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Updated on Thursday, April 2 at 05:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Pleskes Ground Jay,©BirdQuest

2 Apr Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Spring 2015 interim packet) [Matt Bartels ]
07 Mar Bats or owls? [Deborah ]
7 Mar Oak Creek Wildlife Area and vicinity ["Dave Hayden" ]
7 Mar Re: Jerdon's Babbler [Joshua Glant ]
7 Mar Jerdon's Babbler [Megan Lyden ]
7 Mar Issaquah Brambling []
7 Mar Short and Tweet Story, and Discovery Park Say's Phoebe question [Joshua Glant ]
07 Mar Re: Fill Update [Jane Hadley ]
7 Mar No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
7 Mar No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
07 Mar Rufus hummingbird [cyberpoo ]
7 Mar Scrub jay in Wallingford [Katie Sauter Messick ]
7 Mar Cartwheels in The Sky | Union Bay Watch [Larry Hubbell ]
7 Mar Olympic Bird Fest [Boekelheide ]
7 Mar FOY Rufous Hummer [Dianna Moore ]
7 Mar TUVU [Dianna Moore ]
7 Mar Possible Rufous Hummingbird in Yard [Joshua Glant ]
7 Mar Brambling still in Issaquah [Denny Granstrand ]
7 Mar No Sage sparrow Steigerwald [Bob ]
7 Mar No Sage sparrow Steigerwald [Bob ]
7 Mar Say's Phoebe, Discovery Park, Seattle ["Rachel Lawson" ]
7 Mar Back on the Lone Prairie [Jeff Gibson ]
7 Mar a lovely video to start off your weekend right! [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Mar Ocean Shores Friday morning ["Randy Hill" ]
6 Mar Kalama GLAUCOUS GULL ... [Lyn Topinka ]
6 Mar Magnuson Park, 6 March 2015 [Scott Ramos ]
6 Mar Magnuson Park PGCH [Scott Ramos ]
06 Mar MV HWY Bald Eagle Pair [elynde ]
6 Mar Re: Yacolt Monk Parakeets? [Bob ]
6 Mar Sno-Valley, One Wk. Later - 3/5/15 [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar FW: Feather ID Help Please ["Eric Kowalczyk" ]
6 Mar Yacolt Monk Parakeets? ["Rachel Lawson" ]
6 Mar (Clark Co.) western bluebird [Luke Hanes ]
6 Mar Raven in Sammamish ["Ned McGarry" ]
6 Mar Ravens [David Hutchinson ]
6 Mar Feather ID Help Please [Lydia Gaebe Bishop ]
6 Mar hermit thrush and pine siskins [Jennifer DeSelle ]
6 Mar WDFW is on the case (injured eagle) [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar link to photos of injured Bald Eagle [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar injured Bald Eagle on Fir Is. [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar Community Values [Jeff Gibson ]
6 Mar Washington CSWA and other vagrant warbler photos [Joshua Glant ]
6 Mar Brambling still visible 3/5/15 []
5 Mar Re: Is this a whooping crane? (sorry, I got so excited I forgot to give a link!) [Michelle Maani ]
5 Mar Tufted Duck / Woodland Bottoms [Cowlitz co] []
5 Mar My Formative Years [Jeff Gibson ]
5 Mar Is this a whooping crane? [Michelle Maani ]
5 Mar Re: Is this a whooping crane? (sorry, I got so excited I forgot to give a link!) [Michelle Maani ]
5 Mar Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2015-03-05 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
5 Mar Re: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Bob ]
5 Mar Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Bob ]
5 Mar Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Bob ]
5 Mar Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning [Bob ]
5 Mar Unusual Steller's Jay - Redtails courting [Rob Conway ]
5 Mar RE: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA [Rob Conway ]
4 Mar Nisqually Wednesday Walk 3/4/2015 [Shep Thorp ]
5 Mar Ravens ["Diann MacRae" ]
04 Mar Pygmy Nuthatches to Turkeys - A Fun Day in Kittitas County [Blair Bernson ]
5 Mar RFI Advice on learning non-native bird songs/calls [Richard Anderson ]
5 Mar Birding at Juanita Bay Park [Mick ]
4 Mar Fill Update? [Jeff Gibson ]
4 Mar FW: Natural Area and Greenbelt Focus Group Invitation - Will you join us? ["Mark Ahlness" ]
4 Mar Ol' Rusty Returns [Jeff Gibson ]
4 Mar Okanogan Birding and Updated Photos [Khanh Tran ]
4 Mar Re: Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know the local Mallards [Bob Sundstrom ]
4 Mar RE: Bald Eagles preying on Heron colonies []
4 Mar Re: Osprey nest near Montesano (Jason Hernandez [Larry Eickstaedt ]
4 Mar Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know the local Mallards [Joshua Glant ]
4 Mar Brambling -yes ["JERRY D AND MARCENE D'ADDIO" ]
4 Mar Re: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
4 Mar Re: [Tweeters] Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
4 Mar Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
4 Mar Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
4 Mar Seattle-area merlin research project [Benjamin Johnson ]
4 Mar Rules for the black birdwatcher (video) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
4 Mar Franklin's Gull at KGY Olympia []

Subject: Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Spring 2015 interim packet)
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2015 15:42:47 -0700
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders - 

The Washington Bird Records Committee [WBRC] has completed its review of its 
Spring 2015 interim packet. 


The WBRC normally meets annually in October, but often also circulates an 
interim packet half way between meetings. This allows the committee to 
process a number of reports where it is relatively easy to reach consensus 
without discussion. Because the committee does not meet in person to discuss 
these reports, a greater level of voting consensus is required to accept or 
not accept a report. Many reports will be carried over until the October 
meeting for final deliberations. 


30 received 7 yes votes, and are thus passed w/o need for further discussion.
 8 received 4 or more 'no' votes, and are thus not accepted.
15 reports were deferred for more consideration at the Fall meeting. 

 
3 new species are added to the state list:
Spotted Redshank
Broad-billed Hummingbird
Lucy's Warbler

This brings the official Washington State Checklist to 510 species.

ACCEPTED RECORDS:

BRBO-2014-2, Brown Booby - 143nm w of Pt. Brown, Grays Harbor County, 17 August 
2014 Michael Force [w,p] (7-0-0). 


SNEG-2014-1, Snowy Egret - Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, 10/13 - 12/3/2014, 
Randy Hill [w,p], Doug Schurman [w,p] (7-0-0). 


LBHE-2014-1, Little Blue Heron - Fir Island, Skagit County, 14 September 2014, 
Doug Schurman [w, p], Michael Hobbs [w,p], Jeff Mills [w, p] (7-0-0). 


LBHE-2014-2, Little Blue Heron - Spokane, Spokane County, 17 November 2014, 
Wendy Klaue [w], Carrie Lowe [w,p] (7-0-0). 


CAEG-2014-1, Cattle Egret - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 10/30 - 11/11/ 14, Doug 
Schurman [p], Randy Hill [w, p], Michael Charest [p], Len & Dian Jellicoe [p] 
(7-0-0). 


CAEG-2014-2, Cattle Egret - Bay Center, Pacific County, 8 November 2014, Tom 
Mansfield [p], MaryFrances Mathis [w] (7-0-0). 


CAEG-2014-3, Cattle Egret - Satsop, Grays Harbor County, 11/9-11/14, Carol 
Riddell [p], Matt Bartels [w] (7-0-0). 


MOPL-2014-1, Mountain Plover - Ocean Shores, Grays Harbor County, 11/8-15/14, 
Michael Charest [p] (7-0-0). 


SPRE-2014-1, Spotted Redshank - Hayton Preserve, Fir Island, Skagit County, 
11/27 - 12/1/2014, Ginger Rebstock [w], Jeff Bryant [w] (7-0-0). WA State First 
Record. 


TBMU-2015-1, Thick-billed Murre - Ediz Hook, Port Angeles, Clallam County, 
1/3-20/2015, Bob Boekelheide[w], Ryan Merrill [w,p] (7-0-0). 


BHGU-2014-2, Black-headed Gull - South Bend, Pacific County, 10/28 - 11/5/2014, 
Bob Flores [w, p], Jim Danzenbaker [w,p] (7-0-0). 


LIGU-2014-1, Little Gull - Jensen Access, Skagit County, 24 October 2014, Evan 
Houston [w, p], Ryan Merrill [w, p] (7-0-0). 


HERG-2014-1, "Vega" Herring Gull - Waatch River Mouth, Clallam County, 26 
October 2014, Steve Mlodinow [w,p], Ryan Merrill [p] (7-0-0). 


BBLH-2014-1, Broad-billed Hummingbird - Carson, Skamania County, 10/25-26/14, 
Matt Schroeder [p, w], Matt Bartels [w] (7-0-0). WA State First Record. 


EHOB-2014-1, Eurasian Hobby - Waatch River Valley, Clallam County, 10/26/14 - 
11/1/14, Steve Mlodinow [w,p], Doug Schurman [p], Scott Ramos [p], Fanter Lane 
[p], Chris Rurik [p], Ryan Merrill [p], Charlie Wright [p] (7-0-0). 


BGGN-2014-1, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 11/7-10/14, Brad 
Waggoner [w, p], Michael Charest [p], Alan Richards [w] (7-0-0). (Subspecies ID 
decision deferred to Fall meeting) 


NOWH-2014-1, Northern Wheatear - Pt. Robinson, Vashon Island, King County, 
10/18-21/14, Doug Schurman [p], Chris Rurik [p], Martha Taylor [w,p], Grace & 
Ollie Oliver [p], Evan Houston [p], Ed Swan [p], George Pagos [p], Gregg 
Thompson [p], Tom Mansfield [p] (7-0-0). 


OVEN-2014-4, Ovenbird - Anacortes, Skagit County, 11 September 2014, Ryan 
Schain [w] (7-0-0). 


BAWW-2011-4, Black-and-White Warbler - Seattle, King County, 9 May 2011, Nathan 
Keen [w] (7-0-0). 


BAWW-2014-4, Black-and-White Warbler - Washtucna, Adams County, 9/11-13/14, 
Keith Brady [w], Randy Hill [w,p], Matt Bartels[w], Tom Mansfield [p], (7-0-0). 


BAWW-2014-5, Black-and-White Warbler - Spokane, Riverside Park, Spokane County, 
31 December 2014, Patrick McKann [w] (7-0-0). (later resightings not reviewed 
yet) 


LUWA-2014-1, Lucy's Warbler - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 11/6-7/14, Brad 
Waggoner [w] (7-0-0). WA State First Record. 


CSWA-2014-1, Chestnut-sided Warbler - Konnowac Pass, Yakima County, 
9/15-17/2014, Ellen & Andy Stepniewski [p], Debie Brown[w], Karen Zook [p], Tom 
Mansfield [p], Keith Brady [w] (7-0-0). 


OROR-2014-1, Orchard Oriole - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 26 Oct 2014 - at least 
15 Feb 2015, Steve Mlodinow [w,p], Doug Schurman [p], Scott Ramos [p], Fanter 
Lane [p], Ryan Merrill [w, p], Alan Richards [w] (7-0-0). 


HOOR-2014-1, Hooded Oriole - Hoquiam, Grays Harbor County, 11/8-10/14, Arnie 
Martin [p], Tom Mansfield [p], Lynn & John Ogren [p,w] (7-0-0). 


BRAM-2014-1, Brambling - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 10/30 - 11/7/14, Tom 
Mansfield [p], Doug Schurman [p], Scott Ramos [p], Fanter Lane [p], Randy Hill 
[p, w], George Pagos [p], Len & Dian Jellicoe [p] (7-0-0). 


BRAM-2014-2, Brambling - Port Hadlock, Jefferson County, 11/5-9/14, Paula 
Vanderheul [w], David Gluckman [p], Randy Hill [p, w] (7-0-0). 


BRAM-2015-1, Brambling - Issaquah, King County, 4 February 2015 to present, 
Frances & Dan Pope [w, p], Grace & Ollie Oliver [p], Evan Houston [p], Tom 
Mansfield [p], Michael Hobbs [w], Matt Bartels [w], Brian Bell [p] (7-0-0). 


PUFI-2012-1, "Eastern" Purple Finch - Bradley Lake, Pierce County, 20 November 
2012, Charlie Wright [w, a] (7-0-0). 


PUFI-2014-1, "Eastern" Purple Finch - Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, 15 
December 2014, Brad Waggoner [w,p] (7-0-0). 



REPORTS NOT ACCEPTED:

ARLO-2014-3, Arctic Loon - Reach Island, Mason County, 27 December 2014 
(0-7-0). 


ARLO-2015-1, Arctic Loon - Larrabee SP, Whatcom County, 1/9-23/2015 (0-7-0).

ARLO-2015-2, Arctic Loon - Luhr Beach, Thurston County, 1/15-16/2015, (0-7-0).

ARLO-2015-3, Arctic Loon - Tramp Harbor, Vashon Island, Kng County, 17 January 
2015, (0-7-0). 


LEBI-2014-1, Least Bittern - Centralia Steam Plant, Lewis County, 5 September 
2014 (0-6-1). 


SEWR-2014-1, Sedge Wren - Ocean Shores, Grays Harbor County, 19 November 2014 
(0-7-0). 


CARW-2014-1, Carolina Wren - Seattle, King County, 15 March 2014 (0-7-0).

CONW-2009-1, Connecticut Warbler - Sammamish, King County, 13 September 2009 
(1-5-1). 


The results and an updated state checklist will eventually be posted on the 
wos.org website. 


The committee continues to depend on submissions from the community, and I'd 
urge you to submit reports for rarities on the review list when you observe 
them. A form for submitting reports can be found at: 
http://wos.org/observation_exported/observation.php 


I welcome any questions about the status of past decisions or any new report 
submissions, 


Matt Bartels 
Secretary, WBRC 
Seattle, WA _______________________________________________
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Subject: Bats or owls?
From: Deborah <dlrymnd AT aol.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 22:25:33 -0800
Hi, 
Just want to make sure I'm getting this correctly.  Are bats out and about at 
10pm and not owls? Over by the  Laurelhurst playfield.  All  I saw was the 
shadow on the street under the light.  I heard nothing. And it was gone moving 
west. 


Debbie 

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Subject: Oak Creek Wildlife Area and vicinity
From: "Dave Hayden" <dtvhm AT nwrain.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:04:12 -0800
Sherry and I ventured to the east side, targeting mainly the Oak Creek Wildlife 
Area. We had a warm sunny day and very little wind. Our first stop was at Swift 
Rock (mp 182.5 on Hwy 12). We spent about 30 minutes scanning the Basalt cliffs 
and area. We had; 

LEWIS’S WOODPECKER – 4
BLACK-BILLED MAGPIE – 1
CANYON WREN – 1
RED-TAILED HAWK – 1
GOLDEN EAGLE – 1
We continued on to the headquarters of the Oak Creek Wildlife Area. The Elk 
feeding area had no Elk. Not surprising, the snow levels are way too high, so 
they don’t need to be fed at this time. However, they still could come down 
in the late evening or first thing in the morning. Not many birds here, only; 

AMERICAN KESTREL – 1
LEWIS’S WOODPECKER – 2
Our last stop in the Oak Creek Wildlife Area was over at Cleman Mountain, where 
the Big Horn Sheep feeding area is located. We spent about 2 hours here. We had 
between 125 to 150 Big Horn Sheep scattered across the slopes. We had some from 
quite close to way up at the top of the ridges. Birds we saw here; 

RED-TAILED HAWK – 1
GOLDEN EAGLE – 1
PRAIRIE FALCON – 1
Before heading home, we drove up Bethel Ridge Road. We didn’t find any 
woodpeckers, but we did get; 

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH  - 2
MOUNTAIN CHICKADEE – 1
PYGMY OWL – 1   (great scope views)

Dave Hayden
dtvhm AT nwrain.com
Centralia, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Jerdon's Babbler
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:00:04 -0800
Interesting!

Although I find it strange that it's all over the news now, considering
that this all happened at the end of last May. Did it take that long to
process the report and write up a formal scientific essay before being able
to publicize the discovery?

Also, I think that the species as a whole has been considered extant, it's
just the nominate Myanmar subspecies that has been considered extinct.
There are eBird reports from India as recent as 2010. Sort of like the
unfortunate Dusky Seaside Sparrow! I think that calling it an extinct
"species" makes the headline more compelling.

Anyways, thanks for sharing!

Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com

On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 7:09 PM, Megan Lyden  wrote:

> Hi Tweets,
>
>
>
> species of babbler thought extinct rediscovered in Myanmar:
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/6/tiny-bird-long-thought-to-be-extinct-rediscovered-in-myanmar.html 

>
>
>
> Megan Lyden
>
> Bellevue, WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Jerdon's Babbler
From: Megan Lyden <meganlyden AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:09:23 -0800
Hi Tweets,

 

species of babbler thought extinct rediscovered in Myanmar:

 

 

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/6/tiny-bird-long-thought-to-be-
extinct-rediscovered-in-myanmar.html

 

Megan Lyden

Bellevue, WA
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Subject: Issaquah Brambling
From: MEYER2J AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:45:56 -0500
Hi Tweets:
 
Several of us birders saw the Issaquah Brambling this Saturday morning at  
about 10:40 AM.  It came in to feed on what appeared to be bread and  
perhaps seed that the homeowner had spread on the deck railing. Lots of other 

bird species in the area including Varied Thrush, Red-breasted Nuthatch,  Pine 
Siskin, Bushtit, Black-capped and Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Purple Finch,  
Steller's Jay and the ever present junco. 
 
While rambling through Snoqualmie Valley before driving to Issaquah, we  
found a Northern Shrike along 100th, just past the red barn, and a single Tree 
 Swallow on the wire over Sikes Lake.  A Red-breasted Sapsucker was 
drumming  on a utility pole next to the Chinook Bend parking lot.  
 
Joyce Meyer
Mike West
Redmond, WA
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Subject: Short and Tweet Story, and Discovery Park Say's Phoebe question
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:39:47 -0800
Hello Tweets,

In reflecting on our early spring, I thought I would share this very short
story about one of our nature-loving presidents:

"One winter morning the President electrified his nervous Cabinet by
bursting into a meeting with, 'Gentlemen, do you know what has happened
this morning?'
They waited with bated breath as he announced,
'Just now I saw a Chestnut-sided Warbler and this is only February.' "
-- Corine Roosevelt Robinson
 (on her brother
Theodore Roosevelt)
(1861-1933) poet, lecturer, orator


Source: http://www.nabci-us.org/quotes.htm . That site has some other
conservation quote treasures as well.


Also, has anyone seen the Discovery Park Say's Phoebe since this morning?
If so, where was it, and how much was it moving around? I am going to look
for it tomorrow, and I would like as much info as I can get! I'd also
welcome information about the Ravens seen there.


Thanks and have a nice rest of this sunny Saturday (oh, and Good Birding),
Joshua Glant


Mercer Island, WA


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Subject: Re: Fill Update
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 14:40:32 -0800
Jeff Gibson asked for someone to provide "a brief synopsis" of the WOS 
monthly meeting Monday night (March 2). The program was a presentation 
by Seattle Audubon folks about how WSDOT (Washington State Department of 
Transportation) and other government agencies plan to "mitigate" 
wetlands damage from the construction of a new SR-520 bridge across Lake 
Washington.  The current plans call for mitigations in about 15 
locations around the state, including the Montlake Fill. The 
presentation Monday night concerned the plans for Montlake Fill, also 
known as the Union Bay Natural Area.

The impression I had from the presentation was that Seattle Audubon 
believes the mitigations at the Fill will have very negative effects for 
birders and for birds, especially shorebirds.  It appears that when 
WSDOT does wetland mitigation, its main aim is to avoid being sued. It 
implements a standard formula with little concern for local conditions 
or for whether the mitigations will actually succeed at anything. The 
mitigations are very salmon-centric, even though there will be no salmon 
benefit at the Fill.

The major mitigations planned for the Fill involves "buffering" (that 
is, surrounding) ponds with vegetation intended to shade the ponds and 
to keep people out. They will also create a shallow pond and a swampy 
area, but neither is expected to provide valuable habitat. So Seattle 
Audubon's conclusion is that the mitigations will do nothing for 
shorebirds, and will keep birders away from ponds. It also will likely 
also significantly decrease breeding habitat for Savannah Sparrows.  In 
the end, Seattle Audubon thought that the mitigations would result in 
more mallards and "backyard birds" at the Fill, no shorebirds, and fewer 
to none of the less common birds that show up there now. They believe 
the mitigations clearly violate the management plan for the Fill. They 
said that the botanical society, which manages the Union Bay Natural 
Area, also is unhappy about the plan.

Seattle Audubon said it had offered a number of alternative suggestions 
for mitigation at the Fill, but the agencies were not receptive.

More information from Seattle Audubon is at: http://goo.gl/Lv4rIE

Jane Hadley
WOS Board Member_______________________________________________
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Subject: No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:42:55 -0800
Hi All

Randy Hill and I looked for the w. Bluebirds reported by Luke Haines and 
dipped. We did however had a singing pygmy owl just north of the rd 1100 
entrance at 11:30 am. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:42:55 -0800
Hi All

Randy Hill and I looked for the w. Bluebirds reported by Luke Haines and 
dipped. We did however had a singing pygmy owl just north of the rd 1100 
entrance at 11:30 am. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: Rufus hummingbird
From: cyberpoo <cyberpoo AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 13:27:21 -0800
Saw our first Rufus, a female, this morning at our feeder in North Edmonds.


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Subject: Scrub jay in Wallingford
From: Katie Sauter Messick <kfsauter AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:09:22 -0800
Hi Tweets,

I had a scrub jay on the corner of 36th and Densmore in Wallingford this 
morning. 


Katie Messick
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Subject: Cartwheels in The Sky | Union Bay Watch
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:14:06 -0800
Tweeters,

Once on Hood Canal, far in the distance, I saw bald eagles cartwheeling out of 
the sky and into the water. I never expected to see a cartwheeling courtship 
display near Union Bay. Perhaps the fact that Union Bay is in the city helped 
to lower my expectations or may be it was the fact that we have mature eagle 
pairs nesting on both sides of the bay. In any case, this week's post proves 
that I was wrong. On Tuesday, I watched eagles cartwheeling through the sky 
above Montlake Cut, just four or five blocks from my home. I hope you enjoy the 
photos! 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2015/03/cartwheels-in-sky.html

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature cartwheels through the sky!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: Olympic Bird Fest
From: Boekelheide <bboek AT olympus.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:06:50 -0800
Hello, Tweeters,

The Olympic BirdFest is coming up April 8 - 14, and you’re all invited. 
Details and registration are on-line at www.olympicbirdfest.org 
 


Here are some trips that Tweeters folks might be particularly interested in:

1. Once again this year, we have a pre-festival two-day birding trip to Neah 
Bay on April 8-9. It includes a pelagic trip out of Neah Bay and birding 
excursions around the best spots on the Makah Reservation. As you likely know, 
Neah Bay is an amazing birding spot, where anything is possible. Considering 
the distance to Neah Bay, the package includes two nights lodging (April 7 & 
8), two breakfasts and lunches, and a special dinner for our group. Website for 
the Neah Bay trip: http://www.olympicbirdfest.org/neah-bay-birding/ 
 


2. The main festival occurs Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Apr 10 - 12. We have 
several field trips to some of the best birding spots on the north Olympic 
Peninsula, including half-day and full day trips. There is also a nature 
photography class and a bird drawing class for artsy folks. On Friday evening, 
Apr 10, we have a special presentation of live raptors by the Northwest Raptor 
Center, and on Saturday, Apr 11, two trips to a Waterfowl Breeding Sanctuary, 
where you can see close-up views of ducks in spectacular breeding plumage, 
including eiders and Smew. The festival banquet occurs Saturday evening, Apr 
11, at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s fantastic Red Cedar Room overlooking 
Sequim Bay. On Sunday there is a cruise around Protection Island. Sorry, the 
owl prowls are filled up. 


3. Sunday through Tuesday, Apr 12 - 14, is a three-day cruise through and 
around the San Juan Islands on Glacier Spirit, a very comfortable boat run by 
Puget Sound Express. We stay two nights at Roche Harbor Resort on San Juan 
Island, with full days on the boat exploring the area and looking for wildlife, 
including a lunch stop at Sucia Island and return trip through Deception Pass. 
For more info: 

http://www.olympicbirdfest.org/san-juan-cruise/ 
 and 
http://www.pugetsoundexpress.com/whale-watching-and-wildlife-tours/audubon/ 
 


Best thing yet, all proceeds from the festival support education programs at 
the Dungeness River Audubon Center, a very worthwhile cause! 


Hope to see you,
Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness
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Subject: FOY Rufous Hummer
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:30:20 -0800
Hey Tweets...again....first of year, a female Rufous Hummingbird at one of
my three feeders on Wednesday, March 4th...sorry I'm late in posting.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: TUVU
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:24:38 -0800
Hey Tweets...From Cyndie Sundstrom yesterday...Friday the 6th, at 1:23pm, 3
turkey vultures over Hwy 8 in McCleary.

Dianna Moore
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Subject: Possible Rufous Hummingbird in Yard
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:11:12 -0800
Hello Tweets,

Yesterday afternoon, a female/immature hummingbird visited our feeder. I 
grabbed my binoculars to take a closer look. It zoomed over to our blooming 
peonies, and I saw a green back. Then, I thought I saw orangey sides, and at 
that moment the hummer zipped away. Female Rufous? A RUHU would be a new 
yardbird. 


30 minutes later, I heard a sound quite similar to a Rufous Hummingbird's wing 
trill at Ellis Pond. Now I'm keeping my eyes and ears open! 


Also, I have seen at least 2 Hutton's Vireos and a dozen Townsend's Warblers at 
the corner of 45th and 90th just north of Ellis Pond. The vireos were hawking 
gnats from the clouds of them that always seem to cling to the top of conifers 
- surely the secret to how so many small songbirds like Yellow-rumped Warblers, 
kinglets and Hutton's Vireos are able to subsist in the Puget Sound winter. 


The Cedar River mouth has a lot of gnat-covered conifers, as does the Lid Park 
on the Island; I have seen Yellow-rumps (Butterbutts) at both places, and the 
Palm Warbler at the Cedar River mouth. Maybe the hops vines on the bus-stop 
fence in the U District had lots of bugs hiding in it last year? 


Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com


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Subject: Brambling still in Issaquah
From: Denny Granstrand <dgranstrand AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:11:24 -0800
Hi Tweeters,

Friday the Brambling was seen in the large cedar tree near the north end of
the house at 625 Mt. Fury Circle SW, Issaquah, at 10:00 and 1:00.

After a short stay in the cedar at 10:00, it flew into the flowering bushes
across the street.

It was on the deck railing before going into the cedar tree at 1:00. It
disappeared into the tree after posing for a few minutes.

A couple of photos of the Brambling are in the new photos folder on my
website.

Denny Granstrand

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *
Denny Granstrand
Yakima, WA
dgranstrand AT gmail.com
Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:

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Subject: No Sage sparrow Steigerwald
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:34:23 -0800
Randy Hill and I both of this morning looking for the sage sparrows at 
Steigerwald no luck several people here 


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Subject: No Sage sparrow Steigerwald
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:34:23 -0800
Randy Hill and I both of this morning looking for the sage sparrows at 
Steigerwald no luck several people here 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Say's Phoebe, Discovery Park, Seattle
From: "Rachel Lawson" <rwlawson AT q.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:11:49 -0800
Today, on the monthly Discovery Park bird census, Dan Harville and I found a
Say's Phoebe flycatching from the fence around the lighthouse.  Phoebes are
seen down there from time to time, but this is the first time we have had
one for the official count.  We heard from other census participants that
there are now three Common Ravens in the park.  It really seems like spring
is here.Dan and I saw a pair of Bushtits building the beginning of a nest.

 

Rachel Lawson

Seattle

rwlawson AT q.com

 
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Subject: Back on the Lone Prairie
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 06:24:33 -0800





Last April I posted about the Kah Tai Prairie here in Port Townsend, which I 
"discovered" by snooping on the Washington Native Plant Society's Olympic 
Chapter website. It's alway nice having help in discovering things. 


Anyhoo, I went there yesterday seeking Grass Widows. Now, grass widows are not 
women who have lost spouse's due to lawn mowing accidents, or maybe to lethal 
pot growing competition. No, Grass Widows is a plant . That common name is 
interesting, so I did a few minutes of deep research on the internet as to it's 
origin, and came up with vague info. 

The plant is presently known to botanist's as Olsynium douglasii. I first knew 
it as Sisyrinchium douglasii, but since then, busy botanist's have changed the 
name. That's progress! Due to helpful signage at the prairie, I knew this plant 
was gonna be here, but I missed it last year - it's an early bloomer found in 
open grassy "bald's" in rain shadowy areas around these parts. 

A short plant in the Iris family , it is unique (isn't everybody) with its 
showy six-petaled flowers. It's one of those colors that words just can't quite 
fence in. Botany books call it 'reddish purple', which would make it violet on 
a artists color chart, but it don't look violet to me. Technically, it's bright 
and real purdy, as we say on the prairie. You could see a bunch of em' at Kah 
Tai now if you wanna. A few early blooming Lomatiums were the only other 
prairie bloomers I noted- bright yellow. 

As I noted last year, Kah Tai Prairie is a humble affair - a remnant bit of a 
historically larger habitat here, nurtured by Native Plant Society folks. Truth 
is, it looks, defined by a low slung white plastic chain fence, like an unmowed 
old military cemetery plot, without the white crosses - surrounded by the Port 
Townsend Golf Course in which its located. About the size of a couple of city 
home lots. Looks like a failure of golf course maintenance . 

Humble, but really interesting for a naturalist - the soon to pass Grass Widows 
will be followed by a sequence of other native prairie flowers. As for birds, 
my species count for last year was 2 - Savannah Sparrow and California Quail. 

As to Grass Widows, if you can't make it to Port Townsend, keep your eyes 
peeled and to the ground in open balds in places like Deception Pass or 
Washington Park in Anacortes. The flower is a real beauty. Now's the time. 



Jeff Gibsonon the rangePort Townsend Wa



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Subject: a lovely video to start off your weekend right!
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:14:06 +0100
hello everyone,

I have been watching this lovely video of a starling murmuration for a
couple days now. It was filmed a month ago in Utrect, Netherlands, and
captures a spectacular show -- likely one of the last we'll see until
November this year:

http://gu.com/p/46bqb/stw

tschüss!

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
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Subject: Ocean Shores Friday morning
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 00:47:08 -0800
Was at Point Brown Jetty this morning before 9am.  Found 2 dozen Black
Turnstones but only 2 each Rock Sandpiper and Surfbird during a very low
tide.  A single Black-legged Kittiwake at the very end of the jetty.  Most
interesting find was a second winter Glaucous Gull among the flock using the
jetty and adjacent sandy beach.

 

Randy Hill

Ridgefield
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Subject: Kalama GLAUCOUS GULL ...
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:34:19 -0800
hi all ... Gene and I went to Kalama today to see if gulls were there snacking 
on the smelt ... our stops were the end of Sportsmans Road, mouth of the 
Kalama, and the Port of Kalama ... and yes, there were gulls ... HUNDREDS of 
gulls ... er, THOUSANDS of gulls !!!!!!!!!!!!!! ... our highlight was one 
GLAUCOUS GULL on a log boom at the Port ... smelt fishing is apparently still 
good ... 


lots of sea lions too ...


later,
Lyn



Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
www.NorthwestJourney.com
www.NorthwestBirding.com
www.ColumbiaRiverImages.com
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Subject: Magnuson Park, 6 March 2015
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:01:35 -0800
Our string of fabulous weather continues. And the birds certainly seem 
enthused, so much singing going on today it was hard to isolate single birds. 
Some nesting and nest prepping, and more—try to explain to a 3-year old 
(grandson) what the geese were doing was the day’s challenge. Arrived too 
late to evaluate the Barn Owl situation, though there may have been some 
hissing coming from the nest boxes. 


Cackling Goose - 1 Taverner’s with the goose flock at NOAA; we rarely see 
these at Magnuson 

Eurasian Wigeon - a male continues with the large flock of AMWI
Ring-necked Duck - a pair continues at the Sail Lagoon
Common Goldeneye - >40, the flock seems to be growing
Red-breasted Merganser - 3, way out in the lake
California Quail - 1 calling from the wetlands
Ring-necked Pheasant - 3 females; are these new releases or carry-over from 
last year? 

Red-necked Grebe - 3 in breeding plumage
Cooper’s Hawk - adult male and immature female, appear to be a couple, 
Promontory Point 

Dunlin - 2 were on the swim beach; first of year
Herring Gull - adult on the swim platform, juvenile in the sports fields with 
huge flock of Mew Gull 

Belted Kingfisher - a pair seem to be checking out Kingfisher Basin; after the 
bluff was ‘cleaned’ of overhanging ‘weeds', their nest hole of last year 
is quite exposed 

Violet-green Swallow - small flock over Promontory Point; first of year
Mystery Bird - in post to follow

For the day, 62 species.
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22199537 
 

Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Magnuson Park PGCH
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:01:25 -0800
During my walk today, I ran across a new species for the park, in fact, one 
that I have not seen documented locally: the Pacific Golden Chickadee (Poecile 
aureus). Related to the more common Black-capped Chickadee, this variant is 
known to take on a Spring plumage of color not unlike an Orange-crowned 
Warbler: 



https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/PacificGoldenChickadee#6123350486861570226 
 


From summer through winter the PGCH is indistinguishable from its more common 
variant. As the two forms overlap considerably in range, intergrades are 
expected: 



https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/PacificGoldenChickadee#6123350330238135538 
 


This particular group was spotted in the willows near Frog Pond and may persist 
for a few more days of catkin development. 


https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/PacificGoldenChickadee# 
 


Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: MV HWY Bald Eagle Pair
From: elynde <elynde AT cox.net>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 20:49:41 -0800
Hello,

Was wondering if anyone else keeps an eye on the bald eagle pair just west of 
SE 140th Pl on WA-169.  


I thought they were nesting up, but I haven't seen either of them the last two 
days during my commutes.  


If so, please email me offline. 

Lynde Eller
Renton, WA
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Subject: Re: Yacolt Monk Parakeets?
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:51:43 -0800
Yes they are still around but come and go. You just have to be lucky to be at 
the right place at the right time. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, Wa

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 6, 2015, at 16:31, Rachel Lawson  wrote:
> 
> A friend of mine is wondering if there still are any Monk Parakeets nesting 
in Yacolt. I found photos of them online from as recently as 2011. Does anyone 
know if they are still there? If they are, is it possible to go look at them? 

>  
> Rachel Lawson
> Seattle
> rwlawson AT q.com
>  
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Sno-Valley, One Wk. Later - 3/5/15
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:19:46 -0800
No Pygmy Owl did I find this time, but other birds and sights, made the trip 
worthwhile. See what I saw (and heard) in these photos: 


https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5xMSVX


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: FW: Feather ID Help Please
From: "Eric Kowalczyk" <cassidix2005 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:29:29 -0800
 The black and white contour feathers certainly look like the head feathers of 
a male Lady Amherst's Pheasant, Chrysolophus amherstiae. 


 

    Eric Kowalczyk

    Seattle,WA

 

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Lydia Gaebe 
Bishop 

Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 3:06 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Feather ID Help Please

 

Hello Tweeters!

 

I found a big pile of feathers on my property just east of Snohomish near Three 
Lakes Road. 


 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021920178 
 
&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 


 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021960179 
 
&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 


 

What bird did they come from?

 

Thank you

 
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Subject: Yacolt Monk Parakeets?
From: "Rachel Lawson" <rwlawson AT q.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:30:01 -0800
A friend of mine is wondering if there still are any Monk Parakeets nesting
in Yacolt.  I found photos of them online from as recently as 2011.  Does
anyone know if they are still there?  If they are, is it possible to go look
at them?

 

Rachel Lawson

Seattle

rwlawson AT q.com

 
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Subject: (Clark Co.) western bluebird
From: Luke Hanes <lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:20:35 -0800
I jog/hiked 11 miles worth of the Tarbell Trail this morning
Saw what I believe to be two Western Bluebirds
This one is obvious:
http://flic.kr/p/qy3RnU

But what about this one?
http://flic.kr/p/rbJ1Lc
http://flic.kr/p/qyfSyB



-- 
Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
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Subject: Raven in Sammamish
From: "Ned McGarry" <ned_mcgarry AT wavecable.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:50:24 -0800
In a neighborhood conifer being mobbed by about 10 unhappy but highly organized 
crows. Relentless swooping. Looked like a circus act. 


Last seen flying west toward the downslope to the north end of Lake Sammamish.

________________________

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Subject: Ravens
From: David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:15:13 -0800
This morning, over the centrally located Capehart site, in Discovery Park, two 
Ravens were calling, staying close and doing a few aerial tricks. This does not 
quite make a breeding pair, but there may be an empty niche for corvids 
involved. While there are many American Crows around the park in winter, in the 
breeding season, they are much less numerous, according to recent records. They 
mainly appear to nest and feed in the surrounding Magnolia neighborhood, where 
there are plentiful nesting trees and widespread feeding sources. 

David HutchinsonFlora & Fauna Books3213 West Wheeler St, #6Seattle, WA 
98199206-282-0093 
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Subject: Feather ID Help Please
From: Lydia Gaebe Bishop <lydiagaebe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:06:09 -0800
Hello Tweeters!

I found a big pile of feathers on my property just east of Snohomish near
Three Lakes Road.


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021920178&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 



https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021960179&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 


What bird did they come from?

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Subject: hermit thrush and pine siskins
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:49:29 +0000 (UTC)
While walking around Capitol Lake this morning I spotted and was able to 
observe a Hermit Thrush foraging in the grass near the lake-- the first I have 
seen in W. WA in ages.  (When I lived in CA they were a common winter bird.) 
  

Also, after 2 months of occupation (and high birdseed bills) it appears my pine 
siskin "superflock" has begun to disperse.  Now I'm seeing occasional pairs 
visit the feeder.  I wonder if they're gearing up for nesting? 

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Subject: WDFW is on the case (injured eagle)
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:03:03 -0800
In talking with both Greg Meis and Belinda Rotton, of WDFW, about the injured 
Bald Eagle, I was told that, due to it having enough strength to keep clear of 
human captors, they are not able at this time to capture it. Biologist Paul 
DeBruyn will continue to monitor the bird and, should it become too weak, from 
inability to forage, he will try again to capture it and take it to a rehab 
facility (likely Sarvey) to check on its condition. If the bird stays strong, 
it will not be taken to a facility and will hopefully, continue with its 
nesting. Belinda was unsure whether or not there are yet eggs in the nest... 


They will call and let me know how this turns out, and I will pass the report 
on to you Tweets :-) 


Thanks to Michelle and Sammy for your help on this today and to Debra for the 
alert and photos. 



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: link to photos of injured Bald Eagle
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 11:14:00 -0800
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5wtzjN
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Subject: injured Bald Eagle on Fir Is.
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 10:58:29 -0800
This was sent to me early this morning - I tried to call Debra, but could only 
leave a message. If anyone wants to see the photos (3), please write to me - 
later I will post them on my Flickr album. I've contacted WDFW through Chris 
Anderson, but one of you may have another contact or a contact # for the dept. 
and can make a call. As I just rec'd this message and cannot get in touch with 
Debra, I don't know the status of the bird as of daylight today. 


Any help will be appreciated by all, especially the eagle...

The message:

Hi Barb,
My name is Debra Hoskins and I have followed your postings on Tweeters...I am 
pretty new to tweeters and registered a couple of months ago but have never 
posted. Rather than trying to figure out how to go about posting at this late 
hour, I am sending you what I wanted to post. 

 
To all my birding friends and eagle lovers, please be on alert and help keep 
track of this injured eagle. I believe it is one of the pair that has the nest 
at FIR ISLAND RESERVE which is 3.2 miles from the Conway exit driving towards 
LaConner. This eagle was in a short tree directly across from the entrance into 
the reserve. I was there for about 2 hours and saw one of the eagles come and 
go from the nesting tree. It wasn't until I was leaving that I noticed this one 
across the street. I have a sick feeling this is the female that is injured 
because its larger than the other one. My heart sank when I got home tonight 
and downloaded these pictures. When looking through my viewfinder I thought 
this was about a 4 year old eagle who still had some brown on its head. After 
zooming in and cropping the images I can clearly see the terrible injuries! I 
would have called Sarvey Wildlife Care Center in Arlington if I had realized it 
then. I live in Stanwood so its a close drive and I will go back to carefully 
scout the area before I head to Winthrop for the weekend. If she is still in 
the same tree or on the ground I will call Sarvey. 

Blessings, Debra Hoskins..425-876-5881



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Community Values
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 09:35:45 -0800


It was a number of decades ago, when I first heard (or read, in the context of 
Timber Politics here in the wonderful Pacific Northwest), our great Old-Growth 
forest's referred to as "decadent, over mature timber". I remember being 
appalled that people could even think that way about a forest - and still am. 

Why would anybody say something so rude and disrespectful? Well, it's just 
about the money, honey. 

 I imagine the old-growth as a wise old Grandmother. Oh sure, she's old as 
dirt, but still sharp as a tack. And the forest stories she has to tell - and 
will- to anybody who listens! But see, ol' Granny is sitting on a goldmine - 
she's rich. Unfortunately , the family has one branch ( raised primarily on 
video games and ORV's), who don't care about Grannies boring old forest 
anymore, and need to come up with some cash money for their lifestyle. Now. 

Trouble is, Granny's still alive. So the questionable family branch sent a 
representative over to her house to parley - I just happened to be there, 
having a beer with Granny , when we heard the knock. 

There stood ol' Uncle Ernie on the doorstep. "Well Granny" he started into it, 
"the family has been talking and we figured you, being so old and all, that 
you've had a pretty good run of it, so it's time you dropped dead and gave us 
our inheritance. Plus, there been some rumors around town about your decadent 
behavior and....". That's when Granny closed the door on Uncle Ernie's face. 
"Lets you and me get away from Mister Entitled Turd out there, and I'll tell 
you some forest stories. Would you get me another beer ? I could use one after 
hearing all that BS!" she said. 

I handed Granny a cold beer, and sat down next to her on the couch.
"Thanks, honey. You're a good boy, always out in the woods feeling ferns and 
watching the birds! " she told me. I was just starting to get a little 
misty-eyed, when Granny burst out laughing, almost blowing beer out her nose. 

" I can't believe that poor excuse of a relative out there - what a hoser!". 
Granny laughed and laughed. "Some people just don't get it , and maybe never 
will" she continued. " That 'decadent' thing - that punk out there has no idea 
what the hell he's talking about! Trouble is, he's afraid of the forest now - 
spent too much time playing with himself on his x- box or whatever." 

" Some folks don't understand the community I've lived in my whole life. They 
seem to think it's like a retirement home, when really there's room for the 
old, the young, and the in between, because the community is always changing. 
See, geezers like me will fall over someday, providing opportunities for new 
growth in the future- we got the same chance when we were young. All ages 
living together! Oh sure, sometimes it takes a long time for things to change, 
but if you have no patience, you should find another community to live in" 
Granny continued. 

"Like ol' Ernie out there, he might like it in one of those factory monoculture 
'forests' like the neo tree-nazi's put together with their cloned uber-firs. 
More like cornfields than forest's, if you ask me. More like a tree version of 
the Stepford Wives, if you know what I mean. 

Seems like nature folks could do one of those' Bio Blitz' inventories in those 
monoculture patches, in about 15 minutes. A Bio Burp they could call it. In my 
neck of the woods, it would take quite awhile - lifetime maybe." Granny was 
starting to wind down. " I'll split a beer with you, if you want" she asked. " 
Need to wet my whistle." 

After a sip of beer, Granny got a little gleam in her eye. "Decadent!" she 
snorted. " Truth is, the forest if full of 'decadence' - rot, gambling 
(windstorms, fire, disease, are chances we play with) , not to mention half the 
forms of kinky sex ever invented. Thats nature. That reminds me, did I ever 
tell you about that fling I had with Fred Cedar about 500 years ago? He was a 
real stud at the time , and one day we........" 

Jeff Gibsonlistening to the trees inPort Townsend Wa
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Subject: Washington CSWA and other vagrant warbler photos
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 07:34:41 -0800
Hello Tweets,

I have long been fascinated by bird vagrancy in Eastern Washington. It's 
exciting to read of an Eastern warbler discovered in a grove of trees in the 
middle of the plains, like at the Gingko Petrified Forest near Vantage or 
Bassett Park in Washtucna. 


I was wondering if anyone had photos of the following species in WA:

Chestnut-sided Warbler - I am especially interested in the photo supposedly 
taken on June 6th, 2007 of two males together in Ritzville by "B. Lyle". 


Magnolia Warbler - I have seen photos of birds at Gingko Petrified Forest and 
at Harrington Cemetery, but not from Washtucna or other places. 


Black-throated Blue Warbler - I have seen photos of the one on Mercer Island in 
the winter of 1994-1995, and of a female in Yakima in October 2005, but no 
others. 


Blackpoll Warbler - I have only found one video of one in Ephrata, and no 
photos. 


Black-and-white Warblers - one of my favorites. The more, the merrier!

Canada Warbler - I can't find any photos of the 1st state record at McNary NWR 
in September 2010! 


Finally, the Bay-breasted Warbler - I have only seen one photo of the male near 
Olympia in June 2006. 


Thank you for sharing and good birding,

Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com


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Subject: Brambling still visible 3/5/15
From: ctrogon AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 06:25:43 +0000 (UTC)
HI Tweets, 
The brambling was seen by at least 5 people today between 11am and high noon. 
I was told it had been in the exact same place the last 4 days, across the 
street from the residence and down in the flowered shrubbery. It has now 
'discovered' the camellias even farther down the slope, so check there as well. 
~poppe 


----- Original Message -----

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Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2015 12:00:10 PM 
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 127, Issue 5 

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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific 
than "Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..." 

Today's Topics: 

1. Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know the 
local Mallards (Joshua Glant) 
2. Re: Osprey nest near Montesano (Jason Hernandez (Larry Eickstaedt) 
3. RE: Bald Eagles preying on Heron colonies (falcophile AT comcast.net) 
4. Re: Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know 
the local Mallards (Bob Sundstrom) 
5. Okanogan Birding and Updated Photos (Khanh Tran) 
6. Ol' Rusty Returns (Jeff Gibson) 
7. FW: Natural Area and Greenbelt Focus Group Invitation - Will 
you join us? (Mark Ahlness) 
8. Re: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA (Wilson Cady) 
9. Fill Update? (Jeff Gibson) 
10. Birding at Juanita Bay Park (Mick) 
11. RFI Advice on learning non-native bird songs/calls 
(Richard Anderson) 
12. Pygmy Nuthatches to Turkeys - A Fun Day in Kittitas County 
(Blair Bernson) 
13. Ravens (Diann MacRae) 
14. Nisqually Wednesday Walk 3/4/2015 (Shep Thorp) 
15. RE: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA (Rob Conway) 
16. Unusual Steller's Jay - Redtails courting (Rob Conway) 
17. RBA: Portland, OR 3-5-15 (Harry Nehls) 
18. Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning (Bob) 
19. Re: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning (Bob) 

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Subject: Re: Is this a whooping crane? (sorry, I got so excited I forgot to give a link!)
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:35:15 -0800
Thank you to the people who wrote me. Michael Hobbs suggested that the 
different crane is a different subspecies of Sandhill crane. Obviously I have 
never seen a whooping crane. I have to curb my enthusiasm! :) 

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Subject: Tufted Duck / Woodland Bottoms [Cowlitz co]
From: slugranch85 AT wwest.net
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:00:14 -0800
Hello All,

I observed the Tufted Duck at Woodland Bottoms area, Cowlitz county, 
today, 3/5/2015, between 12:20 and 12:50 PM.  Thanks to Bill Tweit and
others for earlier reports.

Alan

Alan Richards / Naselle WA 98638

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Subject: My Formative Years
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:10:01 -0800
I've long been a bit amused by that notion of "your formative years", which, in 
typical usage, seems to imply that there is a certain window (seemingly narrow) 
in which the rest of your life has now successfuly been implanted, and you just 
do your remaining time - kind of like a prison term. Really? 

Well, while carrying plenty of past-time personal baggage, I still find myself 
being impressed, or formed if you will, by life, by nature. It just happened 
again a few minutes ago, and I've been around almost 60 years. 

It's been an unusual night here; my elderly children ( aka parents) both went 
to bed early, leaving me alone in the dark. And that was a good thing, because 
I got to see a moonrise a bit brighter than any I remember. 

We live in such an atmospheric place here in wet side Washington. Depending on 
the cloud conditions, the mountains appear to shrink, or grow. They move 
closer, or further away, or so it seems - just tricks performed by Mother 
Nature's lighting department - clouds change perspective of the scene. 

Clouds can also focus the light of the Sun and Moon in various tricksy ways, 
and tonights moonrise sure was visual proof of that. The moon came up sort of 
orangish, through the low clouds, and something in the atmosphere brightened 
the light effect of the moon's reflection on the waters of Port Townsend - it 
seemed bright as a sunrise almost. It was really remarkable. 

Hey, maybe I'm just getting contact dementia from my parents, and I can't 
remember moonrises real good anymore, but even so, I don't feel my formative 
years are quite over yet. Hey maybe I'll learn something new tomorrow - like 
the ID of a funny little plant I found on the Point Wilson dunes today - a new 
acquaintance. 

Jeff Gibsonslow learner, inPort Townsend Wa

 
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Subject: Is this a whooping crane?
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:33:55 -0800
I have a shot of several Sandhill cranes taken near Frenchman's Bar park in 
Vancouver, WA(actually near the turnoff a little further down the road, where 
there are some houseboats on the left and a turnoff on the right). Anyhow, I'm 
looking at this shot and I see the red on the forehead of the middle crane is a 
bit different. Is it a whooping crane? 


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Subject: Re: Is this a whooping crane? (sorry, I got so excited I forgot to give a link!)
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:35:11 -0800
https://www.flickr.com/photos/11815777 AT N07/16108101513/



________________________________
 From: Michelle Maani 
To: "tweeters AT u.washington.edu"  
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:33 PM
Subject: Is this a whooping crane?
 


I have a shot of several Sandhill cranes taken near Frenchman's Bar park in 
Vancouver, WA(actually near the turnoff a little further down the road, where 
there are some houseboats on the left and a turnoff on the right). Anyhow, I'm 
looking at this shot and I see the red on the forehead of the middle crane is a 
bit different. Is it a whooping crane? 


Michelle Maani_______________________________________________
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2015-03-05
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:52:47 -0800
Tweets – another glorious day. The temp. started out at 32, but even the 
smallest puddles had no ice. By the time we left, it was 50 degrees. Hazy 
sunshine all morning, and BIRDY. 


Highlights:

Cackling Goose                One flyby flock of about 35
Wood Duck                       Pair across from Dog Central
Northern Pintail               One flushed by an eagle well below weir
Green-winged Teal          High numbers - 32+, most below weir
Horned Grebe                  One on lake, seen after the walk
Sharp-shinned Hawk A couple of sightings, possibly all the same large juvenile 

Cooper’s Hawk                 Ditto
Eurasian Collared-Dove   First of Year, flying over NW part of Dog Meadow
Northern Saw-whet Owl   Matt & Brian heard one very early, again
Anna’s Hummingbird        Female on nest near start of boardwalk
RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD  2 males.  Ties earliest Marymoor record with 2014
Red-breasted Sapsucker   Numerous drumming males
MERLIN Landed in Snag Row. Probable “taiga” – quite pale 

VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW  5+ after it warmed up.  3rd earliest sighting
Red Crossbill                     Small number around mansion

There were an unusually large number of BALD EAGLES, including at least 5 
adults (I saw them simultaneously after the walk) and a juvenile (maybe more 
than one). We saw two adults fly over the heronry, which of course resulted in 
all of the herons taking flight. Twice I observed a juvenile eagle scatter the 
herons. We didn’t see any overt moves by any of the eagles to try and hunt 
the herons. We also saw many herons on the nests, and at least one bringing in 
nesting material. 


Two male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS were seen, and both did their ‘J’-display 
flights. One was near the southernmost official dog swim area near the 
footbridge. The second was at the southeast corner of the East Meadow. As I 
noted above, this ties the record for earliest RUHU at Marymoor with 2014. In 
only four years have we had them before March 15. 


Our only earlier sightings of VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW were 2002-02-28 and 
2006-03-03, and it’s only our 5th year with a sighting before March 10. 


We had an astounding 67 species for the day. Adding EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, 
RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, and VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, our 2015 list is up to 84, I 
believe. 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com
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Subject: Re: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 10:37:31 -0800
I am here at the I5 bridge and gulls are numerous and there are smelt.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 10:37:31 -0800
I am here at the I5 bridge and gulls are numerous and there are smelt.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:59:50 -0800
Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:59:50 -0800
Hi All

Been very slow today very few cormorants flying. Some gulls but they are high 
and heading down stream. Best bird is Western gull. This is nothing like the 
experience I had yesterday. Smelt run may be on the downswing. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Unusual Steller's Jay - Redtails courting
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 08:21:31 +0000
I have a large group of Steller's Jays that come to my deck every day to feast 
on peanuts, milo, corn and sunflower seeds - there are sometimes as many as 20 
on the deck at a time and usually 8-12 throughout the day along with 2-4 
Western Scrub Jays. For the past 3 days there has been an unusual Steller's 
early in the day. The bird is a tan/brown color with only a peak of dark 
blue/black on the crest and white streaks over the eye. The bird behaves 
normally and gets along with the flock. Size, patterning, call are all typical 
for the species. I'm guessing a genetic aberration or the result of a skin 
disease (like severe mite infestation) when the bird was in the nest. I'm 
content just to watch him/her and see if he/she pairs up later in the spring. 

The spring-fall resident Redtail pair has shown up and are showing lots of 
courting behave including spectacular aerial acrobatics, close passes, and lots 
and lots and lots of very loud calling. Today I saw the male carrying a stick 
to the nest that has been in use for at least 3 years - housekeeping. It is fun 
to be able to identify this pair by their coloration and markings (female very 
light except for a very dark chest band - male a beautiful red with strange 
black wing tips and dark mottling on the chest). Lets hope for another batch of 
3 (or more!) chicks as they have proven to be very successful and attentive 
parents. 

Rob

Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58N 122.44W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 
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Subject: RE: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 08:05:52 +0000
I was having lunch at Beaches on the Columbia in Vancouver and there scattered 
among several DC Cormorants, a variety of gulls and a few ducks and geese was a 
Pigeon Gullimot... this was today 3/5/15 at 11;30. Maybe more than one in the 
area? If so, why? 


Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58N 122.44W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 



Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:58:44 -0800
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu; obol AT freelists.org; jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com; 
ryanabe79 AT gmail.com; lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com; smsetterberg AT yahoo.com 

CC: 







I tried to find the pigeon you Lamont again going upstream checking the pilings 
I am now at frenchmans bar just sitting. so far also I've picked up first year 
Westernand Thayers gull and a group of 6 Savannah Sparrows. 





Bob



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID





Bob  wrote:




I am at the end of Lower River Rd bait fish are in and gulls/ cormorants 
everywhere. As i sat here a pigeon gullimot fly by 20 yds off shore going up 
stream. It came by to fast for a photo. Cant miss the fat body tapering on both 
ends 

 and large white wing patches.  Seen five minutes ago 1014 hrs.



Bob Flores

Ridgefield, WA



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Subject: Nisqually Wednesday Walk 3/4/2015
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 22:41:29 -0800
Hi Tweets,

approximately 30 of us had a beautiful day at the Refuge with sunny skies
and temperatures in the 30's to 50's degrees Fahrenheit.  There was a Low
Tide of 4'8" at 11:30am, so we dipped on many of our usual shorebirds, but
we had highlights of FOY VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, and great looks of WILSON'S
SNIPE, PILEATED WOODPECKER, AMERICAN BITTERN and GREAT HORNED OWL and
owlets.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, the Wilson's Snipe
was foraging on the muddy spit spring to the right of the platform.  We had
nice looks of CANADA GOOSE, MALLARD, RING-NECKED DUCK, PIED-BILLED GREBE
and SONG SPARROW.  A pair of Swan were seen flying into the Refuge from the
entrance road.

A quick stop in Orchard produced nice observation of GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET,
CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW and TREE SWALLOW.

Along the Access Road we and nice looks of RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, BROWN
CREEPER, RED-TAILED HAWK, NORTHERN PINTAIL, PURPLE FINCH, AMERICAN WIGEON,
EURASIAN WIGEON and FOY Violet-green Swallow mixed in with many TREE
SWALLOW.

The west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail was a good area for
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER.  We had terrific looks at two Pileated Woodpecker,
one male and one female, south of the Twin Barns cut-off.  An adult Great
Horned Owl was bedded down in the nest tree from last year along the north
section of the loop trail as preveiouwly observed over the last two weeks.
The owlets were relocated in the Riparian Stand of shorter Alder Trees just
south of the large stand of Cottonwoods from the east side of the loop
trail.  We suspect the adult owl is exhibiting nesting behavior, but its
only been 7 weeks since the owlets were born.  It will be fascinating to
see what develops with the adult in the old nest tree.

We had nice looks of RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH east of
the Twin Barns.  At the Twins Barns Overlook several GADWALL were feeding
in the flooded field, and we had beautiful looks at a female NORTHERN
HARRIER.

Out on the Nisqually Estuary Trail or new dike, we had terrific views of
NORTHERN SHRIKE, GREATER-WHITE FRONTED GEESE, NORTHERN SHOVELER and two
AMERICAN BITTERN.  A few hundred CACKLING GEESE, both minima and Taverner's
flew in.  A peale's variety of PEREGRINE FALCON soared over the dike.  We
also observed HOODED MERGANSER and MARSH WREN.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail was great for observing BUFFLEHEAD,
COMMON GOLDENEYE, SURF SCOTER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, MEW GULL,
RING-BILLED GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and BELTED
KINGINSHER.  From the Puget Sound Viewing Platform we had nice observation
of HORNED GREBE, GREAT BLUE HERON, and BALD EAGLE.  Other species seen
included all three CORMORANTS, GREATER SCAUP, and COMMON RAVEN.

On the north section of the Twin Barns Loop Trail we had great looks at a
male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD.  At the Nisqually River Overlook, we had nice
observation of COMMON MERGANSER.

We saw 69 species for the day and we've seen 111 species on the extended
walk for the year.  Mammals seen included Coyote, River Otter, Harbor Seal,
and California Sea Lion.

Until next week, when we meet again at 8am.
Good birding,
Shep
-- 
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
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Subject: Ravens
From: "Diann MacRae" <tvulture AT gmx.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 07:18:33 +0100
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Subject: Pygmy Nuthatches to Turkeys - A Fun Day in Kittitas County
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2015 19:46:10 -0800
George Pagos and I took advantage of the great 
weather and birded Kittitas County today.  We 
started with several Pygmy Nuthatches at the Cle 
Elum RR Ponds and ended with a flock of at least 
65 Turkeys in the Teanaway Valley.  In between we 
dipped on Sagebrush Sparrows but enjoyed many 
Mountain and Western Bluebirds, numerous Say's 
Phoebes, at least a dozen Violet Green Swallows at 
Gingko SP where we also had several Rock Wrens.  
It was 20 degrees when we started and over 50 
degrees when we stopped - beautiful sunshine - 
good photos and better company.

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: RFI Advice on learning non-native bird songs/calls
From: Richard Anderson <richardanderson59 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 03:16:20 +0000 (UTC)
I'd appreciate any feedback on useful methods for learning, and also retaining, 
foreign bird calls. Is anyone familiar with the limitations of Thayer's 
'custom' quizzes? Are you able to import mp3's? If so, is this exclusive to a 
specific format?  

Any tips to avoid learning 'artifacts' (wind prior, low bit-rate, etc.) of an 
audio clip rather than the bird call?  

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Subject: Birding at Juanita Bay Park
From: Mick <mthomp1707 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 02:14:23 +0000 (UTC)
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Subject: Fill Update?
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:44:07 -0800
Dear Tweeters,
I am kind of wondering if anyone who attended the recent WOS meeting re: 
mitigation issues at the fill would be willing to share a brief synopsis, or 
share any perspectives from that meeting with those of us unable to attend the 
event. 

Born and raised (partially uplifted) in Seattle, the Montlake Fill has always 
been a natural touchstone for me over the years even though I don't get there 
too often, having been mostly an out-of-towner for several decades. I'm mostly 
curious as to whether or not the recommendations for shorebird habitat as 
presented by Seattle Audubon, et al, have been accepted or not, and if not, 
what further actions could be made by concerned citizens. 

"Mitigation": you know when your local natural area has been relegated to 
lawyer-speak, it's not always a good sign. Hopefully, intelligence will 
prevail. 

Jeff Gibsonconcerned animal


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Subject: FW: Natural Area and Greenbelt Focus Group Invitation - Will you join us?
From: "Mark Ahlness" <mahlness AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 16:37:06 -0800
Hi everybody,

Seattle Parks is redesigning their natural areas/greenspaces policy, and an
invitation to participate is below. This result of this process will most
certainly have an impact on bird habitat in Seattle.

If you are a part of an organization and would like to participate early in
the process, the deadline to apply to be in the focus group discussion is
this Friday. The application can be found on the page listed in the
announcement below, but if you want to cut to the chase, just go here:
http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/NaturalAreaGreenbeltUse/files/Focus%20
Group%20Application_writeable.pdf 

Mark Ahlness
mahlness AT gmail.com
Seattle, WA
www.SeattleNatureAlliance.org



From: Rockwell, Susanne [mailto:Susanne.Rockwell AT seattle.gov] 
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 11:43 AM
To: Rockwell, Susanne
Cc: Sandy Lam (Sandy AT stephersonassociates.com)
Subject: Natural Area and Greenbelt Focus Group Invitation - Will you join
us?

 

Dear friends,

On behalf of Seattle Parks and Recreation, I am asking you to have a voice
in future park planning. 

We want to hear from you!

We want a diverse group of organizations to share what they value about
Natural Areas and Greenbelts. We have hired a consultant team to host
several focus groups and ask organizations to send a representative to
participate in one focus group session. This process will result in a vision
that will maintain the native forest ecosystem, protect public safety and
enhance positive uses over the long term. 

How to get involved

Focus group: Focus groups will discuss existing Natural Areas and Greenbelts
and their uses. Participants will identify priorities, share their opinions,
and develop supporting action items to ensure that Greenbelts and Natural
Areas are managed in a way that ensures their health and vitality, and serve
the open space and "breathing" room needs of the city. 

 

.         If your organization would like to participate in a focus group,
we ask that you fill out the attached Focus Group Application Form with the
name, phone number and email address of one representative from your
organization/group and a preferred date and send back to
susanne.rockwell AT seattle.gov no later than March 6, 2015. 

 

.          You will receive a confirmation of your attendance from our
Consultants, Stepherson & Associates Communications by March 12, 2015. 

 

For more information about the Natural Area and Greenbelt Supplemental Use
Guidelines process, please visit the project webpage:

http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/NaturalAreaGreenbeltUse/default.htm

 

Thank you,

 

Susanne Rockwell

Strategic Advisor, Office of the Superintendent

Seattle Parks and Recreation 

100 Dexter Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109

206-733-9702

 

www.seattle.gov/parks
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Subject: Ol' Rusty Returns
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 16:03:33 -0800
Eating lunch just now with my dear ol' Dad, here in Port Townsend, I noted my 
first Rufous Hummingbird of the year- a spectacularly bright rusty male - at 
the feeder. 

My parents both have dementia, and my Mom, the energizer bunny, is almost 
always supervising every movement in the household, but today was pooped out 
and napping at lunchtime, thus allowing me and Dad a quality moment alone at 
the table. 

As we both noted the hummer out the window, Dad asked me "Hey Audubon" ( I'm 
the well-known birdwatcher in the family - I also paint pictures, so sometimes 
Dad calls me Rembrandt) " what's going on with the Eagle's in the Eagle Tree- 
haven't seen them around". The' Eagle Tree' is a tall Doug-fir prominent in the 
view out the kitchen window, and a pair of Eagles have roosted there for years. 
But Dad was correct - they have been missing lately. 

Dad has been missing lately too, largely sleeping the end of his life away. 
Getting kinda rusty I guess - but sometimes, like today, he comes back, just a 
bit. 

Jeff "Audubon" Gibson inPort Townsend Wa

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Subject: Okanogan Birding and Updated Photos
From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 23:13:03 +0000
Hi Tweets: 


We spent several hours birding the Okanogan Highlands and the birding quality 
was great. Most of the snow has melted below the 4000 feet level but most of 
the wintering specialties still remain in the usual spots. We looked hard for 
the Northern Pygmy Owls but found none:( It was also nice to find a herd of elk 
along Mary Ann Creek Rd and stumbled upon a Great Gray just as we were about to 
give up and leave! 



Golden Eagle-several birds near Chesaw


Great Horned Owl-several birds along Havillah Rd 


Northern Saw-Whet Owl-a great visual of a roosting bird 


Great Gray Owl-a regal bird found near Sno-Park. Almost gave up, and I luckily 
stumbled upon one, perched low in a conifer and blending in well. We all sat 
down in awe and admired in 30 F temps with sun on our backs. It got our hearts 
pumping and it felt balmy and delightful! 



Ruffed Grouse -several birds feeding along Davies and Nealey Rd. Great looks of 
these beautiful fancy chickens. 



Williamson's Sapsucker-drumming birds near Davies 


Snow Buntings-a flock of 75 birds along Grange Rd. Always a treat to watch 
these Escher snowbirds fly and swirl. 



Common Redpolls-a flock of a dozen birds along Mary Ann Creek Rd with great 
views of a colorful male with lots of pink blush. 



Pine Grosbeaks-several flocks along Mary Ann Creek and Pontiac Ridge Rd. 
Several lovely males and russet forms in good light. 



Gray Crowned Rosy-finches-40 spumoni snow birds still lingering along Nealey Rd 



We found a big flock of Bohemian Waxwing, roughly 1000 birds, along Hwy 97/172 
Junction near Monse. They were buzzing loudly and 'fly catching' for insects. 
It was a very cool to see these immaculate beauties in large numbers. 



It appears that the previously reported Snowy Owls near Lamoine, (along F/11th 
Rd) have dispersed with the lack of snow cover. All of the snow has melted 
here, leaving them little protection for camouflage or for staying cool. We did 
not find any despite seeing up to 4-6 birds a couple of weeks ago. 



The weather was gorgeous and we had a fantastic time!  


Here are some recent photos from the last couple of weeks birding in the 
Okanogan and Wallowas areas. 



Sorry for the delay but it has been crazy busy for me but life is swell and 
sweet:) Hope you will enjoy the photos. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/23662496 AT N02/


Peace, love and good birding, 


Khanh   		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know the local Mallards
From: Bob Sundstrom <ixoreus AT scattercreek.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:31:04 -1000
There is a good description of Steller's Jay courtship song, typically 
performed by males within a dense bush, at Birds of North America Online. 
Likely what you heard. Infrequently heard in my experience. 


Bob Sundstrom 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 4, 2015, at 10:18 AM, Joshua Glant  wrote:
> 
> Hello Tweets,
> 
> While walking down a neighborhood street yesterday afternoon, I heard the 
strangest bird call coming from a 4-foot tall rhododendron bush in a yard. It 
started with the cluck-cluck-cluck of a Yellow-billed Cuckoo, then switched to 
a Song Sparrow-like warbling that made me wonder if an exotic Asian finch 
hadn't escaped from some nearby aviary or cage. I proceeded to record the 
sound, and I leaned down to peek into the bush and try to spot the singer. 

> 
> I walked closer and closer, inching slowly forward so as not to scare it. The 
bird cuckoo-clucked again, then warbled once more. Suddenly and without 
warning, a Steller's Jay, blue-black plumage, crest and all, came shooting out 
of the bush and flapped rapidly away with an annoyed chatter. 

> 
> Half an hour later, I heard the same sound again, and looked up to find a 
(the) Steller's Jay perched atop a cedar. 

> 
> I have never heard anything like it. It reminded me of the Raven's "comfort 
sounds", softly given to a mate or chick, who can also make the sound as well. 

> 
> I felt like I had walked in on someone who was humming to their self in a 
quiet room! 

> 
> Also, I heard a Band-tailed Pigeon screech and then coo at Ellis Pond. A 
single call note that sounded exactly like a Western Tanager got adrenaline 
rushing for a moment, as I had just been reflecting on the one that I had seen 
there last August and then another in my yard a week later. And the House 
Finches are very numerous in the area around the pond, even though they are 
scarce at my house just on the other side of the woods! 

> 
> I spent a while trying to find ways to recognize individual Mallards at Ellis 
Pond. 

> The male with heavily brown-flecked sides is my favorite, and he sticks 
constantly with his mate, the one with the gray-green bill. The dominant male 
had the whitest flanks, and his quacks would almost always get a response. 
There was one hen with a bright orange bill, another drake with brown streaks 
on the sides, and then there were about 7 other Mallards also there, enjoying a 
few scraps of bread thrown by neighbors and kids. 

> 
> On a final note, "Barry" the Barred Owl (though there's a good chance that 
there is more than one in our neighborhood) was hooting quite loudly and quite 
close to my window last night. Instead of the normal 8-note pattern, (s)he 
called in a string of the same note, like 
"who-cooks-cooks-cooks-cooks-cooks-for-you-all?", giving the effect of an 
object spinning rapidly as it whooshes through the air. 

> 
> Beautiful and birdy as always in this early spring! Let's hope the wintering 
birds hang around for a bit longer, otherwise mid to late March may be a bit 
slow for birders. 

> 
> Good birding, Joshua Glant
> 
> Mercer Island, WA
> 
> Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Bald Eagles preying on Heron colonies
From: falcophile AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 21:13:14 +0000 (UTC)
Tweets, 

For the last few years there has been "symbiotic" nesting of Great Blue Herons 
and Peregrine Falcons along the Duwamish River in West Seattle. The herons nest 
on the wooded hillside of Pigeon Point, just Southwest of the West Seattle 
Bridge. The Peregrine Falcons who nest on the high bridge have established an 
"Eagle no fly zone" around their nesting turf, which also serves to protect the 
heron rookery. 


Ed Deal 
Seattle, WA _______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Osprey nest near Montesano (Jason Hernandez
From: Larry Eickstaedt <papaduck231 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 20:44:22 +0000 (UTC)
Jason, you may be thinking of the nest that was on a snag in a marshy area to 
the left as you approached the Montesano cutoff. That snag came down a number 
of years ago. The nest I was referring to was on the cross arms of a power pole 
next to the Hwy. 207 bridge over the Chehalis River. 
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Subject: Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know the local Mallards
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:18:42 -0800
Hello Tweets,

While walking down a neighborhood street yesterday afternoon, I heard the 
strangest bird call coming from a 4-foot tall rhododendron bush in a yard. It 
started with the cluck-cluck-cluck of a Yellow-billed Cuckoo, then switched to 
a Song Sparrow-like warbling that made me wonder if an exotic Asian finch 
hadn't escaped from some nearby aviary or cage. I proceeded to record the 
sound, and I leaned down to peek into the bush and try to spot the singer. 


I walked closer and closer, inching slowly forward so as not to scare it. The 
bird cuckoo-clucked again, then warbled once more. Suddenly and without 
warning, a Steller's Jay, blue-black plumage, crest and all, came shooting out 
of the bush and flapped rapidly away with an annoyed chatter. 


Half an hour later, I heard the same sound again, and looked up to find a (the) 
Steller's Jay perched atop a cedar. 


I have never heard anything like it. It reminded me of the Raven's "comfort 
sounds", softly given to a mate or chick, who can also make the sound as well. 


I felt like I had walked in on someone who was humming to their self in a quiet 
room! 


Also, I heard a Band-tailed Pigeon screech and then coo at Ellis Pond. A single 
call note that sounded exactly like a Western Tanager got adrenaline rushing 
for a moment, as I had just been reflecting on the one that I had seen there 
last August and then another in my yard a week later. And the House Finches are 
very numerous in the area around the pond, even though they are scarce at my 
house just on the other side of the woods! 


I spent a while trying to find ways to recognize individual Mallards at Ellis 
Pond. 

The male with heavily brown-flecked sides is my favorite, and he sticks 
constantly with his mate, the one with the gray-green bill. The dominant male 
had the whitest flanks, and his quacks would almost always get a response. 
There was one hen with a bright orange bill, another drake with brown streaks 
on the sides, and then there were about 7 other Mallards also there, enjoying a 
few scraps of bread thrown by neighbors and kids. 


On a final note, "Barry" the Barred Owl (though there's a good chance that 
there is more than one in our neighborhood) was hooting quite loudly and quite 
close to my window last night. Instead of the normal 8-note pattern, (s)he 
called in a string of the same note, like 
"who-cooks-cooks-cooks-cooks-cooks-for-you-all?", giving the effect of an 
object spinning rapidly as it whooshes through the air. 


Beautiful and birdy as always in this early spring! Let's hope the wintering 
birds hang around for a bit longer, otherwise mid to late March may be a bit 
slow for birders. 


Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

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Subject: Brambling -yes
From: "JERRY D AND MARCENE D'ADDIO" <jmdaddio AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:39:55 -0800
Present at 11:15 and was seen by 7 people. Location was across the street from 
the house, down the hill. Ate a caterpillar while sitting in the flowering 
tree. Observed for about 10 minutes then flew away. 

Marcy D'Addio
Redmond, WA


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Subject: Re: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:58:44 -0800
I tried to find the pigeon you Lamont again going upstream checking the pilings 
I am now at frenchmans bar just sitting. so far also I've picked up first year 
Westernand Thayers gull and a group of 6 Savannah Sparrows. 


Bob

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

I am at the end of Lower River Rd bait fish are in and gulls/ cormorants 
everywhere. As i sat here a pigeon gullimot fly by 20 yds off shore going up 
stream. It came by to fast for a photo. Cant miss the fat body tapering on both 
ends and large white wing patches. Seen five minutes ago 1014 hrs. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:58:44 -0800
I tried to find the pigeon you Lamont again going upstream checking the pilings 
I am now at frenchmans bar just sitting. so far also I've picked up first year 
Westernand Thayers gull and a group of 6 Savannah Sparrows. 


Bob

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

I am at the end of Lower River Rd bait fish are in and gulls/ cormorants 
everywhere. As i sat here a pigeon gullimot fly by 20 yds off shore going up 
stream. It came by to fast for a photo. Cant miss the fat body tapering on both 
ends and large white wing patches. Seen five minutes ago 1014 hrs. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:20:12 -0800
I am at the end of Lower River Rd bait fish are in and gulls/ cormorants 
everywhere. As i sat here a pigeon gullimot fly by 20 yds off shore going up 
stream. It came by to fast for a photo. Cant miss the fat body tapering on both 
ends and large white wing patches. Seen five minutes ago 1014 hrs. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:20:12 -0800
I am at the end of Lower River Rd bait fish are in and gulls/ cormorants 
everywhere. As i sat here a pigeon gullimot fly by 20 yds off shore going up 
stream. It came by to fast for a photo. Cant miss the fat body tapering on both 
ends and large white wing patches. Seen five minutes ago 1014 hrs. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Seattle-area merlin research project
From: Benjamin Johnson <tiger80 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:40:35 -0600
 

Hello All.  We
are entering into the third year of our merlin research project.  This
project is investigating merlin nest site characteristics, nesting success and
density, site and pair fidelity, and adult and juvenile annual movements.

 

In 2014 we followed 8
nests in North Seattle and surrounding communities.  Five of the 8 nests
successfully fledged young, producing at least 21 young merlins by our count,
with an average of 4.2 fledglings per successful nest.  All nests occurred
in Douglas fir trees, near the top of trees against the main trunks.

 

To track individual
merlin movements and relationships we band some merlins with blue or red color
bands.  Each color band has a two character code that identifies the
merlin.  Blue bands use two letters, stacked one on top of the other, read
top to bottom.  Red bands use two numbers, side-by-side, read left to
right.

 

Wed like to thank
everyone that contributed banded merlin sightings or merlin observations last
year.  It was very helpful for our study and we appreciate all the reports
we received.  As we approach another breeding season we again would be
very interested and appreciative of any banded merlin sightings or possible
breeding activity that you may observe.  If you are so inclined to share
your observations please contact Ben Vang-Johnson (bvjohnson87 at gmail dot 
com) 

or Kim McCormick (kim.mccormick at comcast dot net).

                                                  

Thank you,

 

Ben and Kim 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Rules for the black birdwatcher (video)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:45:46 +0100
hello everyone,

as a female birder who usually chases birds alone, i've had some rather
scary experiences in the field. fortunately, i've always escaped unscathed.
but that said, i cannot even imagine how scary it must be to be a black man
who goes birding, especially in the South. this funny but sad video by our
very own BirdNote radio, shares a little of what it's like to be a black
birder:

short URL:

http://gu.com/p/44ze7/stw

long URL:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2015/mar/04/rules-for-the-black-birdwatcher 


tschüss,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
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Subject: Franklin's Gull at KGY Olympia
From: festuca AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 06:08:55 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Folks - 

This afternoon, I had a basic-plumaged Franklin's at the Cascade Pole mudflats 
on the east side of the KGY radio studio. The tide was mid-low & flooding, and 
the bird was in a group of a dozen-and-a-half Mew Gulls. A first-of-the-year 
for me. 


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22165534 

Cheers, 
jon. 
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