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Updated on Tuesday, September 23 at 12:59 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Boat-billed Heron,©Barry Kent Mackay

22 Sep Greater White-fronted Geese Over Sequim [John Gatchet ]
22 Sep 520 eagle watch [Debbie McLeod ]
23 Sep Westport Seabirds Trip Report 09/20/2014 [bill shelmerdine ]
22 Sep what shorebird runs fast on one foot? ["Wendy Tanowitz" ]
22 Sep Dipper on the Tolt River works hard for its food [Hank ]
22 Sep A Fine Forest [Jeff Gibson ]
22 Sep Re: no Sabine's on Sunday @ Sammamish [Rick Forsman ]
22 Sep Re: Four Fine Hours @ Rattlesnake Lake (including a Merlin !) [L Markoff ]
22 Sep Western Scrub-Jay in Maple Valley [Mike & MerryLynn ]
21 Sep ACOW field trip [Dianna Moore ]
21 Sep Skagit birds [Gary Bletsch ]
21 Sep Eide Rd & Island County Sandhill Cranes [Josh Adams ]
21 Sep Sharp tailed sandpiper, midway ponds , grayland., SUNDAY sept. 21 [Maxine Reid ]
21 Sep Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Theler Wetlands [John Riegsecker ]
21 Sep Basin birding [Tim Brennan ]
21 Sep Edmonds Roundup [Carol Riddell ]
21 Sep Four Fine Hours @ Rattlesnake Lake (including a Merlin !) [Barbara Deihl ]
21 Sep no Sabine's on Sunday @ Sammamish [Joe Sweeney ]
21 Sep Skagit County birding highlights [Scott ]
21 Sep RE: Band-Tailed Pigeon mixing with EC Dove? [mary hrudkaj ]
21 Sep Re: | Union Bay Watch | 520 Eagle Watch | [Larry Hubbell ]
21 Sep Re: Mt. Rainier - Sunrise ["Phil Pickering" ]
21 Sep No Sabine's Gull ["Louise Rutter" ]
21 Sep Band-Tailed Pigeon mixing with EC Dove? [Josh Adams ]
21 Sep Lewis's Woodpecker at Point no Point [Brad Waggoner ]
21 Sep Bassett Park [David Parent ]
21 Sep Yellowlegs vs. Stickleback? [Jeff Gibson ]
21 Sep From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
20 Sep Long-tailed Jaeger Whatcom county [FanterLane ]
20 Sep Yellowlegs trying to choke down a fish at Wylie Slough [Hank ]
21 Sep Mt. Rainier - Sunrise [Marcus Roening ]
20 Sep Sharp Tailed Sandpiper [Steve Giles ]
20 Sep De"Beaching" (con't) / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
20 Sep Raptor flyover / De"Beaching" [Caryn Schutzler ]
20 Sep Re: Sabine Gull 2:30 pm Sat. [Tom Mansfield ]
20 Sep Sabine Gull 2:30 pm Sat. ["Diane W" ]
20 Sep Crow roost at UW Bothell []
20 Sep Hoquiam and ocean shores question [Mitch ]
20 Sep Union Bay Watch | Striking Speed [Larry Hubbell ]
20 Sep BirdNote - last week, and the week of Sept. 21, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
20 Sep Sabine's now at East Lake Sammamish boat launch [Pamela Girres ]
20 Sep Sabine's now [Pamela Girres ]
20 Sep Migrants and accidentals [Rob Conway ]
19 Sep Vaux's Happening [Larry Schwitters ]
19 Sep White-throated Sparrow and Fox Sparrow Discovery Bay [John Gatchet ]
19 Sep Skagit Ruff continues [Hank ]
19 Sep RE: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough ["Jeff Kozma" ]
19 Sep Re: Skagit Ruff and Yellow-headed Blackbirds ["barry " ]
19 Sep RE: Sabine's Gull at Lake Sammamish SP [Mason Flint ]
19 Sep A note from Orcas Island ["Gayle Benton" ]
19 Sep Rock Wren []
19 Sep Re: owls on the offensive [Jennifer DeSelle ]
19 Sep Hoquiam STPs [Carol Riddell ]
19 Sep (Tweeters) What to do with a dead bird [Andrew McCormick ]
19 Sep Sabine's Gull, Longspur, Sparrows and more in PO ["Terry Little" ]
19 Sep Sabine's Gull at Lake Sammamish SP [Larry Schwitters ]
19 Sep Skagit Ruff [Tom Mansfield ]
19 Sep Whidbey Avocet [Tom Mansfield ]
19 Sep Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk -- 9-18-2014 [Denis DeSilvis ]
19 Sep Hoquiam STP [Blair Bernson ]
19 Sep Re: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough [Harsi Parker ]
19 Sep RE: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough [Jill Freidberg ]
19 Sep Re: Owls on the offensive [L Markoff ]
19 Sep RE: Owls on the offensive ["owler AT sounddsl.com" ]
19 Sep Binoculars Found @ Bottle Beach [bill shelmerdine ]
19 Sep Fw: Owls on the offensive [Gary Bletsch ]
19 Sep Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough [Hank ]
18 Sep RE: DEAD BIRDS in Tweeters Digest, Vol 121, Issue 18 [Steve Krival ]
18 Sep Hoquaim STP Sharp-tailed Sandpiper continues [Brad Waggoner ]
18 Sep re: Owls on the Offensive [Dianna Moore ]
18 Sep Owls on the offensive [Jack Stephens ]
19 Sep Re: getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds? ["Wilson Cady" ]
18 Sep Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-09-18 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
18 Sep A smart Steller's Jay at Lake Joy [Hank ]
18 Sep Adult female peregrine, Island Girl, Heading South Again [Bud Anderson ]
18 Sep getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds? []

Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese Over Sequim
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 22:31:37 -0700
This evening at 7:15 pm 110 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE flew over Sequim
near the Community Church along 5th Ave.  They were head east.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: 520 eagle watch
From: Debbie McLeod <athanases AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 20:22:20 -0700
I spotted one adult eagle this weekend, perched at the Seattle end of the 
bridge early Saturday, Sept. 20. 


Debbie McLeod, Kirkland

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Subject: Westport Seabirds Trip Report 09/20/2014
From: bill shelmerdine <georn1 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 03:14:46 +0000
Greetings Tweeters




Saturday, September 20 we had another fine day offshore, pelagic birding with 
Westport Seabirds. The day started with a somewhat larger swell than 
anticipated, but once we cleared the bar conditions offshore were good with 
light winds. The near shore Sooty Shearwater flocks did not materialize on 
either the out bound or return trip. As a result, Sooties were not the most 
numerous species recorded and Pink-footed Shearwater numbers nearly exceeded 
our Sooty Count. Three species exceeded counts of 2000, with California Gull 
(2800+), Sooty (2400+), and Pink-footed Shearwater (2100+) being the most 
numerous. 

 
The trip across the shelf was routine with the exception of the variety of 
landbirds recorded. Offshore, we encountered several Golden-crowned and 
Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Dark-eyed Junco, Song, and Savannah Sparrow. As we 
approached the outer shelf shearwater activity really started to pick-up. A 
couple of South Polar Skuas were sighted chasing Cal. Gulls and Pink-foots. 
Shortly after we spotted a lot of bird and foraging activity and adjusted our 
course to the south to investigate. As we approached we could see it would be a 
good day for Pink-footed Shearwater, we also had our first of many good looks 
at BULLERS SHEARWATER. There was so much activity at this point it was really 
challenging to keep track of it all. As we stopped the boat, a fine 
FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER glided in slowly to the bow and made several passes for 
some really nice close viewing. 

 
Further offshore and out over Grays Canyon we continued with more shearwaters 
and the occasional Fork-tailed Storm Petrel. Cassin’s Auklet’s started showing 
up, and by the time we reached the chum spot the numbers were looking 
impressive, over 1200 were recorded. Black-footed Albatross were low with a 
count of about 8 and only a handful coming in to the chum slick. Northern 
Fulmar numbers continue to be low (about 20), while Sabine’s Gulls were in good 
supply (40 to 50). Jaegers continue to be a bit elusive with 7 Pomerine and 4 
South Polar Skua for the day. Rhinoceros Auklet, Red-necked Phalarope, and 
Tufted Puffin (1 distant) were present, but in short supply. A couple of Shrimp 
boats on the return hosted many gulls, more Pink-footed, Sooty, and Bullars 
Shearwaters along with several Pomerine jeagers. 

 
The mammal show was a good one with a couple of pods of Dall’s Porpoises 
enchanting us with their bow-riding prowess. Several Humpback Whales, Pacific 
White-sided Dolphin, Harbor Porpoise, Northern Fur Seal, Harbor Seal, and 
Stellers and California Sea Lions rounded out that list. Mola Mola or Ocean 
Sunfish and a few acrobatic salmon (presumably coho) were the fish noted. The 
jetty hosted Black Turnstone, Wandering Tattler, and a lone Surfbird, while the 
boat basin held the traditional Marbled Godwit flock. 

 
Trip participants included a birding tour group from Minnesota lead by Kim 
Eckert along with a few first-timers, regulars, and locals. It was an enjoyable 
group with good energy. Leaders for the trip included Bruce LaBar, Ryan Shaw, 
and Bill Shelmerdine. Phil and Chris Anderson did another fine job running the 
boat and managing all of the logistics. 

Bill Shelmerdine
Olympia WA 		 	   		   		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: what shorebird runs fast on one foot?
From: "Wendy Tanowitz" <green-girl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 19:36:19 -0700
I went to the beach at Moclips on Saturday and where the river comes into
the beach saw a large flock of over 1,000 shorebirds. Some of them were
hopping pretty fast on one foot parallel to the shore. Does anyone know what
bird this might have been?

wendy



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Subject: Dipper on the Tolt River works hard for its food
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 18:36:25 -0700
> 
> Video of the hunt for food:
> 
> American Dipper (Hunting), Tolt River, Snoqualmie Valley, WA 9/22/14
>  
> Video of food preparation and consumption:
> 
> American Dipper (Feeding), Tolt River, Snoqualmie Valley, WA 9/22/14
>  
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
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Subject: A Fine Forest
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 12:48:09 -0700
About 40 years ago I was on top of Mt. Erie, that grand viewing point on 
Fidalgo Island, looking all around. Fidalgo is like a loose cork in the 
northern-most entrance to Puget Sound - a bit of the Salish Sea sneaks around 
it through Deception Pass and the Swinomish Slough, into, and out of, the 
Sound. 

Yes, it was quite a view - and still is - of Puget Sound country; a great 
perspective of the lowlands between the Olympics and Cascades. But what really 
got to me at the time, was realizing that across this vast lowland area, nearly 
every bit of old-growth forest had been cut. Yup, in just over 100 years the 
new kids on the block cut down all that. Kind of amazing, what people are 
capable of. 

They did miss a few spots though, and whether by design or happy accident, we 
still have a few remnants of the old lowland forest to experience in the 
present. Seattle has two bits of old forest in Seward and Schmitz Parks. 
Somebody valued those tall ol' trees. 

And then we have Everett (where I've had a couch parked for 27 years now). In 
Everett the aesthetic standard of trees was measured not by height, but length 
- as in board feet. My theory is that Seattle had a few civilized folks that 
actually lived where they worked, while Everett was largely started as a 
business trip run by big absentee lords of industry. At any rate, in Everett 
they cut every darn old tree down, and were proud of it. I've seen exactly one 
Doug-fir that might have been original growth - but probably it's a big second 
growth. 

Oh well. There are a few other lowland old forest remnants around; near 
Mountain Lake in Moran State Park on Orcas Island; a bit at Hoypus Point in 
Deception Pass State Park; and another bit at South Whidbey State Park - all 
with some nice big trees. Those are a few places I know of. Wonderful samples 
of original vegetation. 

As a native habitat freak, I was interested to read an article in the Port 
Townsend Leader back in April, about Fort Townsend State Park, just south of 
town. I'd driven by the turnoff to the place more than a hundred times and 
never checked it out till this spring. The article notes that the park has been 
designated a "Natural Forest Area" by the Washington State Natural Heritage 
Program (which has preserved many fine habitats in the state). Supposed to be 
one of the finest examples of a" mature forest of Douglas fir, Western Red 
cedar, and Western Hemlock, with an under-story of Pacific Rhododendron" in the 
Puget Sound region. 

So I've checked it out several times since. At first, on quickie walks around 
the edges, I was wondering what the big deal was. "Geez, Gibson, what an 
old-growth snob you've turned out to be!", I chided myself one day (I have 
spent a lot of time in various old growth forests in the hills), "you oughta 
check this place out some more!" And so I did. And soon I was farther into the 
forest, smiling. 

Old - growth? Well this forest got going a bit over 150 years ago, based on 
many of the older Doug firs around (I found some down logs to count rings on). 
A few older firs and a few largish cedars around, and lots of upcoming Hemlock 
and Cedar. In some areas of the forest there is a truly wonderful undergrowth 
of Pacific Rhododendron and lush Evergreen Huckleberry etc. - quite unlike the 
east side of the Sound. To see the tall Rhody's in bloom is quite the 
experience.This is a fine forest with a lot of plant diversity. ( the Peninsula 
Chapter of the Washington Native Plant Society has a good plant list for the 
place online). Lots of nice snags too - always good to see. 

I have heard, and seen many Douglas Squirrels there, which always make me feel 
better - also saw several shrews one day. Most of the walks I've taken have 
been in the recent summer bird doldrums, but have seen such forest dwellers as 
Ravens, Pileated and Hairy Woodpeckers, Brown Creepers, RB Nuthatches, Red 
Crossbills, Pacific Wren and Juncos. 

In the darkest, densest parts of the forest, especially on calm days, I have a 
sense of lurking fungi down in the duff - places that look like a mushroom 
about to happen. Just add water. Could happen any week now. 

Anyway, the place is crisscrossed by trails, each allowing unique perspectives 
of this fine forest. You might wanna check it out. 

Jeff Gibsonforest freak, inPort Townsend Wa

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Subject: Re: no Sabine's on Sunday @ Sammamish
From: Rick Forsman <rjforsman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 12:28:53 -0700
He's out there preening on the floating 5 mph buoy on the right 
At 12:25 pm now that's getting lucky on your lunchtime!

Bird On !!!

Rick forsman
RjforsmanAThotmailDOTcom
Fall city Wa.

> On Sep 21, 2014, at 4:39 PM, "Joe Sweeney"  wrote:
> 
> I also did NOT see the Sabine's Gull from the boat launch off of East Lake 
Sammamish Parkway. 

> I was there on Sunday, 9/21/14, from 11am to 12:30pm, then after a lunch 
break I returned to the boat launch for another session of not seeing the 
Sabine's from 1pm to 2:15pm. 

> 
> Joe Sweeney
> NE Seattle
> sweeneyfit at mac dot com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Four Fine Hours @ Rattlesnake Lake (including a Merlin !)
From: L Markoff <canyoneaglej AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 09:21:58 -0700
Recently, I saw a Merlin that looked to similar to Barb's when I was in the
Okanogan NF.  The bird was silent as it flew in from behind me.  It perched
at the top of a tree for a few moments, then flew off.  Like Barb, I too am
curious about the sub-species of the bird that I saw, in case anyone has an
opinion.  Bird is seen in photos 3 and 4 of this photo set:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/canyoneagle/0W79r0/

Thanks,

Lori Markoff
Eugene, OR
canyoneagle AT comcast.net
​

On Sun, Sep 21, 2014 at 4:40 PM, Barbara Deihl 
wrote:

> 2 Turkey Vultures, an Osprey, perfect temps, blue sky, turquoise lake,
> striking cliffs, people enjoying a relaxing afternoon, and then, out of the
> corner of my eye, I spotted a fast-flying falcon heading after a few
> crows.  Right down there on the 'beach' of stones, rocks and stumps, Merlie
> took a break, allowing me seconds to capture a shot, while it sat on a
> stone. People were in the area, but no one paid the birds any heed except
> me.  One whistling gentleman walked out towards the Merlin, causing it to
> lift off, but it was very exciting to see, hear and watch the small falcon.
>
> Link to Flickr album with scenics and one photo of the Merlin below.
> I figured it was a young Merlin, as it was chasing crows, an activity
> usually reserved for adults during nesting season, and it was practicing
> one of the Merlin calls (not the kee-kee-kee - a quicker, repetitive one).
> Adult Merlins usually don't vocalize like that much in the off-season.
> Anyone able to confirm my assessment (or dispute it) ?  Any guesses as to
> sub-species?
>
> https://flic.kr/s/aHsk3oc6hM
>
>
> Barb Deihl
> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
> barbdeihl AT comcast.net
>
>
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Subject: Western Scrub-Jay in Maple Valley
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 07:02:00 -0700
Hello all,
My brother reports a WS Jay at his feeder - first time he has ever seen 
them there. I see from ebird that a couple have been seen in that area -
Wish they would come to Walla Walla - are being seen in the surrounding 
counties but the only record in WWCo. is from 34 years ago!
Good birding, MerryLynn

-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED
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Subject: ACOW field trip
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 21:01:55 -0700
Hey Tweets...After spending a warm and beautiful Saturday indoors in
meetings in Ocean Shores, approximately 25 members of the Audubon Council
of Washington joined me for a field trip in overcast and a bit windy
conditions, with highs only in the 60's. The goal was to end up at Bottle
Beach SP in time for the high tide spectacle.

We met at the North Jetty, where we were able to find three Wandering
Tattlers, a lifer for two of the women. We also had good looks at a Pacific
Loon, a first for me. We had more gulls than people for a change...summer
must be over...more Heermann's than the usual mix, and many groups of Brown
Pelicans flying over us as we stood on the jetty. American Pipits were a
constant in all three places we stopped.

Our second stop was at the Hoquiam STP, hoping to re-find the Sharp-tailed
Sandpiper, but no luck on that. We did get decent views of a dowitcher,
more pipits, Killdeer, a gorgeous Stilt Sandpiper, some Westerns, Barn
Swallows, and the usual suspects on the ponds.

Finally we arrived at Bottle Beach only to find we were pretty much too
late to catch the rising tide, despite arriving two hours before high tide.
This has happened to me the last 4 or 5 times I have been to Bottle Beach,
and I am going to suggest arriving even earlier from now on.

Despite the water being pretty darned high, we were able to watch restless
flocks of Black-bellied Plover, unable to settle for long, and a nice group
of about 17 Marbled Godwits that wanted to land on our beach but we were in
their way so they headed for Westport. Just not enough space left!

A couple of our party decided to head for Midway Beach to see if they could
locate the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper that Steve Giles found there
yesterday...thanks for the report Steve! I think several people headed
there instead of Hoquiam, and a recent post here justified that decision. I
would loved to have done so myself but had other commitments.

Other things to note, two of our guests were out on the balcony of their
Ocean Shores motel Saturday when a Brown Booby flew over them, headed
south. There was no doubt in their mind it was a Brown Booby. (Matt, do I
get to count it?)
Given the last Brown Booby report was at the mouth of the Frazier River on
Sept 13th, and one off Tacoma on Sept 9th, I have to wonder what is going
on?

And, just an aside....I stopped briefly at the Hoquiam STP on Saturday on
my way into Olympia and ran into Ed Newbold and Delia...always a
delight...all of us hoping for the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (no luck), but
managed to see and hear a circling Red-tailed Hawk. Yes, I frequently see
them in my travels around the coast to south sound areas, but I have seldom
heard them making their distinctive call, so it started my day off on the
right foot...old friends, good birds, and great poetry (with Robert Michael
Pyle in a man skirt!)...what could be better?

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Skagit birds
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 19:49:05 -0700
Dear Tweeters,

Today, 21 September 2014, was a good day for birding in Skagit County.

At the Jensen Access was a Marbled Godwit and a Western Meadowlark.

At DeBay's Slough was a Solitary Sandpiper, plus four Ring-necked Ducks.

Bay View Cemetery had lots of birds in the late afternoon, including a Great 
Horned Owl. 


Yours truly,

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Subject: Eide Rd & Island County Sandhill Cranes
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 19:44:59 -0700
Hello Tweets,
My daughter and I made a run up to Stanwood this afternoon in hopes of
picking up some good shorebirds around high tide. At Eide Rd a pair of
Sandhill Cranes flew in and were hanging out by the large pond. They
eventually flushed and flew west over the county into Island County.
Sandhill Crane is apparently a code 5 for Island County.

Other than that the place was pretty dead. The only shorebirds were a
handful of Killdeer and 3 LB Dowitchers. There were more Starlings then
I've ever seen in one place. Easily 1000.

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Sharp tailed sandpiper, midway ponds , grayland., SUNDAY sept. 21
From: Maxine Reid <baconmf AT mail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 19:38:46 -0700
We saw this beautiful guy at 5:30 pm.
There were 10 pectorals on the edge of the pond who eventually flew away.
Then the sharpie appeared out of the grass onto the pond edge for great views.
Also~ 2 dozen Wilson's snipes and 1 american bittern there at 8:30 am .
Good birding, Maxine Reid 

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Subject: Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Theler Wetlands
From: John Riegsecker <jriegsecker AT pobox.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 17:45:31 -0700
There was a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Theler Wetlands this afternoon:
http://skygardener.zenfolio.com/p1023697513/h25CF124B#h25cf124b

In the restored area, just after you come out of the "tunnel of trees." 
  As a rule, the most activity in the restored area occurs during a 
rising tide.

John Riegsecker
jriegsecker at pobox dot com
Gig Harbor, WA

-- 
John Riegsecker
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Subject: Basin birding
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 17:18:19 -0700
Hey tweets!

I hit mostly Grant and Douglas counties this weekend looking for shorebirds and 
other migrants. Grant didn't have anything too unusual, but a Steller's Jay at 
Oasis park in Ephrata was a surprise. Most of my time was spent in Douglas with 
the following highlights: 


Jolly's Pond - Baird's Sandpiper 3

Jameson Lake - Wilson's warbler, townsends warbler, hermit thrush, ruby-crowned 
and golden-crowned Kinglets, Osprey. 


Waterville STP - Pectoral and Baird's Sandpiper.

Douglas Creek- yellow-breasted Chat, Nashville Warbler, Virginia Rail, 
Townsend's Solitaire, Bewick's Wren, red-naped Sapsucker. The campsite, 
incidentally, was one of the most idyllic I've visited. Stars, crickets and 
falling apples. There was enough fallen apple wood to make a little fire. 


Pipits, yellow rumps and white crowned sparrows everywhere, and honey crisps 
for 1 dollar a pound. Great trip! 


Tim--Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Roundup
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 17:14:00 -0700
Western Grebes (code 2) are finally swimming their way south into Edmonds 
waters. I had 50+ from the Water Street public access and 3 from Sunset Avenue 
on Saturday afternoon. Surf Scoters are now around in small numbers. There have 
been two sightings of Common Terns (code 3) and several sightings of a 
Parasitic Jaeger (code 3). Last Thursday there were 40+ Bonaparte's Gulls (code 
2) in the offshore waters. Heermann's Gull numbers seem to be holding at 
150-200 right now. Two Ancient Murrelets (code 2) were spotted from the public 
pier on Friday morning. There were 75 Red-necked Phalaropes (code 3) seen from 
Water Street on September 11th. An Eared Grebe (code 4) was seen in the 
Underwater Park on September 10th. 


There have been consistent sightings of Common Yellowthroats, Savannah 
Sparrows, and Lincoln's Sparrows in the marsh vicinity over the last couple of 
weeks. On September 10th there was a Mourning Dove (code 4) around the marsh. 
Two Western Scrub-Jays (code 4) were seen there a week or so ago. This morning 
we had our first Golden-crowned Sparrow of fall. Along with one Western 
Sandpiper this morning, there were two Greater Yellowlegs (code 3) in the 
marsh. 


We are at 171 species for the year.

Carol Riddell
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Subject: Four Fine Hours @ Rattlesnake Lake (including a Merlin !)
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:40:23 -0700
2 Turkey Vultures, an Osprey, perfect temps, blue sky, turquoise lake, striking 
cliffs, people enjoying a relaxing afternoon, and then, out of the corner of my 
eye, I spotted a fast-flying falcon heading after a few crows. Right down there 
on the 'beach' of stones, rocks and stumps, Merlie took a break, allowing me 
seconds to capture a shot, while it sat on a stone. People were in the area, 
but no one paid the birds any heed except me. One whistling gentleman walked 
out towards the Merlin, causing it to lift off, but it was very exciting to 
see, hear and watch the small falcon. 


Link to Flickr album with scenics and one photo of the Merlin below.
I figured it was a young Merlin, as it was chasing crows, an activity usually 
reserved for adults during nesting season, and it was practicing one of the 
Merlin calls (not the kee-kee-kee - a quicker, repetitive one). Adult Merlins 
usually don't vocalize like that much in the off-season. Anyone able to confirm 
my assessment (or dispute it) ? Any guesses as to sub-species? 


https://flic.kr/s/aHsk3oc6hM


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: no Sabine's on Sunday @ Sammamish
From: Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit AT mac.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:38:36 -0700
I also did NOT see the Sabine's Gull from the boat launch off of East Lake 
Sammamish Parkway. 

I was there on Sunday, 9/21/14, from 11am to 12:30pm, then after a lunch break 
I returned to the boat launch for another session of not seeing the Sabine's 
from 1pm to 2:15pm. 


Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
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Subject: Skagit County birding highlights
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:13:14 -0700
Tweeters:
 
Had a few highlights today at the Skagit WMA and nearby. Near the end of the 
south fork off the main dike trail, there was a N. WATERTHRUSH that responded 
to pishing about 75 yards from the end of the trail. There were many 
YELLOW-RUMPS here and the bird jumped up on a low dead branch, but try as I 
might, I could not nail the photo. The next 50 yards north of this spot had a 
HOUSE WREN and a late WILLOW FLYCATCHER as well. 

 
At Jensen about 2:30 pm, there was a vocalizing PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER and a 
possible Palm Warbler that I could not pish into view. 

There were 50+ AM. PIPITS on the fields here and two HORNED LARKS. At Rosario 
Beach, a single CASSIN'S AUKLET joined 900+ COM. MURRES, a high count; about 
250 HEERMANN'S GULLS were also present. 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com   
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Subject: RE: Band-Tailed Pigeon mixing with EC Dove?
From: mary hrudkaj <mch1096 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 14:25:09 -0700
Almost every Spring for the past three years I've had a E C Dove with a flock 
of band-tailed pigeons. It's here for a couple days then departs for who knows 
where while the BTPigs stay around to breed. Haven't seen any cross-breeds 
fortunately. 

 
Mary Hrudkaj
Belfair/Tahuya
 
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 12:33:44 -0700
From: xjoshx AT gmail.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Band-Tailed Pigeon mixing with EC Dove?

Hello Tweets,Earlier this morning I was outside with playing my daughter when a 
flock of about ten Band-Tailed Pigeon's flew over heading south. One bird was 
of similar size and shape to the BT's, but obviously much lighter. My immediate 
thought was Eurasian-Collared, but I only got the bird in my binoculars for a 
few seconds and I couldn't ascertain if it had any of the field marks for that 
species. What puzzled me is that I have seen EC Doves mix with Mourning Doves, 
but I've never seen them mix with the more forest dwelling BT Pigeons. I was 
just curious if anyone had witnessed EC Doves mixing with Band-Tailed Pigeons 
before? 

Other highlights of the morning included a singing Golden-Crowned Kinglet, and 
distant calling Pileated Woodpecker, and a few Pine Siskins flying over which 
were my first of the year. Last Sunday I had my first ever flyover of Evening 
Grosbeaks. 

Josh AdamsLynnwood, WA

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Subject: Re: | Union Bay Watch | 520 Eagle Watch |
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 13:58:10 -0700
Ronda,

I do not think anyone knows for sure where the eagles go in August and 
September, however last year Martin Muller added a comment to the Oct. 6th 2013 
post that told about a young eagle heading north in August. You can read it 
here: 


http://www.unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2013/10/520-eagles-waxwing-invasion.html

What I do know is they usually hang around until their young learn to fly. 
Since there were no young in the Broadmoor nest this year it seemed like they 
left sometime in July instead of mid-to-late August. Last year my first 
sighting of the returning parents was on September 30th. It will be interesting 
to see when they show up this year. 


Have a great day on Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net


On Sep 21, 2014, at 8:17 AM, Ronda Stark wrote:

> Larry,
> 
> Do you have any idea where Eva and Albert spend their summer vacation? The 
eagles from St.Edwards seem to be year round residents so I was surprised to 
hear Eva and Albert are not. 

> 
> Ronda
> 
> On Sat, Sep 20, 2014 at 12:27 PM, Larry Hubbell  
wrote: 

> Tweeters,
> 
> How long do you think it takes a Great Blue Heron to capture its prey and 
raise it out of the water? This week's post walks frame by frame through the 
process. The speed involved may be surprising. 

> 
> http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/09/striking-speed.html
> 
> On another note, When do you think the 520 eagles, Eva and Albert, will 
return from their summer vacation? 

> 
> Have a great day on Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!
> 
> Larry Hubbell
> ldhubbell at comcast dot net
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> 
> 
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Subject: Re: Mt. Rainier - Sunrise
From: "Phil Pickering" <philliplc AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 13:24:31 -0700
I was also in the Sunrise area Sept. 19-20, dayhiking
to Panhandle Gap and above on the 19th, and Third
Burroughs Mt. on the 20th.

Raptors noted combined for the 2 days -

1 Northern Harrier 
1 Sharp-shinned
2 Cooper's
10+ Red-tailed
1 Rough-legged
1 Golden Eagle 
1 Kestrel
1 Prairie Falcon

Other than Pipits passerines weren't numerous on the
way up to Panhandle Gap on the 19th.

On the 20th about 8-9 AM I hit a nice stream of migrant
passerines moving above timberline up and over the
shaded north slope of First Burroughs - hundreds of
Yellow-rumps along with smaller numbers of Horned
Larks, Golden-crowned Sparrows and other expected
species.

Also fun was a pure flock of about 12 Solitaires flying
past at eye level over the summit of Third Burroughs
at about 7800 ft.

Phil Pickering
Lincoln City, Oregon
philliplc AT charter.net
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Subject: No Sabine's Gull
From: "Louise Rutter" <louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 13:23:03 -0700
I spent a couple of very pleasant hours not finding a Sabine's gull at Lake
Sammamish State Park this morning, between 9.30 and 11.30. I started at the
boat launch, spent an hour at the main park, then returned to the boat
launch again. It was sunny and warm, and I watched a peregrine chasing two
shorebirds. The shorebirds were in too much of a hurry for me to name them. 

 

On the way home, I made a stop at Marymoor, just in case. I didn't find a
Sabine's gull there either, but there's a lot of lake between the two.

 

Louise Rutter

Kirkland
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Subject: Band-Tailed Pigeon mixing with EC Dove?
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 12:33:44 -0700
Hello Tweets,
Earlier this morning I was outside with playing my daughter when a flock of
about ten Band-Tailed Pigeon's flew over heading south. One bird was of
similar size and shape to the BT's, but obviously much lighter. My
immediate thought was Eurasian-Collared, but I only got the bird in my
binoculars for a few seconds and I couldn't ascertain if it had any of the
field marks for that species. What puzzled me is that I have seen EC Doves
mix with Mourning Doves, but I've never seen them mix with the more forest
dwelling BT Pigeons. I was just curious if anyone had witnessed EC Doves
mixing with Band-Tailed Pigeons before?

Other highlights of the morning included a singing Golden-Crowned Kinglet,
and distant calling Pileated Woodpecker, and a few Pine Siskins flying over
which were my first of the year. Last Sunday I had my first ever flyover of
Evening Grosbeaks.

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Lewis's Woodpecker at Point no Point
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 11:29:10 -0700
Hi All,

Add one more lowland western Washington Lewis's Woodpecker for this 
fall. Yesterday in the Point no Point area I had one at the east end of 
the Gust Halvor Road. This is on the "backside" of the point as the 
access road to the county park trail that connects up to the lighthouse. 
Look at the tops of the dead alder snags near the Gray house (entry 
drive lined with birch trees) at the top of the hill on the south side 
of the road. Ken Brown had it early this morning so it is still in the area.

Cheers and good birding,

Brad Waggoner
Bainbridge Island, Washington
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Subject: Bassett Park
From: David Parent <dpdvm AT whidbey.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:57:06 -0700
A brief stop - 1/2 hour - in the VERY birdy Bassett Park in Washtucna this 
morning yielded Northern Waterthrush by the stream, Blackpoll Warbler and 
American Redstart. 


Dave Parent dpdvm AT whidbey.com

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Subject: Yellowlegs vs. Stickleback?
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 08:04:35 -0700
Hank, 
Thanks for the entertaining and interesting video of a Yellowlegs trying to 
choke down a fish.Better to try to choke down a fish, than to actually choke on 
a fish, which I think could've happened in this situation. 

That's because it looks to me like that fish is a Three-spined Stickleback - 
about the right size, shape, and habitat (they live in fresh/brackish/ or salt 
water). Interesting how the Yellowlegs just can't quite close the deal - the 
fish just keeps getting stuck, even though it didn't look too big, and that's 
exactly what the gnarly spines on a stickleback are for - swallow prevention. 

Smallish fish-eating birds ( like european Kingfisher, and Little Grebe) have 
been found dead with Sticklebacks stuck in their craw. So maybe, if indeed that 
was a Stickleback, it was a win/win situation for fish and Yellowlegs. 

Thanks for all of your photos and videos on tweeters!
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Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 04:17:20 -0700
Hey tweets, a gagglet of Greater White-fronted Geese (3 to be exact) has been 
hanging out with a large Canada Goose flock for the past few days. The flock 
likes to graze near the helipad in the early morning and then either flies to 
the marina to dabble or breaks up into smaller groups, at which point, it's 
almost impossible to relocate the White-fronteds. This is the largest number of 
Greater White-fronteds we've seen at the Fill in many a year. 


Green Herons have been much in evidence lately, foraging and flying from the 
Turtle Logs to Main Pond to SW Pond. At least one is a juvenile, so we had some 
nesting success this year. I'm always glad when that happens. The Fill, you 
know, was the site of the first Washington breeding record, back in 1938. 


In other news, the Yellow-rumped Warblers are back, though still in small 
numbers. 


Increasing numbers of winter ducks are appearing (to make up for our loss of 
summer ducks and songbirds): American Wigeons, Green-winged Teals, Ring-necked 
Ducks, and Northern Shovelers. 


The Double-crested Cormorants are back to roosting in the tall cottonwoods 
along the Montlake Cut in the evening and early morning, when they aren't 
clinging precariously to the light standards over the baseball diamond - always 
a miracle they can stick onto such chrome-like surfaces. 


Lastly, I'd like to remind you all that Friends of Yesler Swamp and UW Botanic 
Gardens are celebrating a ribbon-cutting ceremony today (Sunday) from 2-4 p.m. 
to highlight the construction of a good part of the boardwalk through the 
swamp. There will be free food (Cajun jambalaya), a steel drum band, beer, and 
guided walks through the swamp. Everyone is welcome. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Golden leaves drifting in fall, 
floating on soft wind, 
you leave bare boughs behind 
but give new life to the soil, 
making me happy and sad.

- Connie, Seattle

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Subject: Long-tailed Jaeger Whatcom county
From: FanterLane <fanterlane AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 21:41:14 -0700
Hi tweeters,
This afternoon I observed a adult long-tailed Jaeger make a pass by Sandy Point 
at 2:40 pm. After chasing some Mew Gulls the bird flew south across Lummi Bay. 
I was there for about and 1:40 minutes, with a signal Hermann's Gull and 8 
common murres being the other highlights. Identification notes are on ebird as 
well as the full checklist. 


I also had a MacGillivray's Warbler on my rd this morning witch is the first 
I've seen there this fall. 


Good birding,
Fanter Lane
Acme WA 
fanterlane AT gmail.com

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Subject: Yellowlegs trying to choke down a fish at Wylie Slough
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 21:27:59 -0700
> 
> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15107349650/
> 
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
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Subject: Mt. Rainier - Sunrise
From: Marcus Roening <Marcus.D.Roening AT gsk.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 04:03:54 +0000
Hi Tweets,

 A drop dead gorgeous day on the mountain today. Heather and I arrived a little 
after 9am and the meadows on the approach road was a playground of raptors. 


We had 4 Red-tailed Hawks all chasing each other, then 2 Merlin's joined in the 
fray and then 8 Common Ravens (I know, not raptors...) doing loops and barrel 
rolls around the whole group. It felt like an Air Show. 


So we switched our plans and hiked east on Sourdough Ridge to Dege Peak. A nice 
hike with almost no one else on the trail. 


The nice surprise from Dege Peak was an Immature Golden Eagle that we 
identified from above on the ridge, first perched in profile and later flying 
away from us. We never actually even saw the underside of the wings - a rather 
unique experience. 


Only perching birds in numbers were the Pipits and one small flock of Evening 
Grosbeaks, which we've only seen up there a couple of times before. 


Good Birding,


Sent from my iPad

Marcus Roening, 
Tacoma. WA

Marcus.d.roening at gsk.com

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Subject: Sharp Tailed Sandpiper
From: Steve Giles <giles.steve AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 20:53:24 -0700
Hello all,

This morning a number of birders were disappointed that the Sharp Tailed 
Sandpiper could not be found at the Hoquiam STP. I left there at 10:30 and 
worked my way over to Ocean Shores and then backtracked to Westport and South. 


 

Between 3:45 and 4:45 I visited the ponds at the end of Midway Beach Rd and 
re-found the Sharp Tailed Sandpiper originally reported by Marv Breece. There 
was also an American Bittern there and two Blue-Winged Teal. 


 

Good birding

Steve Giles

Seattle
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Subject: De"Beaching" (con't) / Caryn / Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 17:03:46 -0700
Sorry Tweeters - sent this too soon in error...

>> Just now (now was at 4pm) as I was holding the ladder for hubby we saw a 
what I think was a Red Tail hawk. A nice soar overhead with light filtering 
through the fan-shaped tail. 


This reminded me of our stop at Willipa NWR on the way home from Long Beach - 
two Red-Tails soaring overhead. It was interesting to watch how they used their 
tails to maneuver and could hear them conversing. 


Actually, before we got to that point, not far out of Long Beach, we saw a pair 
of Wild Turkeys (my husbands favorite hooch btw). Pulled over and started to 
get closer to take a photo and they walked right up to me. Do people know of a 
pet wild turkey farm? A lovely feather was left for me along side the road. 


Back in Wedgwood for a few days - today I saw a female robin and a juvenile in 
one of the birdbaths - haven't seen many robins at all lately. I think there 
was some bathing lessons going on. 


Also a nice flock of bushtits streamed by, reminding me of the Sooty 
Shearwaters at the beach. It's nice to be home with our hummers, towhees and 
other visitors (still seeing the BHGB). The getaway was great but glad to be 
home in our own little habitat. 


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Subject: Raptor flyover / De"Beaching"
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 16:38:25 -0700
Just now ( now was at 4pm)as I was holding the ladder for hubby we saw a what I 
think was a red tail hawk. A nice soar with light 


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Subject: Re: Sabine Gull 2:30 pm Sat.
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 18:35:03 -0400
Thanks for posting Diane. As of the time of this post Josh Adams and I are 
having killer views at the boat launch. 


Tom Mansfield at Sammamish State Park boat launch

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 20, 2014, at 3:00 PM, Diane W 
> wrote: 


I saw the Sabine’s Gull by the Lake Sammamish State Park boat ramp off of E. 
Lake Sammamish Parkway at 2:30. I was also there earlier around 12:30, but 
missed the gull at that time. 


Beautiful bird!

Diane Weinstein
Issaquah
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Subject: Sabine Gull 2:30 pm Sat.
From: "Diane W" <diane_weinstein AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 14:58:13 -0700
I saw the Sabine’s Gull by the Lake Sammamish State Park boat ramp off of E. 
Lake Sammamish Parkway at 2:30. I was also there earlier around 12:30, but 
missed the gull at that time. 


Beautiful bird!

Diane Weinstein
Issaquah  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Crow roost at UW Bothell
From: <hjnoble AT igc.org>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:43:51 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
Hi Tweets,

Have the Crows returned to their roost just
east of the UW Bothell campus?

Thanks
Henry
North part of Seattle
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Subject: Hoquiam and ocean shores question
From: Mitch <biglou22 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 12:33:31 -0700
I was thinking about heading to the coast and was wondering if I will need
a spotting scope to see all the goodies people have been posting lately, or
will bins be sufficient? Thanks for the help. You can reply off thread if
you would rather

Mitchell (Woodinville)
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Subject: Union Bay Watch | Striking Speed
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 12:27:38 -0700
Tweeters,

How long do you think it takes a Great Blue Heron to capture its prey and raise 
it out of the water? This week's post walks frame by frame through the process. 
The speed involved may be surprising. 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/09/striking-speed.html

On another note, When do you think the 520 eagles, Eva and Albert, will return 
from their summer vacation? 


Have a great day on Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of Sept. 21, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 12:04:02 -0700
Hey, Tweets!It's a bird, it's a plane, it's ... a fish?! Check out this strange 
gallery from a new book about flying fish: 
http://bit.ly/XRVV3N-------------------------------------------------Last week, 
BirdNote aired:* The Golden Eagles of Ireland - A Success 
Storyhttp://bit.ly/Z23HJN* The Pungent Mudflat, Teeming with 
Lifehttp://bit.ly/OfTh2b* Ravens and Crows - Who's Who?http://bit.ly/UycGKL* 
Night-time Flights of Songbirdshttp://bit.ly/1v3mluv* Snail Kite - A Bird of 
the Evergladeshttp://bit.ly/1DoOmm7* Pirates and Parrots - Talk Like a Pirate 
Dayhttp://bit.ly/Og3dsD* Mono Lake - Seeking a 
Balancehttp://bit.ly/1uo0n4R------------------------------------------------------------View 
the photos and links for next week's shows:   
http://bit.ly/1DoOxxC------------------------------------------------------------Find 
us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for 
birdnoteradio=========================================You can listen to the 
mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly 
mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website. 
http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+ episodes and more than 500 videos in 
the archive.Thanks for listening!Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote 
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Subject: Sabine's now at East Lake Sammamish boat launch
From: Pamela Girres <girresp AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 11:15:06 -0700
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Subject: Sabine's now
From: Pamela Girres <girresp AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 10:55:28 -0700
Looking at the Sabines doing aerial displays off the boat launch off East
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Subject: Migrants and accidentals
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 07:26:58 +0000
A good move of migrants today observed during my morning tea on the deck - I 
even changed my chair to face north to see a stream of raptors moving overhead. 
Between 8:00 and 9:30 I observed: 

 
Golden Eagle, mature and calling - realized he was being harassed by a 
Peregrine Falcon 

2 more Peregrines - one made a brief stop at a snag below the house and 
surveyed the feeders until she realized I was sitting next to them 

3 Sharp-shinned Hawks
2 Cooper's Hawks
12 Greater White Fronted Geese
31 Turkey Vultures (I think 1/2 of these might have been locals that are here 
all summer) 

200-300 American Robins
2 Black-Throated Grey Warblers
3 Wilson's Warblers
1 Townsend's Warbler
30 Red Crossbills (again, maybe residents)
15-20 Red Breasted Nuthatches - interested to see how many stay for the winter 
- many storing sunflower seeds 

5 Swainson's Thrush
11 Red-tailed Hawks
3 Bullock's Orieles
 
Later on a walk along the dike near Steigerwald I had 37 American White 
Pelicans 

1 Sabine's Gull (a Beauty)
5 Greater White Fronted Geese (flyover)
50 Bushtits
An unidentified Warbler that I want to call Chestnut Sided - but not sure of ID
1 Eastern Kingbird (late?)
 


Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58°N 122.44°W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 


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Subject: Vaux's Happening
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 23:35:32 -0700
For the last three evenings there's been 40,000 Vaux's Swifts roosting in our 
two monitored roost sites north of San Francisco. It's been an early and 
intense migration for these small birds and we would like to keep an eye on how 
many are still coming in from Canada. Keith Wiggers documented nearly 9000 
tonight at Old Northern State in Sedro Woolley. But we need help up there. 


Vaux's Happening wants you. Send me an email and get scheduled for a wildlife 
encounter you will never forget. 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: White-throated Sparrow and Fox Sparrow Discovery Bay
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 22:50:02 -0700
Yesterday I viewed a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW here in Gardiner on Discovery
Bay.  I was at the edge of my yard and "pished" and got two FOX SPARROW to
show themselves.  A smaller sparrow was visible in a wild cherry tree.  It
looked like a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and sure enough with great views
through my scope I watched a tan striped bird sitting quietly in the tree.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Skagit Ruff continues
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 21:13:46 -0700
> 
> Thanks to birder Mark from Seattle, Karen and I saw the Ruff at Wylie Slough 
today at about 1:30 p.m. We don't know Mark's last name, but we have run into 
him birding at Big Morongo, CA; Sacramento or thereabouts; Eide Road and now 
Wylie Slough. 

> 
> Photo:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15270710396/
> 
> We parked at the Headquarters and headed right (west) on the trail. We were 
standing about 1/2 to where the trail splits when we saw the Ruff fly into the 
middle of the pond. 

> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: RE: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough
From: "Jeff Kozma" <jcr_5105 AT charter.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 20:17:21 -0700
Although adult wasps and hornets do eat nectar, they stuff the cells of the 
nests where they lay their eggs with paralyzed insects. For most species, that 
is caterpillars and spiders. Thus, wasps are beneficial to have around because 
their developing young feed on insects that are considered by many to be pests. 
Adults will also prey on other insects and yellowjackets also feed on carrion. 
For this reason, if you are stung by a yellowjacket, you should cleanse the 
area thoroughly. My wife was stung by one while camping a few years and she 
developed a nasty infection causing us to leave early and seek a doctor. Come 
to find out, there was a road killed deer up the road from our campsite where 
the hornet was most likely feeding. 


 

Jeff Kozma

 

Yakima

 

J c r underscore 5105 at charter dot net

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Harsi Parker 

Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 9:12 AM
Cc: Tweeters
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough

 

I just wanted to say "thank you" to Jill for trying to educate folks and 
encourage compassion and discernment when considering how we interact with 
wasps. 


 

Paper wasps really are extremely tolerant of us humans and we could attempt to 
reciprocate. :-) Though they are more aggressive and caution is warranted 
around their nests, Bald-faced Hornets are also nectarivorous and help to 
pollinate flowers. (For examples, see photos below where pollen is clearly 
covering the hairs of the body.) 


 

http://bugguide.net/node/view/614150/bgimage

http://bugguide.net/node/view/334785/bgimage

http://bugguide.net/node/view/145290/bgimage

 

 

All my best, 

Harsi Parker

Vashon, WA

 

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Jill Freidberg  > wrote: 


Those are paper wasps (also known as umbrella wasps). They are not aggressive, 
and because they eat flower nectar, they are also a beneficial pollinator. 
Unlike their nasty cousin, the Bald-faced Hornet, these little wasps rarely 
sting, even when you're right next to their nest. Please leave them be. 


Jill

________________________________________
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
 
[tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
 ] on behalf of Hank 
[hank.heiberg AT gmail.com  ] 

Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 6:15 AM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Warning:  wasp nest at Wylie Slough

>
> I should have thought to issue this warning earlier. When Karen and I were on 
the dike closest to the boat launch at Wylie Slough on 9/10, we found ourselves 
standing two feet from a wasp nest on a rock on the pond side of the trail. The 
wasp nest is right at ground level at the end of the dike nearest to the 
outhouse. 

>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15018149898/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Re: Skagit Ruff and Yellow-headed Blackbirds
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 20:03:36 -0700
Tweeters,
Also 4 Yellow-headed Blackbirds seen this afternoon along west dike
trail..
-- 
  barry Levine
  seattle
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

-- 
http://www.fastmail.fm - Access all of your messages and folders
                          wherever you are

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Subject: RE: Sabine's Gull at Lake Sammamish SP
From: Mason Flint <masonflint AT outlook.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 18:11:26 -0700
Tweets - I have the Sabine's Gull about 200 yards off the sandy beach at 6:10 
PM. 


Mason Flint
Bellevue

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Larry Schwitters
Sent: ‎9/‎19/‎2014 3:28 PM
To: Tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Sabine's Gull at Lake Sammamish SP

Juvenile bird at the end of the boardwalk, delta of Issaquah creek. 30 minutes 
ago. Very tame. 


Larry and Leora Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: A note from Orcas Island
From: "Gayle Benton" <gbenton AT rockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:31:12 -0700
Had an interesting bird stop for a drink and pass thru my yard today – in the 
19 years I’ve lived here, it’s the 1st one I’ve seen come thru here – a 
Townsend’s Solitaire. I’ve also wanted to report that I have had Pine Siskins 
here all summer. Early summer 1 showed up, and then 3, then a few more 
followed. I had between 5 and 10 here for the rest of the summer although they 
have thinned out now. 

Gayle Benton
Orcas Island, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: Rock Wren
From: tarajohn1 AT aol.com
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:24:37 -0700
A lovely view of a Rock Wren today on Mt. Scott, just east of Portland.
Tara O'Leary
Portland, Oregon

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Subject: Re: owls on the offensive
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 16:45:49 -0700

A few weeks ago I was dive-bombed by a juvenile barred owl in Olympia (Mission 
Creek Park). I had spotted it on a branch close to the ground right next to the 
trail. I backed up a good 30 feet and stood to watch it. It flew up to a higher 
branch and continued to stare at me, while screeching its god-awful begging 
call. Then, looking straight at me, it came at me with its talons out. I 
ducked, and it missed. I have observed barred owls at close range before and 
have never had this happen! After finishing my walk I came home and googled it, 
to discover this is not uncommon among immature barred owls, especially in the 
fall. And it seems they are more likely to attack people wearing headphones or 
with ponytails! 


--Jen  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Hoquiam STPs
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:57:20 -0700
Many of us saw the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper and the Stilt Sandpiper this morning, 
as Blair posted earlier. On my way home, I decided to stop by and see if they 
were still there. As of 3:30 pm they were, along with one Pectoral Sandpiper 
and the three Long-billed Dowitchers. Again, this is the northwest corner of 
the east pond. Hoping that many more of you get to tick this Sharp-tailed 
Sandpiper! 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: (Tweeters) What to do with a dead bird
From: Andrew McCormick <andy_mcc AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:58:54 -0700
Hello Tweets, 
This questions comes up fairly frequently in calls to our Eastside Audubon 
office, so we developed a policy. 

Here is a link to it.
 
http://eastsideaudubon.org/birding/bird-emergencies/procedures-for-dead-birds-1
 
Andy McCormick
Eastside Audubon
Bellevue, WA
 
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Subject: Sabine's Gull, Longspur, Sparrows and more in PO
From: "Terry Little" <terry AT crossoverchurch.info>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 18:59:01 -0400

Hello,

I was hoping to catch some migration going on along the Pend Oreille River and 
Harvey Creek Rd to Bunchgrass Meadows. Turned out to be a pretty nice day. 


The fun started early this morning along the dike road at the Kalispell Indian 
Reservation. I found a LAPLAND LONGSPUR (county lifer - code 5) that allowed 
some really nice looks. 10 American Pipits, 2 Evening Grosbeaks, Horned Grebes 
(2), and a Cooper's Hawk were also seen along the dike. Just a few minutes 
later, while scoping the river for "whatever" I found a SABINE'S GULL (county 
lifer - I believe a county record) flying north of the dike road. Though the 
bird was a long ways off, the wing pattern was recognized as well as a 
distinctive flight pattern. All white tail suggests a basic plumaged adult. 


My next stop was at the mouth of LeClerc Creek. Here I found a number of 
migrants, especially a nice mixed sparrow flock that included Spotted Towhee, 
Song, White crowned, Lincoln's (3), Fox (2), WHITE THROATED (tan striped - 2), 
GOLDEN CROWNED (1 - county lifer). Also in the area was a Red naped Sapsucker, 
Ruby crowned Kinglet, Pine Siskins, and a Gray Catbird. 


Finally, I made it to Harvey Creek Rd (to Bunchgrass Meadows) a little later 
than I like. The trip up and back was overall not too birdy, but there were a 
few exceptions: NORTHERN GOSHAWK, Cooper's Hawk, Northern Pygmy Owl (3), BOREAL 
CHICKADEES (4), PINE GROSBEAK (1). 


Not a bad day.

Terry Little
Mead, Wa


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Subject: Sabine's Gull at Lake Sammamish SP
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:24:02 -0700
Juvenile bird at the end of the boardwalk, delta of Issaquah creek. 30 minutes 
ago. Very tame. 


Larry and Leora Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: Skagit Ruff
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:55:06 -0400
As of the time of this post Steve Giles and I are having great views of the 
Wiley Slough RUFF (despite the attentive PEFA). 


Tom Mansfield headed south. 

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Subject: Whidbey Avocet
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 14:05:28 -0400
As of the time if this post the AMAV continues feeding in the shallows at the 
east end of Crockett Lake at Keystone. 


Tom Mansfield on Whidbey

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Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk -- 9-18-2014
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:30:32 -0700
Tweeters,

Not as many species yesterday for the monthly Eagles Pride bird walk, but
the 16 of us had a good time. Noteworthy were the number of RED CROSSBILLS
(46), including one flock of 22, and the spotting of a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK at
the top of a cottonwood tree behind Hodge Lake. Leah said she happened to
see the leaves twitching in the slight breeze, put her bins on the area, and
found the bird, which is a first of this species noted during our walks. The
eBird report is at the bottom of this message.

 

NOTE: After the flurry of PINE SISKIN reports on Tweeters during the past
month, during which we had quite a few on our walk, they seemed to have
mostly disappeared. We found only three yesterday at Eagles Pride, and at my
home in Roy, after having as many as 25 coming to feeders every day, I now
have none. Is this a more widespread occurrence than just our local area? 

 

The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at
8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf
Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the
following:

.        October 16

.        November 20

.        December 18

 

Anyone is welcome to join!

 

Eagles Pride GC, Pierce, US-WA

Sep 18, 2014 8:15 AM - 12:05 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.5 mile(s)

Comments:     Overcast, with little to no breeze, 58 degrees F, and slightly
humid day following an overnight rain -- the first in a while. Initially, we
found very few birds, but two of our primary hotspots -- the powerline
corridor and the road behind Hodge Lake -- were very birdy with large
mixed-species flocks in both places. RED CROSSBILLS were particularly
evident from start to finish, with one flock of 22 birds seen between the
13th hole and the tee-box to #14. A highlight, and a first for this walk,
was the immature SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. How Leah spotted that bird astounded
everyone (including her son!), but good looks were had by all. In addition,
we also scoped an adult COOPER'S HAWK (only the second record for the walk
for this species) at the top of a tree near the Dupont housing area adjacent
to the JBLM property. Three BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLERS continued our
record of warblers seen in hotspot behind Hodge Lake. Last month, it was
Wilson's and Orange-crowned Warblers that were in the mixed-species flock.

32 species (+1 other taxa)

 

Wood Duck  2

Pied-billed Grebe  6     Found at the pond near the 4th (?) hole. These
could be the family of birds that we've seen the past two months on Hodge
Lake, where the adults presumably nested.

Great Blue Heron  3     Given our first sighting of this species was last
month, finding three today was a bonus.

Sharp-shinned Hawk  1

Cooper's Hawk  1

gull sp.  1

Mourning Dove  17

Anna's Hummingbird  1

Downy Woodpecker  1

Northern Flicker  4

Steller's Jay  13

American Crow  8

Black-capped Chickadee  25

Chestnut-backed Chickadee  2     Likely under-counted by at least an order
of magnitude, but these were confirmed sightings

Bushtit  24     In one large foraging party

Red-breasted Nuthatch  14

Brown Creeper  1

Pacific Wren  3

Golden-crowned Kinglet  26

American Robin  6

European Starling  24

Cedar Waxwing  3

Yellow-rumped Warbler  10

Black-throated Gray Warbler  3

Spotted Towhee  3

Song Sparrow  6

Lincoln's Sparrow  1

White-crowned Sparrow  8

Dark-eyed Junco  21

House Finch  6

Purple Finch  1

Red Crossbill  46

Pine Siskin  3

 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19875091

 

May all your birds be identified,

 

Denis DeSilvis

Roy, WA

avnacrs4birds at outlook dot com

 

 
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Subject: Hoquiam STP
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:27:26 -0700
Several of us have been watching both the Sharp Tailed and Stilt Sandpipers as 
of 10:30 am at NW corner of first (easternmost) pond. 



Blair Bernson
Edmonds_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough
From: Harsi Parker <hparker AT solaceimages.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:11:43 -0700
I just wanted to say "thank you" to Jill for trying to educate folks and
encourage compassion and discernment when considering how we interact with
wasps.

Paper wasps really are extremely tolerant of us humans and we could attempt
to reciprocate. :-) Though they are more aggressive and caution is
warranted around their nests, Bald-faced Hornets are also nectarivorous and
help to pollinate flowers. (For examples, see photos below where pollen is
clearly covering the hairs of the body.)

http://bugguide.net/node/view/614150/bgimage
http://bugguide.net/node/view/334785/bgimage
http://bugguide.net/node/view/145290/bgimage


All my best,
Harsi Parker
Vashon, WA

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Jill Freidberg  wrote:

> Those are paper wasps (also known as umbrella wasps). They are not
> aggressive, and because they eat flower nectar, they are also a beneficial
> pollinator. Unlike their nasty cousin, the Bald-faced Hornet, these little
> wasps rarely sting, even when you're right next to their nest. Please leave
> them be.
>
> Jill
>
> ________________________________________
> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu [
> tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] on behalf of Hank [
> hank.heiberg AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 6:15 AM
> To: Tweeters
> Subject: [Tweeters] Warning:  wasp nest at Wylie Slough
>
> >
> > I should have thought to issue this warning earlier.  When Karen and I
> were on the dike closest to the boat launch at Wylie Slough on 9/10, we
> found ourselves standing two feet from a wasp nest on a rock on the pond
> side of the trail.  The wasp nest is right at ground level at the end of
> the dike nearest to the outhouse.
> >
> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15018149898/
> >
> > Hank Heiberg
> > Lake Joy
> > Carnation, WA
> > hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough
From: Jill Freidberg <JFreidberg AT uwb.edu>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:16:03 +0000
Those are paper wasps (also known as umbrella wasps). They are not aggressive, 
and because they eat flower nectar, they are also a beneficial pollinator. 
Unlike their nasty cousin, the Bald-faced Hornet, these little wasps rarely 
sting, even when you're right next to their nest. Please leave them be. 


Jill

________________________________________
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] on behalf of Hank 
[hank.heiberg AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 6:15 AM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Warning:  wasp nest at Wylie Slough

>
> I should have thought to issue this warning earlier. When Karen and I were on 
the dike closest to the boat launch at Wylie Slough on 9/10, we found ourselves 
standing two feet from a wasp nest on a rock on the pond side of the trail. The 
wasp nest is right at ground level at the end of the dike nearest to the 
outhouse. 

>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15018149898/
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Re: Owls on the offensive
From: L Markoff <canyoneaglej AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 08:08:14 -0700
Barred Owl family groups may still be out there.  In the early hours of 9/6
while making my 7th (unsuccessful) attempt for Great Gray Owl, I
encountered a family of Barred Owls on NF-32 in Okanogan County.  They were
calling and flying about.  I saw at least two juvie birds and one of the
parents.  Knowing how protective BDOW parents are of their offspring, and
not having my hardhat on that day, I gave them a wide berth.   ;-)



Lori Markoff

Eugene, OR



-----Original Message-----

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu [
mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
] On Behalf Of Jack Stephens

Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2014 9:32 PM

To: Tweeters

Subject: [Tweeters] Owls on the offensive



I have had two non-birders ask me why owls are diving at, and occasionally
hitting, people walking through woodland areas. These are two different
locations, on Whidbey Island and in Mukilteo. I am not sure what species,
by report they are large so that would imply either Barred or Great Horned.
What puzzles me is that it is happening at this time of year. Nest defense
seems the obvious reason, but why would this be occurring now, long after
the young have presumably fledged? Could it be they were inspired by
late-night Hitchcock reruns? Could this be ARAB (Autumnal Recrudescence of
Amatory Behavior)? Any information is welcome.



Jack Stephens

Edmonds, WA

jstephens62 AT comcast.net

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​

On Thu, Sep 18, 2014 at 9:32 PM, Jack Stephens 
wrote:

> I have had two non-birders ask me why owls are diving at, and occasionally
> hitting, people walking through woodland areas. These are two different
> locations, on Whidbey Island and in Mukilteo. I am not sure what species,
> by report they are large so that would imply either Barred or Great Horned.
> What puzzles me is that it is happening at this time of year. Nest defense
> seems the obvious reason, but why would this be occurring now, long after
> the young have presumably fledged? Could it be they were inspired by
> late-night Hitchcock reruns? Could this be ARAB (Autumnal Recrudescence of
> Amatory Behavior)? Any information is welcome.
>
> Jack Stephens
> Edmonds, WA
> jstephens62 AT comcast.net
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: RE: Owls on the offensive
From: "owler AT sounddsl.com" <owler@sounddsl.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 07:11:36 -0700
These events are reported annually at this time of year. I had someone two 
weeks ago contact me from Virginia inquiring 

about a Barred Owl attack on a human.

While the ARAB theory may responsible, I also believe that these attacks have a 
lot to do with perceived territorial 

violations. Barred Owls have had their young dispersed for about a month now, 
and the youngsters are out seeking new 

territories. Resident Barred Owls are much more vocal now, as if by calling 
they announce to any juvies in the area 

that "this turf is taken; keep moving on". Adult Barred Owls that had young 
this past season are just now completing their 

molt (some of them, particularly the males as their molt pattern lags behind 
the females)are looking a bit ratty, especially 

about the head. Molting requires additional calories, which are now available 
to them since they are no longer feeding 

young. Following molt, they will begin packing on body mass in anticipation of 
next year's breeding cycle. Adults have 

experienced winter, and are most likely proactive in obtaining food while they 
can, also increasing their turf defensiveness. 


Preferred human targets seem to be women joggers with pony tails or ball caps. 
Most attacks occur in the early evening or 

early am. I would suspect that virtually all attacks on humans are done my 
adult owls (males?), though I have no proof. 

Juvies are rarely vocal at this time of year, and tend to keep a low profile 
when I conduct my surveys. 


-J. Acker
owler AT sounddsl.com
Bainbridge Island, WA 



------- Original Message -------
>From    : Jack Stephens[mailto:jstephens62 AT comcast.net]
Sent    : 9/18/2014 9:32:14 PM
To      : tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Cc      : 
Subject : RE: [Tweeters] Owls on the offensive

 I have had two non-birders ask me why owls are diving at, and 
occasionally hitting, people walking through woodland areas. These are 
two different locations, on Whidbey Island and in Mukilteo. I am not 
sure what species, by report they are large so that would imply either 
Barred or Great Horned. What puzzles me is that it is happening at this 
time of year. Nest defense seems the obvious reason, but why would this 
be occurring now, long after the young have presumably fledged? Could it 
be they were inspired by late-night Hitchcock reruns? Could this be ARAB 
(Autumnal Recrudescence of Amatory Behavior)? Any information is welcome.

Jack Stephens
Edmonds, WA
jstephens62 AT comcast.net
_______________________________________________
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 http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 


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Subject: Binoculars Found @ Bottle Beach
From: bill shelmerdine <georn1 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:59:42 +0000
Good morning All,
 
 A pair of binoculars with case was found at Bottle Beach on Friday, 12 Sep at 
about 220 pm. Please contact Scott Mills at millsgs AT aol.com or 412-7978. 

 
Bill Shelmerdine
Olympia WA
georn1 AT Hotmail.com
 
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Subject: Fw: Owls on the offensive
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 06:29:32 -0700

----- Forwarded Message -----
>From: Gary Bletsch 
>To: Jack Stephens  
>Cc: Tweeters-alerts  
>Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 6:24 AM
>Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Owls on the offensive
>  
>
>
>Dear Jack and Tweeters,
>
>
>I would bet that the attackers are Barred Owls. They are well known to do 
that. I don't recall hearing about Great Horned Owls (GHOW) doing this. Maybe 
they do, but I think it's rare. Whenever they've nested in popular parks and 
wildlife areas that I have frequented, the GHOWs just glare at the passersby 
and go about their business. 

>
>
>Barred Owls have been attacking people in the Anacortes Forest Lands for 
years. Soaring Eagle Park and some other parks in King County have had enough 
attacks that parks have been closed for periods of time. I have heard that 
Barred Owls go after female joggers; one hypothesis is that the ladies' 
ponytails might look like rodents. I am not making this up! 

>
>
>A Eurasian relative of the Barred Owl is the Ural Owl. The Scandinavians call 
it "Slaguggla," which translates to "attacking owl." Birders over there know 
not to approach the nest site if they value their eyeballs. 

>
>
>Yours truly,
>
>
>Gary
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>>________________________________
>> From: Jack Stephens 
>>To: Tweeters  
>>Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2014 9:32 PM
>>Subject: [Tweeters] Owls on the offensive
>>  
>>
>>I have had two non-birders ask me why owls are diving at, and 
>>occasionally hitting, people walking through woodland areas. These are 
>>two different locations, on Whidbey Island and in Mukilteo. I am not 
>>sure what species, by report they are large so that would imply either 
>>Barred or Great Horned. What puzzles me is that it is happening at this 
>>time of year. Nest defense seems the obvious reason, but why would this 
>>be occurring
 now, long after the young have presumably fledged? Could it 
>>be they were inspired by late-night Hitchcock reruns? Could this be ARAB 
>>(Autumnal Recrudescence of Amatory Behavior)? Any information is welcome.
>>
>>Jack Stephens
>>Edmonds, WA
>>jstephens62 AT comcast.net
>>_______________________________________________
>>Tweeters mailing list
>>Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>>http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>>
>>
>>    
>
>    _______________________________________________
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Subject: Warning: wasp nest at Wylie Slough
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 06:15:30 -0700
> 
> I should have thought to issue this warning earlier. When Karen and I were on 
the dike closest to the boat launch at Wylie Slough on 9/10, we found ourselves 
standing two feet from a wasp nest on a rock on the pond side of the trail. The 
wasp nest is right at ground level at the end of the dike nearest to the 
outhouse. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15018149898/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: RE: DEAD BIRDS in Tweeters Digest, Vol 121, Issue 18
From: Steve Krival <stevekrival AT live.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:28:42 -0700
About 15 years ago, the NOAA office in Port Angeles had a dead bird survey
program in which they relied heavily upon volunteers to routinely patrol
beaches throughout he Sound and coast of Washington. I believe their central
interest was in determining background levels of dead birds or all species
found on beaches in order to have a benchmark for comparison to man-made
disasters, and as a way of assessing natural changes in species population
levels. I don't know whether the program still exists, but they were quite
skilled in dead bird species identification. They had quiet specific
methods developed for handling and preserving specimens. I suspect that any
NOAA personnel or trained volunteer would be helpful in answering questions
about how to treat a dead bird.  

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Subject: Hoquaim STP Sharp-tailed Sandpiper continues
From: Brad Waggoner <wagtail24 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 23:02:13 -0700
Hi All,

The lovely Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Hoquiam STP continued this 
afternoon. The Stilt Sandpiper was still there along with a Pectoral 
Sandpiper, one juv. Short-billed Dowitcher and two juv. Long-billed 
Dowitcher - all in the nw. corner of the east pond near the "mallard 
roost".

Cheers and good birding,
Brad Waggoner
Bainbridge Island, Washington
mailto:wagtail24 AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: re: Owls on the Offensive
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:46:35 -0700
>From Seattle Audubon's Bird Web:

"Great Horned Owls are early nesters and begin calling in courtship in
early winter."
and
"Both parents feed and tend the young for several months, often as late as
September or October."
and
"Barred Owls are monogamous and form long-term pair bonds. These bonds are
maintained throughout the year, and pairs may defend their territories
year-round...."

So the GHO's are still tending their young...and Barred Owls defend their
territory year-round.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Owls on the offensive
From: Jack Stephens <jstephens62 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 21:32:14 -0700
I have had two non-birders ask me why owls are diving at, and 
occasionally hitting, people walking through woodland areas. These are 
two different locations, on Whidbey Island and in Mukilteo. I am not 
sure what species, by report they are large so that would imply either 
Barred or Great Horned. What puzzles me is that it is happening at this 
time of year. Nest defense seems the obvious reason, but why would this 
be occurring now, long after the young have presumably fledged? Could it 
be they were inspired by late-night Hitchcock reruns? Could this be ARAB 
(Autumnal Recrudescence of Amatory Behavior)? Any information is welcome.

Jack Stephens
Edmonds, WA
jstephens62 AT comcast.net
_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Re: getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds?
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 03:59:34 GMT
Our last Rufous Hummingbirds, in western Skamania County, were two juvenile 
males on Sept. 14th. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Pterodroma AT aol.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds?
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:50:31 -0400


One immature male Rufous Hummingbird is still hanging on and doesn't seem to 
show any signs of leaving anytime soon. It likes to perch on the top of the 
tallest crocosomia now dried seed head which is a perfect perch actually from 
which to fend off the Anna's and defend it's favorite little feeder only about 
3 feet away and just hangs out there all day long, day after day after day. 
It's getting late for Rufous and I haven't had one this late into September for 
a long long time although the latest date ever over here (Bellevue-Eastgate) 
was October 4 several years ago, so it will be fun to see how long this guy 
might last. The last time I saw an adult male here was way waay back on June 
28, but way more female/immature types persisted in much larger numbers than 
usual for this location through mid-August after which just the occasional 
sighting and this one immature male which first showed up a couple weeks ago. 
Anyone else still seeing Rufous Hummingbirds around? Richard RowlettBellevue 
(Eastgate), WA 
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-09-18
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 20:24:16 -0700
Tweets – It was dark and misty this morning, though we didn’t get rain or 
even drizzle, really. But it was dark, and it was QUIET, especially for the 
first couple of hours. Also rather steamy and moist, with temps in the 60’s, 
and humidity that you could practically wring out of the air. 


The big highlight were 3 JAEGERS that flew past the Lake Platform heading 
north. This wasn’t a total surprise, since we had a Jaeger fly north on the 
very same day of September, back in 2008. Our consensus was that today’s 
birds were LONG-TAILED JAEGERS, for they looked slim and had very long tails. 
Last year, we had a Long-tailed Jaeger on August 29th for our only other Jaeger 
sighting at the park. 


Other highlights:

Common Loon            One WELL out on the lake – First of fall
Osprey                        Still 2 over the lake
Bald Eagle                  Adult at lake, after 2 week summer vacation
Wilson’s Snipe           Again, 2 below weir
American Kestrel       1 over mansion area, 11:20 – First of fall
Merlin                        1 perched near mansion, 11:20 – First of fall
Willow Flycatcher      Last of the year? 1-2
Bl.-thr. Gray Warbler Grace saw 1, south end of Dog Meadow
HOUSE SPARROW      One at Compost Piles – First for 2014

In the last two years, we’ve had as many sightings of Jaegers (2) as House 
Sparrows :) 


For the day, 58 species. Misses today included Green Heron, Vaux’s Swift, 
Barn Swallow, and Yellow-rumped Warbler. 


I believe we’re up to 152 species for the year.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: A smart Steller's Jay at Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 18:28:20 -0700
There is a Steller's Jay in our yard that has discovered that if it sits on a 
particular forsythia branch, the branch lowers to the feeder providing a nice 
perch. It has done this several times. (Since I can't tell one Steller's Jay 
from the others, I suppose that more than one jay could be doing this.) 


> Video:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15260109496/
> 
Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Adult female peregrine, Island Girl, Heading South Again
From: Bud Anderson <falconresearch AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:58:30 -0700
She left her nesting area on Baffin Island yesterday, once again heading
for Chile to hopefully complete the southbound leg of her sixth
transcontinental migration with a GPS satellite transmitter.

You can follow her on this journey at www.frg.org. Select maps and Island
Girl to see her position three times a day during the next 6-8 weeks via
Google Earth.

Enjoy...

Bud Anderson
Falcon Research Group
Box 248
Bow, WA 98232
(360) 757-1911
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Subject: getting late for lingering Rufous Hummingbirds?
From: Pterodroma AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:50:31 -0400
 
One immature male Rufous Hummingbird is still hanging on and  doesn't seem 
to show any signs of leaving anytime soon.  It likes to perch  on the top of 
the tallest crocosomia now dried seed head which is a  perfect perch 
actually from which to fend off the Anna's and defend it's favorite little 
feeder 

only about 3 feet away and just hangs out there all day  long, day after 
day after day.  It's getting late for Rufous and I haven't  had one this late 
into September for a long long time although the latest date  ever over here 
(Bellevue-Eastgate) was October 4 several years ago, so it  will be fun to 
see how long this guy might last.  The last time I saw an  adult male here 
was way waay back on June 28, but way more female/immature types  persisted 
in much larger numbers than usual for this  location through mid-August after 
which just the occasional sighting  and this one immature male which first 
showed up a couple weeks ago.   Anyone else still seeing Rufous Hummingbirds 
around?
 
Richard Rowlett
Bellevue (Eastgate), WA_______________________________________________
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