nuthatch
> House and Gold Finch(es)
> Field Sparrow(s) in field ("needs mowed," but wish the park wouldn't)
> Eastern Towhee (singing, only got glimpse)
> Northern Mockingbird(s)
>
> The best part, is that I walk to the park from home and a male and female
> bluebird pair "followed" me over traffic, across Hwy 100 (the beautiful
> male even stopped at the stop sign) and up to 50 feet from my doorstep. No
> mealworms here, but very buggy!
>
> Peace,
>
> Ashley Heeney
> Davidson Cty
>
>
> NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER
> The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
> first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
> You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
> you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
> appear in the first paragraph.
> _____________________________________________________________
>       To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
>                     tn-bird AT freelists.org.
> _____________________________________________________________
>                 To unsubscribe, send email to:
>                  tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
>             with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
> ______________________________________________________________
>   TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>        Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
>         endorse the views or opinions expressed
>         by the members of this discussion group.
>
>          Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
>                  wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
>                 ------------------------------
>                 Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
>                          Cleveland, OH
>                 -------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
>                           Rosedale, VA
>                --------------------------------
>                Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
>                         Clemson, SC
> __________________________________________________________
>
>           Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
>               web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
>
>                           ARCHIVES
>  TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/
>
>                        MAP RESOURCES
> Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
> Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com
>
> _____________________________________________________________
>
>
>
Subject: Observations - Warner Park - Davidson Cty
From: "Ashley Heeney" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "acheeney@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 21:16:52 -0500
Hello all,

I bird Warner Parks/Vaughns Gap Road daily (West Nashville/Davidson Cty in 
Middle Tenn), at different times of day for two to three hours, and this 
evening as the sun was beginning to set, just before roosting time, proved to 
be especially hopping, many birds in male/female pairs. 


While common, I believe, to the parks, there were larger numbers tonight - and 
more active and vocal - of all species compared to other times of day, by my 
observation. 


All birds were observed within 1.5 miles of the Hwy 100 entrance. In no 
particular order: 


Summer Tanager
Great Horned Owl (calling, not seen)
Eastern Bluebird(s)
Ruby Throated Hummingbird(s)
Brown Thrasher(s) (only on Vaughns Gap Rd, in woods by creek) 
Barred Owl
Great Crested Flycatcher(s) 
Acadian Flycatcher (heard)
Blue gray Gnatcatcher  
Cardinal(s) (numerous pairs)
Indigo Bunting 
Baltimore Oriole(s) (in same oak tree as Bunting and Summer Tanager)
Blue Jay(s)
Carolina Wren(s)
Kentucky Warbler (only heard - did not ID by sight)
Prothonatary Warbler  (only heard - did not ID by sight) 
Other Warblers - possible Common Yellowthroat(s) way high up & flying so could 
not ID enough to verify 

Waterthrush in creek (getting too dark at this point to ID species)
Wild Turkey(s)
Black Vulture(s)
American Robin(s)
Carolina Chickadee(s) 
Pileated Woodpecker(s)
White-breasted Nuthatch 
House and Gold Finch(es)
Field Sparrow(s) in field ("needs mowed," but wish the park wouldn't) 
Eastern Towhee (singing, only got glimpse)
Northern Mockingbird(s)

The best part, is that I walk to the park from home and a male and female 
bluebird pair "followed" me over traffic, across Hwy 100 (the beautiful male 
even stopped at the stop sign) and up to 50 feet from my doorstep. No mealworms 
here, but very buggy! 


Peace,

Ashley Heeney
Davidson Cty


=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: big Knoxville oil tanker company now has Vickie Henderson art work on back
From: Lyda Phillips <lydap AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 19:18:40 -0500
wow

Lyda Phillips
(301) 518-7538 (cell)
www.lydaphillips.com
writerworking.blogspot.com/


From: jwcoffey AT tricon.net
To: tn-bird AT freelists.org
Subject: [TN-Bird] big Knoxville oil tanker company now has Vickie Henderson 
art work on back 

Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 19:35:53 -0400

 TN-Birders Birders: Look what happened ! Sent Vickie Henderson of Knoxville an 
email and suggested she contact Conestoga Transport out of that city and ask if 
the company wanted one of her Ruby-throated Hummingbird photos for the back of 
their ole big tanker trucks which haul oil over hundreds of thousands of miles 
and maybe in the view of millions of motorists on our highways. Way to go ! Yea 
for Vickie ! Yea! Yea ! Wallace CoffeyBristol, TN From: BBC Net 

Sent: Monday, December 8, 2014 5:32 PM
To: 'bristol-birds'
Subject: [Bristol-Birds] three owlets on truck along TN Rt. 394 in Bristol 
While driving home from birding late this afternoon, I spotted three owlets 
perched on the tail of a petroleum tanker truck rolling over TN Rt. 394 near 
the Bristol MotorSpeedway in Sullivan County. I was pleasantly surprised. To my 
delight, the driver pulled into a delivery stop and I followed. Just another 
person wanting to know about the owls on the back of your big rig,I shouted up 
to his open cab window. He crawled down into the lot with a widesmile and was 
proud to share the artwork with me. I have people stop and ask about it ever 
where, he said. They love it. He said the owner of his trucking company has 
about a dozen or more tankers onthe road and each has different wildlife art on 
the tail. He is a history buff and a very conscientious conservationist and 
environmental owner. The truck is in a fleet of about 15 owned by Conestoga 
Transport out of Knoxville. It is acompany that provides transportation 
services of petroleum products. The name Conestoga has a rich history dating 
back to the foundation of business in America. In the late 18th and early 19th 
centuries  long before the era of tractor and trailers and before the 
development of the railroad system  Conestoga wagons were the primary vehicles 
for hauling freight. The drivers of those wagons were much like their 
modern-day counterparts (todays professional truck driver)  tough, 
resourceful and very professional. The Knoxville fleet, sporting the theme 
Tradition With A Vision, has images of Black Bear, White-tailedDeer, Mallard, 
Bald Eagle, frog, Mr. Ed the horse, Bobwhite and Wild Turkey. The driver, with 
his truck in Bristol, said the most beautiful and his favorite is the Bobcat. 
If you wish you can go to the website link with this post and look thru most of 
the animals inwhat they call their Trailer Tails Gallery. The company has a 
link where you can send them a nomination for the next species they put on a 
new truck. http://www.conestogatransport.com/conestoga/trailer-tails.asp 
Wallace CoffeyBristol, TN 
Subject: big Knoxville oil tanker company now has Vickie Henderson art work on back
From: "Wallace Coffey" <jwcoffey AT tricon.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 19:35:53 -0400
hummer on an oil tanker TN Rt 394 side view.jpg

 

TN-Birders Birders:

 

Look what happened !   Sent Vickie Henderson of Knoxville an email and
suggested  she contact Conestoga Transport out of that  city and ask if the
company wanted one of her Ruby-throated Hummingbird photos for the back of
their ole big tanker 

trucks  which haul oil over hundreds of thousands of miles and maybe in the
view of millions of motorists on our highways.  Way to go !  Yea for Vickie
!  Yea!  Yea !

 

Wallace Coffey

Bristol, TN 

From: BBC Net
Sent: Monday, December 8, 2014 5:32 PM
To: 'bristol-birds'
Subject: [Bristol-Birds] three owlets on truck along TN Rt. 394 in Bristol

 

owls on an oil tanker TN Rt 394.jpg

 

While driving home from birding late this afternoon, I spotted three owlets
perched 

on the tail of a petroleum tanker truck rolling over TN Rt. 394 near the
Bristol Motor

Speedway in Sullivan County.  I was pleasantly surprised.

 

To my delight, the driver pulled into a delivery stop and I followed.

 

"Just another person wanting to know about the owls on the back of your big
rig,"

I shouted up to his open cab window.  He crawled down into the lot with a
wide

smile and was proud to share the artwork with me.

 

"I have people stop and ask about it ever where," he said.  "They love it."

 

He said the owner of his trucking company has about a dozen or more tankers
on

the road and each has different wildlife art on the tail.  

 

"He is a history buff and a very conscientious  conservationist and
environmental owner."

 

The truck is in a fleet of about 15 owned by Conestoga Transport out of
Knoxville.  It  is a

company that provides transportation services of petroleum products. The
name Conestoga 

has a rich history dating back to the foundation of business in America. In
the late 18th and early 19th 

centuries - long before the era of tractor and trailers and before the
development of the railroad 

system - Conestoga wagons were the primary vehicles for hauling freight. The
drivers of those wagons 

were much like their modern-day counterparts (today's professional truck
driver) - tough, resourceful 

and very professional. 

 

The Knoxville fleet, sporting the theme "Tradition With A Vision," has
images of Black Bear, White-tailed

Deer, Mallard,  Bald Eagle, frog, Mr. Ed the horse, Bobwhite and Wild
Turkey.  

 

The driver, with his truck in Bristol, said the most beautiful and his
favorite is the Bobcat.

 

If you wish you can go to the website link with this post and look thru most
of the animals in

what they call their  Trailer Tails Gallery.  The company has a link where
you can send them a 

nomination for the next species they put on a new truck. 

 

http://www.conestogatransport.com/conestoga/trailer-tails.asp

 

Wallace Coffey

Bristol, TN

 

 
Subject: Birding Meigs County and Hamilton County at Birchwood
From: Charles Murray <dro1945 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 15:40:45 -0400

I noted several common yard birds this morning along with a female summer
tanager that was feeding on peanut butter suet in Birchwood (Hamilton
County). I then drove down Shadden Road and Blythe Ferry Lane (Meigs County)
toward the Cherokee Removal Memorial Park. I saw a wild turkey near Shadden Rd.
and heard several yellow-breasted chats on both sides of Blythe Ferry Lane near
the newest 68 acre addition to the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge. I also heard two 
prairie 

warblers on the south side of the road. Afterward I drove onto Priddy Road 
(Meigs 

County). There I saw a bobwhite quail hen cross the road with at least 20 very
young chicks.



Charles Murray

Birchwood, TN

 		 	   		  
Subject: Dickcissel in Washington Co
From: "Richard Knight" <rknight8 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 13:41:59 -0400
20 Jun 2015
Washington Co., TN
Muddy Fork Rd, about 0.6 mile west of Leeesburg Rd
large, partly mowed field with lots of chickory

Dickcissel - 1, rather far from road

Only one I have found in county this year.

Rick Knight
Johnson City, TN
Subject: KTOS Field Trip Reminder
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 15:54:31 +0000 (UTC)
Where: Forney Ridge Trail, Great Smoky Mountains National
Park
When: Sunday, June 21, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. 
Leaders: Jay Sturner and Jimmy Tucker
Contact info: Jay Sturner, 865-244-7819, 
flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com 


Three birds walk into a bar in the Smoky Mountains. Mr. Red,
the barkeep squirrel, jumps onto the counter. "What'll y'all have?"
he asks, cleaning a pint glass with his fluffy tail.

"Quick, three beers!" says the Olive-sided
Flycatcher.
"Beer-beer-beer-beer-pleeeease," buzzes the
Black-throated Blue Warbler.
"I'll take a PBR tall and a bag of salted gnats,"
says the Veery in perfect English.

Eyes turn in their general direction. "Learned it from
a tourist," the Veery proclaims as he takes his beer. Heads shake and turn
away. A snail withdraws into her shell with a thimble of moonshine.

All of a sudden an Alder Flycatcher sallies forth from the
jukebox and shouts "Freee-beer! Freee-beer!" as he drunkenly bumps
into things.

This ruffles a few feathers.

A towhee sipping tea squints from her perch by the window. A
murder of poker-playing crows drops their cards and gets up from the table. All
goes quiet. Somewhere in the back, a wet slap is heard as a tipsy salamander
falls from his log and passes out. Now the corvids start to flap-hop
aggressively toward the disruptive bird…

Like vultures on a summer thermal, the tension rises. A
black bear hiccups and runs out the back door.

"Beer-check!" shouts a Least Flycatcher.
"Beer-check!"

* * *

Join us this Sunday for a Jay Walk (an impromptu field trip
with naturalist Jay Sturner) at the Forney Ridge Trail in the Great Smoky
Mountains to look for high-altitude beercatchers and other birds. Target
species include Least, Alder, and Olive-sided Flycatchers. There is no
guarantee we'll find these species, as they are not always common here
(Olive-sided hasn't been documented in awhile), but the point is to try.
Fortunately there will be lots of other great birds to see.

Meet at the Clingmans Dome parking lot no later than 7:30
a.m. We will drink a few beers then hike the Forney Ridge Trail to Andrews Bald
(3.5 miles roundtrip). The hike will be moderately difficult and last a few
hours, so bring plenty of water, food, raingear, maybe a walking stick, and
sunblock. I was just kidding about the beer.

This is a free event. No RSVP required, and you do not have
to be a member of KTOS to attend. See you there!

Clingmans Dome parking lot: 35°33'24.9"N 83°29'46.2"W
or 35.5569312,-83.4961581

Forney Ridge Trail and Andrews Bald: 
http://www.hikinginthesmokys.com/andrewsbald.htm 

 
 
Posted by Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co.
=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER====================
The TN-Bird Net requires you to SIGN YOUR MESSAGE with
first and last name, CITY (TOWN) and state abbreviation.
You are also required to list the COUNTY in which the birds
you report were seen.  The actual DATE OF OBSERVATION should
appear in the first paragraph.
_____________________________________________________________
      To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
                    tn-bird AT freelists.org.
_____________________________________________________________
                To unsubscribe, send email to:
                 tn-bird-request AT freelists.org
            with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
______________________________________________________________
  TN-Bird Net is owned by the Tennessee Ornithological Society
       Neither the society(TOS) nor its moderator(s)
        endorse the views or opinions expressed
        by the members of this discussion group.

         Moderator: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
                 wallace AT bristolbirdclub.org
                ------------------------------
                Assistant Moderator Andy Jones
                         Cleveland, OH
                -------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Dave Worley
                          Rosedale, VA
               --------------------------------
               Assistant Moderator Chris O'Bryan
                        Clemson, SC
__________________________________________________________

          Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
              web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

                          ARCHIVES
 TN-Bird Net Archives at http://www.freelists.org/archives/tn-bird/

                       MAP RESOURCES
Tenn.Counties Map at http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/states/tennessee3.gif
Aerial photos to complement google maps http://local.live.com

_____________________________________________________________

Subject: Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing?
From: "Steve Routledge" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "eyerout@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:47:14 +0000 (UTC)
A few weeks ago we had one standing in the middle of the large fishing pond at 
the Clarksville Marina/Liberty Park, the busiest park in town. He seemed out of 
place, but he was in a good feeding spot. Definitely, we just seem to see them 
randomly and rarely. 

Steve RoutledgeClarksville, TN 


     On Friday, June 19, 2015 9:02 PM, Ron Hoff  wrote:
   

 Kenneth & Bob, Well it’s not west TN, but thanks to Rick Knight for 
directions, Dollyann & I found a nest with 2 young on the Watauga River today 
near Elizabethton at 36.33072, –82.27313. They have REALLY never been common 
over here in E. TN, but I agree, they certainly seem few and far 
between. Related to the BP gulf oil spill? Hard to prove any way you look at 
it, but for us, we haven’t bought a drop of BP fuel since. Great 
birding, Ron Hoff & Dollyann MyersClinton, TN  From: Mcdonald, Kenneth Sent: 
Friday, June 19, 2015 1:14 PMTo: editorthemigrant AT gmail.com Cc: TN-Birds Bird 
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons 
disappearing? Mark Greene reported something similar this morning on the list 
with herons, egrets, and anhingas. He was speculating fish crows preying on 
nests could be a candidate explanation, but if a wide range of wading birds are 
suffering similar declines in these counties it's something worth knowing more 
about, for sure! 

 On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 10:03 AM, Bob Ford  
wrote: 


 Hello all - starting last summer (2014), I realized it has been a few years 
since I've seen Yellow-crowned Night-herons in west Tennessee.  Several years 
ago I would see them fairly often each summer, always early in the morning 
while driving near roadside ditches or walking through wooded bottomland 
creeks.  A quick check on eBird and there are a few records in 2014 and 2015 
but most are from several years ago.  They have never been "common" by my 
estimation, but I'd expect to see at least a few each summer, even with random 
birding.   Anybody else noticed this, or am I just in the wrong place at the 
wrong time the last few years?   Thanks in advance for any feedback,   Bob 
Ford Haywood County TN     



 -- 
Kenneth W. McDonald

Energy Biologist

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

446 Neal Street

Cookeville, TN 38501

Office: 931.525.4990

Fax: 931.528.7075

kenneth_mcdonald AT fws.gov 
Energy and persistence will conquer all things-  Benjamin Franklin

  
Subject: Results from NTOS Field Trip
From: "Chloe Walker" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "chloebelle119@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:25:55 +0000 (UTC)
 6-20-15Beaman Park, Davidson County, TN
The NTOS's field trip to Beaman Park was a great success, despite the wet and 
windy conditions. Upon arrival, we were treated to a chorus of juvenile 
Carolina Wrens learning to sing. Worm-eating Warblers, an annual breeder here, 
responded to pishing and cooperated nicely for the group. A couple of us had 
fleeting looks at a Great Egret as it flew from the creek - quite a surprise. 
Louisiana Waterthrushes were also present during our walk, though they were 
heard only. Thank you to those who participated! Our checklist can be found 
below. 

24 species
Great Egret - 1Chimney Swift - 4Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1Downy Woodpecker 
- 1Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2Acadian Flycatcher - 3Red-eyed Vireo - 2Blue Jay - 
1Carolina Chickadee - 3Tufted Titmouse - 4White-breasted Nuthatch - 1Carolina 
Wren - 4Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2Wood Thrush - 2Worm-eating Warbler - 
4Louisiana Waterthrush - 4Kentucky Warbler - 1Northern Parula - 
2Yellow-throated Warbler - 3Summer Tanager - 2Scarlet Tanager - 2Northern 
Cardinal - 2Indigo Bunting - 1Brown-headed Cowbird - 1 

***Get it on your calendars! The next NTOS field trip will be on Saturday, July 
18th, at Bowie Nature Park in Fairview. Meeting time will be at 7:00 AM. More 
information can be found here at the NTOS website. 

Chloe WalkerMurfreesboro, TN  
Subject: Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing?
From: "Ron Hoff" <aves7000 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:01:39 -0400
Kenneth & Bob,

Well it’s not west TN, but thanks to Rick Knight for directions, Dollyann & I 
found a nest with 2 young on the Watauga River today near Elizabethton at 
36.33072, –82.27313. They have REALLY never been common over here in E. TN, 
but I agree, they certainly seem few and far between. 


Related to the BP gulf oil spill? Hard to prove any way you look at it, but for 
us, we haven’t bought a drop of BP fuel since. 


Great birding,

Ron Hoff & Dollyann Myers
Clinton, TN


From: Mcdonald, Kenneth 
Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 1:14 PM
To: editorthemigrant AT gmail.com 
Cc: TN-Birds Bird 
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons 
disappearing? 


Mark Greene reported something similar this morning on the list with herons, 
egrets, and anhingas. He was speculating fish crows preying on nests could be a 
candidate explanation, but if a wide range of wading birds are suffering 
similar declines in these counties it's something worth knowing more about, for 
sure! 



On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 10:03 AM, Bob Ford  wrote:

 Hello all - starting last summer (2014), I realized it has been a few years 
since I've seen Yellow-crowned Night-herons in west Tennessee. Several years 
ago I would see them fairly often each summer, always early in the morning 
while driving near roadside ditches or walking through wooded bottomland 
creeks. A quick check on eBird and there are a few records in 2014 and 2015 but 
most are from several years ago. They have never been "common" by my 
estimation, but I'd expect to see at least a few each summer, even with random 
birding. 


 Anybody else noticed this, or am I just in the wrong place at the wrong time 
the last few years? 


  Thanks in advance for any feedback,

  Bob Ford
  Haywood County TN






-- 

Kenneth W. McDonald

Energy Biologist

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

446 Neal Street

Cookeville, TN 38501

Office: 931.525.4990

Fax: 931.528.7075

kenneth_mcdonald AT fws.gov 


Energy and persistence will conquer all things

-  Benjamin Franklin
Subject: Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing?
From: Richard Blanton <zsleepyz72 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 21:27:07 -0400
Is there any chance this could be directly related to the oil spill in the 
gulf? 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 19, 2015, at 1:14 PM, Mcdonald, Kenneth  
wrote: 

> 
> Mark Greene reported something similar this morning on the list with herons, 
egrets, and anhingas. He was speculating fish crows preying on nests could be a 
candidate explanation, but if a wide range of wading birds are suffering 
similar declines in these counties it's something worth knowing more about, for 
sure! 

> 
>> On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 10:03 AM, Bob Ford  
wrote: 

>> Hello all - starting last summer (2014), I realized it has been a few years 
since I've seen Yellow-crowned Night-herons in west Tennessee. Several years 
ago I would see them fairly often each summer, always early in the morning 
while driving near roadside ditches or walking through wooded bottomland 
creeks. A quick check on eBird and there are a few records in 2014 and 2015 but 
most are from several years ago. They have never been "common" by my 
estimation, but I'd expect to see at least a few each summer, even with random 
birding. 

>> 
>> Anybody else noticed this, or am I just in the wrong place at the wrong time 
the last few years? 

>> 
>> Thanks in advance for any feedback,
>> 
>> Bob Ford
>> Haywood County TN
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Kenneth W. McDonald
> 
> Energy Biologist
> 
> U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
> 
> 446 Neal Street
> 
> Cookeville, TN 38501
> 
> Office: 931.525.4990
> 
> Fax: 931.528.7075
> 
> kenneth_mcdonald AT fws.gov
> 
> Energy and persistence will conquer all things
> -  Benjamin Franklin
Subject: US Open bird song
From: richard connors <didymops07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 12:16:28 -0500
Out of area, but possibly one of our winter birds on nesting territory:

'Had the US Open golf tourney on tv (Fox Sports) yesterday during lunch and
noticed a bird singing consistently in the background, sometimes fairly
loud. Today it's back on and I still hear this bird. I'm thinking
White-crowned Sparrow, but not sure. Sounds something like "CHEREEE chip
chip chip chereee". Costal Washington state, white-crowned is an all year
resident there, according to Sibley, so that's at least a possibility.
Anyone familiar with west-coast bird song, I'd be curious if you have an
opinion.

Richard Connors
Nashville TN
Subject: Re: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing?
From: "Mcdonald, Kenneth" <kenneth_mcdonald AT fws.gov>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 12:14:21 -0500
Mark Greene reported something similar this morning on the list with
herons, egrets, and anhingas. He was speculating fish crows preying on
nests could be a candidate explanation, but if a wide range of wading birds
are suffering similar declines in these counties it's something worth
knowing more about, for sure!

On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 10:03 AM, Bob Ford 
wrote:

> Hello all - starting last summer (2014), I realized it has been a few
> years since I've seen Yellow-crowned Night-herons in west Tennessee.
> Several years ago I would see them fairly often each summer, always early
> in the morning while driving near roadside ditches or walking through
> wooded bottomland creeks.  A quick check on eBird and there are a few
> records in 2014 and 2015 but most are from several years ago.  They have
> never been "common" by my estimation, but I'd expect to see at least a few
> each summer, even with random birding.
>
> Anybody else noticed this, or am I just in the wrong place at the wrong
> time the last few years?
>
> Thanks in advance for any feedback,
>
> Bob Ford
> Haywood County TN
>
>
>


-- 














*Kenneth W. McDonaldEnergy BiologistU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service446 Neal
StreetCookeville, TN 38501Office: 931.525.4990Fax:
931.528.7075kenneth_mcdonald AT fws.gov *

Energy and persistence will conquer all things

-  Benjamin Franklin
Subject: Are west Tennessee Yellow-crowned Night-herons disappearing?
From: Bob Ford <editorthemigrant AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 11:03:28 -0400
Hello all - starting last summer (2014), I realized it has been a few years
since I've seen Yellow-crowned Night-herons in west Tennessee.  Several
years ago I would see them fairly often each summer, always early in the
morning while driving near roadside ditches or walking through wooded
bottomland creeks.  A quick check on eBird and there are a few records in
2014 and 2015 but most are from several years ago.  They have never been
"common" by my estimation, but I'd expect to see at least a few each
summer, even with random birding.

Anybody else noticed this, or am I just in the wrong place at the wrong
time the last few years?

Thanks in advance for any feedback,

Bob Ford
Haywood County TN
Subject: Lauderdale & Dyer Counties
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 14:38:18 +0000 (UTC)
June 18, 2015Dyer & Lauderdale Counties
Yesterday, I made a loop into southern Dyer County and to a few spots in 
Lauderdale County that I hadn't been to in a while. Here are the highlights: 

Moss Island WMA, Dyer CountyWood Duck - female with 6 youngMallard - 15 total 
with at least 9 young birdsAmerican White Pelican - 10, mostly immaturesSnowy 
Egret - 1, Snowies have been hard to find this yearMississippi Kite - 2Least 
Tern - 4 

Chickasaw NWR, Lauderdale CountyWild Turkey - 32Mississippi Kite - 77 species 
of warblers including CeruleanScarlet Tanager - 1 

Open Lake, Lauderdale CountyOsprey - 1Mississippi Kite - 11Least Tern - 2
Chisholm Lake, Lauderdale CountyMississippi Kite - 23, most were feeding just 
south of the lake in the refuge area.Least Tern - 1Black-billed Cuckoo - 1, 
possibly 2. Two cuckoos flew low across the road in front of me. I stopped and 
got on the second bird as it landed in a small bush nest to the road and 
noticed the black bill and red eye ring. I believe that the first bird may have 
been a Black-billed Cuckoo as well but I just didn't get a good enough look at 
it. The habitat looks good here so there birds could be nesting. This was just 
east of the lake on Chisholm Lake Road. 

Always good to visit some area that I haven't been to in years. I need to do 
more of that. There are lots of great areas and habitat in Lauderdale County 
that goes largely unbirded now that the Ol' Coot is no longer with us. There 
are several areas that I did not get to visit that have been good in the past - 
Sunk Lake State Natural Area, Bee Lake, Fort Pillow State Park, Lower Hatchie 
NWR, Crutcher Lake, Plum Point, Porter's Gap, and Key Corner. I wish I lived 
just a little bit closer to this vastly underbirded county! 

Good birding,
Mark GreeneTrenton, TN 
Subject: Macedonia Bottoms Heronry - bad news
From: "Mark Greene" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "greenesnake@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 14:00:20 +0000 (UTC)
June 18, 2015Macedonia Bottoms Heronry,Forked Deer River Bottoms, Hwy 104Gibson 
County 

Yesterday, a non-birding but outdoors friend of mine and I took a boat and went 
into the swamp in the Macedonia Bottoms to check on the heron & egret nesting 
colony that has been active for a few years now. While we were putting the boat 
in I noticed that there was not a lot of activity in the area of the colony but 
with all the trees it is difficult to see into the area. After the boat was in 
the water and we got to where we could see, we were very disappointed at the 
lack of birds. There were lots of nests but very few birds. We saw maybe 10 
Great Blue Herons, despite the fact that there are probably 300 nests in the 
trees. No Great Egrets. No Anhingas. No Double-crested Cormorants. Where were 
they? Last year we went into the colony on July 17 and there were birds 
everywhere with 16 Anhingas. Now a full month earlier this year, there should 
have been lots of activity, but there wasn't. What happened? 

I had my first Anhinga on April 10 and the last time I saw Anhingas there this 
year was May 7. I had noticed that in the last couple of weeks that there were 
less herons and egrets coming and going into the colony area in the bottoms but 
I though that maybe they were just going a different direction to disperse and 
feed. I thought back over what I had witnessed in the area of the colony this 
spring and I have a theory on what happened. Several times back in April and 
May when I visited the colony there were lots of Fish Crows (and a few American 
Crows) there. A couple of times I could hear loud, raucous calls from the 
herons and egrets and constant calling from the Fish Crows like there was a 
fight going on. The loud calls would attract more Fish Crows and even though I 
couldn't actually see what was going on I would guess that the crows were 
raiding the nests in the colony of eggs. Fish Crows are known nest robbers and 
will take the eggs of many other species and there are almost always Fish Crows 
in the bottoms and we heard a few there yesterday. There was no other evidence 
of any other kind of disturbance - nests were still intact so it wasn't a storm 
or winds that caused the colony to be mostly abandoned. I can only surmise that 
it was the constant harassment and depredation from the crows that caused the 
birds to leave. It was disappointing to see this and I have no idea where they 
might have moved to but I will keep an eye out in the river bottoms in the 
area. It was nice to have Anhingas nesting in my home county for a short while, 
maybe they will return. 

Good birding,
Mark GreeneTrenton, TN 
Subject: Oak Ridge birds
From: Thomas Miko <thomas_miko AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 11:18:06 -0700
 Hi Folks, 
 
My job has had me super busy, and I have been unable to plan for my trip to Oak 
Ridge, next week (I arrive Sunday afternoon 6/21/15 and fly home Friday 
afternoon 6/26/15). To make matters worse, unlike my trip to Chattanooga last 
week (that's right: I flew from LA[Los Angeles] to Chattanooga, was there for a 
week, am home for a week, then am flying to Oak Ridge, for another class), I 
don't get a rental car, because my supervisor, and a bunch of other people from 
California's radiation program will be there, and I have to ride with them. 

I would really like to see a Cerulean Warbler and/or a Blue-winged Warbler, 
and/or a Black-billed Cuckoo. Can you give me good info for these birds near 
Oak Ridge? I will look on eBird, but I have noticed that eBird coverage for 
Chattanooga isn't all that thorough, so I assume the same is true about Oak 
Ridge. 

 
Tom Miko
Claremont, California
909.241.3300
213.471.6001 
  		 	   		  
Subject: KTOS Jay Walk Announcement: Barflies of the Smokies
From: "Jay Sturner" <dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org> (Redacted sender "flowerpetalsonthecreek@yahoo.com" for DMARC)
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 13:34:03 +0000 (UTC)
Where: Forney Ridge Trail, Great Smoky Mountains National Park
When: Sunday, June 21, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Leaders: Jay Sturner and Jimmy Tucker
Contact info: Jay Sturner, 865-244-7819, 
flowerpetalsonthecreek(at)yahoo(dot)com 


Three birds walk into a bar in the Smoky Mountains. Mr. Red,
the barkeep squirrel, jumps onto the counter. "What'll y'all have?" he asks,
cleaning a pint glass with his fluffy tail.

"Quick, three beers!" says the Olive-sided Flycatcher.
"Beer-beer-beer-beer-pleeeease," buzzes the Black-throated
Blue Warbler.
"I'll take a PBR tall and a bag of salted gnats," says the Veery
in perfect English.

Eyes turn in their general direction. "Learned it from a
tourist," the Veery proclaims as he takes his beer. Heads shake and turn away. 
A 

snail withdraws into her shell with a thimble of moonshine.

All of a sudden an Alder Flycatcher sallies forth from the
jukebox and shouts "Freee-beer! Freee-beer!" as he drunkenly bumps into things.

This ruffles a few feathers.

A towhee sipping tea squints from her perch by the window. A
murder of poker-playing crows drops their cards and gets up from the table. All
goes quiet. Somewhere in the back, a wet slap is heard as a tipsy salamander
falls from his log and passes out. Now the corvids start to flap-hop
aggressively toward the disruptive bird...

Like vultures on a summer thermal, the tension rises. A black
bear hiccups and runs out the back door.

"Beer-check!" shouts a Least Flycatcher. "Beer-check!"

* * *

Join us this Sunday for a Jay Walk (an impromptu field trip
with naturalist Jay Sturner) at the Forney Ridge Trail in the Great Smoky
Mountains to look for high-altitude beercatchers and other birds. Target
species include Least, Alder, and Olive-sided Flycatchers. There is no
guarantee we'll find these species, as they are not always common here 
(Olive-sided 

hasn't been documented in awhile), but the point is to try. Fortunately there
will be lots of other great birds to see.

Meet at the Clingmans Dome parking lot no later than 7:30
a.m. We will drink a few beers then hike the Forney Ridge Trail to Andrews Bald
(3.5 miles roundtrip). The hike will be moderately difficult and last a few
hours, so bring plenty of water, food, raingear, maybe a walking stick, and
sunblock. I was just kidding about the beer.

This is a free event. No RSVP required, and you do not have
to be a member of KTOS to attend. See you there!

Clingmans Dome parking lot: 35°33'24.9"N
83°29'46.2"W or 35.5569312,-83.4961581

Forney Ridge Trail and Andrews Bald: 
http://www.hikinginthesmokys.com/andrewsbald.htm 



Posted by Jay Sturner
KTOS Field Trip Coordinator
Knoxville, TN
Knox Co.
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