Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Tweeters List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Wednesday, April 23 at 08:07 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Little Auks,©BirdQuest

23 Apr RFI "consumers reports" for bird tour guides [Gary Bletsch ]
23 Apr "How Wolves Change Rivers" - a video [Barbara Deihl ]
23 Apr Auburn Black- necked Stilts -YES [Ann Wood ]
23 Apr UWRA Ocean Shores-Grays Harbor NWR trip 4-22-2014 - Wandering Tattler, lots of Western Sandpipers+ [Denis DeSilvis ]
23 Apr Sibley on Sibley [David Hutchinson ]
23 Apr Black Neck Stilt ["B&PBell" ]
23 Apr Ocean Shores: thousands of shorebirds [Eric Ellingson ]
23 Apr SnoCo Western Kingbird, etc. [Josh Adams ]
23 Apr RE: Female hummingbird ID help please ["Wayne Weber" ]
23 Apr TAS/RAS Field Trip to Swan Creek Tuesday 4/22 [Shep Thorp ]
23 Apr Edmonds birds 4-21-14 [Bill Anderson ]
22 Apr Female hummingbird ID help please ["Tim O'Brien" ]
22 Apr Merlin at UPS? [Jennifer DeSelle ]
22 Apr Edmonds Roundup (Short) [Carol Riddell ]
22 Apr VANCOUVER, BC BIRD ALERT -- APRIL 22, 2014 [Julian Hudson ]
22 Apr VANCOUVER, BC BIRD ALERT -- APRIL 22, 2014 [Julian Hudson ]
22 Apr western kingbird Clallam Bay, WA ["Tonia" ]
22 Apr ABA and Corpus area [Jerry Broadus ]
22 Apr Spring 2014 Klickitat County North American Migration Count.. May 10th...put it on your calendars and let me know if you will be able to participate... [Bob Hansen ]
22 Apr [SPAM:#] Spring 2014 Klickitat County North American Migration Count.. May 10th...put it on your calendars and let me know if you will be able to participate... [Bob Hansen ]
22 Apr Call for papers: WFO's conference in San Diego CA, October 8-12 []
22 Apr Chambers Bay Osprey Nest Abatement [Tony ]
21 Apr Coast of Washington pelagic [Ken Lane ]
21 Apr arrivals ["Kristin Stewart" ]
21 Apr Ridgefield NWR Closure - Update [Scott Carpenter ]
21 Apr Black-Necked Stilts at S 204 St in Kent [Julie Monahan ]
21 Apr Old Sam Peabody ["J. Acker" ]
22 Apr Nisqually NWR - White-throated Sparrow and Yellow-headed Blackbird []
21 Apr Vashon Island Chipping Sparrows, Purple Martins back today ["Ed Swan" ]
21 Apr Chipping Sparrow Question ["Mary K." ]
21 Apr WHITE PELICAN - West Seattle, King County, April 21, 2014 [Houston Flores ]
22 Apr black-necked stilts in kent []
21 Apr Black-necked stilts @ 204th St. wetlands in Kent [Darrel Denune ]
21 Apr W Tanager, Renton [Leslie McWethy ]
21 Apr Nashville Warbler at Lake Sammamish State Park, Apr 21, 2014 [Sharon Cormier-Aagaard ]
21 Apr Battle Ground backyard birding [Jim Danzenbaker ]
21 Apr Chipping Sparrows - Thurston County []
21 Apr Stilts @ 204th St. Kent [Darrel Denune ]
21 Apr re: bremerton id help-thanks ["antoniadg1 AT juno.com" ]
21 Apr Western Tanager, Singing, Renton [Leslie McWethy ]
21 Apr Edmonds Marsh now [William Boyington ]
21 Apr The Water Bear's [Jeff Gibson ]
21 Apr Skagit big day, resending [Gary Bletsch ]
21 Apr From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
20 Apr gull seen in Edmonds [tredick christina ]
20 Apr Skagit big day [Gary Bletsch ]
20 Apr re: oil terminal at Bowerman [Dianna Moore ]
20 Apr Black-bellied Plovers at Olympia Airport [Gary Wiles ]
20 Apr photo and follow-up tagged Brant Goose [Clare McLean ]
20 Apr Pacific-slope Flycatcher, 4/19 Lake Wash, and 4/20 Lake Sammamish [Sharon Cormier-Aagaard ]
20 Apr Oil terminal prelim proposal near Bowerman Basin [Jerry Broadus ]
20 Apr Tracking "Island Girl" North for Her Sixth Satellite Migration (!) [Bud Anderson ]
20 Apr a beautiful short nature video and message [Barbara Deihl ]
20 Apr Whidbey Island Chipping Sparrow [Marv Breece ]
20 Apr RE: Greater White-fronted Geese [Rob Conway ]
19 Apr RE: Greater White-fronted Geese ["Randy Hill" ]
20 Apr Edmonds Roundup [Carol Riddell ]
19 Apr sno falls peregrines [Dave Templeton ]
19 Apr Re: Greater White-fronted Geese ["Wilson Cady" ]
19 Apr Greater White-fronted Geese [Jim Danzenbaker ]
19 Apr House Hunting Controversy | Union Bay Watch [Larry Hubbell ]
19 Apr Pacific-slope Fly in Dungeness [B Boekelheide ]
19 Apr BirdNote - last week, and the week of Apr. 20, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
19 Apr Orange crowned warbler [Noah Sanday ]
19 Apr Belfair SP Greater White-fronted Geese [Ann Wood ]
18 Apr Red-breasted Sapsucker prepares nesting cavity/Duvall [Hank ]
18 Apr Auburn - Townsend's Solitaire ["Carol & Lynn Schulz" ]
18 Apr S. 204th & S. Ctr. Pkway - Gr. Yellowlegs & Pipits ["Carol & Lynn Schulz" ]
18 Apr Cliff swallows [Noah Sanday ]
19 Apr Connecticut Warbler: Not possible, right? [Josh Hayes ]
18 Apr Eagle Owl found []
18 Apr Help needed for Eagle Owl search, Tacoma []
18 Apr FW: eBird Report - Lake Sammamish State Park, Issaquah WA, Apr 18, 2014 [Sharon Cormier-Aagaard ]
18 Apr Re Early Arriving Migrants and a Plea for Caution [B Boekelheide ]
18 Apr Magnuson Park, 18 April 2014 [Scott Ramos ]
18 Apr tuvus in north bend/snoqualmie [Dave Templeton ]

Subject: RFI "consumers reports" for bird tour guides
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:41:17 -0700 (PDT)
Dear Tweeters,

As indicated in an earlier post, I am planning a trip to India for later this 
summer. It's just a sideline to themain trip to Bhutan, but my friend and I 
have a week or so to bird in India, and we are trying to line up a birding 
guide. 


I wish there was some sort of vetting or rating website where one could check 
up on the reputations of bird-guiding services, sort of like Consumers 
Reports--the gold standard in my opinion--or Tripadvisor. The thing I like 
about CR is that they don't accept any advertising, so it's about as objective 
as possible. Surfbirds has some info on birding guides, but they take 
advertising, so there is always the possibility of conflict of interest. 


Tripadvisor occasionally has a side-mention of a guide service, but birding is 
still a small enough niche that there isn't any obvious answer to the questions 
one might have about tour operators--especially internationally. 


Any ideas?

Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: "How Wolves Change Rivers" - a video
From: Barbara Deihl <BARBDEIHL AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:05:47 -0700
Just saw this again and was reminded of how beautifully and elegantly 
easy-to-understand this shows the connections between wolves and the entire 
ecosystem they are a part of in Yellowstone Nat'l Park. More importantly it 
really shows the dependence that the living organisms, land and water have on 
each other, in order to maintain/sustain an environment. AND, it's beautiful 
photography, besides ! A fine 4-min. reminder for Earth Week. 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa5OBhXz-Q

Barb Deihl
North Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net
 _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Auburn Black- necked Stilts -YES
From: Ann Wood <annmariewood AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 15:22:17 -0700
Tweeters:

All four are now in the flooded field SE of 29th St NW and M St NW in Auburn. 

FYI: "M" St NW runs along the East side of Hwy 167 and dead ends at the pond.

Thanks to Margaret, Brian, and Hank for getting the word out.

Good Luck!
Ann Marie

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: UWRA Ocean Shores-Grays Harbor NWR trip 4-22-2014 - Wandering Tattler, lots of Western Sandpipers+
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:14:50 -0700
Tweeters,

Rain, hail, and wind did little to deter the U of W Retirement Association
birders (11 plus me) on an Earth-Day trip to Ocean Shores and Bowerman Basin
(Grays Harbor NWR). It looks as if the Shorebird Festival this weekend
should be a hit, if what we saw at the refuge is any indication: I estimated
there were a minimum of 50,000 WESTERN SANDPIPERS scattered across the
mudflats - with quite a few large groupings of several thousands of birds.
The only other shorebirds we saw there were about 15 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS.

 

Other highlights included a lone WANDERING TATTLER on the jetty at Point
Brown; a WHIMBREL alongside Ocean Shores Blvd just south of the last of the
motels; three MERLINS at differing locations; and a lone PEREGRINE FALCON
and 125 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE at Bowerman.

 

On the way to Ocean Shores, we noted over a dozen TURKEY VULTURES from Elma
to the outskirts of Aberdeen. While stopping at the state-maintained rest
area (no permit needed for Earth Day) on Damon Road, we waited out a heavy
rain shower and saw two large flights with over 300 CACKLING GEESE in each
flight. The outgoing tide was still fairly high at the beach at the end of
Damon Rd., so we couldn't drive out onto the beach to get closer to the
water. Nonetheless, we saw many DUNLIN, about 30 MARBLED GODWITS, some
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, and several thousand peeps we couldn't identify
because of the distance. A MERLIN coursed north past us, then dipped down
just over the sand toward a large group of shorebirds, putting them to
flight, but not getting any prey. It stooped a time or two more, but still
didn't catch anything. We noted another big flock of geese, which included
some CANADAs among the more numerous Cackling Geese.

 

Heading south on Ocean Shores Blvd toward Point Brown, we spotted a WHIMBREL
in the median strip. Not too much at Point Brown, but ace spotter Ellen saw
a shorebird on the jetty rocks, about half-way between the beach and the end
of the jetty. After discussing what it might be (given the bright yellow
legs, Surfbird was a prime contender), I noticed the bird bobbing like a
Spotted Sandpiper as it moved from one rock to another. Then, with better
lighting, we could see that the bill length was fairly long (longer than
that of a Surfbird): WANDERING TATTLER, the first for some of us. A couple
of PELEAGIC CORMORANTS, SURF SCOTERS, a single loon (unknown species), and a
couple of small flocks of BRANT rounded out this site for us.

 

The marina had several new species for us: WHITE-WINGED SCOTER, GREAT BLUE
HERON, COMMON LOON, BUFFLEHEAD, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, MALLARD, HORNED
GREBE (two in breeding plumage), DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, BARN SWALLOW,
SAVANNAH SPARROW (very bright coloring on the three we saw), WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROW (singing in the distance), and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. A pair of Canada
geese with about 5 goslings was on the berm on the west side of the marina.
In addition, another MERLIN buzzed past us. (Here is where we got pelted
with hail and a cold shower - not the best for our lunch stop, but the views
of some of the birds was excellent.)

 

On our way to Burrows Road, a SPOTTED TOWHEE crossed in front of our car,
and as we traveled to the wildlife viewing site, an immature BALD EAGLE flew
over. At the stop, we saw about a dozen Canada geese, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS,
several more Barn Swallows, and yet another MERLIN.

 

Two OSPREYS were on the ground (!) next to the nest location beside Paulson
Road. When we parked, we heard, then saw a MARSH WREN close by, and at the
mudflat/plant intersection, about 125 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE. Two other
folks had just come from walking the refuge boardwalk, and told us that
they'd seen the geese, but there was "not much out there." Even with the
wind and the rain headed our way, we weren't going to take other folk's word
for it (and noting they didn't have spotting scopes). As we walked along, we
picked up YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, SONG SPARROWS, a MOURNING DOVE, AMERICAN
GOLDFINCHES, GREAT BLUE HERONS, and a deer that walked ahead of us on the
boardwalk. At our first stop, scope-views of the mudflats assured us that we
made the right choice: we could see that there were quite a few shorebirds
feeding out there. We set up scopes in the boardwalk loop, and were amazed
at the number of WESTERN SANDPIPERS: thousands of them from the mouth of
Bowerman Basin to about a quarter-mile from where we saw the white-fronted
geese. One group of about a thousand birds came in closer to us, and as we
scanned the flats (and with the five scopes set up, we looked hard), with
the exception of a small group of SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, we could ID only one
species of shorebird: the Westerns. Everywhere we looked, we saw them! As
did the PEREGRINE FALCON that was on a log to the west of the loop.

 

On the way back to the parked cars, we heard a PACIFIC WREN singing from an
area in the boardwalk loop, and also ticked an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and a
COMMON RAVEN.

 

Note: eBird reports were made for each of the major stops. Total species for
today's trip: 44 - which, given the weather and tide conditions, was pretty
good.

 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18043080 - Damon Road

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18042936 - Point Brown

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18043205 - Marina 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18043276 - Burrows Road

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18043432 - Grays Harbor NWR

 

Here's hoping the Shorebird Festival has good weather, 'cause the shorebirds
appear to be in!

 

May all your birds be identified,

 

Denis DeSilvis

Roy, WA

Mailto: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com

 

 

 

 

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Sibley on Sibley
From: David Hutchinson <flora.fauna AT live.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:12:47 -0700
This may be flogging a dead horse, but I did have a nice chat with Mr.Sibley 
about his new field guide at S.A.S. on Tuesday. I asked him what HE thought of 
it and he said that overall he was quite pleased. He had been looking for 
brighter, richer tones than in the previous edtn., and felt he had got that. He 
thought there were maybe half a dozen pages of plates, where the colors were 
wrong - too blue or green and that there were a few needed corrections to 
individual bird illus. He also made the interesting point that he thought that 
it was the FIRST edtn that was "off", not bright enough and that this why 
people in comparing the new one to the old found it "off". 


Hope this helps and does not leave you totally confused!! All I can say is that 
the line to have him sign your books ran through two rooms and down the hall. 
We have come a long way since Ernest Seton Thompson. David 


--
David Hutchinson, Owner
Flora & Fauna: Nature Books
3213 West Wheeler St., # 6
Seattle,WA.98199

CallSend SMSAdd to SkypeYou'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Black Neck Stilt
From: "B&PBell" <bellasoc AT isomedia.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 12:34:32 -0700
>From Margaret Snell - reported 12:30 pm 

Four black-necked-stilt at north end of  'M' Street near Emerald Downs, in
cattle pond.

 

 

 

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Ocean Shores: thousands of shorebirds
From: Eric Ellingson <abriteway AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 12:16:08 -0700
On a combined razor clamming and birding trip to Ocean Shores we were pleased 
with both activities. 

At one spot behind the Best Western Inn there were
 
Sanderling - 400
Dunlin - 1000's - they stayed most of the day leaving in huge ribbons toward 
evening/high tide, they appeared as far as we could see/drive up/down the 
beach. 

Marbled Godwits - 100's
Semipalmated Plovers - 6
Black-bellied Plovers - 3
Western Sandpipers - 100's
Short-billed Dowitchers 100's
 
These were in huge mixed flocks busy feeding.
 
Razor clammers - 100's
 
This should be a good weekend for the Gray's Harbor Bird Fest in Hoquiam Wa.


EricEllingson.com


 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: SnoCo Western Kingbird, etc.
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 09:06:51 -0700
Hello Tweets,
On my way home from work yesterday I took a "birders shortcut" through
Monroe. The weather kept most of the bird activity down, but I was
surprised to see a Western Kingbird hunting along Tualco Loop Rd, just
north of Crescent Lake WMA. April 22nd beat my earliest SnoCo WEKI record
by a day. Perhaps it's one of the birds that has breed near Lake Tye the
past few years.

The only other new migrant for the day were three Least Sandpipers just
north of the county line.

To tie back in to Brad Waggoner's post from earlier in this week from a
little bit back, for the second year in a row there is a starling hanging
out near the Monroe Prison Farm Pond that gives a relatively good
impression of a Western Wood-Peewee. Not nearly as confusing as the one I
heard in my neighborhood impersonating a Common Nighthawk late last fall.

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RE: Female hummingbird ID help please
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 08:55:38 -0700
Tim,

Looks like a female Black-chinned to me; a Rufous or Calliope would show
some buffy or cinnamon color on the flanks.

A word of advice: your hummer photos are all significantly underexposed--
in future, I would brighten them up using Photoshop or just the Windows
photo program before posting them on Flickr, which would make the colors
easier to distinguish.

All the best,

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus AT telus.net



-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Tim O'Brien
Sent: April-22-14 8:34 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Female hummingbird ID help please



Hi all,

Today, our first hummingbird showed up at our feeders. I have 5 photos
posted on Flickr for your review.

It is a female - we know that! I usually get Black-chinned at my feeder,
but not until later in the spring. While I was taking photos, it was very
still on the feeder. I didn't notice any movement of the tail.

It flew off the feeder into our leaf-less Aspen trees and the back and head
were a striking emerald green with no buff on the belly or flanks.

So the question is for the female hummingbird experts - is it an early
Black-chinned or is it something else like Ruby-throated (which would be
quite out of range)?

Feel free to email me privately or make comments on the photos.

Link to the pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red_knot/

Thanks,

Tim O'Brien
Cheney, WA
mailto: kertim7179 at yahoo dot com

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: TAS/RAS Field Trip to Swan Creek Tuesday 4/22
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 08:39:51 -0700
Hi Tweets,

thirteen of us enjoyed a pleasant morning of birding, with initial light
rain, then cloudy skies with sun breaks and temperatures in the 50's
degrees Fahrenheit.  Highlights included high counts of HAMMOND'S
FLYCATCHER, HERMIT THRUSH and PURPLE FINCH.  We also had great looks at
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, CHIPPING SPARROW, PACIFIC WREN, and HUTTON'S
VIREO.

We started the morning at 6am at the Pioneer Way East entrance.  Here we
observed our first of many HERMIT THRUSH, and MALLARD, YELLOW-RUMPED
WARBLER (AUDUBON'S VARIETY), and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.  As we walked along
Swan Creek in the north end of the park, initially things were slow.  At
the bridge that crosses the creek we observed our first BLACK-THROATED GRAY
WARBLER and HAIRY WOODPECKER.  As we started to ascend the slope of the
west bank of the gulch, we came across many more HERMIT THRUSH and many
PACIFIC WREN.  The Pacific Wren were in full song and we had many wonderful
looks.  We also saw SPOTTED TOWHEE, SONG SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO (OREGON
VARIETY) and BROWN CREEPER.  Both CHESTNUT BACKED CHICKADEE and AMERICAN
ROBIN were observed nest building.

The most activity was in the vicinity of the undeveloped neighborhood at
the southwest end of the park.  Coming out of the woods along the west rim
of the gulch, we were able to see the many PURPLE FINCH that were singing.
 We initially observed RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET,
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and additional YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER.  We had great
looks at BAND-TAILED PIGEON roosting in the conifers.  And nice fly overs
of GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL and GREAT BLUE HERON.

As we explored the undeveloped neighborhood, the birding was really great,
and we could have spent all day looking for different species.  Along the
forest edge we heard several ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER.  As soon as the sun
warmed things up we had great looks at several CHIPPING SPARROW in the
shrubs around the conifers.  In the deciduous trees we initially heard then
observed several BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLERS singing.  We also observed in
two different locations a small gray empid with a small dark bill, and long
primary projection, HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER!  FOY for many, we played digital
recordings to elicit a response for confirmation.  The Hammond's
Flycatchers not only responded to the playback, but occasionally called
back with a definitive "peek" call note.  We also had nice observations of
COOPER'S HAWK, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, NORTHERN FLICKER, TREE SWALLOW and
VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW.  PILEATED WOODPECKER were heard and
NORTHWESTERN/AMERICAN CROW were observed eating ants from THATCH ANT nest
mounds.  Sadly many of the Madrone Trees appear to be dead or dieing.  One
of our birders reported that many Madrone Trees are dieing in our region
from a contagious spreading infectious organism.

The dense predominantly Douglas Fir Stand between the undeveloped
neighborhood and the South 56th street entrance has a large COMMON RAVEN
nest.  We had several sightings of Common Raven with nice vocalizations.
 At the south end of the park, there is an open area on the rim of the
southwest gulch, usually birdy, we had nice looks at HUTTON'S VIREO,
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, and STELLER'S JAY.

The walk back north along the creek at the bottom of the gulch was
gorgeous.  We had several additional nice looks at HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER,
this species is obviously migrating through the Puget Sound Lowlands to the
higher elevation coniferous forest and stream side riparian habitat where
it more typically resides for breeding.  We also had great looks of a
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER adjacent to the Hammond's, providing an
opportunity to contrast the longer, more spatulated, yellow-mandibular bill
of the more yellow and shorter primary projection of the PSFL.  We also had
great looks at RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER.

We finished up our walk around 2pm with more HERMIT THRUSH at the trail
head.  I wish I had spent more time in the undeveloped neighborhood, a
fascinating area, but a very fun day with 47 species seen.

Until next time, good birding!

Shep Thorp
sthorp AT theaec.com
253-370-3742_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Edmonds birds 4-21-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 01:00:25 -0700 (PDT)
As has been mentioned earlier, some migratory birds have recently been passing 
through Edmonds. Monday I photographed a small flock of western sandpipers and 
a lone dunlin at the marsh. A Pacific loon and a pair of marbled murrelets 
were hanging out by the fishing pier.  Thanks to Blair Bensen for helpwith 
ID's. Photographs can be found by scrolling down page 29. 


http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page29 


PSA: The website of the Puget Sound Bird Fest in Edmonds now has links to city 
parks in Edmonds where birds can usually be seen. The links can be helpful in 
conjunction with reading posts of bird sightings in Edmonds or when responding 
to requests for information from out of town visitors. 

http://www.pugetsoundbirdfest.com/links 



Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Female hummingbird ID help please
From: "Tim O'Brien" <kertim7179 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:33:39 -0700 (PDT)

Hi all,

Today, our first hummingbird showed up at our feeders. I have 5 photos posted 
on Flickr for your review. 


It is a female - we know that! I usually get Black-chinned at my feeder, but 
not until later in the spring. While I was taking photos, it was very still on 
the feeder. I didn't notice any movement of the tail. 


It flew off the feeder into our leaf-less Aspen trees and the back and head 
were a striking emerald green with no buff on the belly or flanks. 


So the question is for the female hummingbird experts - is it an early 
Black-chinned or is it something else like Ruby-throated (which would be quite 
out of range)? 


Feel free to email me privately or make comments on the photos.

Link to the pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/red_knot/

Thanks,

Tim O'Brien
Cheney, WA
mailto: kertim7179 at yahoo dot com

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Merlin at UPS?
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:10:13 -0700 (PDT)
Hello all!

My husband reports a possible merlin at the University of Puget Sound in 
Tacoma. This raptor has been seen near the library on campus, often flying and 
being harassed by crows. It is very vocal and "sounds like a merlin". My 
husband says it looks like a falcon (originally he thought it was a kestrel), 
but is not a peregrine. This raptor has been observed over the past few days. 
Has anybody else seen this bird? Thoughts on probability? Apparently a 
biology prof on campus has identified it as a merlin. 


--Jen_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Edmonds Roundup (Short)
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:58:42 -0400
Western Sandpipers showed up at Edmonds marsh on April 20th. On the 21st there 
were three American Pipits, two Western and six Least Sandpipers, and a Greater 
Yellowlegs. A Black-throated Gray Warbler and a Hammond's Flycatcher were 
reported yesterday in Yost Park. 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: VANCOUVER, BC BIRD ALERT -- APRIL 22, 2014
From: Julian Hudson <vnhs_news AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:59:49 -0700
This is Nature Vancouver's Bird Alert for Tuesday, April 22, 2014 
sponsored by Wild Birds Unlimited in Vancouver and North Vancouver. If 
you wish to report a rare, unusual or interesting bird, please phone the 
main number at 604-737-3074, press "2" for the rare bird reporting line, 
and follow the instructions given there.   To post online go to 
http://naturevancouver.ca/node/add/rare-bird-form. Please provide photos 
whenever possible.


Migrants:
Flycatchers and Vireos along with more species of wood-warbler are 
beginning to show.
Purple Martin are arriving.
Caspian Tern and Osprey are returning to their breeding areas.
Harlequin Ducks, Caspian Terns, Horned and Red-Necked Grebes, Brant 
Geese, Black Oystercatchers, Common Goldeneyes, Surf Scoters continue 
along the coast.  Many grebe and loon in breeding plumage.


Sightings:

Tuesday, April 22
a CASSIN'S VIREO was reported singing  near the mouth of the creek at 
Maplewood Conservation Area in North Vancouver.

two YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD, five CINNAMON TEAL and a CALLIOPE 
HUMMINGBIRD were reported from Iona Regional Park.



Monday, April 21
a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, a HERMIT THRUSH, one BLACK-THROATED GRAY 
WARBLER and a

HORNED LARK were all seen at Burnaby Lake.

a pair of PURPLE MARTIN and 6 LEAST SANDPIPER were seen at Blackie Spit 
in Crescent Beach.

three CINNAMON TEAL and three NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW were seen at 
Pitt Lake marsh near viewing tower.

an AMERICAN KESTREL was seen along Thompson Road south of Pitt Lake.

a RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER and a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER were seen at 
Burnaby Lake Regional Park near the equestrian centre.

a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER was reported from east Richmond.



Sunday, April 20
two WHIMBREL were present at Iona Regional Park at the north side of the 
south jetty.



Saturday, April 19
a CASSIN'S VIREO, several ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED 
SWALLOW and a

flock of 15 BLACK OYSTERCATCHER were seen at Point Roberts, Washington.

8 TOWNSEND'S WARBLER, 1 BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, 10 ORANGE-CROWNED 
WARBLER,

20 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, a TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE and a SOOTY GROUSE were 
present at Burnaby Mountain in Burnaby.

27 AMERICAN PIPIT were counted at the Terra Nova Natural Area in Richmond.

a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER was heard and a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER has 
been present for a few days at Hastings Park in Vancouver.

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER 
were seen at Lost Lagoon in Stanley Park.



Friday, April 18
at least a dozen COMMON YELLOWTHROAT were seen and heard, a SORA and a 
VIRGINIA RAIL were heard at

Colony Farm Regional Park in Coquitlam.

three TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE and two SANDHILL CRANE were seen near Grant 
Narrows at Pitt Lake in Pitt Meadows.

a BONAPARTE'S GULL, one AMERICAN PIPIT and several ORANGE-CROWNED and 
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER were seen at Maplewood Flats Conservaton Area in 
North Vancouver.

a NORTHERN GOSHAWK, a TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE and a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK were 
seen at Horseshoe Bay in West Vancouver.



Thursday, April 17
a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen with a flock of Canada Geese at 
Brockton Point in Stanley Park.

a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER along with ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS were 
seen at Pacific Spirit Park in Vancouver.



Tuesday, April 15
the two WESTERN SCRUB JAYS are still present in Maple Ridge.  They were 
both seen at York St and 119th Ave between Dewdney Trunk Rd and Lougheed 
Hwy.

a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was reported from Maple Ridge at 230th Ave and 
Dewdney Trunk Rd.



Monday, April 14
4 SHORT-EARED OWL, 1 BARN OWL along with 1,000's of shorebirds were seen 
at Brunswick Point in Ladner.

2 MARBLED GODWIT and 1 WESTERN MEADOWLARK were seen at Boundary Bay 
Regional Park near Beach Grove Lagoon.


***For reporting dates for rare birds please see,
http://naturevancouver.ca/VNHS 
files/4/20080501_Reporting_Dates_for_Bird_Sightings.pdf

***For owl reporting guidelines please see,

http://naturevancouver.ca/sites/naturevancouver.ca/VNHS%20files/Reporting%20Guidelines%20for%20Owl%20Sightings.pdf 




For a summary of extremely rare bird sightings throughout British Columbia,
check "British Columbia Bird Alert" at http://bcbirdalert.blogspot.com .

A brief account of 31 of the best birding locations in the Vancouver area
can be found on the Nature Vancouver website at
http://www.naturevancouver.ca/Birding_Birding_Sites .

If you have any questions about birds or birding in the Vancouver area,
please call Wayne Weber at 604-597-7201, Larry Cowan at 604-465-1402, or
Viveka Ohman at 604-531-3401.


This message was prepared and distributed by Julian Hudson 
(vnhs_newsAThotmail.com)
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: VANCOUVER, BC BIRD ALERT -- APRIL 22, 2014
From: Julian Hudson <vnhs_news AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:45:44 -0700
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: western kingbird Clallam Bay, WA
From: "Tonia" <rsignor AT centurytel.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 15:41:49 -0700
I was able to see my second western kingbird in Clallam Bay yesterday. it was 
sitting on a reflector alongside the road a 1/2 mile before Clallam Bay. I took 
one crappy picture with my iphone. I keep looking but haven’t seen him today. 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: ABA and Corpus area
From: Jerry Broadus <jbroadus AT seanet.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:42:13 -0500
Clarice and I arrived Yesterday in Corpus Christi, TX, for our first ABA 
convention which starts this afternoon. Spent the morning re-tuning our eyes to 
the intense coastal TX sun (no rain likely here), and reconnecting with 
tri-colored herons, reddish egrets, neo-tropics, skimmers, ruddy turnstones, 
royal and least terns, roseates, displaying willets, AM oystercatchers, indigo 
buntings, chats, brown boobies (two of them),and lots more with gulls laughing 
all day and grackles chortling all evening. Nice bay front hotel with helpful 
staff. Spendy, but starting out very well. 


Jerry Broadus
Puyallup, WA. _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Spring 2014 Klickitat County North American Migration Count.. May 10th...put it on your calendars and let me know if you will be able to participate...
From: Bob Hansen <bobhansen AT gorge.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 09:01:00 -0700
Folks,

Who is ready for a countywide Spring migration bird count? Well it is a BIG 
event in Klickitat County, where we have been doing it since 1997. Yes, nearly 
20 years. 


We set aside the second Saturday in May for this memory creating event. It is a 
grand way to experience our colorful Spring migrants, citizen science and 
collaborative birding. 


Randy Robinson has done a masterful of tabulating the results of all 15 prior 
years, including last year's. Click on 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/SpringNAMC.htm to see how we did 
compared to the average year. Here are last year's ( Spring 2013) results.... 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/Spring2013.htm Once again, thanks Randy 
and all of last Spring's participants... 


Please let me know as soon as possible if you will be able to participate this 
Spring. May 10th is only 18 days away... 


Happy Birding, 
Bob

"ask not what your eco system can do for you,
"ask what you can do for your eco system." OWS graffiti







_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: [SPAM:#] Spring 2014 Klickitat County North American Migration Count.. May 10th...put it on your calendars and let me know if you will be able to participate...
From: Bob Hansen <bobhansen AT gorge.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 09:01:00 -0700
Folks,

Who is ready for a countywide Spring migration bird count? Well it is a BIG 
event in Klickitat County, where we have been doing it since 1997. Yes, nearly 
20 years. 


We set aside the second Saturday in May for this memory creating event. It is a 
grand way to experience our colorful Spring migrants, citizen science and 
collaborative birding. 


Randy Robinson has done a masterful of tabulating the results of all 15 prior 
years, including last year's. Click on 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/SpringNAMC.htm to see how we did 
compared to the average year. Here are last year's ( Spring 2013) results.... 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/Spring2013.htm Once again, thanks Randy 
and all of last Spring's participants... 


Please let me know as soon as possible if you will be able to participate this 
Spring. May 10th is only 18 days away... 


Happy Birding, 
Bob

"ask not what your eco system can do for you,
"ask what you can do for your eco system." OWS graffiti







_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
Subject: Call for papers: WFO's conference in San Diego CA, October 8-12
From: MEYER2J AT aol.com
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 11:12:27 -0400 (EDT)
Hi, Birders:

Western Field Ornithologists is now soliciting papers  for presentation 
during the general science session at its 39th annual  conference, hosted by 
San Diego Field Ornithologists in San Diego, California,  October 8-12.

As always, papers should reflect original research or  summarize existing 
unpublished information about birds in western North America.  The papers 
should be presented in a manner that will interest serious  amateurs and 
professional field ornithologists alike.  Each presentation  will be allotted 
fifteen minutes, including three minutes for questions from and discussion with 

the audience -- a hallmark of WFO conferences.

Review the  call for papers at  
http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/docs/2014/CallForPapers_WFO_2014.pdf 
Note the range of topics and the 

geographic area appropriate for the meeting. Also note the format to follow 
when 

submitting an abstract, which you can do NOW.  July 1 is the deadline for 
receipt of  abstracts.

See  http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/conference.php  for  
preliminary information about the conference, and check it regularly for 
updates. 

Registration will open in mid-June. Current members of WFO will be able  to 
register in advance of the general public.

I hope to see you in San  Diego in October!  
Please forward this "call for papers" to others you know who may be  
interested in participating.
If there is an issue with the above links, go to 
_www.westernfieldornithologists.org_ 
(http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org) . 


Joyce Meyer
Redmond, WA
_meyer2j AT aol.com_ (mailto:meyer2j AT aol.com) _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Chambers Bay Osprey Nest Abatement
From: Tony <tvarela AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 08:04:41 -0700
Went to Chambers Bay to check on the Osprey. I was a bit disappointed to see 
that the birds have ignored the "engineered" new platform that was built for 
them about 500 to 1000 yards from original abated nest site and have instead 
started building on one of the cement structures in the meadow. 


The new nest is in a bit of a precarious position, there is a pile of debris 
below nest that has already fallen. I saw both Osprey at this location and also 
walked down to the railroad trestle and saw the second pair there on their long 
time nest site undisturbed..... 


https://flic.kr/p/neWvWq

https://flic.kr/p/niMnjB

https://flic.kr/p/niMjbn

- Regards

Tony
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony-v
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Coast of Washington pelagic
From: Ken Lane <ken.lane63 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 23:52:05 -0700
Hey tweeters,
 Last friday I returned from my annual Blackcod fishing venture off the
coast. We fished from April 12 thru the 16 and this year we were fortunate
to have a scientist observing our fishing interactions with seabirds. She
mostly watched us setting out our gear to see how the streamered tory lines
we use deter the birds from feeding on the baited hooks as they are set off
the boat. We have been using the tory lines for many years and they work
really well, next year this becomes a law off the west coast as it is in
Alaska. We didn't catch any birds but we did see some interesting ones.
 Day 1 fishing off Cape Elizabeth birds:
  Black-footed Albatross-200+
  Northern Fulmar-3
  Black-legged Kittiwake-1
  Sooty Shearwater -3
  Western Gulls
  Glaucous-winged Gulls
  Thayer's Gulls
  Herring Gulls
  California Gulls
 Day 2-5 moved to Willapa Canyon off Willapa Bay birds:
  Short-tailed Albatross -1 juvenile. We have seen Short-taileds 4 or 5
years now in this area in
  the spring. Last year fishing in the area in Sept none seen.
  Black-footed Albatross -100+
  Parasitic Jaeger-1
  Leach's Storm-Petrel -1 at night
  Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels
  Northern Fulmar -6
  Black-legged Kittiwake -3
  Sooty Shearwaters
  Pink-footed Shearwaters
  Tufted puffin -3 at night
  Glaucous Gull -2
  Ring-billed Gull -1
  Sabine's Gulls -one flock of 30
  Western Gulls
  Thayer's Gulls
  Herring Gulls
  California Gulls
  Glaucous-winged Gulls
  Common Murre
 Also Ancient and Marbled Murrelets, Cassin's and Rhino Auklets, a fly by
Orange-crowned
 Warbler, a flock of Phalaropes, 2 loons, and 2 Brant.
  I have a few photos of the Short-tailed Albatross at
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swamproad/
  Also I've got an interesting video of Black-footed Albatross doing some
of their courtship at sea
  taken last fall.
 Good Birding,
  Ken Lane
  Acme, Wa
  ken.lane63 AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: arrivals
From: "Kristin Stewart" <kristinstewart01 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 22:49:22 -0700
Tweeters,

 

I had a male Goldfinch on April 1st, the first of the season; and then not
another until 3 days ago. Today there were perhaps 6. They usually arrive in
more numbers at the same time. And yesterday, April 20, I had 2 Pine
Siskins, the first of the entire winter. They are usually the most common
wintering bird in our yard, and then most of them leave in the spring. But 2
or 3 pairs have remained to breed in our area/property (5 acres with many
alders). The breeders left in the fall about the time the Goldfinches left,
and I have not seen them since until yesterday. I did not see them today.
This is certainly not the usual pattern in our 10 years here.

 

Kristin Stewart

 

Olympia

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Ridgefield NWR Closure - Update
From: Scott Carpenter <slcarpenter AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:39:30 -0700
CARTY AND RIVER 'S' UNITS CLOSED APRIL 25
Weather Related Change in Construction Schedule

The Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge will be closed on Friday, April
25th for road improvements. These repairs will impact both the River 'S'
and Carty Units. The closures will allow crews to extend asphalt at the
Refuge entrances and replace asphalt along the Observation Blind trail.

Please note: Construction closures were previously announced for April
24th, however, precipitation in the forecast has delayed the work to April
25th.

For more information check out these websites:

Refuge Complex -
     www.fws.gov/ridgefieldrefuges
Ridgefield Friends Website -
     www.ridgefieldfriends.org
Gorge Stewards Website -
     www.refugestewards.com

-- 
Scott Carpenter
Portland, Oregon
-------------------------
http://www.scottcarpenterphotography.com/_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Black-Necked Stilts at S 204 St in Kent
From: Julie Monahan <jamonahan AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:44:06 -0700
Hi All,
A scan of the flooded fields down the hill from St. Patrick's Cemetery
turned up four head-bobbing Black-necked Stilts today at about 6pm. A lucky
find, considering they were in swooping distance of a perched Peregrine
Falcon that had just finished unsuccessfully buzz the dabbling ducks
nearby. Yay spring!

Julie Monahan
Seattle, WA_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Old Sam Peabody
From: "J. Acker" <owler AT sounddsl.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:43:40 -0700
Heard the call this morning.  The White-throated Sparrow that arrived on 16
October has started singing.  I so love the song, but know that it means
that the bird will be gone in two weeks.  I have had a White-throated
sparrow visit my feeder from 2009-present, October - May.  Don't know if it
is the same bird, but I enjoy its visit.

 

-J. Acker

owler AT sounddsl.com  

Bainbridge Island, WA

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Nisqually NWR - White-throated Sparrow and Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: johntubbs AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 03:09:39 +0000 (UTC)

Hi everyone, 



I should have mentioned two other good birds at Nisqually today, besides the 
Chipping Sparrow.  First of all, thanks to the group of birders leaving when I 
was arriving who alerted me to the general vicinity of each of them.  




The YHBL was in the marshy area between the twin barns and the start of the 
boardwalk, foraging at the water's edge when I saw it.  The yellow head was 
really noticeable at distance, even with just binocs.  




The WTSP was on the river side of the boardwalk, a bit closer to the visitors 
center than the barn end of the trail.  It was working the gravel path in the 
company of two Golden-crowned Sparrows and flew up for very good looks when I 
walked by the birds. 




John Tubbs 

Lacey, WA 

johntubbs AT comcast.net 

  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Vashon Island Chipping Sparrows, Purple Martins back today
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:10:41 -0700
Two, possibly three, Chipping Sparrows were on Old Mill Road on southcentral
Vashon Island today.  We have twelve records for the spring over the last
fifteen years, three others for the third week of April.  Susan McClellan
found one around noon.  I came by to check it out and found one each on
either side of the road and heard possibly a third on some private property
where I couldn't chase it down.

 

Steve Caldwell also saw our first Purple Martins of the season over Tramp
Harbor bluff.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new second edition of The Birds of Vashon Island at:

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Chipping Sparrow Question
From: "Mary K." <catbird54 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:38:07 -0700
Is it my imagination, or are Chipping Sparrows showing up more regularly in
Western WA outside of their normal breeding spots?  Seems from Tweeters
reports that may be the case, wonder what others think.

Thanks,
Mary


Mary Klein
Bremerton WA
catbird54 at Comcast dot net




_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: WHITE PELICAN - West Seattle, King County, April 21, 2014
From: Houston Flores <houstonflores AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:00:31 -0700
Hey Tweets,

So...I was just hanging out in my backyard (West Seattle, Highland 
Park)...minding my own business (gardening)...and I look up and see a WHITE 
PELICAN casually glide over my house heading south. What the...? Perhaps the 
same bird that was hanging out in South Park last winter??? I drive by that 
pond every day on my way to work, so I'll let you know if I see it again. 



Keep your eyes on the skies,

Houston Flores
houstonflores AT hotmail.com
West Seattle
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: black-necked stilts in kent
From: wheelermombi AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 01:14:34 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Tweeters, 

I stopped by the flooded field area located at S. 204 St. in Kent to see what 
might turn up, at the suggestion of Carol Schultz, who I ran into the other 
day. When I arrived, I spotted Evan Houston along the edge of the road, 
binoculars in hand. He alerted me to 4 Black-necked Stilts, which were a very 
nice surprise. After a few minutes, a Solitary Sandpiper appeared nearby, 
moving around near a few Greater Yellowlegs. 


Good birding, 

Lonnie Somer 
Kent, WA 
wheelermombi AT comcast.net _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Black-necked stilts @ 204th St. wetlands in Kent
From: Darrel Denune <darrel.denune AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:41:02 -0700 (PDT)
-Further clarification where sighted, -south of 204th in the south marsh only 
30-40' off the roadway. There were at least one male and three females present, 
as well as a single solitary sandpiper a few yards from the stilts. Good luck 
to any one looking. 


-DD_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: W Tanager, Renton
From: Leslie McWethy <lguy_mcw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:36:43 -0700
Tweets,
Several good birds in the yard in Renton today 
The WHITE-THROATED SPARROW is still hanging around, and I heard a partial song 
this morning. He has been here since January, and is looking REALLY crisp in 
fresh plumage now. 

FOY ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER today.
And a singing WESTERN TANAGER was just up in the maple trees.

Spring has sprung 
Guy_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Nashville Warbler at Lake Sammamish State Park, Apr 21, 2014
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 16:00:12 -0700
Hi Tweets....

 

Birded LSSP a couple hours this morning to look for arriving spring migrants 
and was satisfyingly rewarded with a great 10-minute look at all sides of a 
male NASHVILLE WARBLER feeding in one of the flowering apple trees. The trees 
are in the old orchard just to the south of the Cottonwood forest at the SE 
corner of the Sunset Beach parking lot (the farthest lot to the right of the 
main entrance). There was also a lone CHIPPING SPARROW feeding with a bunch of 
Savannah Sparrows in the large grassy area to the south (right) of Sunset 
Beach. The PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER continues calling in the Cottonwood forest. 
Had an amazing experience with a large (estimated 100 or more) migrating flock 
of Yellow-rumped Warblers. They were surrounding me in every direction....above 
me, to the left, right, front and back.....singing, chipping, and foraging. 
First time I've been enveloped in a cloud of Yellow-rumps! They were mostly 
male Audubons, with a just few male Myrtles. 


 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18012834 


 

Sharon Aagaard

Bellevue WA

scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com


 
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Battle Ground backyard birding
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:53:58 -0700
Tweeters,

Although not a very good visible migration over my Battle Ground, Clark
County backyard this morning, I was surprised that, while doing some yard
work later in the morning, I heard a Black-throated Gray Warbler, a
MacGillivray's Warbler (earliest for the yard by three weeks) and a
Hammond's Flycatcher (the first since May 22, 2011).  All of these were
FOYs for the yard.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Chipping Sparrows - Thurston County
From: johntubbs AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 22:24:19 +0000 (UTC)



Hi everyone, 

  

I had Chipping Sparrows at two locations this morning.  The first was at 
Nisqually NWR, with a single bird seen just past the visitors center along the 
trail to the boardwalk (where it hasn't quite reached the boardwalk).  This 
bird was feeding on the ground near the trail, and then flew to the other side 
of the gravel road that goes to the twin barns. 


  

Having found the Nisqually bird, after finishing at Nisqually I went back to 
the Hawks Prairie Reclamation Ponds since I had caught a glimpse of what I 
thought was a Chipping Sparrow yesterday, but the bird was flying away and the 
look wasn't definitive.  Sure enough, I found 3 Chipping Sparrows right where 
I had thought I saw one yesterday.  These birds were in the Marvin Road corner 
of the ponds area, outside the fence in a couple trees between the fence and 
the gymnastics building, along the ditch in that area.  


  

Obviously these are not particularly rare, but this is the first time I've had 
multiples of this species in a single day in separate locations. 


  

John Tubbs 

(newly in) Lacey, WA 

johntubbs AT comcast.net 

  

  

  

  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Stilts @ 204th St. Kent
From: Darrel Denune <darrel.denune AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 13:42:05 -0700 (PDT)
Four EA and a solitary sandpiper._______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: re: bremerton id help-thanks
From: "antoniadg1 AT juno.com" <antoniadg1@juno.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:09:26 GMT
Thanks all; I'm almost certain it was a Flicker. The wings were a beautiful 
coppery color. Your tips were very helpful; as soon as I googled images there 
were enough that I found one a useful picture and description. Good lesson. 


____________________________________________________________
Do THIS before eating carbs (every time)
1 EASY tip to increase fat-burning, lower blood sugar & decrease fat storage
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/53557b4ebf8517b4e2a97st03duc
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Western Tanager, Singing, Renton
From: Leslie McWethy <lguy_mcw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:37:36 -0700
Tweets,
Several good birds in the yard in Renton today 
The WHITE-THROATED SPARROW is still hanging around, and I heard a partial song 
this morning. He has been here since January, and is looking REALLY crisp in 
fresh plumage now. 

FOY ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER today.
And a singing WESTERN TANAGER was just up in the maple trees.

Spring has sprung 
Guy_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Edmonds Marsh now
From: William Boyington <wrboyington AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:44:47 -0700

Seeing 3 American Pipits and 5 Least Sandpipers at this time.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: The Water Bear's
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:07:16 -0700
Well another Easter has gone by, with all the leftover cards, eggs, ham, etc. 
The easter bunny has resumed normal activities in the hedgerows of Port 
Townsend, or wherever. 


 

Of course the actual reason for the holiday, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, 
typically gets lost in the commercialism. Whether you can accept resurrection 
or not, the universe is a mysterious place. Everybody says so. Except religious 
and scientific fundamentalist's of course, who like to simplify everything down 
to pabulum. Whatever. 


 

But hey, how about them Water Bear's!

 

This whole post came up Easter morning for the reason that I was snooping on 
Google Earth to show my folks, who have never used a computer in their lives, a 
picture of our ol' house on Sylvan Lane in West Seattle, which they sold about 
26 years ago. The ol' homestead looked pretty good. It had always been 
surrounded by trees and greenery and it looked like it had grown up even more 
under present ownership. 


 

One green item still present is the english laurel hedge surrounding two sides 
of the place. And in that hedge was an old, (even when we moved in back in 
1959) rock and concrete bird bath. Tucked into an alcove cut into the hedge, it 
harbored a good growth of water moss. And in that moss were Water Bear's. 


 

See, as a young naturalist, I had a microscope at home, cheapo but good enough, 
and was intrigued by pond life. So I examined the bird bath water to find many 
fabulous microscopic things - diatoms in their many forms, paramecium, 
rotifers, etc., and-- the amazing Water Bear's! 


 

What is a Water Bear, you might be wondering. Well it's a microscopic creature 
vaguely related to arthropods (another mystery). They look sort of like a 
rubbery mole with 8 legs, which are tipped with gnarly claws to grip the moss, 
etc. that they eat. They also do look sort of bear like as they slowly amble 
about - also known as Tardigrades ('slow stepper'). Anyway, pretty cool. 


 

As it turns out, the Water Bear (there are 900 plus species)(maybe) is one of 
the toughest little animals in existence. They can: 


- survive up to ten years in a dried out state, then just add water, and voila! 
back to life. 


- survive temps from minus 458 degrees F, to plus 300 degrees F.

- take extreme radiation

- survive six times the pressure of the deepest ocean.

- survived being tortured by scientists in outer space, as they lived through 
10 days in vacuum. 


 

So although the Water Bear doesn't actually achieve resurrection, it can be 
reconstituted at least. Water Bear's - many photos of these little wierdos 
online. 


 

I mentioned finding Water Bears in my old birdbath on tweeters a few years ago, 
and was questioned about the validity of my sighting by Larry ("Vaux 
Happening") Schwitters, which was reasonable, because your typical nice clean 
bird bath ain't gonna have Water Bears. I explained about the moss. Anyway I 
thought it would be interesting if Larry and I showed up at the front door of 
my old house in West Seattle, dressed in borrowed Ranger outfits, with clip 
boards, a giant magnifying glass, and a big salmon net. 


 

"Miss, we are here from Seattle NSI" we would tell the current owner, as we 
pulled out our fake NSI badges (Natural Scene Investigators). 


 

" We have a report of a Water Bear sighted in your birdbath. We need to check 
it out. There may be a bunch of them ". 


 

"Oh my god!" the homeowner replies." When were they seen?"

 

" Oh about 1970" And we rattle off the above list of Water Bear abilities, just 
before the homeowner goes to the phone and calls 911. We are then arrested by 
the SPD. 


If I could make a film short of this I'd star Leslie Nielsen, and Dan Aykroyd 
as the rangers. Of course Leslie would have to be resurrected. 


 

Jeff Gibson

tardigrade in

Port Townsend Wa
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Skagit big day, resending
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 06:51:26 -0700 (PDT)
Dear Tweeters,

If myarithmetic is right, I think I just found 104 species of birds in Skagit 
County today, 4-20-2014. 


Big misses included Belted Kingfisher, Mourning Dove, R-B Nuthatch, Brown 
Creeper, and Pelagic Cormorant. A flock of fifty or sixty Calidris sandpipers 
tormented me on the Samish Flats, too--I was pretty sure there were Westerns 
among them, but I could never get an ID. They would not settle down! 


Good birds today included these:

Blue-winged Teal, one on Minkler Flats;

Cinnamon Teal, three on Minkler Flats;

Sora, birds heard on Minkler Flats and Butler Flats;

Black-bellied Plover, upwards of 150 on Samish Flats;

Lesser Yellowlegs, one at West Edison;

S-B Dowitcher, one on Samish Flats;

Bonaparte's Gull, a goodly flock off Samish Island;

Caspian Tern, one off Samish Island;

Short-eared Owl, four on Samish Flats, after a long time when I'd not seen any 
there; 


Townsend's Solitaire, one at Corkindale, three at Marblemount Boat Launch;

Mt Bluebird, seven at Corkindale;

It was very pleasant seeing the shorebirds in breeding plumage out on Samish 
Flats. There are huge puddles in many fields--who knows what might turn up out 
there in the coming days! 


Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 05:55:17 -0700
Hey tweets, Some days out in the field are so perfect, you never want them to 
end. The light, the birds, the greenness, the *life* are all so compelling you 
feel transported out of the everyday hustle and hassle of ordinary life into 
the timelessness of Eden. Yesterday was such a day at the Fill. 


It started with a sighting of a now-rare AMERICAN BITTERN at Conibear, who 
decided it didnt like to be looked at by me, gave a kind of squawk, and flew 
off majestically toward Foster Island. Another bird that wasnt too keen about 
being looked at was a PILEATED WOODPECKER at the north end of Sidles Swamp 
(name is not my fault), who objected vocally as it flew deeper into the trees 
and disappeared, leaving behind only its voice, which kept objecting for about 
15 more minutes. Also on view, hundreds of Yellow-rumped Warblers, both Myrtle 
and Audubons, and numerous Common Yellowthroats. I think theyre going to have 
a very good year, along with the ever-exploding population of Marsh Wrens. In 
University Slough was the years first crop of ducklings skittering across the 
water like yellow puffballs while the Mallard mom looked on. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Shy bittern, cryptic in the marsh, 
tell me your secrets. 
The bittern raises its bill, 
sways like a fat reed, 
and hopes I'll go away soon.

- Connie, Seattle

constancesidles AT gmail.com
www.constancypress.com
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: gull seen in Edmonds
From: tredick christina <cjt37 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:27:29 -0700 (PDT)
Happy spring tweeters, I was looking out at the water from a private home Thurs 
4-17 and saw a gull with a black head. I didn't have binos, but could have been 
a bonaparte's gull? 


Chris in Ballard_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Skagit big day
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:02:06 -0700 (PDT)
Dear Tweeters,

If myarithmetic is right, I think I just found 104 species of birds in Skagit 
County today, 4-20-2014. 


Big misses included Belted Kingfisher, Mourning Dove, R-B Nuthatch, Brown 
Creeper, and Pelagic Cormorant. A flock of fifty or sixty Calidris sandpipers 
tormented me on the Samish Flats, too--I was pretty sure there were Westerns 
among them, but I could never get an ID. They would not settle down! 


Good birds today included these:

Blue-winged Teal, one on Minkler Flats;

Cinnamon Teal, three on Minkler Flats;

Sora, birds heard on Minkler Flats and Butler Flats;

Black-bellied Plover, upwards of 150 on Samish Flats;

Lesser Yellowlegs, one at West Edison;

S-B Dowitcher, one on Samish Flats;

Bonaparte's Gull, a goodly flock off Samish Island;

Caspian Tern, one off Samish Island;

Short-eared Owl, four on Samish Flats, after a long time when I'd not seen any 
there; 


Townsend's Solitaire, one at Corkindale, three at Marblemount Boat Launch;

Mt Bluebird, seven at Corkindale;

It was very pleasant seeing the shorebirds in breeding plumage out on Samish 
Flats. There are huge puddles in many fields--who knows what might turn up out 
there in the coming days! 


Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: re: oil terminal at Bowerman
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:00:01 -0700
Thanks to Jerry for bringing this up; Grays Harbor Audubon has become very
unpopular with the City of Hoquiam and Port of Grays Harbor for daring to
insist an EIS was indeed needed for this project. The Quinault's are also
very vocal about the (may I say) stupidity of putting such a project so
close to a major salmon river; the oystermen are getting nervous, those of
us who know the geology of the region know this is a major hazard zone in
the event of a substantial earthquake, let alone the Cascadia subduction
zone 60 miles offshore. And now a recent map in The Daily World showing the
effects of rising sea levels clearly shows that whole area will be under
water "by 2100", making all of this a moot point.

The illustration of the tank farm on Pg 5 (

http://www.portofgraysharbor.com/downloads/crude-by-rail/USD-Commission-Briefing.pdf) 

does not seem to show the light standard along Paulson Rd. which currently
houses an osprey nest, and notice in the lower left corner the new baseball
fields and Hoquiam High School's bright red oval track, with the high
school just east of it, out of sight. That track is the site of the Relay
for Life walk every June, ironic with the health hazards caused by
petroleum gasses.

I'll stop now before I really get on a rant.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Black-bellied Plovers at Olympia Airport
From: Gary Wiles <wilesharkey AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 20:23:20 -0700 (PDT)
Tweeters,

I visited the Olympia Airport (which is actually in Tumwater) this morning to 
do some birding. The most interesting sighting was a flock of 24 Black-bellied 
Plovers in the south-central part of the airfield. Also saw 1 American 
Kestrel, good numbers of Savanna and White-crowned Sparrows, and several 
probable meadowlarks. 


Gary Wiles
Olympia, WA
wilesharkey AT yahoo.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: photo and follow-up tagged Brant Goose
From: Clare McLean <clareishere AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 19:18:32 -0700
Thanks to all Tweeters who responded to my RFI re a tagged Brant last week. 
Photos here: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/claremclean/13936184611/

David Ward, a research wildlife biologist with US Geo Survey mailed me. Based 
upon the info I relayed, he wrote: 


 "G-YAL is an Adult male  was caught and banded in mid July of 2006 
near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska (North Slope).  The metal band on the right 
leg of this bird is 1767-06129.  We have not seen this bird since it was
 banded."

I've been back twice to Carkeek weekend but no Brant in sight.

Clare McLean
clareishere AT hotmail.com
Seattle, WA
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Pacific-slope Flycatcher, 4/19 Lake Wash, and 4/20 Lake Sammamish
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 15:58:40 -0700
To add to Bob's 4/19 PSFL sighting, Andy and I saw one PSFL and heard more 
(song and calls) on 4/19 while doing a monthly bird survey at Saint Edwards 
State Park. Today (4/20) at Lake Sammamish State Park, I heard several calls in 
the Cottonwood forest near the SE corner of the Sunset Beach parking lot. 


Sharon Aagaard
Bellevue WA
scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Oil terminal prelim proposal near Bowerman Basin
From: Jerry Broadus <jbroadus AT seanet.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 15:11:22 -0700
Tweets: At last week's Nisqually Bird Walk a birder and fellow environmentally 
active friend (Bruce Hoeft; Thanks, Bruce) alerted us of plans to construct a 
crude oil terminal in Grays Harbor on the Port owned property directly east of 
and just across the road from the east end of the Grays Harbor Refuge, 
popularly known as Bowerman Basin. I knew of two other proposals, located 
upstream in Hoquiam, that were delayed (at least) by the Shoreline Hearings 
Board, but I had not heard of this proposal. Here is a link to a publicly 
available preliminary document, which includes a "vision" of the proposed 
development. Anyone who has birded at Bowerman and the sewer treatment pond 
there will recognize the spot: 



http://www.portofgraysharbor.com/downloads/crude-by-rail/USD-Commission-Briefing.pdf 


I have very little info on this proposal, but I think many birders would like 
to keep abreast of this, given its proximity to the Basin. Here is Bruce's 
contact, which I am relatively sure he will not mind me sharing if you want to 
ask him for more info. I hope I am not spreading alarm prematurely, but I 
gather this is in its prelim stages. 


brucehoeft AT gmail.com

Jerry Broadus
Puyallup, WA. _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Tracking "Island Girl" North for Her Sixth Satellite Migration (!)
From: Bud Anderson <falconresearch AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 14:01:11 -0700
This remarkable peregrine, Island Girl, that we tagged in Chile six years
ago, has just begun another northbound migration towards her nest on Baffin
Island, Canada. We now have five complete years of data on her
transcontinental movements and are hoping for more.

She left her wintering area on the coast of Chile (same location every
year) a couple of days ago and, as usual, you can see her current position
based on our three signals per day via the FRG website at www.frg.org.

Pretty sure that this is a record for a satellite-tagged peregrine. Amazed
that her GPS solar powered transmitter from Microwave Telemetry has lasted
for so long.

And for all of you that have contributed to this project, and there are
many here on Tweeters, thanks again.

This would not be happening without you guys.

Enjoy,

-- 
Bud Anderson
Falcon Research Group
Box 248
Bow, WA 98232
(360) 757-1911
falconresearch AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: a beautiful short nature video and message
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 12:34:23 -0700
perfect for today and any other day as well...

http://www.ted.com/talks/louie_schwartzberg_nature_beauty_gratitude

Enjoy!

Barb Deihl
North Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Whidbey Island Chipping Sparrow
From: Marv Breece <marvbreece AT q.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 15:17:33 -0400 (EDT)
Yesterday was a good birding day on Whidbey Island. 95 species showed 
themselves on a day with a warm, still morning, and a cold, very windy and at 
times rainy afternoon. Here are a few highlights. 



DEER LAKE 
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1 myrtle 
Olive-sided flycatcher 


CULTUS BAY & CULTUS BAY ROAD 
American Goldfinch - 1 
Orange-crowned Warbler - 1 seen & others heard 
Caspian Tern -1 
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1 audubon 
Greater Yellowlegs - 17 
Western Sandpiper - 2 w/ Dunlin flock 
Least Sandpiper - flock of 10 or more 
Cooper's Hawk - 1 
Bonaparte's Gull - numbers in alt plumage 
Rufous Hummingbird - several 
Anna's Hummingbird - 1 male 


EWING ROAD MARSH 
American Bittern - 1 heard 


USELESS BAY & DEER LAGOON 
Black-bellied Plover - 40 
Sanderling - 1 
Short-billed Dowitcher - 5 
Greater Yellowlegs - 8 
Caspian Tern 


FORT CASEY 
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1 audubon 
no House Wren 


SUNYSIDE CEMETERY SW of COUPEVILLE 
Chipping Sparrow -2 eating dandelion seeds 
Slate-colored Dark-eyed Junco - 1 male eating dandelion seeds 
White-crowned Sparrows, Purple Finches and Savannah Sparrows also eating 
dandelion seeds 



DUGUALLA BAY 
Cackling Goose - 4 minima w/ moffits 
Barn, Violet-green, Northern Rough-winged, Cliff and Tree Swallows over pond on 
Dike Rd 



SWANTOWN AREA 
Long-tailed duck - 8 in their darker spring plumage 






Marv Breece 
Seattle, WA 
marvbreece AT q.com 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RE: Greater White-fronted Geese
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 06:44:14 +0000
On Friday there was a steady stream of GWF over the western end of the gorge 
with at least 20 skeins of 15-80 birds going over between 10AM and 2PM, there 
were usually birds from south to north as far as my eyes could see. 

 
We had a lot more daytime rain today, but I saw at least 4 V's of 20-30 birds 
go over late afternoon after we had some clearing. 

Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58N 122.44W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 


 
From: re_hill AT q.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Greater White-fronted Geese
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 21:22:32 -0700

And 17 just north of the Lewis River on the Woodland Bottoms. Randy 
HillRidgefield From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jim 
Danzenbaker 

Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 3:57 PM
To: tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Greater White-fronted Geese Tweeters, Just reporting a 
flock of over 100 Greater White-fronted Geese that flew high from southeast to 
northwest over my Battle Ground, Clark County yard at 2pm this afternoon. Keep 
your eyes and ears skyward.Jim-- 

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: RE: Greater White-fronted Geese
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 21:22:32 -0700
And 17 just north of the Lewis River on the Woodland Bottoms. 

 

Randy Hill

Ridgefield

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jim 
Danzenbaker 

Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 3:57 PM
To: tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Greater White-fronted Geese

 

Tweeters,

 

Just reporting a flock of over 100 Greater White-fronted Geese that flew high 
from southeast to northwest over my Battle Ground, Clark County yard at 2pm 
this afternoon. 


 

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.




Jim

-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Edmonds Roundup
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 00:16:49 -0400
I'll start this report with an intriguing sighting today. A local bird 
photographer, who has a view of the Edmonds Bowl from his home, watched a large 
white bird, with the structure and size of a Great Blue Heron, fly by his 
window. He said it was a 2-3 second observation. Great Egret has been seen in 
Edmonds. It is a code 5 bird. It may have moved on to Port Susan Bay, which 
seems to be the preferred habitat for Great Egrets in Snohomish County, but it 
may be worth checking the marsh in the morning. 


Today (4-19) there were three Least Sandpipers and a few Dunlin in the marsh. 
Yesterday there were four peeps on the far side of the marsh, feeding and 
moving around like Leasts but seen through binoculars rather than scope so the 
identification is soft. On Thursday (4-17) there was a Greater Yellowlegs in 
the marsh. The first Caspian Tern was seen over the marina on 4-14. The first 
Brown-headed Cowbird appeared at the marsh on 4-12. 


On April 9th there were 300 Western Grebes strung out across the Edmonds 
off-shore waters, seen by scope. On that same morning there were four 
Violet-green Swallows flying over the marsh. We also saw, for the second time 
in a week, a Myrtle Yellow-rumped Warbler. 


The first Osprey sighting was April 8th over the Edmonds portion of Lake 
Ballinger. 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: sno falls peregrines
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 16:14:54 -0700
hello all:

the weather so far this year has conspired to take the starch out of us
all.  the falcon should have laid several weeks ago but she still has not.
it is remotely possible she laid eggs on schedule but nobody saw them and
they have since died or been abandoned (although no one has spotted any
eggs at any of the usual sites).   the pair have been working a site on the
far right side of the cliff but still no eggs that anyone has seen although
there are several reports of copulation.  thus i suppose what's going on
now could be an attempt at a second clutch rather than a seemingly
lackadaisical effort at nesting for the current year.

so, we are left with lots of questions and much to speculate about.
perhaps bud or dennis might have some thoughts based on knowledge and
experience.  i opine on nothing more than wild conjecture that this year is
likely a washout (pun intended).  either the weather was so crummy the pair
never got in sync or perhaps she has reached the age where she is either no
longer productive (i think we have around ten years of nesting records) or
was affected adversely by the horrid weather.  i have done some web
searches to support or detract from that position but find nothing on point
so far.  so i guess we can continue to watch and see what happens, if
anything.

regards,

t

-- 
dave templeton
fall city, wa

crazydave65atgmaildaughtcom

"Don't worry about the world coming to an end today; it's already tomorrow
in Australia."  Charles Schultz_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re: Greater White-fronted Geese
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 23:07:15 GMT
We also had two flocks of about 40 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE heading 
Northwest pass over our place at the mouth of the Columbia Gorge today. They 
were flying at a much lower elevation than I usually see here, probably due to 
the heavy cloud cover and winds. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Jim Danzenbaker 
To: tweeters tweeters 
Subject: [Tweeters] Greater White-fronted Geese
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 15:56:37 -0700


Tweeters, Just reporting a flock of over 100 Greater White-fronted Geese that 
flew high from southeast to northwest over my Battle Ground, Clark County yard 
at 2pm this afternoon. Keep your eyes and ears skyward.Jim-- 

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 15:56:37 -0700
Tweeters,

Just reporting a flock of over 100 Greater White-fronted Geese that flew
high from southeast to northwest over my Battle Ground, Clark County yard
at 2pm this afternoon.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-723-0345
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: House Hunting Controversy | Union Bay Watch
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 14:55:14 -0700
Tweeters,

This week's post primarily concerns a pair of Downy woodpeckers looking for a 
new nesting site(s). However there are also a couple of bird feather challenges 
that might help you sharpen your skills. 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/04/house-hunting-controversy.html

Good Luck!

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Pacific-slope Fly in Dungeness
From: B Boekelheide <bboek AT olympus.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 12:04:12 -0700
Hello, Tweeters,

This morning (4/19) I was very surprised to see a lovely Pacific-slope 
Flycatcher flitting around in some trees in Dungeness. It was a classic PS Fly 
 all-pale lower mandible on a fair-sized bill, nice oval eye-ring enlarged 
behind the eye, yellow wash on belly, olivey-brown back, creamy wing-bars, and 
it perched repeatedly on the inside of the tree, never sitting out on an 
exposed branch. It let me look for several seconds as it moved between perches, 
then it flitted away into some other trees and disappeared. 


The onslaught has begun!

Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness

 _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of Apr. 20, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 12:04:03 -0700
Hey, Tweets,Last week, BirdNote aired: * Mistaken Identity - Sounds like... 
http://bit.ly/1jTUc4O * Nocturnal Migration of Songbirds http://bit.ly/1eMmkb0 
* A Chance to See Whooping Cranes - At Port Aransas http://bit.ly/1tlW2Aq * 
Sapsuckers and Hummingbirds http://bit.ly/1tlW5fz * Wood Buffalo National Park 
- Birthplace of Whooping Cranes http://bit.ly/1tlW9Mg * American Bittern 
http://bit.ly/1eMmI9b * Frank Bellrose and the Wood Ducks http://bit.ly/Qn7NY4 
------------------------------------------------------------ View the photos 
and links for next week's shows: http://tinyurl.com/m3akcuy 
------------------------------------------------------------ Find us on 
Facebook. Search for birdnote. ... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for 
birdnoteradio ========================================= You can listen to the 
mp3, see a photo, read the transcript, sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, 
and find related resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org All episodes 
are in the archive. Thanks for listening! Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote 
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Orange crowned warbler
From: Noah Sanday <puffleshatchery AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 11:50:18 -0700
There is a orange crowned warbler on Maleng rd in the blackberries on the left 
and there is also a chickadee nest on the rite at the bottom of the hill in a 
dead tree branch by the puddle. 

puffleshatchery AT gmail.com 

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Belfair SP Greater White-fronted Geese
From: Ann Wood <annmariewood AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 10:53:48 -0700
30 GWFG flew in about 15 minutes ago! Nice new county bird.

Marbled Godwit still present,

Ann Marie Wood
Mountlake Terrace

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Red-breasted Sapsucker prepares nesting cavity/Duvall
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 22:21:51 -0700
> 
> Video:  Red-breasted Sapsucker, Duvall, WA 4/18/14
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Auburn - Townsend's Solitaire
From: "Carol & Lynn Schulz" <carol.schulz50 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:52:34 -0700
Hi Tweets:
Alex Juchems and his very-sharp birder kids Sara and Matthew were excited to 
get a terrific yard bird today, Apr 18, about 9am. They live near Auburn's west 
hill. 

Here is their msg. "Just a few minutes ago we ID'd a Townsend's Solitaire! It 
perched on top of a bird house Matthew had built and offered us 10 minutes of 
clear viewing, first with bin's and then with a scope. Using the scope we 
clearly saw the white eye ring, small black beak, large mostly gray body. The 
final confirmation came when we saw the orange-buff colored mark on the wing. 
What a thrill for us - a new life list bird." 

Reported by Carol Schulz for the Cooper-Juchems_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: S. 204th & S. Ctr. Pkway - Gr. Yellowlegs & Pipits
From: "Carol & Lynn Schulz" <carol.schulz50 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:42:05 -0700
Hi Tweets:
I was at S 204th in North Kent midday. There were 10 Greater Yellowlegs in the 
big enhanced field south of 204th, some doing their rolling display song along 
w/ their usual tu, tu, tu's. I also heard some more Yellowleg calls from the 
pond north of 204th. A flock of Cackling Geese got up near the Green River and 
flew around. 

Over at the fields by the intersection of Southcenter Parkway and S 200th, 
there were 12 Amer. Pipits in the field NW of the intersection, and 4 Pipits in 
the big field to the south. They were there 'til a fellow started sending his 
retreiver down amongst them. An adult dark intermediate morph Red-tailed Hawk 
flew by. 

Yours, Carol Schulz
Des Moines  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Cliff swallows
From: Noah Sanday <puffleshatchery AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 18:51:19 -0700
There are a few cliff swallows that have shown up today in acme along with 
hairy woodpecker, red breasted sapsucker, and band tailed pigeons on Maleng rd 
an the rail road crossing. Noah Sanday at puffleshatchery AT gmail.com 


Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Connecticut Warbler: Not possible, right?
From: Josh Hayes <coralliophila AT live.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 01:24:22 +0000
Last weekend my family and I went for a lovely little hike up a canyon a few 
miles above Klickitat, WA (on the Klickitat River, natch). The hike was up the 
Swale Canyon portion, and the habitat was nicely riparian around the creek in 
the canyon, and was quite grassy on the surrounding rather steep hillsides. We 
heard canyon wrens, some rapid drumming (I'm guessing downy or hairy WP but 
never saw it). A turkey made a break for it across the path on our return, 
which was cool. There was a VERY active little flock of about six 
black-throated gray warblers zipping around, pausing to sing for a few seconds 
and then zipping off again. Fun to see! 

 
But there was some sort of "hooded" warbler skulking around in the same area. 
Very grey in the hood and bib, and what seemed to me to be a distinct and 
complete eye ring, so my East-Coast bird brain -- not that I'm a bird-brain! -- 
immediately thought "Connecticut Warbler", but then I rethought it, but was 
unable to get a second look at it. Based on geography alone, I'm going to 
tentatively say female MacGillivray's, because it was really pretty gray rather 
than slaty on the breast (and therefore a female, not a male). Maybe I mistook 
the partial ring for a full one? Or is it even possible that it could have been 
a Connecticut? Any input gratefully accepted! 

 
-Josh Hayes in North Seattle (for now)
coralliophila at live dot com
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Eagle Owl found
From: jbroadus AT seanet.com
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 17:29:05 -0700
Hello,

I'm pleased to let you know that the missing owl was just found, and
zookeepers are bringing him back home.

If you happened to make it out there on short notice, and at least a couple
of us did, Thank You!

Jerry Broadus
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Help needed for Eagle Owl search, Tacoma
From: jbroadus AT seanet.com
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 16:45:30 -0700
------- Forwarded message follows -------
From:	Krystal Kyer 
Date sent:	Fri, 18 Apr 2014 12:30:23 -0700
Subject:	Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium seeks public's help in finding Forrest
 the Eurasian eagle owl
To:	

I've been contacted by staff at the zoo. At this time they would
appreciate assistance from any expierenced birders that are available
to vist Point Defiance Park today 4/18 to help locate a missing
Euarasian eagle owl that flew out of the zoo two days ago and is
believed to be in the forest at Point Defiance Park. The bird's name
is Forrest. You can call for it by name, and it may hoot in response.

For a physical description and number to report sitings and more
information please see the press release below and attached photos.

If you see/hear the bird, please call the zoo at 253-591-5337 or email
tresa.edmonds AT pdza.org. Zoo staff are searching for the bird, and any
additional eyes and hears on the ground from experienced birders would
be appreciated.

Please share this with any experienced birders you think might be able
to help find Forrest ASAP!

Thanks,

Krystal McArthur Kyer
Executive Director

*Connecting People with Nature*

 *Tahoma Audubon Society*
2917 Morrison Road W.
University Place, WA 98466

POINT DEFIANCE ZOO & AQUARIUM SEEKS PUBLIC'S HELP IN LOCATING EAGLE
OWL Forrest believed to be somewhere in Point Defiance Park

TACOMA, Wash. - Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium is asking for help from
the public in locating Forrest, the zoo's Eurasian eagle owl, which
flew into Point Defiance Park during a training session on Wednesday
afternoon.

Individuals who spot him are asked to call the zoo at 253-591-5337 or
email tresa.edmonds AT pdza.org.

Members of the zoo's Wild Wonders Outdoor Theater staff were
rehearsing a new show when Forrest flew away. They believe he was
startled by some changes recently made to their stage in preparation
the show.

He is trained to fly during performances of the Wild Wonders show and
then return and does so routinely. On Wednesday, he didn't return from
his practice flight.

A team of staff biologists spotted the owl several times Wednesday
afternoon but lost sight of him late in the day. They have since been
unable to pick up his telemetry, which sends a radio signal to help
track him.

"Forrest likely is sitting high up in a tree and may be surrounded by
a mob of crows unhappy about the owl's presence in their territory"
staff biologist Sara Mattison said. He is comfortable around people
and may even hoot if he sees someone.

He is nearly 9 years old and has lived at the zoo since he was just a
few months old. Forrest has a wingspan of about 5 feet, stands about 2
feet tall and has bright, orange-colored eyes.

He is wearing red jesses, which look like red cords dangling from his
legs, and telemetry, which looks like a black wire dangling from a
leg.


                                   ###

Jerry Broadus
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Lake Sammamish State Park, Issaquah WA, Apr 18, 2014
From: Sharon Cormier-Aagaard <scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 16:02:08 -0700
Hi Tweets,

 

Here's the monthly bird walk report of what's being seen/heard at Lake 
Sammamish State Park: 

 
Lake Sammamish State Park, King, US-WA
Apr 18, 2014 8:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments: Sharon Aagaard and Stan Wood birded with 14 others at Eastside 
Audubon's monthly bird walk at Lake Sammamish State Park on April 18, 2014, 
from 8 am to 12:15 pm. We enjoyed dry, partly cloudy/sunny skies, 3-9 mph 
winds, with temps ranging from 44 to 54 degrees F. HIGHLIGHTS: Most of the 
wintering water birds have migrated out, leaving us with a dozen GADWALLS, half 
a dozen AMERICAN WIGEONS, a bunch of MALLARDS, and a few COMMON MERGANSERS. A 
small number of WESTERN GREBES remain (4). The approximate 40 nests in the 
heron colony is full and active. One female NORTHERN HARRIER flew over at the 
end of our walk. Two separate "swarms" of AMERICAN COOTS remain at the lake 
edge (70). The parks's wintering gulls have migrated, leaving us with just two 
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULLS. VAUX'S SWIFTS and five swallow species were feeding over 
the lake (TREE, VIOLET-GREEN, NO. ROUGH-WINGED, BARN AND CLIFF). We observed 
the male BELTED KINGFISHER burst out of the nest hole on the bank of Issaquah 
Creek, with the female perched nearby. We watched a RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER 
excavating a nest hole in a large snag near the kayak rental area, and another 
was perched just above a hole on last year's nest tree at the SE corner of the 
Sunset Beach parking lot. A male PILEATED WOODPECKER was excavating a hole in 
the same snag where we watched the pair interact with a MERLIN during last 
month's walk. The woodpecker pair called back and forth while we stood watching 
eastward on the new boardwalk. There were 7 AMERICAN PIPITS feeding in the 
patchy grass at Sunset Beach. Four warblers were seen/heard: ORANGE-CROWNED 
(6), YELLOW-RUMPED (36), BLACK-THROATED GRAY (1) and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT (6). 
52 species for the day; and 78 species for the year. The next bird walk is MAY 
21 (it's our once annual BIRDATHON walk with a suggested donation of $25). No 
pre-registration, just show up depending on your mood or the weather. Since 
this is a state park, a Discover Pass is necessary to park ($10 daily, $30 
annual). We meet in the large parking lot to the left just inside the main park 
entrance, now signed as the Costco Parking lot but we meet at the far end 
towards the lake (not the boat launch entrance). 

52 species (+1 other taxa)

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17949615 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 

Sharon Aagaard

Bellevue WA

scormieraa001 AT hotmail.com


 
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Re Early Arriving Migrants and a Plea for Caution
From: B Boekelheide <bboek AT olympus.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 14:27:31 -0700
Thanks, Brad, for your post on Tweeters. We deal with too-early reports all the 
time up here, so every little reminder helps. 


One small point about Cassins Vireos, however. Over the years we have a 
distinct pattern here of Cassins passing through the north Olympic Peninsula 
in mid-April, with first sightings around RR Bridge Park along the Dungeness 
River and a few other local habitats between Apr 10-18. They are singing males, 
often in the riparian forest where they don't remain to nest, so likely heading 
further north and singing on the way. When we first heard them, I, too, was a 
disbeliever, but after repeated sightings there seems to be a pattern. I dont 
have the records right at my fingertips right now, but theyve occurred several 
years over the last 18 years. I see that Bruce Paige just reported one 
yesterday, 4/17. The odd thing is that the Cassins that nest here seem to be 
in different areas than where these early birds are singing, so who knows where 
the early birds end up. Most of the local nesters are in mixed forests in the 
foothills of the Olympics south of Hwy 101. 


Thanks!
Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness


From: Brad Waggoner 
Subject: [Tweeters] Early Arriving Migrants and a Plea for Caution
Date: April 12, 2014 at 3:49:07 PM PDT
To: tweeters 

Hello All,

I'm not sure how this will come across, and I really have no intent here on 
picking on anyone for tweeters post about arriving migrants and breeders. Posts 
on heard-only birds are especially concerning to those of us that attempt to 
track records in the state of Washington. Ain't spring wonderful, especially 
with glorious days like this with returning swallows about, and Common 
Yellowthroats setting up territory in our local marshes, and Orange-crowned 
Warbler trilling in shrubby riparian areas. But, there are a number of species, 
despite such a nice batch of weather, that really do not show until the latter 
part of the month of April or into May. I would encourage all to take a look at 
bar graphs in A Birders Guide to Washington, or for those that really are keen 
on status and distribution here, take a look at Birds of Washington. Take a 
look at when some species normally arrive, and maybe use it as a reference 
source for making calls on certain species. Be careful not to interpret rare or 
casual lines in these graphs as the time they arrive. I find that a bit 
deceiving and arrivals in those dates need superb documentation. 


Specifically, be very careful of flycatchers, especially a few of our empids, 
pewees, and Olive-sided Flycatchers. Yes, things like Hammond's and 
Pacific-sloped Flycatchers arrive in late April (early to mid April could use 
documentation), but Willow Flycatchers do not arrive until mid-May. Pewees and 
Olive-sided Flycatcher are early May arriving birds, but a few might be found 
in the waning days of April. Warbling and Cassin's Vireo do not arrive until 
later in the month despite a few rare or casual marks earlier in April. 
Red-eyed Vireos, and I will throw in American Redstarts, do not show until mid 
May. Some of are thrushes are early migrants including the bluebirds, 
solitaires, and Hermit Thrush, but Veery (a west-side rarity anyway) and 
Swainson's Thrushes are both May arriving birds. A few Swainson's Thrushes may 
actually show in the last few days of April, but I can almost guarantee you 
will get a "whit" vocalization at that time, and not an actual song. They just 
don't sing until they get strongly territorial until after the first week in 
May. Warblers such as Nashville, Black-throated Gray, Wilson's and Macs will 
indeed show quite soon, but Yellow Warbler will not be on the scene until early 
May. Bright Orange-crowned Warblers in March and April can be the likely source 
of early reported Yellows. Western Tanagers, Black-headed Grosbeaks, and Lazuli 
Buntings are late April/first of May arriving birds. And chats too arrive in 
May. Oh yeah, and nighthawks don't arrive until late May early June. 


Thanks and good birding,

Brad Waggoner
Bainbridge Island, Washington_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Magnuson Park, 18 April 2014
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 14:02:53 -0700
After last nights soaker, it was nice to be out in drier weather, though it 
was still blowing near the open areas. Glad to have had multiple layers! Got an 
early enough start to observe Barn Owls in the two active nesting boxes: in the 
Doug Firs near Santos Place and in the roof corner box on the Community Center. 
More good birds were to come: 


Among the smattering of Canada Geese was a solitary Cackling Goose (minima), 
near the NOAA shore. At least one family of Canadas were escorting around their 
new brood. And 2 families of Mallards were doing the same. In the Entrance Pond 
was an intergrade Green-winged Teal: no vertical stripe and a faint white 
horizontal stripe. A couple of female Greater and Lesser Scaup were still 
around. 


A Merlin was seen being escorted out of the park by a small pack of crows, and 
an Osprey was seen riding a thermal with a Red-tailed Hawk. Two Coopers Hawks 
were seen: a large immature bird calling and irritating the smaller birds on 
Promontory Point and another small adult cruising over the meadows. Also in the 
meadows, early, was a calling Wilsons Snipe. 


No unusual gulls on the platform today: over 100 Mew, a couple of Ring-billed, 
4 California in crisp adult plumage, and a couple of Glaucous-winged Gulls. 


The pair of Belted Kingfisher continue in Kingfisher Basin, likely using the 
same nest hole as last year. Also on the point were fly-overs of a Band-tailed 
Pigeon and 3 Eurasian Collared-Dove. 


Lots of singing Common Yellowthroat, Orange-crowned Warbler, and Yellow-rumped 
Warblers, both Audubons and Myrtle. A singing FOY Black-throated Gray Warbler 
was with one of the Yellow-rumped flocks. 


Dozens of Savannah Sparrows, everywhere; in one small flock at the south end, 
another sparrow flew into the scrub flashing its white outer tail feathers: a 
VESPER SPARROW (first in the park for me). In the Pea Patch, a Gambels 
White-crowned Sparrow was singing right next to a Puget Sound variety and a 
Golden-crowned Sparrow. Nice contrasting views of all three. Finally, at least 
half a dozen Brown-headed Cowbird and a lingering Fox Sparrow. 


Met Penny Bolton on the trails who mentioned having seen American Pipit on the 
ball fields. 


For the day, 63 species; with OSPR, EUCD, CLSW, BTYW, and VESP new, 98 species 
for the year. 

Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17947431
Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: tuvus in north bend/snoqualmie
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 07:57:23 -0700
hi:
i rec'd the following msg time stamped 7:10 am 4/18:



On way to school [on hwy 202].  Three turkey vultures going around in their
shaky ass way.


gosh, i love scientific observational talk.

regards,

t

-- 
dave templeton
fall city, wa

crazydave65atgmaildaughtcom

"Don't worry about the world coming to an end today; it's already tomorrow
in Australia."  Charles Schultz_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters