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Updated on Sunday, March 1 at 01:47 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black-faced Shrikebill,©BirdQuest

28 Feb Magnuson Park, 28 February 2015 [Scott Ramos ]
28 Feb Issaquah Brambling ["Al " ]
28 Feb Edmonds Roundup [Carol Riddell ]
28 Feb RE: Another Heronry gone? []
28 Feb RE: Another Heronry Gone? ["Bob" ]
28 Feb Pheasant ["Tracey Kidston photography" ]
28 Feb Another Heronry Gone? []
28 Feb Union Bay Watch | Crossbills to Cucumbers [Larry Hubbell ]
28 Feb camera lens found at Edmonds Pier [Joe Sweeney ]
28 Feb BirdNote, last week, and the week of March 1, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 Feb Issaquah Brambling - YES [Joshua Glant ]
28 Feb Issaquah Brambling [Rick Hibpshman ]
28 Feb Mystery bird call - this time with a recording! [Joshua Glant ]
27 Feb Marymoor Park - Dog saves heron! ["Mike Hamilton" ]
27 Feb Red-naped Sapsucker in Volunteer Park last Monday [Kevin Purcell ]
27 Feb Re:Great Gray Owl at Reifel Bird Sanctuary in Delta BC Canada ["kathleen" ]
27 Feb RFI: Birds at Chinook Bend ["Vanderhoof, Jennifer" ]
27 Feb Issaquah Brambling Update - Friday Morning [Carol Riddell ]
27 Feb Pine siskins at Point No Point [Annette Wright ]
26 Feb RFI Vancouver (WA) Rarities [Jon Houghton ]
26 Feb Brambling seen 10:15am Mt. Fury stakeout [Shep Thorp ]
26 Feb Yard birds - the changing scene [Rob Conway ]
26 Feb Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2015-02-26 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
26 Feb Another FOY for the day - Grosbeak ["A & S Hill" ]
26 Feb Another FOY for the day - Grosbeak ["A & S Hill" ]
26 Feb Issaquah brambling - yes ["Louise Rutter" ]
26 Feb Great Gray in Jasper [Loren Mooney ]
26 Feb Snow Geese in the Skagit ["zuckerbond" ]
26 Feb Rufous Hummingbird arrival ["A & S Hill" ]
26 Feb Rufous Hummingbird arrival ["A & S Hill" ]
26 Feb BBC News: The girl who gets gifts from birds [Hank ]
26 Feb Re: A Walk at Eide - 2/24/15 [vickibiltz ]
26 Feb The Reach of Tweeters [Blair Bernson ]
26 Feb Snow Geese still here? [Melissa Willoughby ]
26 Feb A Walk at Eide - 2/24/15 [Barbara Deihl ]
26 Feb Re: More on the Reifel Refuge (Photogenic) Great Gray Owl [Monica Van der Vieren ]
25 Feb eBird Northwest article on Northwestern Crows [Charlie Wright ]
25 Feb More on the Reifel Refuge (Photogenic) Great Gray Owl [Blair Bernson ]
25 Feb Important WOS Program - Monday March 2 [Blair Bernson ]
25 Feb Full Circle [Jeff Gibson ]
25 Feb Woodland Bottoms - Wednesday [Lyn Topinka ]
25 Feb Issaquah Brambling [Blair Bernson ]
25 Feb The Otter and the Cormorant [Jeff Gibson ]
25 Feb Bald Eagle eating fish at Lake Joy [Hank ]
25 Feb Snowy Owls & Pigeons []
25 Feb 50 birds stolen from Carnation sanctuary [Ellen Blackstone ]
25 Feb Brambling in Issaquah [Steve Pink ]
25 Feb RFI Alaska Ferry [Amy Shumann ]
25 Feb Lesser yellowlegs Ridgefield NWR Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
25 Feb Lesser yellowlegs Ridgefield NWR Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
24 Feb field trip date correction MONDAY MAR 2 [Twink Coffman ]
24 Feb field trip ..Mar 2 ..Tuesday.. 8:30 AM to 2 PM [Twink Coffman ]
24 Feb SE Owls Hovering ["D. Gluckman" ]
24 Feb Bushtits in pairs [Tom and Carol Stoner ]
24 Feb Night Beach [Jeff Gibson ]
24 Feb re: Observing & Respecting Owls and Their Habitat [wong ]
23 Feb Observing & Respecting Owls and Their Habitat - A WOS Birding Ethics Press Release [Barbara Deihl ]
23 Feb Skagit and Stanwood ["D. Gluckman" ]
23 Feb test ["Edwin Lamb" ]
23 Feb 978075551 [Idie Ulsh ]
23 Feb (Clark Co.) Ross's still at Lowlands [Luke Hanes ]
23 Feb Fw: Peregrine falcons under the West Seattle high bridge [Mary Metz ]
23 Feb Great Blue Heron building nest at Ballard Locks in Seattle [Hank ]
22 Feb WA Birder List Report is now available ["washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle" ]
23 Feb Good year for Eurasian Wigeons [Jason Hernandez ]
22 Feb Swans on Whidbey [IAN YOUNG ]
22 Feb Guillemots, etc. [Jeff Gibson ]
22 Feb Three owl night, thanks to waking early [Bob ]
22 Feb Three owl night, thanks to waking early [Bob ]
22 Feb Re: swans on Whidbey Island ["Martha Jordan" ]
22 Feb Rockpipers on Alki, West Seattle [Eric Stahlfeld ]
21 Feb Eagle & Owls videos + a bird art show [Hank ]
21 Feb Delta great grey [Debra Lewis ]
21 Feb Great Blue Heron Rookery, and a Tufted Duck at the Other Vancouver [Joshua Glant ]
21 Feb some "spring" firsts, south Thurston Co ["Paul Hicks" ]
21 Feb Update on bald eagle in local news [Teresa Stokes ]

Subject: Magnuson Park, 28 February 2015
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 22:12:35 -0800
After a week of 70 degree temps in SE Arizona, this morning was downright cold, 
especially with the breeze that made the 40s seem like the 30s. But, the clear 
skies and varied bird activity made it worthwhile. Plenty of water birds still 
around, but the wind made it hard to see much of anything out in the lake. A 
canoe and tent were on the swim platform, so no gull activity there. And, lots 
of boats nearshore and off-leash dogs splashing about created more challenges. 
Notables for the morning included: 


Eurasian Wigeon - male among the large American Wigeon flock, Entrance Pond; 
also in the flock was a male Eurasian x American Wigeon with a reddish crescent 
on the face where green should be 

Scaup - a few dozen of each Lesser and Greater
Ring-necked Duck - a pair on Dead-end Pond
Common Merganser - about a dozen; the males were doing a lot of head bobbing 
and croaking 

Red-necked Grebe - one was braving the waves out in the lake, in full breeding 
plumage 

Cooper’s Hawk - one adult, one juvie, Promontory Point
Red-tailed Hawk - very light adult, also over the Point
Virginia Rail - 2, one giving the kiddick call
Barn Owl - 1 at the new box across from the Tower bldg
Anna’s Hummingbird - at least a dozen, almost all male; one female gathering 
nesting material on Promontory Point 

Tree Swallow - 1 flew out to the lake
Brown Creeper - 3, don’t see these even half the time; one was very 
cooperative in its preening: http://youtu.be/r-LlT9sDckc 
 

Purple Finch - at least half a dozen; several non-adult-male singing

For the day, 58 species; with TRSW new, 76 species for the year.
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22117935 
 

Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Issaquah Brambling
From: "Al " <aclark AT wamail.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 18:23:31 -0800
I was one of about 15 birders waiting for the Brambling Saturday morning. 
Finally a picture opportunity-I got at least a dozen, but none were very sharp, 
even with Photoshop. 


My best picture at:

http://www.pbase.com/image/159301897

Al Clark_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds Roundup
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:59:54 -0800
February dished up some interesting sightings for Edmonds. No new species has 
been seen and there have been no existing code 5 (fewer than 5 records) birds 
seen. Code 4 (rare, 5+ records) sightings include Wood Duck at Pine Ridge Park 
(high of five) and Chase Lake (a pair), an American Kestrel at Chase Lake, and 
a Western Meadowlark near the marsh. Code 3 (harder to find but usually seen 
annually) sightings were Peregrine Falcon twice at the marsh, Eurasian 
Collared-Dove once at the marsh, and Common Raven in a neighborhood along 220th 
St. SW. Our code 2 (uncommon) sighting was one of the Barred Owls in Yost Park. 
Another code 2 species, Virginia Rail, was heard grunting in the Pine Ridge 
Park marshy area. Although it is a code 1 (common) species, we have only 
recently added a lone Northern Shoveler to the year list. 


It was not new to February, but there have been a number of Wilson's Snipe 
sightings at the marsh this month. The numbers have been unusually large for 
this location. There was one observation of four snipes and another of five 
snipes. Other locations have been reporting swallows. We have not seen any yet, 
other than the winter Barn Swallows. 


On the waterfront, Harlequin Ducks (code 3) continue in small numbers north of 
the underwater park, seen from Sunset Avenue. Brants are foraging along the 
shore north of the ferry dock. With afternoon ebb tides right now, it is 
possible to walk north along the beach and observe them at closer range. 


We have reached 100 species for the first two months of 2015. If you would like 
a copy of the revised checklist, with species abundance codes, please email us 
at checklistedmonds at gmail dot com. We will send you a PDF that you can print 
or just save to your computer. There are significant differences between the 
Edmonds and Snohomish County checklists. If you bird Edmonds frequently, or 
even occasionally, it can be a useful tool. 


May March bring many good birds,

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Another Heronry gone?
From: MEYER2J AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 19:32:21 -0500
Tweets:
 
The Kenmore heronry tends to get a later start than in other areas.   
Actually, the heronry has been in existence since 1990. For about an hour there 

were no birds flying around; none seen on or over the water.  Usually  by 
this date most of the nests are occupied with heron pairs busy with nest  
repair and pair bonding.  Let's hope all the birds were simply out and away  
enjoying the sunshine before settling down to the task at hand.
 
Joyce Meyer
Redmond, WA
_meyer2j AT aol.com_ (mailto:meyer2j AT aol.com) _______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Another Heronry Gone?
From: "Bob" <bobs AT world-wide.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:44:17 -0800
I catch a bus from Seattle at that park and ride and counted 25 GBHs on
nests on 2/17 (in eBird).

I have seen some birds on nests many times since, but also remember seeing
what seemed like the entire flock flying around the tops of parking lot
trees one day last week.  Spooked?  I did not see any eagles but I was in a
hurry.

I will pay more attention next week.

 

Bob Schmidt

Bothell, WA

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of
MEYER2J AT aol.com
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 1:22 PM
To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Another Heronry Gone?

 

Hi Tweets:

 

March 6th is Great Blue Heron viewing day in Kenmore (behind the
park-n-ride),  sponsored in part by Eastside Audubon.  However, today there
was only 1 heron in the vicinity of nearly 40 nests.  This heronry has been
viable since 1998.  "Viewing" starts at 11 AM followed by a noon
presentation by Mike West at the nearby fire house.  Topic?  Great Blue
Herons.

 

Joyce Meyer

Redmond, WA

meyer2j AT aol.com
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Subject: Pheasant
From: "Tracey Kidston photography" <info AT traceykidstonphotography.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:29:09 -0800
I have an unusual visitor at my feeders today not sure where this pheasant 
belongs. You can see an image at my Facebook page. 



Thanks,
Tracey Kidston 
Gig Harbor, WA

http://www.traceykidstonphotography.com
https://www.facebook.com/TraceyKidstonPhotography_______________________________________________
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Subject: Another Heronry Gone?
From: MEYER2J AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:21:30 -0500
Hi Tweets:
 
March 6th is Great Blue Heron viewing day in Kenmore (behind the  
park-n-ride), sponsored in part by Eastside Audubon. However, today there was 
only 

1 heron in the vicinity of nearly 40 nests.  This heronry  has been viable 
since 1998.  "Viewing" starts at 11 AM followed by a noon  presentation by 
Mike West at the nearby fire house.  Topic?  Great  Blue Herons.
 
Joyce Meyer
Redmond, WA
_meyer2j AT aol.com_ (mailto:meyer2j AT aol.com) _______________________________________________
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Subject: Union Bay Watch | Crossbills to Cucumbers
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:54:06 -0800
Tweeters,

This week's post covers crossbills, the red-naped sapsucker, a male downy 
woodpecker and male & female pileated woodpeckers in the Arboretum, plus a 
cooper's hawk and an otter at the Union Bay Natural Area. The last week and a 
half have been busy. The cherry blossoms are starting on some of the trees, 
while the magnolia blossoms seem to have just popped out without any warning. 
It certainly feels like spring around Union Bay. 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2015/02/crossbills-to-cucumbers.html

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net_______________________________________________
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Subject: camera lens found at Edmonds Pier
From: Joe Sweeney <sweeneyfit AT mac.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:23:42 -0800
This morning, Saturday, 2/28/15, I found a camera lens on a bench on the 
Edmonds Pier. 

It probably belongs to the photographer who was leaving when I arrived after 
7am. 


If its yours, email me and describe it, and then you can retrieve it from me.

Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
sweeneyfit at mac dot com

sweeneyfit.wordpress.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sweeneyfit/

http://joe-sweeney.fineartamerica.com



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Subject: BirdNote, last week, and the week of March 1, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:02:05 -0800
Hey, Tweets,

Check out the new BirdNote video with Clemson's Dr. Drew Lanham,
"Rules for the Black Birdwatcher" - http://youtu.be/4thb2zGuOnU
_____________________

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Snowy Owls Are Here - With Gerrit Vyn of Cornell
http://bit.ly/1o2NBr6
* Bird Tracks in the Snow - A story without words
http://bit.ly/17EXtmN
* Wood Storks and Climate Change
http://bit.ly/1E1gUCz
* February - Summer in Argentina
http://bit.ly/1EyrnWV
* Flocking and Foraging, Safety in Numbers
http://bit.ly/1DjZnSi
* Ravens' Love Song
http://bit.ly/1BoJei2
* Regal Great Blue Heron
http://bit.ly/1vI3oCw
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1E1hksP
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a 
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related 
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+ 
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote_______________________________________________
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Subject: Issaquah Brambling - YES
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:00:31 -0800
Good morning Tweets,

The Brambling put on quite a show this morning! There was a brief sighting at 
8:15 AM, before I arrived. But the real magic started at 9:50 AM, when someone 
spotted it in the cedar just to the right of the deck. After sitting in the 
tree for about one minute with its head peeking out, the Brambling flew into 
the holly bush up the hill for about 20 minutes. 


Then, it briefly flew into the blossoming white magnolia in the yard, before 
returning to the tall cedar, where Alan Grenon refound it for all of us at 
about 10:25 AM. The Brambling sat very still for long periods of time, and 
everyone present got good looks and photos. The Brambling even stretched its 
wing out and preened at one point, and it was acting very calm. 


While it was in the cedar, the Brambling flew in a wide loop above the deck 
before returning to its perch, almost like a flycatcher would. It also briefly 
hopped across the deck before returning to the tree. 


Some birders there were discussing the age and sex of the bird, and settled on 
winter-plumaged male based on the orange-pink throat. 


As I left at 10:50 AM, the Brambling was spotted in the trees directly across 
the road from the house, and I caught a glimpse before it dropped down and out 
of sight. 


There was also a singing male Purple Finch, many crows, lots of siskins, two 
Varied Thrushes, and a calling Red-tailed Hawk, as well as juncos, 
Chestnut-backed Chickadees and other birds. 


The Brambling really is handsome, with its white belly, salmon-orange throat 
and breast, and grayish head with black around the beak and eyes. The pattern 
on its wings is also very unique and interesting. The Brambling has been a 
dream-bird of mine almost since the beginning of my birding career, when I 
first learned of the phenomenon of vagrancy. It is with great joy that I can 
say, "I have seen a Brambling." 


Wonderful views, wonderful bird! Birding is such a grand hobby.

Happily, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com

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Subject: Issaquah Brambling
From: Rick Hibpshman <hibpshman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:20:26 -0800
Present for a short time around 0815, 28 FEB feeding on the rail of the deck.  
 
a  very poor photo:
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/crappywildlifephotography/16673375045/
 
Rick Hibpshman
Issaquah, WA 
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Subject: Mystery bird call - this time with a recording!
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 07:26:37 -0800
Hello Tweets,

Yesterday afternoon, the birding was good in my backyard. A Bald Eagle perched 
on a branch 50 feet above our kitchen window, staying for 20 minutes as crows 
mobbed around him; our feeders were visited by both Northern Flickers and Downy 
Woodpeckers; and a few Varied Thrushes fluted deep in the forest. 


Suddenly, a strange call emerged from a tall bush near our feeders. It sounded 
almost like a syllable of the Whip-poor-will's song. While I was obtaining a 
recording, I caught a glimpse of a brown bird, probably a junco, in the bush. 


Now, my guesses this far are either junco, towhee, siskin or bushtit 
(unlikely), as all of those had been seen in the vicinity yesterday. I don't 
know, though. It sounds very intriguing! 


If you are interested in trying to solve the mystery, I will send you the voice 
recording right along. 


Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com


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Subject: Marymoor Park - Dog saves heron!
From: "Mike Hamilton" <mikeham44 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:21:13 -0800
Ok, I’m exaggerating. It wasn’t just a dog. It was a man and his dog that 
saved the heron. 


Inside the Marymoor Park off-leash dog area is at least a curious, if not 
unlikely place, for a great blue heron colony. But they have coexisted for four 
years now. Today the herons were minding their own business, hunting and 
preparing nests for the coming season (1-7). Then trouble struck and it 
wasn’t dogs or people. Forget them. It was the usual problem....eagles. An 
eagle went into the colony, snatched an adult heron and made a 150 foot glide 
to the ground with it, landing about thirty feet off a main footpath. 
Unfortunately I couldn’t get to a vantage point for a photo in time. They had 
only been on the ground less than ten seconds before a man and his dog came 
down the path and spooked the eagle into leaving. This was extremely good 
fortune for the heron. I think given another fraction of a minute and that 
heron was a goner. As it was, it was able to take off and join the other 
herons. The eagle returned to a place inside the colony, which was now empty of 
herons (8). At this point I discovered that it wasn’t just one eagle, but 
four adults, all together. As far as I could see there was no attempt to attack 
a heron in flight. After a few minutes, all four took off and headed toward the 
lake (9). 


After about a half hour, one of the four eagles returned to the heron colony 
circled, but didn’t land (10-11). The herons again flushed high into the sky 
(12), eventually landing in scattered groups outside the colony (13). After 
awhile they singly began to make their way back to the colony (14-18). By two 
hours after the attack, all had returned. Whether this was an opportunistic 
attack by “tourist” eagles or the beginning of persistent trouble remains 
to be seen. I have witnessed and photographed a number of eagle attacks on 
heron nests in years past at Black River in Renton, causing that colony to 
dissipate to other sites. This was the first time I have seen an eagle attack 
an adult heron in a colony. Fingers crossed for those at Marymoor! 


I spent most of the time with the herons. Otherwise, there was the Pea Patch 
male Anna’s at his usual perch (19-21), golden-crowned sparrows all over the 
place (22), and a garter snake who was thankful I wasn’t an eagle (23). 


Photos of all this are on my website at:

http://www.mikehamilton.biz

Mike Hamilton
Sammamish, WA
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Subject: Red-naped Sapsucker in Volunteer Park last Monday
From: Kevin Purcell <kevinpurcell AT pobox.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:00:08 -0800
Apologies for the late report.

I saw a Red-naped Sapsucker in Volunteer Park last Monday morning (at the 
Tennis Courts on the Loop Road). 


Clearly not a Red-breasted (which surprised me as that's what I've seen in VP 
previously) given the stripy head and black/white border at the top of the 
breast. 


Perhaps the Arboretum bird on a sightseeing trip to Cap Hill?

Or is there more than one hanging around?

Saturday should be nice. Keep your eyes peeled on the Hill.
--
Kevin Purcell    (Capitol Hill, Seattle, WA)
kevinpurcell AT pobox.com  |   AT kevinpurcell
http://flic.kr/kevin_g_purcell

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Subject: Re:Great Gray Owl at Reifel Bird Sanctuary in Delta BC Canada
From: "kathleen" <kathleen AT reifelbirdsanctuary.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:35:26 -0800
Hi all,

 

If people want a general update and best guess at whether they would be able
to see the Great Gray Owl here at the Sanctuary, I have been updating part
of our website daily. Visit page
http://www.reifelbirdsanctuary.com/visitor.html and look for the February
updates. Every morning, our staff go looking for the bird to make sure it is
still around. If we can't find it, we generally let people know at the Gift
Shop and update the website to that effect. If we don't find it in the
morning, visitors should know that there is less likelihood of a viewing
that day.

 

If it is around, it is usually holed up in a cedar tree in an area that is
out of bounds, and we leave the bird to rest for the morning. Although
sometimes we have let small groups of 8-10 people into the roost site, it is
only after lunch, and usually only on those really bright days when the bird
might not appear out in the meadow until quite late. (One day last weekend,
we took about 20 of these small groups in for a very short viewing of just a
few minutes each, and spent the whole afternoon doing that until everyone
had had a look).  Lately we have started to keep the big cameras and tripods
out of the narrow trail by the roost tree as there isn't much space and
seems to be too much equipment and noise underfoot for the bird. Later in
the day, it nearly always moves over to hunt in a nearby meadow, also closed
to visitors, but we let most interested visitors in at that point, as
everyone can stand on the roadway and get a good view.  

 

I hope this helps people who might be planning a trip. Everyone has been
very good around this bird, but then again, the bird keeps to the areas out
of bounds to visitors, so all viewing has been supervised.

 

Kathleen Fry, R.P.Bio

Sanctuary Manager

George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary

www.reifelbirdsanctuary.com

Direct Line: 604-946-6985

 
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Subject: RFI: Birds at Chinook Bend
From: "Vanderhoof, Jennifer" <Jennifer.Vanderhoof AT kingcounty.gov>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:47:39 +0000
King County will be conducting an assessment on some of the restoration work 
regarding the wetland at Chinook Bend Natural Area, and we are seeking 
information on birds observed on site. Do you make regular birding treks to 
Chinook Bend and keep bird lists? If so, we'd be very interested in what you've 
seen. 


Thanks!
-Jen

Jennifer Vanderhoof, Senior Ecologist | King County Water and Land Resources 
Division | Ph: 206-477-4840 | jennifer dot vanderhoof at kingcounty dot gov 


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Subject: Issaquah Brambling Update - Friday Morning
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:41:06 -0800
Came in to feed on the deck railing twice about 9 a.m. Seen for a total of 
about 3 minutes. Traveling with the juncos. 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: Pine siskins at Point No Point
From: Annette Wright <acapwright AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:43:16 -0800
We've been seeing a flock of pine siskins all week at our thistle and sunflower 
seed feeders at Point No Point, Hansville. 


Joe and Annette W

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Subject: RFI Vancouver (WA) Rarities
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 22:45:01 +0000
Hi Tweets - contemplating a trip to the South of WA this weekend and wondered 
if anyone has seen (or dipped on) the Tufted Duck or Ross's Goose in the last 
few days? Feel free to respond off-line. - Thanks!! 


Jon Houghton
Edmonds (206) 601-0773

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Subject: Brambling seen 10:15am Mt. Fury stakeout
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:32:13 -0800
Hi Tweets,
Several of us had 5 minute observation of the previously reported Brambling at 
625 Mt. Fury Circle S.W. in Issaquah around 10:15 am. The bird flew in with 
Dark-eyed Juncos, perched in the two Cedar Trees just to the right of the deck, 
and bathed in the gutter on the right side of the house. The very nice owner of 
the home placed seed on the railing of the deck to attract the birds. There is 
a pull off across the street from the house with room for 4 cars, which 
provides for nice viewing. A quiet neighborhood with little traffic. 

Good birding,
Shep

Shep Thorp
Browns Point

http://flic.kr/p/r6tHir


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Subject: Yard birds - the changing scene
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 21:59:53 +0000
Tweets,
 
I've been mostly confined to home for the past several weeks - except for a 2 
week trip to Florida to be evaluated for a transplant at Mayo Clinic in 
Jacksonville (no time for birding there). 

 
Here at home spring is definitely starting with changing birds, blooming 
flowers, and general vernal behavior from flora and fauna alike. Every morning 
I am now awakened by the penny whistle calls of Varied Thrushes from every 
direction. It is fun to listen to the differences in tone and call length from 
individual birds - just wish I could see them when they are calling as I'd like 
to know if sex makes a difference in call type and length. Continuing on the 
thrush front American Robins have moved in en force over the past two weeks. 
Their songs and calls continue all day. I even saw a robin exploring the vine 
clad porch column where there was a nest last year - so early for this. 

 
I had my first Rufous Hummingbird male at the feeders yesterday (2/25/15). He 
stayed around for at least a couple of hours, sparring on and off with the 
resident Anna's. The Anna's are showing mating behavior and their song/call is 
a constant from dawn 'til dusk every day. 

 
Great Horned Owls are calling every night - I have even gotten them to converse 
with me and come in to the dead snag where I can see their outline against the 
western evening and night sky. I have also heard both Saw Whet and Screech Owls 
in the yard and Barred Owls in the more forested area on the slopes to the 
north and west. Yesterday Redtail Hawks appeared and were calling loudly before 
the rain set in. I'm guessing this might be the pair that has nested yearly in 
the big fir just up the slope for the past 3 years - they have produced 8 
offspring during that time that have all fledged and then stuck around with 
juvenile antics and calls until fall pushes them out. 

 
My feeders are crowded with Purple, House and Cassin's Finches, American and 
Lesser Goldfinches, Black Capped and Chestnut Backed Chickadees (a 2 
Mountain's!), White and Red Breasted Nuthatches and the occasional cowbird. The 
suet feeders have a constant clientele of Bushtits, Flickers, Downy and Hairy 
Woodpeckers, Fox and Song sparrows, and Scrub and Steller's Jays. I put out 
seed on my deck and have a flock of 30+ Dark Eyed Juncos feeding there. It is 
interesting to observe the diversity of plumages shown. I have Oregon, Slate 
Colored, and Pink Sided almost every day - with the Oregon numbers taking up 
most of the flock. I have trained to Steller's and Western Scrub Jays to come 
to the sound of a cup I bang out after throwing out my feed mix of millet, 
milo, corn, sunflower seeds and peanuts. I get as many as 20 at a time and they 
are a hoot to watch. They are joined by many Mourning Doves, Towhees, 5 sparrow 
species and occasional surprises like a seed loving Varied Thrush. 

 
I'll put out my bird boxes and nesting materials this weekend to see what 
critters stick around. 

 
Cheers,
 
Rob


Rob Conway  
Camas, WA
45.58N 122.44W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 

 
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2015-02-26
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:06:53 -0800
Tweets – Another fine day for February; though today was gray and misty, it 
was warm (44-50) and fairly birdy. 


Highlights:

Red-tailed Hawk        One at odd-snag nest west of park entrance
California Gull            Two adults
HERRING GULL          3rd-winter bird with GWGU and GWGUxWEGUs
N. Saw-whet Owl       Matt heard one very early
Northern Shrike          Adult in East Meadow
Tree Swallow             6 over Dog Meadow
Red Crossbill              ~30 in mansion firs
American Goldfinch   Large flock, 10-20 birds

We’d done pretty well for species count by the time we got to the Rowing 
Club, though the only woodpecker we’d had was NORTHERN FLICKER. But down near 
the old boathouse, we suddenly had a RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER, two male DOWNY 
WOODPECKERS, and a pair of HAIRY WOODPECKERS. Couldn’t turn up a Pileated 
though. 


So, for the day, 60 species. We averaged 60.25 species/week for February, after 
averaging 57 in January. Low count for the year: 56 (thrice). 2015 is starting 
well! 


Nothing new for the year except MUSKRAT.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
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Subject: Another FOY for the day - Grosbeak
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:29:32 -0800
Adult female EVENING GROSBEAK with a flock of Pine Siskins. She is picking
up what the Siskins are dropping from the feeder.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Another FOY for the day - Grosbeak
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:29:32 -0800
Adult female EVENING GROSBEAK with a flock of Pine Siskins. She is picking
up what the Siskins are dropping from the feeder.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
Subject: Issaquah brambling - yes
From: "Louise Rutter" <louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:11:57 -0800
I looked for the brambling 9.30-10.40am this morning. At no point during
this period was the bird seen on the deck railing where the feed was. It was
spotted at about 10.15am in the dense conifer at the right corner of the
house. It also flew into the flowering bush in the yard, across the road
into the trees opposite the house, and eventually down behind the house and
out of sight. It was seen for a little over five minutes.

 

Louise Rutter

Kirkland
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Subject: Great Gray in Jasper
From: Loren Mooney <loren.mooney AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:07:24 -0800
Off topic a little - it's Alberta, not Washington - but I thought I'd
share.  I went up to Jasper and Calgary a couple weeks ago for a
photography workshop.  While there, I got some fun pics of some snowy owls
around Calgary and a great gray owl near Jasper, plus some other fun
stuff.  The trip pics are here.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/sets/72157650502069370/

Shameless plug:  One of the great gray owl shots was featured today in Nat
Geo's Daily Dozen.  If you like the shot, please vote for it.  If it gets
enough votes it will be published in the magazine.  :)

http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/daily-dozen/2015-02-26/

-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
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Subject: Snow Geese in the Skagit
From: "zuckerbond" <zuckerbond AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:12:31 -0800
Hi Melissa,

I was up in the Skagit on Sunday 2/22, and saw many thousands of snow geese.
I first saw a large flock at about 5 pm in the fields north of Calhoun Rd.,
between Best Rd. and Bradshaw Rd. 

Then I took in sunset, dusk, and dark at the Fir Island Farms/Hayton WDFW
site off Fir Island Rd., where I was able to watch even larger flocks of
Snow Geese fly out to the bay.

Mary Bond, Seattle zuckerbond over at comcast.net

 

Subject: Snow Geese still here?

Date: Thu Feb 26 2015 10:36 am

From: putabirdonit AT hotmail.com 

Hi Tweets-

Are the Snow Geese still up in the Skagit in large numbers?  I have some out
of town friends asking and I've not been up there in a while.

Thanks for any info-

Melissa

Melissa Willoughby

Seattle

putabirdonit  AT  hotmail
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Subject: Rufous Hummingbird arrival
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:52:38 -0800
Just now, our first of year RUFOUS HUMMINGIBRD, a male, has arrived here in
Kalama. That's 12 days earlier than in 2014 for our yard.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Rufous Hummingbird arrival
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:52:38 -0800
Just now, our first of year RUFOUS HUMMINGIBRD, a male, has arrived here in
Kalama. That's 12 days earlier than in 2014 for our yard.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
Subject: BBC News: The girl who gets gifts from birds
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:28:09 -0800
> 
> The girl who gets gifts from birds
> 
> Lots of people give food to the birds in their garden and get nothing in 
return - but when one girl feeds the crows outside her house, they show their 
affection with tiny presents. 

> 
> Read more:
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-31604026
> 
> 
> Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: A Walk at Eide - 2/24/15
From: vickibiltz <vickibiltz AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:02:44 -0600
Barb and tweeters, 
I have noticed in my travels that there are many places the birds become 
approachable and totally ignore the public. I think caution is truly the 
correct word. We who know a birds body language can tell if we are getting to 
close. Some of the places I've been able to bird such as near Haifa, Israel, 
and some reserves in Costa Rica are very approachable, and and are great 
study's. I prefer my car for a blind when possible as most of us do. But I know 
not to turn around and head toward that falcon as it will have to move along. 

Happy Birding. We leave Tennessee shortly. We lost my coat at the airport and 
due to bad roads and freezing conditions, no attempt was made to bird. All I 
enjoyed was a mockingbird who was feeding near the door. 


Vicki Biltz
Buckley, wa
Vicki biltz at gmail. Com

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2015, at 7:44 AM, Barbara Deihl  wrote:
> 
> After receiving quite the variety of messages about the status of the birds 
and the people at Eide Rd. as of 2/23/15 (before the ethics media release was 
posted on Tweeters), I decided to venture up there again to check things out 
for myself. I arrived at 4:15 p.m and left at 6:30 p.m. 

> You can draw your own conclusions about my visit from the photos in the 
following 2 Flickr albums :-) 

> 
> 
>> Eide, The Site From the Road :      https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5hHRRm
> 
>> Eide, A Non-owl Bird Sampling (taken with a Point&Shoot :-)) : 
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk8Rtasn 

> 
> And, thank you for all the responses that were sent me, after the ethics post 
appeared on Tweeters - made for some interesting thoughts and dialog... 

> 
> 
> Barb Deihl
> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
> barbdeihl
> 
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: The Reach of Tweeters
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 09:06:46 -0800
We live in an age where the internet, digital 
photography (heck digital everything) can greatly 
broaden our reach.  Pictures shared on Picasa and 
Flickr (and elsewhere), posts on Tweeters and on 
other listservs and blog sites etc travel 
instantly across borders and time ones.  As an 
admitted "Parasitic Birder" often I find birds 
that were first seen and reported by others on 
EBird, Tweeters etc. This is a far cry from the 
days when I started birding in the early 70's when 
it was almost entirely by word of mouth, personal 
experience in the field and a few "hotlines".  
Each of us can weigh the pros and cons of the 
"good old days" which if nothing else included far 
less traffic, but there is no question that this 
electronic reach can open many doors and new paths 
and create new intersections.  This morning I 
received this link from someone in B.C. who had 
seen my post about the Reifel Great Gray.  She 
asked me to share it with Tweeters - a story in 
B.C. about a young girl in Seattle.  No 
borders...   Enjoy 
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Snow Geese still here?
From: Melissa Willoughby <putabirdonit AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:35:57 -0800
Hi Tweets-
Are the Snow Geese still up in the Skagit in large numbers? I have some out of 
town friends asking and I've not been up there in a while. 

Thanks for any info-
Melissa
 
Melissa Willoughby
Seattle
putabirdonit  AT  hotmail 
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Subject: A Walk at Eide - 2/24/15
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 05:44:39 -0800
After receiving quite the variety of messages about the status of the birds and 
the people at Eide Rd. as of 2/23/15 (before the ethics media release was 
posted on Tweeters), I decided to venture up there again to check things out 
for myself. I arrived at 4:15 p.m and left at 6:30 p.m. 

You can draw your own conclusions about my visit from the photos in the 
following 2 Flickr albums :-) 



> Eide, The Site From the Road :      https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5hHRRm

> Eide, A Non-owl Bird Sampling (taken with a Point&Shoot :-)) : 
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk8Rtasn 


And, thank you for all the responses that were sent me, after the ethics post 
appeared on Tweeters - made for some interesting thoughts and dialog... 



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl
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Subject: Re: More on the Reifel Refuge (Photogenic) Great Gray Owl
From: Monica Van der Vieren <mvanderv4137 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 05:17:16 -0800 (GMT-08:00)
Hi Blair,
You had a nicer experience on your weekday trip to Reifel than my friend and I 
did on Sunday- in fact, we did better stopping at Eide Road on the return trip, 
where we watched a magnificent flock of snow geese fly overhead as we chatted 
with a lovely group from Audubon. 


At Reifel, the woman who let us in (not the usual staff, apparently) was 
downright angry that people were showing up in the morning to see the owl (we 
intended to spend the day enjoying all the wildlife, along with several others 
waiting at the gate when she arrived). A volunteer told us that the day before, 
Saturday, 400 people had shown up in the afternoon to see the owl and they were 
taking them in groups of 10-12. She said people were deliberately coughing, 
dropping car keys, and making distracting noises to get the owl to look over 
for photos, and that the owl was "scared" by all the camera noise. She was 
really unhappy about the behavior, and said it wasn't good for the owl. She 
also said people were bugging the saw whets, which had been roosting low in the 
trees: moving branches for photos, crowding, flashing them, etc. 


My friend and I walked the trails slowly and met some wonderful birders and 
bird photographers, as well as the exotically beautiful and elegant wood ducks. 
On the second pass from the visitor's center, a group of long lenses under a 
tree signalled the presence of a saw whet. One person had a specialized 
long-distance flash, which he felt was needed because the owl was roosting so 
high in the tree with his vole of the day. Other photographers kept telling him 
not to use the flash. He was still there waiting when we turned around. One 
birder postulated the bird was roosting so high because of the previous day's 
harrassment. 


It was so depressing that we decided not to join the crowds to see the great 
gray owl. My friend, in fact, has sworn off ever going out again on notice of 
an owl siting. 


We did see a second saw whet owl. Two birders were looking for them in trees by 
the parking lot, but the volunteer in the lot said people had scared them off 
the day before. My friend knew they must be near, so we scanned the trees for 
signs and found one in a very dense cedar. We stood back and got crummy 
pictures through the branches (these are my first saw whets), but still had to 
police the tree because a woman came up and wanted to wade into the tree for a 
better picture. 


I work with the public for a living, and can tell you that posting responsible 
wildlife watching guidelines will help those that simply didn't know they were 
harrassing owls, but who care about animals. People who don't care, or who are 
very self-serving, simply don't read these things, or justify that their 
behavior is not the problem. It's not just owls that are being harrassed- it's 
happening to various animals all over the world. I've seen the same behavior 
everywhere. I personally believe it's a cultural issue, a fundamental view of 
animals, in conjunction with the availability of high quality optics and 
cameras that causes this; and that all the education in the world isn't going 
to prevent harrassment. If education, signage, fliers, and plain common sense 
can't keep people from ending up on the horns of a 2000 lb bison because they 
get too close for a picture, then there's little hope for reasonable guidance 
as an effective approach. 


Again, I'm glad you had a great day. Lovely, lovely photos as well- thank you 
for sharing. 


Monica

-----Original Message-----
>From: Blair Bernson 
>Sent: Feb 25, 2015 8:25 PM
>To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>Subject: [Tweeters] More on the Reifel Refuge (Photogenic) Great Gray Owl
>
>I joined Pilchuck Audubon yesterday visiting B.C. 
>where we found waterbirds few and far between but 
>we more than made up for it at Reifel Refuge.  In 
>a previous post Steve Pink shared his experience 
>and although we did not find a Saw Whet Owl (there 
>had been as many as 6 but not one seen yesterday), 
>we had wonderful looks at the Great Gray Owl - 
>both on its day roost and then later hunting and 
>posting in the nearby meadow.  Both areas are 
>closed to the public. At 3:00, if they have 
>located the owl, they take small groups (4 to 6) 
>out to see the Owl - getting close enough for 
>pictures (not going into that discussion area 
>after the Eide Road brouhaha).  After all groups 
>have seen the GGOW, if it has relocated to the 
>meadow (often does) then they let EVERYONE in to a 
>convenient observation spot for their fill of 
>looks and photos.  Yesterday I would estimate at 
>least 40 people there.  It is supervised and order 
>maintained but it is a very satisfying 
>experience.  The owl is approximately 200 yards in 
>from the visitor center.  They said that more than 
>4000 people have seen this owl!!!!  For most it 
>was a life bird and/or a life photo.
>
>Two pictures are at https://flic.kr/p/rmnpMi and 
>https://flic.kr/p/rmuHyR
>
>A bonus shot is my all time favorite of Wood Duck 
>- one of MANY there.  https://flic.kr/p/qpHzEM
>
>-- 
>Blair Bernson
>Edmonds
>
>_______________________________________________
>Tweeters mailing list
>Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: eBird Northwest article on Northwestern Crows
From: Charlie Wright <cwright7 AT uw.edu>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 23:34:19 -0800
Hello All,
If you have ever pondered what to do about Northwestern/American Crows
in eBird, or if you're just interested in the ongoing debate about the
distribution of each, check out the recent article on eBird Northwest.
Just go to www.ebird.org/nw and it's the top article now.

eBird Northwest is the new regional portal for eBird in Oregon and
Washington, and is being regularly updated with articles of specific
interest to birders in our area. If you're like me, you'll make it
your homepage, so that you'll know right away when the latest article
is up. In the works are identification spotlights on Red-shafted and
Yellow-shafted Flickers, and call types of Red Crossbills.

Cheers,
Charlie Wright
Seattle, Washington
--
cwright770 AT gmail.com
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Subject: More on the Reifel Refuge (Photogenic) Great Gray Owl
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 20:25:14 -0800
I joined Pilchuck Audubon yesterday visiting B.C. 
where we found waterbirds few and far between but 
we more than made up for it at Reifel Refuge.  In 
a previous post Steve Pink shared his experience 
and although we did not find a Saw Whet Owl (there 
had been as many as 6 but not one seen yesterday), 
we had wonderful looks at the Great Gray Owl - 
both on its day roost and then later hunting and 
posting in the nearby meadow.  Both areas are 
closed to the public. At 3:00, if they have 
located the owl, they take small groups (4 to 6) 
out to see the Owl - getting close enough for 
pictures (not going into that discussion area 
after the Eide Road brouhaha).  After all groups 
have seen the GGOW, if it has relocated to the 
meadow (often does) then they let EVERYONE in to a 
convenient observation spot for their fill of 
looks and photos.  Yesterday I would estimate at 
least 40 people there.  It is supervised and order 
maintained but it is a very satisfying 
experience.  The owl is approximately 200 yards in 
from the visitor center.  They said that more than 
4000 people have seen this owl!!!!  For most it 
was a life bird and/or a life photo.

Two pictures are at https://flic.kr/p/rmnpMi and 
https://flic.kr/p/rmuHyR

A bonus shot is my all time favorite of Wood Duck 
- one of MANY there.  https://flic.kr/p/qpHzEM

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Important WOS Program - Monday March 2
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 19:40:43 -0800
The Program for our WOS Meeting this upcoming 
Monday is an important one for all area birders.

As part of "mitigation" efforts related to the 
Highway 520 expansion, WSDOT is planning 
significant and troubling changes at the Montlake 
Fill and Foster Island.  We will present a panel 
consisting of  Larry Hubbell who will describe 
what's happening around Foster Island; Connie 
Sidles who will give an overview of what's 
happening at the Fill; Susan North (Conservation 
Manager for Seattle Audubon) who will describe 
Seattle Audubon's efforts; and Jon Houghton (on 
Seattle Audubon's Conservation Committee and a 
mitigation consultant) who will talk about the 
rules and regulations of mitigation and the 
implications for Union Bay. Herb Curl may be able 
to join us to talk about the latest changes in 
regulations and what they might mean.  And I am 
sure Connie will have other observations to share 
from her endless supply of stories of the Fill.

WOS meets the first Monday of every month at the 
Urban Horticulture Center adjoining the Fill.  
Social time begins at 7:00 P.M. and our program 
begins at 7:30 P.M.  Please join us for this 
important event.

-- 
Blair Bernson
WOS Program Chair

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Subject: Full Circle
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 18:02:30 -0800
What a long strange trip it's been. I mean my past year, largely unplanned and 
uncertain, here in Port Townsend, watching over my parents gradual descent into 
dementia. How much longer I'll be here I don't know. 

But now, just over a year into my de facto eldercare job, I'm getting to reap 
the benefits of spending a whole year in the nature of the place. Because what 
goes around, comes around. 

At turns amused, and disgusted, about the various forms of the "race to space", 
such as proposed manned missions to Mars, or childish notions of the super-rich 
to encourage "space tourism" (thinly clad fantasies of trying to get laid in 
zero gravity probably) at an incredible level of resource waste, I really gotta 
wonder sometimes about my fellow hominids. What the big deal? We're already in 
space. Maybe we could just appreciate what we already have. 

Even the laziest feeder watching birder has just spent the last year traveling 
584 million miles through space. Yup, that's how far the Earth travels each 
year in it's circle around the Sun. After working in the woods for three months 
straight, and not moving faster than 30mph on rough mountain roads (in places 
like Stehekin) and mostly walking, to emerge into "civilization", and getting 
the car up to 60mph on the highway for the first time was a bit scary. Too 
fast. 

But did you know, that right now, you are traveling at the speed of 67,000 mph 
through space, circling around the sun. The Earth is a wonderful vehicle. Gets 
great mileage. Good thing about that gravity. 

Moving right along, I like to think of the annual cycle, and the seasons 
(thanks to Earths tilted axis) as sort of a remedial program for nature buffs. 
Miss that shorebird migration last year? Well, guess what, if you're still 
around, it's gonna happen this year too! Miss those masses of summer 
wildflowers in the mountains - you get another opportunity this time around.Did 
you miss out on certain natural details last year? Well, keep watching. Plus, 
what is better than seeing old friends coming around the bend again. Coming 
full circle. 

I just got a little bit of a thrill like that today , when I saw that tiny 
annual plant Collinsia (aka Blue-eyed Mary) blooming in the ol' sand dunes here 
at Point Wilson (more than 45 days earlier than last spring). While tiny (the 
whole vegetable about the size of a half-dollar) it is brilliant. Although 
small, it looks big next to neighboring Draba's - which although technically a 
'weed', isn't too harmful, and I just had to admire it for being such a eentsy 
blooming plant. Soon the dunes will go through the whole annual cycle of 
leafing and blooming plants once again, in their various orders. 

Soon, I hope, the Rufous Hummers will be back - the current bushes are ready 
for 'em- and some weeks later on, the Robins will fill the airwaves with 
wonderful song, like last year, but maybe differently. I hope all these old 
friend keep coming around. Full circle. 

Jeff Gibsonspace cadet
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Subject: Woodland Bottoms - Wednesday
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:24:42 -0800
hi all ... Gene and I went out to Woodland Bottoms today to see if we could 
find the male Tufted Duck as reported by Bill Tweit yesterday on eBird ... and 
we lucked out !!! ... and I mean "lucked out" ... he was in the FIRST flock of 
about 50 Scaup we came to on the Columbia ... we had good views through the 
trees but wayyyy too many tree limbs and scrub branches in the way to try for 
photos ... then the flock flew upstream and we followed and tried to re-find 
 ... no luck ...we kept heading upstream looking at small Scaup flocks until 
we hit the "motherload" of Scaup ... HUNDREDS !!! ... AND the rain started ... 
so we gave up ... 


our other "highlight" of the day were TWO Cooper's Hawks !!! ... one at 
Martin's Bar and the other one on the gravel dike ... the first Coopers we've 
seen there ... both were youngsters ...  


nice views too of Gulls smelting ... and hundreds of Sandhill Cranes in the 
fields ...  


Lyn









Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
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Subject: Issaquah Brambling
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:58:48 -0800
Now that the word is out in the public:  the 
Brambling was a more frequent visitor to the 
railing at the Pope residence on Mt. Fury Circle 
SW in Issaquah today and I observed it and 
photographed it on this my third visit.  I first 
saw it at 10:29 a.m. when it came in with a flock 
of perhaps 10 Juncos and remained for exactly 5 
seconds before the garbage truck pulled in and all 
birds flew off and I bemoaned my fate. I remained 
and it returned at 10:55 and fed on the railing 
alone for 3 minutes before flying off into the 
Cedar tree. The Popes have been wonderful hosts 
and enjoy visitors.

Other birds seen there:  Hutton's Vireo, Purple 
Finch, Varied Thrush, Cassiar form of Junco, 
Steller's Jay, Robins, Song Sparrow

Photo at 

https://picasaweb.google.com/103072475474183849815/Brambling?authkey=Gv1sRgCMD325Xzuaf0_QE#6119909000558734882 



-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: The Otter and the Cormorant
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:46:54 -0800














Bopped over to Point Wilson, here in Port Townsend, around noon, and checked 
out the scene . First stop was the pier at the Marine Science Center. 

First sighting was a splendid pair of Common Goldeneye's, seen at close range. 
A fabulous duck. Next, I couldn't help but notice a tremendous amount of 
carnage on what I think of as the Otter Dock - the floating dock out there I've 
written about before. Sometimes it seems like a River Otter is primarily a 
digestive tract that large portions of Salish Sea life passes thru - they eat a 
lot and poop a lot. The dock was covered with crap and body parts. 

At one end of the dock, was a dark mass of feathers, which at first glance 
looked like a crow carcass, but turned out to be the wing of a fairly large 
bird. Tip-toeing down the dock, in between piles of crab leftovers, otter poop 
in various forms (if you go, don't wear your dance shoes), I found another big 
dark wing about 50ft away, attached to a cleaned-out sternum. Wondering what 
this bird was, I soon found out, a bit further down the dock, where I found the 
severed head- a Double-crested Cormorant. 

Just a few weeks ago I got very close looks at one of these birds, right on 
this same dock, as it sat on the dock edge, drying it's wings. At the time, I 
noted just how colorful the face of these birds can be- bright yellow-orange 
skin at the base of the bill, and a nicely complementary blue tint to the eye. 
Todays severed head, allowed an even closer view of this beautiful creature. 
Alway's having enjoyed the leisurely pace of Dead Wildlife photography, I got a 
close-up head shot with my cell phone. The kill was so fresh, that the eyes 
noticeably faded in the short time I was there. 

Too bad for the ol' Cormorant, but the Otter got a good meal deal - based on 
the size of the sternum, it seems like a Cormorant packs a fair amount of 
pectoral muscle. I was also surprised at the heaviness of the bird's wing 
bones- pretty stocky they seemed to me. I now understand a bit more how these 
birds dive with such ease- like a loon, they're a bit heavy, and if you've ever 
seen one underwater, its apparent that they lack the buoyancy that some of the 
lighter weight diving birds have working against them down beneath the waves. 
Truly designed to dive. 

Jeff Gibsonreporting fromPort Townsend Wa




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Subject: Bald Eagle eating fish at Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:16:38 -0800
> 
> This morning Karen saw a Bald Eagle flying low along our shoreline and called 
me to the window. We saw the bird go down apparently into the water on the far 
side of a large bush. Four crows rushed to the bush to watch the action. I 
grabbed my camera and went on a neighbor's dock and got this video. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16621836296/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Snowy Owls & Pigeons
From: <mlfrey AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 12:45:18 -0800
Are Snowy Owls still in the Okanogan area? If so, where have they been found? 
Also, 

theirrr backkk! The Band-tailed Pigeons showed up again for another “eat all 
of Mary’s seed” season! 


Thanks,

Mary Frey
Covington_______________________________________________
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Subject: 50 birds stolen from Carnation sanctuary
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 12:06:04 -0800
Hey, Tweets,

This is not about wild birds, but I'm posting it here as a sort of 
"public service announcement." (Hal Opperman's term -- I made sure it 
was OK to post this.)

Sometime over the weekend, 50 exotic birds were stolen from a sanctuary 
near Carnation:

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/50-birds-stolen-from-sanctuary-in-carnation-search-launched/ 

Here is more about the sanctuary: http://www.macawrescueandsanctuary.org/
And here's how to contact them: 425-941-7543 or e-mail: 
MacawSanctuary AT gmail.com if you have any info.

As Hal says, /Perhaps some of the birds escaped and will be spotted 
locally. Perhaps the perpetrator will try to sell them, and the more 
people out there with their eyes and ears (and social media accounts) at 
the alert, the better./

I figure that a few Tweeters might have connections to the local pet 
bird community and can help get the word out.

Again, if you learn anything or have any leads, please contact 
425-941-7543 or e-mail: MacawSanctuary AT gmail.com.

Thanks!

Ellen Blackstone
Wedgwood, Seattle
ellenAT123imagineDOTNET

P.S. Please, let's not start a thread about the pet bird industry. We 
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Subject: Brambling in Issaquah
From: Steve Pink <pirangas AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:27:56 -0800
Hi,
There is a Brambling visiting a feeder in Issaquah recently. Initially news was 
only cautiously released for many good reasons not least to avoid crowds and 
disturbance to the quiet neighborhood. 

I was there yesterday and the homeowner encouraged me to make sure that birders 
were aware of the bird. Recently the bird appears to make visits erratically - 
so you should be prepared for a wait. On Monday it did not make an appearance. 
Yesterday it showed at 10:35 and stayed for 10 minutes. When it does show it 
usually feeds on the deck railing allowing good views from the road. 

I have pasted an earlier email from the homeowners Dan and Fran Pope. There is 
decent parking and homes on only one side of the street. Good luck, here is the 
message from Dan Pope: 

 "We saw the Brambling on Feb 4 and every day since, up to today (2/19). It 
hangs out with the Oregon Finches at our bird feeder and seems to enjoy the 
same cracked seeds. Usually seen at about 11:00 AM, time not reliable. We live 
on a side street, so anyone can come by to park and watch if it lights on our 
front deck railing where we spread the patio mix. It does light on the trees 
opposite our house at perhaps 30' height. We live at 625 Mt Fury Circle SW, 
Issaquah WA 98027, so can be found on Google Maps. If some one wants to come 
inside, they can call and we'll take it on a case by case basis. Most 
importantly, my wife says it's ok. From my own experience, this bird startles 
easily so a close up picture on our deck without glass in between is unlikely 
unless you use a remotely triggered camera. I took a half dozen pictures 
through glass with finches, so some show it with a finch and some do not. I 
love the side by side comparison. Our house is in mixed woods on the north side 
of Squak Mountain at 400' elevation, steep slope, fairly urban with 1/4 acre 
lots. Also fairly wild, with bears, cougars, coyotes, and bobcats passing 
through, and 100' conifers (all types). This month we are feeding two 
overwintering Anna's Hummingbirds, Song Sparrows, Fox Sparrows, Varied 
Thrushes, Chestnut-backed and Black-capped Chickadees, Steller's Jays, 
Red-breasted Nuthatches, a Pine Siskin and some kind of female Grosbeak (seems 
very early). Right now the surrounding forest has Pileated Woodpeckers, Brown 
Creepers, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and the usual assortment of wrens and 
difficult to see small birds like the bushtit. We have a lot of fun bird 
watching. What you see varies a lot with elevation, vegetation and water. Dan 
and Fran Pope. 


Cheers and good birding
Steve Pink
Edmonds, WA
mailto: pirangas AT hotmail.com
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Subject: RFI Alaska Ferry
From: Amy Shumann <daccshumann AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 09:31:37 -0800
Hi Tweeters, I'm looking for information as I plan a trip to Alaska via the
Alaska Marine Highway in late August/early September. The itinerary
possibilities are overwhelming. If you've had good experiences birding from
the ferry or from particular ports please let me know. We won't be bringing
a car so will be looking for fun places to stop that have walking access to
good wildlife viewing spots. We will likely arrange a few guided day trips
so we can get a little farther afield. We're considering flying to Kodiak
Is. and working our way south (10 days?) all the way to Bellingham but
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Subject: Lesser yellowlegs Ridgefield NWR Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:45:37 -0800
This morning on River S Unit i found a lesser yellowlegs and a single greater 
yellowlegs on Canvasback wetland. Also found 16 long-billed dowitchers and 12 
dunlin on Ruddy wetland. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: Lesser yellowlegs Ridgefield NWR Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:45:37 -0800
This morning on River S Unit i found a lesser yellowlegs and a single greater 
yellowlegs on Canvasback wetland. Also found 16 long-billed dowitchers and 12 
dunlin on Ruddy wetland. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
Sent from my iPad

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Subject: field trip date correction MONDAY MAR 2
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 20:35:06 -0800
Birding Field Trip to Samish Flats.
MAR 2... MONDAY... 8:30 AM to 2 PM
This may be the last chance to see lots of raptors as they will be
dispersing in mid-March. We will also search for snow geese, swans, other
waterfowl and shorebirds on the Samish Flats.
Steven Harper guide... call 360-650-9065 or email stevenharper2 AT msn.com

-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach_______________________________________________
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Subject: field trip ..Mar 2 ..Tuesday.. 8:30 AM to 2 PM
From: Twink Coffman <wilber4818 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 20:24:56 -0800
Birding Field Trip to Samish Flats.
MAR 2 Tuesday... 8:30 AM to 2 PM
This may be the last chance to see lots of raptors as they will be
dispersing in mid-March. We will also search for snow geese, swans, other
waterfowl and shorebirds in the Samish Flats.
Steven Harper guide... call 360-650-9065 or email stevenharper2 AT msn.com

-- 
happy birding
Twink
wilber4818 AT gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
in Whatcom County
out on the beach_______________________________________________
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Subject: SE Owls Hovering
From: "D. Gluckman" <cgluckman AT aol.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 22:38:46 -0500
My recent trip to the West 90 in Skagit County resulted in a lot of images of 
one particular owl doing a lot of hovering while hunting. Some of these hover 
episodes lasted more than 10 seconds before it either dove or flew onward. I'm 
aware that SEO's hover while hunting but this seemed a bit extreme. Over an 
hour or so, without realizing it, I shot more than 175 images of this behavior, 
some quite good ( https://www.flickr.com/photos/125370117 AT N08/ ). There was a 
mild breeze blowing that might have helped. Have others seen this lengthy 
hovering by SEO's at the W. 90 or other places? 



David Gluckman
Pt. Townsend, WA 
David 360.531.3325 
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Subject: Bushtits in pairs
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 12:22:58 -0800
Hi Tweets,

I've been watching a flock of "approximately" 24 Bushtits make the rounds
of Gatewood Hill in West Seattle for much of the winter.  This morning
there was a single pair visiting the suet.  Another good sign of the season.

Carol Stoner
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Subject: Night Beach
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 12:11:19 -0800
I'd been wanting to take a night time trip to the beach to check out a low 
tide. As you may, or may not, know, in winter, low tides are at night, unlike 
in spring and summer. Last tuesday I took the opportunity to go to a Port 
Townsend Marine Science Center sponsored beach walk to North Beach here in Port 
Townsend, and it couldn't have been a calmer, or warmer February night to do 
it. 


Beach birding at night, is maybe not the greatest, but arriving early at the 
empty dark parking lot, I was delighted to hear a single American Widgeon 
calling loudly out on the dark water, which was a bit odd I thought, since I 
have never seen one out there in the daytime, on the open saltwater. 

Well, soon the rest of the folks showed up, and on down the beach we went, 
flashlights in hand, and headlamps on head. In short order, I began suffering 
from a mental problem new to me - Flashlight Envy. You see, being kind of 
cheap, I made the mistake of buying yet another cheap LED flashlight, and 
despite being new, it soon crapped out. And it didn't have enough of those 
lumen thingy's to begin with. I was soon tailgating other participants with 
better lights. 

That was too bad, because I was on my ongoing mission to turn people on to 
using close-focusing binoculars for viewing tide pool creatures, and being sort 
of a dim bulb in the lighting category may have damaged my credibility. 
Actually this trip was a test run for me using the binocs at night, but 
watching areas lit by people with real flashlights - like 80 - 120 lumens (or 
so), I was able to see little things quite nicely. From 5 or 6 ft away, at 8x, 
I can tell a copepod (about the size of a comma in this post) from other 
similar sized planktonic critters, for example. Being 6 or so feet away also 
allows creatures some room to move - so you can watch their behavior with out 
scaring them off. Kind of neat. 

Anyway, it was sort of fun, and we saw a number of interesting things. Starfish 
are currently suffering a mysterious wasting disease, which is devastating 
populations all along the west coast, but we did see many of the brilliant 
orange red Blood Stars (the most I'v e ever seen in one place), and Mother 
Nature gave us so many Sea Lemons (a big yellowish Nudibranch) we could have 
made Sea Lemonade. At least three other species of Nudibranchs, or Sea Slugs, 
were around too. 

My favorite critter of the night though, were the shrimp. These small (one to 
two inches long) shrimp were all over the place and even with my dim light 
their eyes glowed like lanterns in the dark. Cool. 

Jeff Gibsonin Port Townsend Wa 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: re: Observing & Respecting Owls and Their Habitat
From: wong <chupaflor AT igc.org>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 11:52:41 -0800
Thank you, Barbara Deihl and Dan Stephens for this important ethics 
announcement!! Much appreciated. 


best birding to all,
isadora wong
seattle, wa
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Subject: Observing & Respecting Owls and Their Habitat - A WOS Birding Ethics Press Release
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 20:38:12 -0800
I was asked, by Dan Stephens, WOS President, to post this on Tweeters - I am 
glad to help: 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net

------------------------------------------------------------

Contact: Dan Stephens, President, Washington Ornithological Society   
Phone: 
Cell: 509-679-4706 
email: dstephens AT wvc.edu 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 Observing and Respecting Roosting Owls and their Habitat 


 

Owls, in particular Long-eared Owls, are fascinating raptors that you don't see 
every day due to their nocturnal habits and secretive ways. When a roosting owl 
is located, it is natural to want to observe it. 


Recently, two Long-eared Owls were found roosting on a road near Stanwood, 
Wash. As word got out, more and more observers visited the site, resulting in 
dozens of visitors at once -- not all of whom respected the owls' needs. They 
approached too close to the owls, usually in an attempt to get a better 
photograph. 



Roosting owls want to stay as still as possible. This is a defense mechanism so 
that they remain as undisturbed as possible. There are telltale signs that a 
roosting owl has been disturbed including a forward crouching defensive stance, 
wide open eyes that follow the observer, and changing positions on its perch. 
The very last thing that an observer should do is get too close which causes an 
owl to flush. Often, a day flying owl can attract the attention of larger 
daytime predators to the detriment of the owl. 


 

Study the behavior of the owl to determine how you should proceed once you have 
located one or if you are tracking an owl that has already been located by 
somebody else. As a general rule, keep well back from roosting owls as they 
will become alarmed. Be aware of your effects on the habitat surrounding the 
owl. Abide by the established codes of ethics that cover observation and 
photography of wildlife: 


 

Nature Photography:  http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html

Birding: http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html

 

These owls need all their calories to survive the winter. Please do not force 
them to use important energy reserves to flee from you or your pets by getting 
too close. Help these owls to live alongside us without being harassed. If they 
are left undisturbed, they may return in future years for all of us to once 
again have the opportunity to observe these magnificent secretive birds. 


The Washington Ornithological Society (WOS) was founded in 1988 to to increase 
our knowledge of the birds of Washington and to enhance communication among all 
persons interested in those birds. WOS provides a forum for birders from 
throughout the state to meet and share information on bird identification, 
biology, population status, and birding sites. Membership is open to all 
persons interested in birds and birding. WOS is a non-profit organization under 
501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue code. 




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Subject: Skagit and Stanwood
From: "D. Gluckman" <cgluckman AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 20:01:57 -0500
Spent 4 days in Skagit County and Stanwood over the weekend. I didn't see any 
owls at Stanwood after looking from early afternoon to dark on Friday. There 
were 5 or 6 Short-ears at the West 90 at mid morning and mid afternoon Sunday 
and Monday. Three flew consistently in the area near the dike, west from the 
parking lot but others were seen to the south as well by some dog walkers. The 
Northern Shrike was still there today as well as the big dark Ginea (SP?) fowl 
with the white head walking around the parking lot. There must have been 6-8 
Rough-legged Hawks on posts Monday morning, with N. Harriers and eagles 
everywhere. I only saw 2 Red-tailed Hawks. A few thousand Snow geese were in 
the fields on Bayview-Edison Road Saturday through Monday with lots of 
Trumpeters everywhere. Wonderful weather. 



David Gluckman
Pt. Townsend, WA 
David 360.531.3325 Casey 360.531.3359_______________________________________________
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Subject: test
From: "Edwin Lamb" <edsplace2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:34:15 -0800
Test.
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Subject: 978075551
From: Idie Ulsh <idieu AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:19:23 -0800
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Subject: (Clark Co.) Ross's still at Lowlands
From: Luke Hanes <lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 13:24:11 -0800
I finally got to see the Ross's Gosse at Vancouver Lake Lowlands today
(12:15pm).
Like others who have reported, it was with a large flock of Cacklers on the
east side of the road, about a 1/4 mile past Frenchman's Bar entrance, in
the water, about 50 yards from the road.  A few people have reported it
closer to Post Office Lake as well.


-- 
Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
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Subject: Fw: Peregrine falcons under the West Seattle high bridge
From: Mary Metz <maryjmetz AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:11:35 -0800



I don't know if there is an official group that monitors the behavior of the 
peregrine falcons that nest, most years, in the box under the West Seattle high 
bridge but I assume there is. And that they might be interested to know that 
there was a quick bit of what certainly seemed like peregrine sex on top of the 
bridge keeper's tower this morning. 

 
 -Mary Metz
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Subject: Great Blue Heron building nest at Ballard Locks in Seattle
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 07:35:17 -0800
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16412044667/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: WA Birder List Report is now available
From: "washingtonbirder.Ken Knittle" <washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 20:24:24 -0800
2014 Washington Birder List Report, Big Day Reports and County Statistics are 
now available on the Washington Birder website: http://wabirder.com/online.html 
. 

 
The first Washington State List Report published was for year 1992. It was 
included inside the Washington Birder Newsletter and was 2 pages in length. 25 
individuals reported their Washington State "Life List". 19 birders kept a 
variety of county lists. Gene Hunn and Burt Jahn were the only 2 birders who 
reported 50 species or more for every county. 

 
The List Report has grown over the years with increased numbers of participants 
and additional reporting categories that interest birders in Washington. This 
year the list is 28 pages in length, with about 125 individuals actively 
reporting. Washington State "Life List" reporting continues to be the most 
popular category. Over the past 22 years, birders in Washington began to report 
100, 150, and eventually 175 species or more in every county. It seemed 
unlikely when the first list was published that anyone would ever report 200 or 
more species on every county list, but with the 2014 List Report, Tom Mansfield 
has become the first person to report 200 or more species in every Washington 
county, adding yet another category to the list. 

 
Thanks to all who continue to participate with List Reporting. We look forward 
to receiving your List Reports for 2015. 

 
Finally, we really appreciate receiving notes sent directly to us about "County 
Firsts", the observers, dates & locations. 

Additionally, please contact us about species with abundance codes in need of 
revision. 

 
Ken Knittle      washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com 
Laurie Knittle  info AT wabirder.com




Ken
 Knittle

Vancouver WA 
98665 mailto:washingtonbirder AT hotmail.com
Washington Birder online 



http://www.wabirder.com/
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Subject: Good year for Eurasian Wigeons
From: Jason Hernandez <jason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 04:18:23 +0000 (UTC)
...or maybe I'm just having a lucky streak.  Last year, I was driving all over 
the Puget Sound region, and even into BC, looking for winter waterfowl, and it 
seemed only every fourth or fifth American Wigeon flock had any Eurasians in 
it.  This year, I have not gone to nearly as many places, but all three of the 
American Wigeon flocks I have found have had Eurasians -- today at Lions Park, 
East Bremerton, there were three males (I scanned the females carefully, but 
could not call any of them Eurasian).  I am calling this a separate flock from 
the one at Evergreen Rotary Park, but of course, since I have never been in 
both places at once, I cannot prove that. 

Jason Hernandez  
Bremerton  
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Subject: Swans on Whidbey
From: IAN YOUNG <ianyoung AT u.washington.edu>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 19:37:08 -0800 (PST)
Regarding the swans on Whidbey, I spotted over 30+ at Dugwalla Bay behind the 
store in the fields on Saturday afternoon. 

Ian Young

>
> Does anyone know if the swans are still using the fields west of the
> Dugwalla Bay area, behind the farm store?
> If so, approximately how many.   Are they in the Dugwalla pond or on the bay
> as well?
>
> Thanks for any information.
>
> Martha Jordan
> Everett, WA
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> M

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Subject: Guillemots, etc.
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 14:26:32 -0800
Coming into Edmonds yesterday on the ferry, I was surprised , pleasantly, to 
find that all of the guillemots I saw (about 10), had changed into their 
striking breeding plumage, without any supervision by me. It seems like it was 
just a week or two ago, they were all in their light-toned winter garb, but I 
guess I have lost track of time lately, due to the effects of my current job of 
herding the elderly. Time waits for no one, regardless of mental state, and the 
guillemots have made their dramatic plumage change. 

The water was a bit rough coming in to the dock - the type of cross - chop of 
sharp-crested waves that would surely challenge a human kayaker. I paddled 
through such stuff once, and was so exhausted trying to stay upright, that by 
the time I got to shore I could hardly lift my kayak on to my truck. 

That's why I particularly admired the seabirds by the ferry dock - mostly 
guillemots, surf scoters, and horned grebes - riding out the rough water with 
remarkable buoyant ease. Pretty cool really. 

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Subject: Three owl night, thanks to waking early
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 09:13:49 -0800
Woke at 1:00 am and decided to owl a bit. I went to a location where Randy Hill 
had a report of a calling western screech owl. I did not hear that or any other 
owl. I did though experienced a young man driving up quickly, about 2:30 am, 
and stooped the car about half a block from me and just sit. I had been at that 
spot for a while and decided to leave as I drove past the car the guy was 
slumped over the wheel asleep! Or passed out 2:30 am hum? I then decided to go 
to Ridgefield and made several stops along NW 289 and 291st Streets with no 
owls detected. I arrived at the corner of NW 291st and Main St near the 
Ridgefield NWR office. I listened for a while with no calls then decided to 
play a western screech owl call. To the north a Norther saw-whet owl (#136) 
called twice. This is an area I have had them before in the past. The owl quite 
calling soon after responding when two great horned owls began calling. I then 
went to the opposite end of Main St to a small overlook (the refuge) and sat 
listening i had two great horned owls calling here. I thought it was a bit 
early to get a barred owl but decided to go to Krieger Rd where one had been 
reported earlier and even with playing a song I had no luck no owls called at 
all. On the way to this location on Hillhurst Rd ( NW 31 St) just north of NW 
221 St a barn owl was sitting on the fence along the road edge. After whiffing 
on the barred owl I decided to head to Green Lake, still on Krieger, and when I 
arrived at the parking lot where Whipple Creek crosses the road I had three 
great horned owls calling. I again played a barred owl song with no luck it 
also did not effect the great horned owls which I was concerned about but also 
curious what would happen. I was surprised by the result. I tried for owls 
close to my house on Gee Creek with a single great horned to only owl heard. It 
being 4:30 am I went to sleep waking just recently. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: Three owl night, thanks to waking early
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 09:13:49 -0800
Woke at 1:00 am and decided to owl a bit. I went to a location where Randy Hill 
had a report of a calling western screech owl. I did not hear that or any other 
owl. I did though experienced a young man driving up quickly, about 2:30 am, 
and stooped the car about half a block from me and just sit. I had been at that 
spot for a while and decided to leave as I drove past the car the guy was 
slumped over the wheel asleep! Or passed out 2:30 am hum? I then decided to go 
to Ridgefield and made several stops along NW 289 and 291st Streets with no 
owls detected. I arrived at the corner of NW 291st and Main St near the 
Ridgefield NWR office. I listened for a while with no calls then decided to 
play a western screech owl call. To the north a Norther saw-whet owl (#136) 
called twice. This is an area I have had them before in the past. The owl quite 
calling soon after responding when two great horned owls began calling. I then 
went to the opposite end of Main St to a small overlook (the refuge) and sat 
listening i had two great horned owls calling here. I thought it was a bit 
early to get a barred owl but decided to go to Krieger Rd where one had been 
reported earlier and even with playing a song I had no luck no owls called at 
all. On the way to this location on Hillhurst Rd ( NW 31 St) just north of NW 
221 St a barn owl was sitting on the fence along the road edge. After whiffing 
on the barred owl I decided to head to Green Lake, still on Krieger, and when I 
arrived at the parking lot where Whipple Creek crosses the road I had three 
great horned owls calling. I again played a barred owl song with no luck it 
also did not effect the great horned owls which I was concerned about but also 
curious what would happen. I was surprised by the result. I tried for owls 
close to my house on Gee Creek with a single great horned to only owl heard. It 
being 4:30 am I went to sleep waking just recently. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
Sent from my 
iPad8rz0zX+r{Sʋi({h칻&ކi0zX+bnB{Zr٨uڶ졺%^hyb( 
Subject: Re: swans on Whidbey Island
From: "Martha Jordan" <mj.cygnus AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 08:49:02 -0800
Does anyone know if the swans are still using the fields west of the 
Dugwalla Bay area, behind the farm store?
If so, approximately how many.   Are they in the Dugwalla pond or on the bay 
as well?

Thanks for any information.

Martha Jordan
Everett, WA


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Subject: Rockpipers on Alki, West Seattle
From: Eric Stahlfeld <stahlfelde AT aol.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 02:46:09 -0500
This afternoon I parked just past Salty's on Alki, West Seattle, and walked 
northwest along the waterfront looking for Surfbirds and Black Turnstones. 
Individual birds gathered into a small flock as they moved towards Duwamish 
Head on the incoming tide, eventually numbering five Turnstones and four 
Surfbirds. At high tide, around 5:15, they settled down opposite the 1027 
Harbor Avenue condo. Pretty good photo opportunities. 


 

Eric Stahlfeld
145 SW 155th St., Ste 101
Burien, WA  98166_______________________________________________
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Subject: Eagle & Owls videos + a bird art show
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 20:42:11 -0800
> 
> Fledgling Great Horned Owls at Nisqually NWR:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16420580030/
> 
> 2nd year Bald Eagle vocalizing near Sikes Lake:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/16582026796/
> 
> An excellent bird art show in Auburn by well known northwest artists that 
Karen and I viewed on our trip back from Nisqually: 

> 
> http://wrvmuseum.org/currently_on_exhibit.html
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Delta great grey
From: Debra Lewis <goofyone AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 20:31:17 -0800
We were lucky enough to see the great grey today in Delta BC - you do have to 
be escorted out to see the bird - some days you get better views than others. 
Here's my pic from today: 

 
 
http://s255.photobucket.com/user/DDLewis1/media/Great%20grey%203_zpsplaq24h0.jpg.html 

 
It's well worth the trip up and the $5.00 entrance fee. Lots of birds and areas 
to walk around. My tracker showed that we walked 4 miles so if you do go bring 
comfy shoes. 

 
Have a good evening 
 
D. Lewis
North Bend
 
goofyone at msn.com
 
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Subject: Great Blue Heron Rookery, and a Tufted Duck at the Other Vancouver
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 18:38:30 -0800
Hello Tweets,

After hearing all the reports of heron rookeries across the greater Seattle 
area, I was delighted to encounter one that I have not yet heard of from anyone 
else. We were stuck in a traffic jam on I-90 W, right at the Mercer Slough. I 
looked into the trees on the right side of the road (south) and saw a few 
herons flapping their huge wings! As we inched forward, more herons became 
visible, many standing near or on their ball-of-sticks nests. I tried firing 
off a few photos on my point-and-shoot camera, and I think that they may have 
turned out pretty well! 


Again, this rookery is located in the portion of Mercer Slough just south of 
I-90. The nearest nests were just 20 feet from the freeway! Your best chance of 
viewing the rookery is probably to hope for a traffic jam! 


I caught a glimpse of it this afternoon while driving by.

Oh, and a correction to my last email: I meant to change it, but I wrote that 
Bewick's Wrens "twitter" and Anna's Hummingbirds "chatter". I think that the 
Wrens actually "chatter", and that Anna's Hummingbirds "twitter". 


On a last note, in case anyone is interested, a gorgeous male Tufted Duck has 
been seen at the Iona Island sewage ponds in Vancouver, BC. Interestingly 
enough, the other Tufted Duck in the Pacific Northwest is at Wintler Park near 
Vancouver, WA. Tufted Ducks must like the name Vancouver! Or maybe Vancouver 
himself had an eye for good Tufted Duck habitat. 


I just saw the Tufted Duck this morning, in fact! Stunningly handsome. He was 
in the Northwest inner sewage pond, in all his Eurasian, black-and-white glory. 
He is in prime condition, with a full tuft, ebony back and snowy-white sides. 
This is on private land with a password-locked gate, though, so you will need 
to contact the person with the code to get in. Send me a message if you're 
interested, and I'll forward you the contact info! 


I also visited Reifel Bird Sanctuary this afternoon. I couldn't get to the 
Great Gray Owl, but there was a special tour to the private area where it has 
been seen at 3 PM. It sounded like the owl was present, at least from what I 
heard at the visitor center. I made up for being too early for the tour with 
several Black-crowned Night-Herons, including a juvenile, and a very visible 
Great Horned Owl, among many other great birds! Though I didn't see them, there 
are also a few Swamp Sparrows (which I might have heard at the NW corner near 
the observation tower), and a Harris's Sparrow in the bushes near the entrance 
to the trails, beside the visitor center. 


Great birding in Vancouver, BC! I have a feeling that the same is true with 
Vancouver, WA... 


Oh, and to contribute to the Raven conversation, I saw one soaring over 
downtown Vancouver on February 19th. I'm always happy whenever I see one! 


Wishing you good birding as always, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com
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Subject: some "spring" firsts, south Thurston Co
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 20:19:19 -0500
Tweets, Saturday morning I set out to find bluebirds, thinking I'd seen a 
"drive-by" the evening before in the vicinity of nest boxes south of Tumwater. 
Nothing, but I did hear a few FOS (for me) TREE SWALLOWs over a small patch of 
prairie. (There would be 25-30 at the Mull St marsh outside Tenino, along with 
a handful of VIOLET-GREEN, so they've probably been around a while.) The most 
reliable spot for WESTERN BLUEBIRD I know of is the nest box in the SW corner 
of the section of Weir Prairie that stretches N and E from Rainier x Military 
Rds. A pair was present atop the "stop" sign that hosts a nest box on the back 
side. No sign of Acorn Woodpecker which had been sighted from 123rd x Moes Rd 
in late fall. Two HUTTON'S VIREOs were dueting (FOS) along Military Rd that 
skirts the N side of McIntosh Lk. Sparrows, juncos, and towhees were in full 
voice, and several groups of CROSSBILL were present at several locations. When 
I arrived home a pair of calling BALD EAGLEs were engaged in some sort of 
display flight directly overhead. Very cool! 46 species for the two hours. Good 
birding! 

-- Paul Hicks / Tenino / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org (soon: paulhicks7373 AT 
gmail . com) 


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Subject: Update on bald eagle in local news
From: Teresa Stokes <tlstokespoetry AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 15:32:11 -0800
Jason Filan, head of Parks & Recreation for the City of Kirkland
connected me to folks in that area, and Mavis Karalius, Systems Adm
reported seeing Kirkland's two bald eagles in a tree at Heritage Park on
2/19/15 at 12:35pm. (4 days after the eagle/car accident)

So fingers crossed if one of them was the one hit by the
car, there are no lasting injuries. Will follow up on this and let you
know if I hear anything significant.

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Mercer Island_______________________________________________
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