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Updated on Thursday, July 24 at 02:21 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Pale-billed Woodpecker,©Dan Lane

24 Jul Re: [obol] Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Jul July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Jul July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope [Jim Danzenbaker ]
24 Jul The owl who liked sitting on caesar [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 Jul Mountain Beavers/food [Megan Lyden ]
23 Jul Red Crossbills feeding young [Joy Kosola Johnson ]
23 Jul Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough [James Karr ]
23 Jul Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough ["Wilson Cady" ]
23 Jul Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough [Blair Bernson ]
23 Jul Re: Bird pile [Larry Schwitters ]
23 Jul Pine Siskins ["A & S Hill" ]
23 Jul Local birder raising money for trip to do research in Australia. [Chris Warlow ]
23 Jul July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
23 Jul July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
23 Jul Bird pile [Larry Schwitters ]
23 Jul One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more) [Jerry Broadus ]
23 Jul More Mountain Beaver trivia: fleas [Jerry Broadus ]
23 Jul RE: Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods [Rob Conway ]
22 Jul Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow ["A & S Hill" ]
22 Jul Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow ["A & S Hill" ]
22 Jul RE: Mountain Beavers [Michael Donahue ]
22 Jul Battle Ground RED-EYED VIREO [Jim Danzenbaker ]
22 Jul Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods [Doug Will ]
22 Jul Merlin with dragonfly @ Edmonds marsh (re: Bill A's post) [Barbara Deihl ]
22 Jul Birding Skagway and Juneau [Ted Goshulak ]
22 Jul Edmonds marsh merlin? [Bill Anderson ]
22 Jul Kent Branching Eaglet video by Ralph Meier - 7/21/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
22 Jul Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds [Jim Danzenbaker ]
22 Jul 2014 PSBO Bird Bander Training – August Weekend Workshop [Cynthia Easterson ]
22 Jul Edmonds marsh 7-21-14 [Bill Anderson ]
22 Jul post-nesting yard visitors ["Paul Hicks" ]
21 Jul Re: Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on July 20, 2014 ["Randy Hill" ]
21 Jul Re: regarding the Help ID'ing post [Loren Mooney ]
21 Jul Snohomish Co. - Eide Road Shorebirds [Joan Bird ]
21 Jul Save Cheasty--and vote no on the Parks District [Ed Newbold ]
21 Jul Iron Creek - Bear Creek hike and bird ["lsr AT ramoslink.info" ]
21 Jul head tufts [pan ]
21 Jul Re: [’JŒû AT r‹± ]
20 Jul regarding the Help ID'ing post ["Grace and Ollie" ]
20 Jul Re: Fledgling with head tufts?? ["barry " ]
20 Jul Mountain Beavers: An Important Prey Species for Larger Owls in Seattle and Open Spaces (by Dave Hutchinson) [Evan Houston ]
20 Jul Help ID'ing [Loren Mooney ]
20 Jul Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on July 20, 2014 []
20 Jul great blue heron video ["Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers" ]
20 Jul odd heron at Nisqually []
20 Jul Beer and Birds ["Craig Merkel" ]
20 Jul Several Black Swifts now between Lake Wash. & LFP Towne Center [Todd S Hass ]
20 Jul WFO Youth Scholarship Announcement []
20 Jul test ["Mary K." ]
19 Jul Midway/Grayland & Bottle Beach Saturday [Karen Wosilait ]
19 Jul A mid summer night in Monroe [Larry Schwitters ]
20 Jul Am White Pelican at Columbia River on WA side of Astoria Bridge []
19 Jul Black-headed Grosbeak fledgling [Greg Pluth ]
19 Jul Rufous Hummingbird enjoying Honeysuckle at Lake Joy [Hank ]
19 Jul Birds of North America (with link) [pan ]
19 Jul Birds of North America database [pan ]
19 Jul Black-headed Grosbeak question [Linda Phillips ]
19 Jul Baby Elf Owls rescued from Acorn Woodpecker assault [Ed Newbold ]
19 Jul Re: Do herons cough up pellets? [Martin Muller ]
19 Jul Predators & Prey | Union Bay Watch [Larry Hubbell ]
19 Jul BirdNote - last week, and the week of July 20, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
19 Jul Where have all the Anna's gone? []
19 Jul Re: Great Blue Heron hunting video [ck park ]
19 Jul RE: Great Blue Heron hunting video [Terry Sargent Peart ]
19 Jul From the Fill [Connie Sidles ]
18 Jul Discovery Park Question [Miles Brengle ]
18 Jul Re: Great Blue Heron hunting video []
18 Jul Great Blue Heron hunting video [Terry Sargent Peart ]
19 Jul black swifts at Sauk Mountain []
18 Jul Hummingbirds and artificial sweeteners ["Rachel Lawson" ]
18 Jul King/Kittitas birding [Tim Brennan ]
18 Jul Request: Observations of jaeger/falcon interactions [Todd S Hass ]
18 Jul Pine Siskins ["Ken and Tina Grant" ]
18 Jul Shorebirds at Midway and Bottle Beach - Not a RED NECKED STINT Turns into a SANDERLING [Blair Bernson ]
18 Jul Bombing Robins - Yard Changes - Babies (kinda long) [Rob Conway ]
18 Jul Active Fledgling Day Today in the Wedgwood Neighborhood? - 7/18/14 [Barbara Deihl ]

Subject: Re: [obol] Possible seabird at mouth of Deschutes River
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 11:53:58 -0700
Tweeters,

Forwarding a message regarding a possible Long-tailed Jaeger seen along the
Columbia River just west of where highway 97 intersects with highway 14.

Jim in Battle Ground, WA


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Shawneen 
wrote:

> For anyone birding near the Deschutes River.  I received several text
> messages from Suzy Murphy about a bird seen while driving 65 MPH.
>
>
> " Just saw at mouth of Deschutes river fly over to the columbia at 65
> miles per hour. What looked like a sea bird. Long thin wings black and
> white pattern light underbelly, with longish white streamiing tail
> feathers. Can't stop hauling a camper. If someone close maybe they can
> check it out.
>
> Thanks,Suzy Murphy"
>
>
> "It's was the tail feathers. I'm no seabird expert, but those were the
> longest streamers I have seen , like LT Jaeger. Got a 2 second look. My
> impression was the wings had sharp contrast b/w, much more black, like
> whole trailing edge."
>
>
> She has been driving a long time and NOW, I have been driving for 8 days
> and no references to check at present.
>
>
> lt was flying north across the Columbia River towards Washington.
>
>
> Shawneen Finnegan
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>



-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:38:39 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

For the third consecutive morning, I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County,
WA  to find out how shorebird diversity and quantity have changed over the
last several days.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the
right side of the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between
markers 11 and 12) follows (Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday):

Killdeer: 15-15-10
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1-3
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18-28
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25-49
Western Sandpiper: 12-0-6
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0-0
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER 0-0-1
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4-1
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15-45
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12-8
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1-0
WILSON'S PHALAROPE: 0-0-1

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides:http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).
 Mornings also seem best.

Daily sightings of River Otter continue.

The southwest corner of Rest Lake is beginning to attract shorebirds
including Long-billed Dowitcher (15) and Greater Yellowlegs (5) this
morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: July 24 shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR - Wilson's Phalarope
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:38:39 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

For the third consecutive morning, I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County,
WA  to find out how shorebird diversity and quantity have changed over the
last several days.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the
right side of the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between
markers 11 and 12) follows (Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday):

Killdeer: 15-15-10
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1-3
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18-28
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25-49
Western Sandpiper: 12-0-6
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0-0
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER 0-0-1
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4-1
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15-45
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12-8
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1-0
WILSON'S PHALAROPE: 0-0-1

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides:http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).
 Mornings also seem best.

Daily sightings of River Otter continue.

The southwest corner of Rest Lake is beginning to attract shorebirds
including Long-billed Dowitcher (15) and Greater Yellowlegs (5) this
morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: The owl who liked sitting on caesar
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:04:02 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published my review of a witty and educational memoir about a man
who shared his london home with a tawny owl. This interesting book will
delight adults and young people on summer holidays and may also be an early
addition to one's christmas shopping list:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/jul/24/owl-who-liked-sitting-on-caesar-martin-windrow-book-review 


cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Mountain Beavers/food
From: Megan Lyden <meganlyden AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 00:05:40 -0700
Hi Tweets,

Mountain Beavers are not picky eaters, that is for sure.

One day in June, I noticed one of my heucheras was essentially gone....I
thought maybe I hadn't watered it and it had withered awau.  I was rather
surprised, but didn't give it too much thought.  I went out four hours later
to water the other heucheras and noticed that another heuchera was gone.  I
had no idea what was going on....except that one of my music students had
told me earlier that week that she had looked out my window and seen a
"strange animal with pink feet" run across my lawn with a piece of greenery
in its mouth.  By the next day, my one of my perennial geraniums
disappeared, as did some crocosmia and some woody herbs...and several sword
ferns were missing a substantial number of fronds. The next time that
student came for her lesson, I showed her a photo of a mountain beaver and
asked her if that was what she saw.  She said "yes."

The Mountain Beaver was stealing my plants and pulling them under the fence
(I went out one day and must have surprised it; a 6-foot tall shrubby plant
was half-way under the fence). I explored the greenbelt behind my house;
there must be a dozen large burrows...the ground so excavated that it
literally caved in as I walked over it.  I've got to hand it to this
mountain beaver....he/she has good taste.  My beautiful blue geraniums were
arranged around the opening of one of the burrows.

The greenbelt behind my house is a virtual ivy desert.  I read that Mountain
Beavers like to eat ferns, and I wondered if it is having difficulty finding
edible plants with all the ivy that has taken over the greenbelt.

Before we fortified the fence, I saw the little gal/fellow myself; he went
running out from under one of my geraniums, shot across the yard, scared the
hell out of the dog, went under my garden shed and out through a hole in the
fence. In broad daylight (I thought Mountain Beavers were mainly nocturnal).

Megan Lyden
Bellevue, Wa

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Subject: Red Crossbills feeding young
From: Joy Kosola Johnson <joyofwriting AT whidbey.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:25:25 -0700
Hi Tweets,

Here are two links to a new short video Craig put together featuring Red 
Crossbills, which have been feasting on an abundant crop of Douglas Fir cones 
in our yard this year. 

These videos are designed to engage people with birds, both new and experienced 
birders. 

Please feel free to share.


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=745146438883514&set=vb.168478993216931&type=2&theater 


http://vimeo.com/101261702

Enjoy!

Joy & Craig Johnson

www.pugetsoundbackyardbirds.com
joyofwriting AT whidbey.com
Freeland, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
From: James Karr <jrkarr AT olypen.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:54:03 -0700
 I have a photo of a Great Kiskadee with a frog taken one of the members of my 
group. Photo taken during a March trip this year in Costa Rica. The bird spent 
several minutes beating the frog on its perch before feeding on all but the 
hind legs. The legs were discarded. 


Jim 






/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Mail and express delivery address:
     James R. Karr
     102 Galaxy View Court
     Sequim, WA  98382
E-mail:  jrkarr at olypen dot com
Telephone: 360-681-3163
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

On Jul 23, 2014, at 12:44 PM, Blair Bernson  
wrote: 


> Steve Pink and I braved the weather this morning and birded Eide Road and 
Wylie Slough among some other spots. We actually were quite lucky and remained 
mostly dry for almost an hour at Eide Road and similarly at Wylie. Shorebirds 
were good at the former - 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 40+ LBDO and a similar number 
of Western Sandpipers, a scattering of Leasts, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and a 
Wilson's Phalarope. No luck with Semipalmated Sandpiper or Baird's. 

> 
> Wylie Slough was another story altogether - not a single shorebird - not even 
a Killdeer. BUT it produced both the bird and highlight of the day. We had an 
Eastern Kingbird fly in and perch on a snag very closed by - agreed as the bird 
of the day. THEN - maybe 20 minutes later we had the same/another Eastern 
Kingbird fly into a tree nearby in the open. At first we thought it had nesting 
material in its bill. A closer look however disclosed that it was carrying a 
fairly large Pacific Tree Frog - wriggling in its grasp. I was not able to get 
the camera on it quickly enough for what would have been a really cool shot - 
as it flew off with the frog still in its mouth. As a "fly" catcher I guess the 
EAKI is a "meateater" but this seemed pretty extreme. We wondered if it was 
going to take it back to a nest and have food for a week. 

> 
> Neither of us had ever seen anything like this.  Anyone else?
> 
> -- 
> Blair Bernson
> Edmonds
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 23:23:59 GMT
Roger Windemuth got a fantastic shot of an American Robin with a tree frog in 
it's beak at the Ridgefield NWR, and I have seen Robins doing the same at the 
Steigerwald Lake WR. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Blair Bernson 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Cc: Sam Iam , "masterbirder2013 AT seattleaudubon.org" 
 

Subject: [Tweeters] Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:44:17 -0700

Steve Pink and I braved the weather this morning 
and birded Eide Road and Wylie Slough among some 
other spots.  We actually were quite lucky and 
remained mostly dry for almost an hour at Eide 
Road and similarly at Wylie.  Shorebirds were good 
at the former - 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 40+ LBDO 
and a similar number of Western Sandpipers, a 
scattering of Leasts, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and a 
Wilson's Phalarope.  No luck with Semipalmated 
Sandpiper or Baird's.

Wylie Slough was another story altogether - not a 
single shorebird - not even a Killdeer.  BUT it 
produced both the bird and highlight of the day.  
We had an Eastern Kingbird fly in and perch on a 
snag very closed by - agreed as the bird of the 
day.  THEN - maybe 20 minutes later we had the 
same/another Eastern Kingbird fly into a tree 
nearby in the open.  At first we thought it had 
nesting material in its bill.  A closer look 
however disclosed that it was carrying a fairly 
large Pacific Tree Frog - wriggling in its grasp.  
I was not able to get the camera on it quickly 
enough for what would have been a really cool shot 
- as it flew off with the frog still in its 
mouth.  As a "fly" catcher I guess the EAKI is a 
"meateater" but this seemed pretty extreme.  We 
wondered if it was going to take it back to a nest 
and have food for a week.

Neither of us had ever seen anything like this.  
Anyone else?

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

_______________________________________________
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Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Eastern Kingbird with Pacific Tree Frog at Wylie Slough
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:44:17 -0700
Steve Pink and I braved the weather this morning 
and birded Eide Road and Wylie Slough among some 
other spots.  We actually were quite lucky and 
remained mostly dry for almost an hour at Eide 
Road and similarly at Wylie.  Shorebirds were good 
at the former - 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 40+ LBDO 
and a similar number of Western Sandpipers, a 
scattering of Leasts, 2 Greater Yellowlegs and a 
Wilson's Phalarope.  No luck with Semipalmated 
Sandpiper or Baird's.

Wylie Slough was another story altogether - not a 
single shorebird - not even a Killdeer.  BUT it 
produced both the bird and highlight of the day.  
We had an Eastern Kingbird fly in and perch on a 
snag very closed by - agreed as the bird of the 
day.  THEN - maybe 20 minutes later we had the 
same/another Eastern Kingbird fly into a tree 
nearby in the open.  At first we thought it had 
nesting material in its bill.  A closer look 
however disclosed that it was carrying a fairly 
large Pacific Tree Frog - wriggling in its grasp.  
I was not able to get the camera on it quickly 
enough for what would have been a really cool shot 
- as it flew off with the frog still in its 
mouth.  As a "fly" catcher I guess the EAKI is a 
"meateater" but this seemed pretty extreme.  We 
wondered if it was going to take it back to a nest 
and have food for a week.

Neither of us had ever seen anything like this.  
Anyone else?

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Re: Bird pile
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:39:36 -0700
The pile grows. Watched 100 plus more come in at 1:30. I think they've been 
coming in all day. Theres enough of them that their hot little bodies are 
fogging up the camera. Hope someone gets a count as.....oops another 50 just 
came in.......they exit. I would bet theres pushing 500 swifts in that pile. 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts
On Jul 23, 2014, at 9:30 AM, Larry Schwitters wrote:

> Theres a pile of Vaux's Swifts 15-20 feet down the Monroe Wagner roost site 
in the SE corner. http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts Why are these swifts not 
out hunting bugs at 9:30 this morning? Why are they in a pile? Why aren't they 
piled up in the NW corner? How many are there? Who will be the Tweeters arm 
chair hero that counts them as they leave? 

> 
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Subject: Pine Siskins
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:36:02 -0700
We just had two PINE SISKINS on our seed feeder. These are the first ones
we've seen here in 2014.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Local birder raising money for trip to do research in Australia.
From: Chris Warlow <christopherwarlow AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:19:24 -0700
I'm not sure that this is ok to post, but since I don't benefit I feel it's ok. 


Micheal Warren, a recent graduate of Evergreen State College, has been offered 
an opportunity to go to Australia to help a PhD study. The study is on the 
predation of cuckoos on Yellow-Rumped Thornbills nests (Cowbird style). 


He is also a great artist and has put together a t-shirt of one of his 
peregrine pictures to raise money. The link is- 


https://www.booster.com/yellow-rumped-thornbill

Chris Warlow
Olympia_______________________________________________
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Subject: July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:08:50 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, WA again this morning to find out
how shorebird diversity and quantity had changed since yesterday morning.
 This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of the
auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and 12)
compared to yesterday (yesterday-today):

Killdeer: 15-15
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25
Western Sandpiper: 12-0
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1

There was one flock of about 25 peeps flying around that I couldn't see
well enough to confirm ids (these were not the same 25 Least Sandpipers
included above).

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides: http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).

Again, there were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly
enjoying their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there were three Long-billed Dowitchers and two Greater
Yellowlegs on the southwest edge of the lake this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: July 23 Ridgefield shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 13:08:50 -0700
Hi Tweeters and OBOLers,

I visited Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, WA again this morning to find out
how shorebird diversity and quantity had changed since yesterday morning.
 This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of the
auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and 12)
compared to yesterday (yesterday-today):

Killdeer: 15-15
Semipalmated Plover: 1-1
Greater Yellowlegs: 15-18
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1-1
Least Sandpiper: 40-25
Western Sandpiper: 12-0
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1-0
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5-4
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10-15
Wilson's Snipe: 6-12
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 0-1

There was one flock of about 25 peeps flying around that I couldn't see
well enough to confirm ids (these were not the same 25 Least Sandpipers
included above).

Shorebird enthusiasts who are planning to visit the refuge should consult
the local tide table.  High tide or the rising tide is best (closest to
Vancouver tides: http://www.ezfshn.com/Tides/USA/Washington/Vancouver).

Again, there were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly
enjoying their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there were three Long-billed Dowitchers and two Greater
Yellowlegs on the southwest edge of the lake this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Bird pile
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:30:00 -0700
Theres a pile of Vaux's Swifts 15-20 feet down the Monroe Wagner roost site in 
the SE corner. http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts Why are these swifts not 
out hunting bugs at 9:30 this morning? Why are they in a pile? Why aren't they 
piled up in the NW corner? How many are there? Who will be the Tweeters arm 
chair hero that counts them as they leave? 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Subject: One more on Mountain Beaver fleas (I promise, no more)
From: Jerry Broadus <jbroadus AT seanet.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:50:23 -0700
From Flea News Vol. 49:

The host is the mountain beaver, Aplodontia rufa, a primitive rodent with a 
restricted range from northern Califonia to extreme southwestern British 
Columbia. According to the literature, ten species of fleas have been reported 
from this host. Five of these are obviously strays from other hosts, or at 
least accidental associations. 

...

Hystrichopsylla schefferi has the distinction of being the largest, 
non-neosomic flea in the entire order, and females may exceed one centimeter in 
length. All members of the genus are considered primitive by most students of 
the order and the most plesiomorphic taxa seem mostly associated with 
insectivores, although host specificity is not particularly strong in this 
genus. That the largest and one of the most primitive species is associated 
with such a primitive host suggests a fascinating evolutionary complex of taxa 
that has been lost to us through extinction of their hosts. Lewis & Lewis 
(1994) discuss this species in more details. 



Seems the evolutionary progenitor of the Mountain Beaver supported some mighty 
big fleas. 



Jerry Broadus
Puyallup, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: More Mountain Beaver trivia: fleas
From: Jerry Broadus <jbroadus AT seanet.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:28:37 -0700
Several sources (probably copying the Guiness Record account) trace the world's 
largest flea to a Mountain Beaver nest in Puyallup (1913). One quote: 


Elsewhere in the world, the largest known flea is the Hystrichopsylla schefferi 
— a flea found in the nest of a mountain beaver in Washington State, USA. It 
can grow up to 8mm long and has been known to bite a man's arm off at the 
shoulder blade (Ed's note: OK, there's a certain amount of poetic licence there 
— but they do grow to 8mm). 

And then there is this, for you collectors:


http://deadinsects.net/Giant-mountain-beaver-flea-Hystrichopsylla-schefferi-Siphonaptera02.htm 



Jerry Broadus
Puyallup, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 06:54:07 +0000
Mountain Beavers will trim almost any plant they can reach whether they eat it 
or not. Their burrows can be hundreds of feet long and up to 4 feet underground 
and are often lined with plant material for eating and nesting. In the Index to 
California Vertebrates the following describes feeding habits - the most 
surprising is that they climb quite high in trees and bushes to forage: 

 
Feed on vegetative parts of plants, mostly thimbleberry, salmonberry, 
blackberry, dogwood, salal, ferns, lupines, willows, and grasses. Voth (1968) 
found, in western Oregon, males and nonpregnant females fed on ferns (85%), 
deciduous trees (5%), and conifers (3%); lactating females (April through June) 

fed on ferns (45%), conifers (34%). grasses (18%), and forbs (3%). 
Coprophagous. 

Voth (1968) found changes in diet related to protein content of available 
vegetation. Forage underground, on ground, under snow, on surface of snow, and 
up to 4.5 m (15 ft) in trees and bushes. Vegetation is stored near a burrow 
entrance or in underground chambers (Maser et al. 1981). 
 
When I lived in Newcastle and in Preston (both east King Co.) they were the 
yard terrorists. A small colony burrowed under my 12" buried chicken wire and 
6' above ground cedar fence in Newcastle and in one night literally wiped out 
$2000 worth of landscape plants including rhodies, ferns, hostas, dwarf 
conifers, BAMBOO, rhubarb, and every flowering plant in the yard. All of the 
plants could be seen sticking out of dozens of burrow entrances outside the 
fence on a steep hillside leading down to China Creek. In Preston I finally had 
to go on a burrow busting campaign literally using a crowbar stuck down the 
burrows and lifted up to remove their hiding places. This is how the owners of 
tree plantations handle them except by using large plowing tools to break up 
the burrows. 

 
Fascinating but destructive creatures indeed.
Rob

Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58°N 122.44°W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 


 
> Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:44:10 -0700
> From: diwill AT uw.edu
> To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods
> 
> Tweeters,
> 
> One additional favorite food of Aplodontia in the PNW is rhododendrons,
> both native and ornamental. Last week I found half a dozen 2 foot rhodie
> branch ends (the most tender) arrayed with their cut ends at one burrow
> entrance with their leafy ends fanned out.
> 
> Doug Will
> UW and Lake Forest Park
> diwill at uw dot edu
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:22:29 -0700
Hello Tweeters and OBOL-ites!

 

After a short trip out of town over the Fourth of July holiday, I thought
our male RUFOUS and ANNA'S Hummingbirds may have departed. A few days with
the trailcam aimed at the feeder, though, proved me wrong.

 

All the male Anna's we are seeing now are immature. We do see an occasional
very brilliantly-feathered male Rufous visiting as well. Activity on our two
feeders has recently increased again, so I decided to keep track of
consumption with the trailcam. I posted an 11-shot sequence of feeder
traffic that covers about 43 hours - and 60 ounces of nectar - on my flickr
photostream starting with this picture: https://flic.kr/p/o9uU7x 

 

The link at the end of this sentence will take you to a less blurry image of
an immature male Anna's Hummingbird: https://flic.kr/p/o9vwpe  who visited
the front-porch nectar feeder.

 

We also have been visited by a pair of HOUSE FINCHES this week. I managed a
few blurry shots of the male seen through the slats on the front porch.
https://flic.kr/p/osKWki   He was eating the seeds of wild Forget-me-not
flowers growing in our yard.

 

Today (Tuesday) I noticed a SONG SPARROW clumsily hopping about under the
seed feeder and eventually perching on the fence near the feeder. Upon
closer inspection with the telephoto lens, it appears the little songster
may have had a recent lucky escape from a wandering cat or other predator.
There is no tail at all on this bird: https://flic.kr/p/oqHiew  Click
through from the previous link to see a second shot of the bird.

 

And while you're on my photostream, I invite you to enjoy some photos of wet
plants from our yard and also non-bird images from our recent trip to
Washington, D.C.

 

Happy Birding!

 

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Nectar wars, a finch and a plucked Sparrow
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:22:29 -0700
Hello Tweeters and OBOL-ites!

 

After a short trip out of town over the Fourth of July holiday, I thought
our male RUFOUS and ANNA'S Hummingbirds may have departed. A few days with
the trailcam aimed at the feeder, though, proved me wrong.

 

All the male Anna's we are seeing now are immature. We do see an occasional
very brilliantly-feathered male Rufous visiting as well. Activity on our two
feeders has recently increased again, so I decided to keep track of
consumption with the trailcam. I posted an 11-shot sequence of feeder
traffic that covers about 43 hours - and 60 ounces of nectar - on my flickr
photostream starting with this picture: https://flic.kr/p/o9uU7x 

 

The link at the end of this sentence will take you to a less blurry image of
an immature male Anna's Hummingbird: https://flic.kr/p/o9vwpe  who visited
the front-porch nectar feeder.

 

We also have been visited by a pair of HOUSE FINCHES this week. I managed a
few blurry shots of the male seen through the slats on the front porch.
https://flic.kr/p/osKWki   He was eating the seeds of wild Forget-me-not
flowers growing in our yard.

 

Today (Tuesday) I noticed a SONG SPARROW clumsily hopping about under the
seed feeder and eventually perching on the fence near the feeder. Upon
closer inspection with the telephoto lens, it appears the little songster
may have had a recent lucky escape from a wandering cat or other predator.
There is no tail at all on this bird: https://flic.kr/p/oqHiew  Click
through from the previous link to see a second shot of the bird.

 

And while you're on my photostream, I invite you to enjoy some photos of wet
plants from our yard and also non-bird images from our recent trip to
Washington, D.C.

 

Happy Birding!

 

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
Subject: RE: Mountain Beavers
From: Michael Donahue <bfalbatross AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:00:26 -0700
Great write up on this curious, secretive, but apparently very common
animal!

Mike Donahue_______________________________________________
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Subject: Battle Ground RED-EYED VIREO
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:48:54 -0700
Tweeters,

I was surprised to hear another Red-eyed Vireo while I was standing in the
backyard of my Battle Ground, Clark County home.  This is the 3rd one this
year although, like before, I couldn't lure it into view.  I also saw two
Black-throated Gray Warblers which must have bred nearby.  The vegetation
has really grown beyond my tiny little yard and I can now best describe my
yard as bordering a greenway which I don't think would have been the way
that I would have classified it when I moved here 9 years ago.  Things
change!

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Mountain Beavers: Aplodontia rufa rufa - foods
From: Doug Will <diwill AT uw.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:44:10 -0700
Tweeters,

One additional favorite food of Aplodontia in the PNW is rhododendrons,
both native and ornamental. Last week I found half a dozen 2 foot rhodie
branch ends (the most tender) arrayed with their cut ends at one burrow
entrance with their leafy ends fanned out.

Doug Will
UW and Lake Forest Park
diwill at uw dot edu
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Subject: Merlin with dragonfly @ Edmonds marsh (re: Bill A's post)
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:33:18 -0700
Yessirree, Bill and Joe and others interested in what some juvenile Merlins are 
up to - this is the first I've seen/heard of a young Merlin out going for 
dragonflies so far this year - great spot, pics and call ! 


Caught my attention, and just as I was ready to lie low for a bit and give 
myself and the local Merlins a rest, I now see that it could be worth jumping 
back up again to head to the wetlands :-) 


Last year there was almost daily Merlin activity at Magnuson Pk. at the 
wetlands between (to my records) July 31 and Aug. 18. Guess we have a few early 
birds catching the flies !!! 


Thanks for the posts and pics, Bill and Joe - if only I had another one of 
those battery-operated garden dragonflies - I'd surely award it to the both of 
you. 


I'd appreciate hearing if any of you Tweets also spot the same or similar 
combination of bird and prey anywhere around the Sound :-) 


Kee kee tee hee  :-)


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net_______________________________________________
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Subject: Birding Skagway and Juneau
From: Ted Goshulak <tgosh AT twu.ca>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:11:16 +0000
We will be in Skagway in early August (taking the Fjord Express to Juneau for 
the day). Has anyone else take this ferry? Birds? 


Thanks.

TED GOSHULAK
Langley, BC, CANADA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Edmonds marsh merlin?
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:51:50 -0700
Yesterday I posted that Monday evening (7/21)  I had seen a falcon at the 
Edmonds march and posted a link to my photos.  Joe Meche looked at my photos 
and thought that it was a merlin, not a peregrine falcon. 



I have enlarged and lightened three of my otherwise poor photos and posted them 
on the website if anyone cares to take another look.  Scroll down page 42 for 
the photos and additional comments. 




http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page42 


 
 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Kent Branching Eaglet video by Ralph Meier - 7/21/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:22:35 -0700
07/21/14 RHM Bald Eaglets (Brancher Now) End Of James St  AT  Kent, Wa HD

posted by Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Ridgefield NWR (Clark County) shorebirds
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:21:15 -0700
Tweeters,

Since it was raining down here in Clark County this morning and since Randy
Hill found a Semipalmated Sandpiper at Ridgefield yesterday, I decided to
visit the refuge this morning and try my luck.  Shorebirds are definitely
arriving and any visit to the refuge specifically to look for shorebirds
should be planned based on the tides.  High Tide or the rising tide is
best.  This morning's shorebird tally on S. Big Lake (on the right side of
the auto tour loop on the south end of Rest Lake - between markers 11 and
12):

Killdeer: 15
Greater Yellowlegs: 15
Lesser Yellowlegs: 1
Least Sandpiper: 40
Western Sandpiper: 12
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER: 1 (first of season - adult)
Pectoral Sandpiper: 5+ (first of season - presumably all adults - 2
observed on the mud and nearby vegetation and a flock of four flying off to
nearby Campbell Lake)
Long-billed Dowitcher: 10
Wilson's Snipe: 6

I wasn't able to locate the Semipalmated Sandpiper.

There were two very cute River Otters near stop 12 quite audibly enjoying
their morning breakfast.

Currently, the water level on Rest Lake is still too high to attract
shorebirds although there was one lone Long-billed Dowitcher on the edge of
it this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward.

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: 2014 PSBO Bird Bander Training – August Weekend Workshop
From: Cynthia Easterson <eastersonfamily AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:08:54 -0700

Registration
is Open and there are a few spots left in the Puget sound bird observatory bird 
bander training! Save your spot today by using our secure 

PayPal option at http://pugetsoundbirds.org/training/bander-training-program/

Here is
your chance to learn bird banding techniques at two spectacular Northwest
setting, both convenient to lodging and food. The training follows North
American Banding Council (NABC) guidelines and includes 5 days of classroom and
field instruction in riparian, mixed forest habitat. 

We are now taking
registrations for the 3rd season of our Weekend Bird Bander Training. The first
weekend will be held at The Northwest Stream Center in South Everett,
Washington on the following dates (participants must be present all dates):

Friday, August 22, 2014   
               
8 am – 4:30 pm

Saturday, August 23, 2014
             8 am –
4:30 pm

Sunday, August 24,
2014
               
7 am – 3:00 pm

The second weekend
will be held at the Green River Natural Area, about 7 miles east of Auburn,
Washington along State Route 164.


Saturday, August 30, 2014
             8 am –
4:30 pm

Sunday, August 31,
2014
               
7 am – 3:00 pm

No birding or banding
experience is required. Participants must be minimum 16 years of age.

FEES: $450 +$50 materials
fee for PSBO members, $500 +$50 materials fee for non-members.

For additional
information email contact AT pugetsoundbirds.com





Cindy Easterson
Secretary | Volunteer Engagement
PUGET SOUND BIRD OBSERVATORY
Sound Science - Scientific Information - Informed Public

Phone: 425.876.1055
"Sight is a faculty; seeing, an art." ~ George Perkins Marsh (1887 - 1948) 
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Subject: Edmonds marsh 7-21-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 01:03:12 -0700
Monday (7/21) I photographed what I believe were a long-billed dowitcher and a 
peregrine  falcon at the Edmonds marsh.  Scroll down page 42 for (lousy) 
photos.  



http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showthread.php?9587-Wldlife-of-Edmonds-WA-2014/page42 


 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: post-nesting yard visitors
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 01:45:58 -0400
Tweets, Monday mid-morning I had some first-of-season visitors in my yard 
in Tenino: a pair of Black-throated Gray Warblers feeding two begging 
young, and a male Bullock's Oriole feeding two young. This is only the 
third sighting of oriole in my yard, the last one was a brief visit on July 
6. Good birding!
-- Paul Hicks / Tenino, s Thurston Co / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org

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Subject: Re: Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on July 20, 2014
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:50:01 -0700
This afternoon a Semipalmated Sandpiper was on S Big Lake, looking back from 
stop#12 on the auto route. With several least. 

Randy Hill
Ridgefield

Sent via randy's smartphone

----- Reply message -----
From: ErikKnight05 AT gmail.com
To: 
Subject: [Tweeters] Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark 
County, Washington on July 20, 2014 

Date: Sun, Jul 20, 2014 2:58 pm


This report was mailed for Erik Knight by http://birdnotes.net



Date: July 20, 2014

Location: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington



Wind direction: N

Prevailing wind speed: 6-11 km/h

Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 80%

Precipitation: none



from 10:43AM to 3:46PM.



Birds seen (in taxonomic order):



Canada Goose                        4

Wood Duck                           6

Gadwall                            12 [1] 

Mallard                           240 [2] 

Cinnamon Teal                      28 [3] 

Hooded Merganser                    1 [4] 

Pied-billed Grebe                   9 [5] 

American Bittern                    1

Great Blue Heron                   19

Great Egret                         3

Turkey Vulture                      4

Osprey                              5

Bald Eagle                          1 [6] 

Red-tailed Hawk                     4

American Kestrel                    2

Virginia Rail                       6

Sora                                1

American Coot                      22 [7] 

Semipalmated Plover                 3 [8] 

Killdeer                           10

Greater Yellowlegs                 21

Least Sandpiper                     3

Long-billed Dowitcher              30

Common Snipe                        1

Rock Dove                           1

Eurasian Collared-Dove              1

Mourning Dove                       5

Vaux's Swift                        5

Anna's Hummingbird                  1

Belted Kingfisher                   1

Northern Flicker                    1

Western Wood-Pewee                  3

Steller's Jay                       2

Western Scrub-Jay                   8

American Crow                       6

Common Raven                        1 [9] 

Purple Martin                      10

Tree Swallow                      100

Violet-green Swallow               20

Cliff Swallow                      10

Barn Swallow                       30

Black-capped Chickadee             14

Red-breasted Nuthatch               2

White-breasted Nuthatch             1

Brown Creeper                       2

Swainson's Thrush                   2

American Robin                     15

European Starling                  50

Cedar Waxwing                      30

Yellow Warbler                      1

Common Yellowthroat                22

Spotted Towhee                     10

Savannah Sparrow                    5

Song Sparrow                       25

Black-headed Grosbeak               2

Red-winged Blackbird               20

Yellow-headed Blackbird             2

Brown-headed Cowbird                2

House Finch                         5

American Goldfinch                 20



Footnotes:



[1]  hens & 10 young

[2]  adults & 40 young

[3]  females & 25 young

[4]  juvenile

[5]  adults & 4 juveniles

[6]  juvenile

[7]  adults & 12 young

[8]  Swartz Lake

[9]  Rest Lake



Total number of species seen: 60



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Subject: Re: regarding the Help ID'ing post
From: Loren Mooney <loren.mooney AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:18:58 -0700
Thanks all for your help with this.  The voting varied a little, but the
consensus is that it's a juvenile Western Blue Bird.

In the same sets I got this weekend I found a Williamson's Sapsucker up
Reecer Creek above Ellensburg, but he had yellow under his chin, not red.
Another juvenile?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14704400775/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14704398085/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14704106812/

Loren





On Sun, Jul 20, 2014 at 10:19 PM, Grace and Ollie 
wrote:

> Tweeters,
>
> These are gorgeous photos.  I’m thinking this is a young Townsend’s
> Solitaire.  What do others think?
>
> Beautiful bird!  Thanks for sharing Loren!
>
> Grace Oliver
>
> Redmond, WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>


-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
Mooney Images _______________________________________________
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Subject: Snohomish Co. - Eide Road Shorebirds
From: Joan Bird <jbird202 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:07:27 -0700
In search of migrating shorebirds, Mitch Blanton and I went to Eide Road today, 
arriving at 1:30 p.m., on a low rising tide. The ponds had a lot of water in 
them and we were delighted to discover many more birds than we had anticipated, 
as follows: 


Long-billed Dowitchers - 120+
Western Sandpipers - 150+
Least Sandpipers - 20+
Greater Yellowlegs - 8
Lesser Yellowleg - 1
Pectoral Sandpipers - 6
Killdeer - 20+
Wilson's Phalarope - juvenile -1    
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1 probable

Nearly all of the birds were in the second large pond. 

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Subject: Save Cheasty--and vote no on the Parks District
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 15:58:07 -0700

Hi all, I am here forwarding a letter from Patricia Naumann about what can be 
done to slow or stop the conversion of the Cheasty Greenbelt from nature to 
active-recreation status by the Seattle Parks Dept. 


Notice that the Cheasty Project is designed to pry open other areas of the Park 
System for more active uses in the future. 


Please take action on Cheasty and please please please vote NO on the Parks 
District.  With an enhanced flow of money, there will be no respite ever from 
the new recreation and athletic projects designed to fill in what few remaining 
(currently 14%) areas of the Seattle Park system that are still in nature. 


Thanks, Ed Newbold ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com   residential Beacon Hill

Here's the letter....

From: Patricia Naumann 
To:
Subject: Save Our Natural Areas . . . .
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:35:29 -0700
 
Hello All,
I am writing to ask if you would take a minute to support my efforts to fend 
off a mountain bike park being installed in the largest contiguous forest in SE 
Seattle and quite near me.  It also is designed to be the vanguard, as a pilot, 
to change the bike-use policy so as to allow mountain bike parks in all but 
excluded Seattle Parks and Greenspaces.  So it is more that just my 
neighborhood here.  It will effect ALL Seattle in time -- our values, 
our present and our future.  Once we lose our natural areas, we can't get them 
back.  Did I mention this large parcel is an Environmentally Sensitive/Critical 
Area with wetlands, steep slopes, a history of slides, and is quality habitat?  
Let me, because the proponents never did in any applicaiton.  And a house 
adjacent to the parcel is sliding now and has had to be abandoned.  The list 
goes on; don't get me started.  The effort three years in the making by the 
combination of the proponents, 

 Parks, and Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance has circumvented the normal 
public-involvement process.  Some neighbors still are just learnning of this.  
Parks is allowing it to proceed without having funding along with other 
exceptions. 

 
On Tuesday, July 22, the Seattle Neighborhoods and Public Utilities Council 
Committee meets at 2pm in Council Chambers at City Hall.  The Neighborhood 
Matching Fund Large Project Grants will be up for approval including that for 
the proposed pilot project for a mountain bike park in Cheasty Greenspace.  The 
Committee is chaired by Sally Bagshaw.  Members are Bruce Harrell and Kshama 
Sawant, with Tom Rasmussen as alternate. 

 
Here's what I ask:  I hope you may attend to voice your position and/or that 
you might communicate with the Council by email, addresses below.    

 
In addition, the following week , Monday, July 28 at 2pm, the Full Council will 
take up final approval of the applications and I hope you will reach the 
Council for that as well.   

 
Please see the attached letter from the Lake City Neighborhood Alliance 
regarding process concerns and implications for the entire City.  In addition 
are the letter from the Director of Neighborhoods Bernie Matsuno to the CNC and 
a previously sent, but amended, "Why Not To Build A Mountain Bike Park in 
Cheasty Greenspace," the Open Letter by Denise Dahn, and perspective on 
mountain bikes in natural areas by highly respected Ruth Williams of the 
Thornton Creek Alliance.  I hope you will take a few minutes to contact all the 
City Council members and perhaps that you will even come to the Council 
Chambers on those days. 

 
Visit www.savecheastygreenspace.org for more.
Those Councilmembers on the N'hoods & PU committee Tuesday, July 22, are in 
bold.   

Sally Bagshaw        sally.bagshaw AT seattle.gov
Bruce Harrell          bruce.harrell AT seattle.gov
Kshama Sawant      kshama.sawant AT seattle.gov
Tom Rasmussen     tom.rasmussen AT seattle.gov
Jean Godden          jean.godden AT seattle.gov
Sally Clark               sally.clark AT seattle.gov
Nick Licata              nick.licata AT seattle.gov
Mike O'Brien          mike.obrien AT seattle.gov
Tim Burgess           tim.burgess AT seattle.gov
 
Thank you for your interest.
Sincerely,
Patricia Naumann
patnaumann AT msn.com
206.779.6825
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	* 5 Attachments
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.pdf
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.pdf
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Subject: Iron Creek - Bear Creek hike and bird
From: "lsr AT ramoslink.info" <lsr@ramoslink.info>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:15:51 -0700
On a remarkable summer day, with temperatures in the 50s and 60s, little 
wind and no bugs, a group of 8 people took a hike on the Iron Creek - Bear 
Creek Trail for a Seattle Audubon birding trip this past Sunday. We were 
far enough east to avoid the west-side showers but distant enough from the 
unfortunate fires affecting Leavenworth and Entiat so that we had 
near-perfect conditions. This hike climbs about 1800 feet in 3.5 miles, 
passing dense stream-sides, mixed stands of trees and shrubs, and dry, open 
slopes, thus offering several habitats. Along the way, we enjoyed views, 
flowers, butterflies and birds. And a very compatible and enthusiastic 
group of nature fans.

Early on a Ruffed Grouse flushed but then posed for clear views for all. We 
also had a fleeting view of a male Williamson's Sapsucker then excellent 
views, in the sun, of a female WISA. As both species were life birds for 
several participants, they were trip highlights. 

Many birds were vocalizing, providing good birding-by-ear opportunities. 
However, one call confused us all until we were finally able to find the 
source: a small group of recently-fledged Evening Grosbeaks being fed by a 
pair of adults. As we heard and saw dozens of EVGR throughout the hike, it 
was rewarding to see the family group at fairly close range. 

We saw many Nashville and MacGillivray's warblers with good enough looks to 
allow discussion of the different ID diagnostics. Because of the mid-level 
altitude, both Swainson's and Hermit Thrush were well-heard and, in some 
cases, seen. One HETH in particular provided and nice demonstration of its 
calls:http://youtu.be/uayuxfS42Xw

Other classic birds for this type of area showed for us, including Lazuli 
Bunting, Mountain Bluebird and a surprise Black-headed Grosbeak. Several 
groups, from 2 to over 40, of Pine Siskin showed up, more than I have seen 
all year. Western Wood-Pewee were observed throughout the trip, of course, 
but we also saw a single, silent, Olive-sided Flycatcher, several Dusky 
Flycatcher, and as we arrived back at the cars at the end of the day, a 
charming group of recently-fledged Pacific-slope Flycatchers huddling 
together on a branch. Cuteness to end the day, who could ask for more.

For the hike portion of the trip, we had 42 species:
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19168065
With a couple of additional stops before and after the hike, we tallied 60 
species for the day.
Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: head tufts
From: pan <panmail AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:43:15 -0700
Barry,

I've seen birds of many species, mostly passerines, with symmetric head
tufts (like ears/horns) in summer.  These have been recently fledged
birds, in which the last vestiges of semi-downy nestling plumage
persists on the upper sides of the head, sometimes seemingly attached to
the ends of incoming feathers.  I've got a newbie Song Sparrow out my
window right now that could almost qualify.  When I was a kid, people
(unfortunately) brought me recently fledged birds, thinking the birds
were abandoned, and many had this feature.  That would be my first
hypothesis.  

Cheers,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Subject: Re:
From: ’JŒû AT r‹± <ttanigu-tky@umin.ac.jp>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:30:37 +0900
How about juvenile western bluebird?

Toshi Taniguchi
Seattle, WA

> From: "Grace and Ollie" 
> To: 
> Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 22:19:14 -0700
> Subject: [Tweeters] regarding the Help ID'ing post
> 
> 
> 
> Tweeters,
> 
> These are gorgeous photos.  I'm thinking this is a young Townsend's
> Solitaire.  What do others think?  
> 
> Beautiful bird!  Thanks for sharing Loren!
> 
> Grace Oliver
> 
> Redmond, WA

Got some good shots of a bird I haven't seen before.  I'm guessing it's
common, but need some help ID'ing.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14517722218/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14724251323/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14517699200/


-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
Mooney Images 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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> 
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Subject: regarding the Help ID'ing post
From: "Grace and Ollie" <grace.ollie AT frontier.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 22:19:14 -0700
Tweeters,

These are gorgeous photos.  I'm thinking this is a young Townsend's
Solitaire.  What do others think?  

Beautiful bird!  Thanks for sharing Loren!

Grace Oliver

Redmond, WA
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Subject: Re: Fledgling with head tufts??
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:48:18 -0700
Tweeters,
Kate and I saw a House Wren at Ocean Shores this week that had tufts of
feathers located symmetrically on both sides of its head. I was at a
Dragonfly workshop with Dennis today and asked him what he thought. He
was unsure and when I got home he had sent me an email that referred to
the previous post about the grosbeaks and wrens by Greg Pluth. Somewhat
strange to have 2 different species showing this same characteristic. A
characteristic that I've never seen reported before in either species. 
Any ideas about the head scratching (sic) question about this phenomena?
-- 
  barry 
  Seattle
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

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Subject: Mountain Beavers: An Important Prey Species for Larger Owls in Seattle and Open Spaces (by Dave Hutchinson)
From: Evan Houston <evanghouston AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:12:16 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

Dave Hutchinson asked me to post the following message about Mountain Beavers 
for him.  Please direct comments and questions about this interesting 
information to him (contact info at bottom of his post): 


In a previous discussion I commented on the apparent disappearance of Flying 
Squirrels from Seattle's Parks in the last thirty years. As part of these 
thoughts I have turned to examine the role of  the Mountain Beaver. Quite 
often, when one mentions "Mountain Beaver" in polite conversation, the response 
is: "What's that?" Or else: " Oh I've heard of them, but never seen one." 
Around  Seattle's larger parks and forested places,  two groups know the 
critter well: the larger owls and Green Seattle Partnership forest restoration 
volunteers. 


Aplodontia rufa rufa  is a rodent endemic to Western North America and is quite 
common in the Seattle area. It is one of Washington State's endemic species. It 
is not related to the freshwater animal we also call Beaver. Apparently it can 
be 15 to 25 inches long, though it always seems much smaller to my eye. It's 
weight in the wild can be up to  1.4 kg. and  is  a usual prey item for skunks, 
fox, badger, species of cat, weasel and coyote. Of course, some of these are 
uncommon within the city's limits.  


In evolutionary terms, it is an ancient animal, going back to the Miocene, 
perhaps radiating from other, earlier continental formations. It' s mating 
system has never been described. Because its inefficient kidneys cannot 
concentrate urine, it requires a constant source of surface water and succulent 
vegetation to process its vegetarian diet. Mountain Beaver start breeding in 
late January to early February. The gestation period is 28-30 days 
(March/April), while weaning begins in June. Smaller home ranges tend to have 
greater concentrations of native saplings and ground covers.  Mountain Beaver 
density is lower in older forest stands with a more closed canopy than in 
recently logged stands. Open canopy habitats, created  after commercial 
harvesting are preferred. This fits well with the largely open canopied, second 
and third growth mixed forests typical of Seattle's green belt and some of its 
larger parks. 


In our region its most common foods includes: Vine Maple, Sword Fern, Bracken 
Fern, Salal, Red Elderberry, Salmonberry and Oregon Grape. All  these  native 
plant species are often heavily "clipped" by Aplodontia, which makes the 
logging companies mad and  GSP forest restoration volunteers frustrated, to say 
the least.  


The problem on commercial forest-lands, is the "clipping" of seedling 
coniferous trees, such as Douglas Fir and deciduous trees, often right after 
planting. The leaders are chiseled off, fresh side shoots consumed. The same 
damage  takes place in our parks, with the aforementioned native plants, 
particularly Sword Fern and Western Red Cedar. After initially planting a 
restoration site, one returns to find the tender leaves of saplings chewed off, 
while the animal uses the stubby side branches as a ladder to climb the little 
tree,chopping off the top. One well-known park volunteer has been heard to 
state: "I am NOT running a delicatessen for Mountain Beaver! Another volunteer 
claims to keep a particular restoration site open by removing tall grasses and 
exotic shrubs, while leaving branches as perches, to encourage the predation of 
Mountain Beaver by raptorial species. 


Adult Mountain Beaver are solitary, so that the mass of tunnelings you might 
have come across, is the work of merely one rodent. Each individual has an 
extensive burrow system with high soil humidity  and good soil  drainage. Each 
burrow is often five to six feet deep and contains extensive woody debris and 
stripped herbaceous vegetation. Consequently soil is churned, organic matter is 
incorporated and infiltration routes  for water and air are created, with soil 
profiles generally improved by this bio-turbation. Because of the associated 
soils disturbance and vegetation "management" by Aplodontia, their workings are 
often important sources of habitat and biotic diversity in otherwise uniform or 
depauperate forests, both commercial and park-land. However the extensive 
presence of Mountain Beaver workings can lead to increased soil erosion and 
damaged tree roots. Thus trees in and around them can be weak and unstable. 


Managers of commercial forest lands control them by lethal trapping. Forest 
restoration volunteers try to practice self-control, but know that owls are 
part of their team. In Discovery Park, for example, many volunteers have seen a 
live Mountain Beaver, had one slowly walk over their foot as a Great Horned Owl 
looks on, or had a swooping Barred Owl snatch and carry one off. The Barred Owl 
 diet (Birds of N.America Acct. 508) is described as: small mammals and 
rabbits, birds up to the size of grouse, amphibians, reptiles and rodents. From 
my own observations  in Discovery Park, I can specifically add: American Crow, 
Bonaparte's Gull, squirrels, mice, freshwater snails and Mountain Beaver .Again 
from personal observations,  I have seen Barred or Great Horned Owls in the 
following Seattle open spaces: Discovery and Seward Parks, the Interlaken area 
and the Washington Arboretum. All these sightings have occurred next to  or in 
the middle of Mountain 

 Beaver workings. Correspondents also mention Bainbridge Island, Lake Forest 
Park and Carkeek as having healthy populations of either or both Barred and 
Great Horned Owls as breeding species. Again in Discovery Park, Long-eared Owls 
occupied a Mountain Beaver zone over several years and I have seen what looked 
suspiciously like an Aplodontia being carried by a Barn Owl back to its nest. 


Clearly Mountain Beaver and Barred Owls  like to occupy the same habitats for 
breeding or wintering in our area. To this list can certainly be added 
Red-tailed Hawk and Cooper's Hawk, both of which breed in Seattle and which use 
forest perches for hunting.  I am unsure that the Aplodontia - owl 
 relationship has previously been studied. Therefore it is only a surmise that 
Mountain Beaver is a major prey species for owls in our urban park settings. If 
so, owls may be playing a silent but critical role in controlling Many of the 
latter are under active restoration by the Green Seattle Partnership. 


Thanks to: Clay Antieau & Miller Myers for critical comments; Miller for the 
great photos; several correspondents from Tweeters for important 
information.Special thanks go to Wendy Arjo for allowing me to use her 
Aplodontia research. Please note my (Dave Hutchinson) current email: 

florafaunabooks AT hotmail.com


Evan Houston
Seattle, WA

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Subject: Help ID'ing
From: Loren Mooney <loren.mooney AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:13:56 -0700
Got some good shots of a bird I haven't seen before.  I'm guessing it's
common, but need some help ID'ing.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14517722218/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14724251323/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/loren-mooney/14517699200/


-- 
Loren Mooney
Seattle, Washington
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Subject: Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on July 20, 2014
From: ErikKnight05 AT gmail.com
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:58:08 GMT
This report was mailed for Erik Knight by http://birdnotes.net



Date: July 20, 2014

Location: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington



Wind direction: N

Prevailing wind speed: 6-11 km/h

Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 80%

Precipitation: none



from 10:43AM to 3:46PM.



Birds seen (in taxonomic order):



Canada Goose                        4

Wood Duck                           6

Gadwall                            12 [1] 

Mallard                           240 [2] 

Cinnamon Teal                      28 [3] 

Hooded Merganser                    1 [4] 

Pied-billed Grebe                   9 [5] 

American Bittern                    1

Great Blue Heron                   19

Great Egret                         3

Turkey Vulture                      4

Osprey                              5

Bald Eagle                          1 [6] 

Red-tailed Hawk                     4

American Kestrel                    2

Virginia Rail                       6

Sora                                1

American Coot                      22 [7] 

Semipalmated Plover                 3 [8] 

Killdeer                           10

Greater Yellowlegs                 21

Least Sandpiper                     3

Long-billed Dowitcher              30

Common Snipe                        1

Rock Dove                           1

Eurasian Collared-Dove              1

Mourning Dove                       5

Vaux's Swift                        5

Anna's Hummingbird                  1

Belted Kingfisher                   1

Northern Flicker                    1

Western Wood-Pewee                  3

Steller's Jay                       2

Western Scrub-Jay                   8

American Crow                       6

Common Raven                        1 [9] 

Purple Martin                      10

Tree Swallow                      100

Violet-green Swallow               20

Cliff Swallow                      10

Barn Swallow                       30

Black-capped Chickadee             14

Red-breasted Nuthatch               2

White-breasted Nuthatch             1

Brown Creeper                       2

Swainson's Thrush                   2

American Robin                     15

European Starling                  50

Cedar Waxwing                      30

Yellow Warbler                      1

Common Yellowthroat                22

Spotted Towhee                     10

Savannah Sparrow                    5

Song Sparrow                       25

Black-headed Grosbeak               2

Red-winged Blackbird               20

Yellow-headed Blackbird             2

Brown-headed Cowbird                2

House Finch                         5

American Goldfinch                 20



Footnotes:



[1]  hens & 10 young

[2]  adults & 40 young

[3]  females & 25 young

[4]  juvenile

[5]  adults & 4 juveniles

[6]  juvenile

[7]  adults & 12 young

[8]  Swartz Lake

[9]  Rest Lake



Total number of species seen: 60



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Subject: great blue heron video
From: "Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers" <jonnsher AT wavecable.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:02:05 -0700
Wow that was totally amazing.I've got moles do you think I could get a heron
to come and do them in?  I had no idea that they would eat something so big.
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Subject: odd heron at Nisqually
From: jbroadus AT seanet.com
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:53:43 -0700
Thought I would add to the report on last Wednesday's bird walk at Nisqually, 
that several of us spotted an 

odd looking Great Blue Heron. Several primaries on both wings, and some primary 
coverts, were entirely 

white. They were not the same feathers on each wing; such taht each wing had 
different white panels. The 

entirety of the white feathers were white, with no gradations from any blueish 
color. Also, the head and 

back of neck were a little lighter and browner than usual-- not as striking as 
a Wurderman's would look-- but 

not quite right for a northwest GBHE. The bird flew by and had very yellow feet 
and dark tarsi (since seeing 

this bird I have noted that other GBHE at Kent Ponds also have feet that are 
lighter colored than the legs-- 

sort of tawny, but on this bird the foot color was striking). I suppose some of 
its white plumage genes were 

being expressed; made for an interesting bird. Jerry Broadus
PLS 17660

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Subject: Beer and Birds
From: "Craig Merkel" <quetsal48 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:41:29 -0700
Oh, it's been a busy month! So busy in fact that the notice for B and B
isn't going out until the day before. Shame on me. But to my defense I (like
many of you probably) have been a busy birder. Hopefully you'll get this
message and join us at the Fish Tale Brew Pub in Oly at 4:30 on Monday. We'd
love to hear all about your travels.

 

Craig Merkel

Olympia
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Subject: Several Black Swifts now between Lake Wash. & LFP Towne Center
From: Todd S Hass <thass AT uw.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:33:35 -0700
Lowish clouds and coincidentally, my first flock in the neighborhood this
year.
Todd

Lake Forest Park
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Subject: WFO Youth Scholarship Announcement
From: MEYER2J AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:56:49 -0400 (EDT)
Hi Tweets:
 
Six youths have been awarded scholarships to the WFO conference in San  
Diego in October.  Go to _www.westernfieldornithologists.org_ 
(http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org) to see the recipients and read 
excerpts from 

their essays. WFO occasionally  provides competitive scholarships to help 
young people who are interested in  field ornithology attend birding trips or 
conferences.
Also, registration is open for the Oct. 8-12, 2014 conference with many  
field trip and workshop offerings.
 
Joyce Meyer
Redmond, WA
_meyer2j AT aol.com_ (mailto:meyer2j AT aol.com) 
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Subject: test
From: "Mary K." <catbird54 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:32:18 -0700

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Subject: Midway/Grayland & Bottle Beach Saturday
From: Karen Wosilait <kwseattle AT clearwire.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 21:39:01 -0700
This afternoon I drove the beach between Twin Harbors and Midway and saw many 
of the same birds as Blair reported earlier. (I didn't pick out any Leasts or 
Semipalmated Sandpipers though.). The highlight was 5 Snowy Plovers in two 
groups that were pretty widely separated, but all in the Grayland/Midway area. 


I also enjoyed huge flocks of (mostly) Heerman's Gulls near Twin Harbors. 

Before high tide this evening, Bottle Beach had 200+ dowitchers, 50+ 
Black-bellied Plovers, around 200 Westerns, 20 or so Semipalmated Plovers and a 
Dunlin. 


Caspian Terns were out in force on both beaches. 

Karen Wosilait 
kwseattle  AT  uwalumni.com
Seattle

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Subject: A mid summer night in Monroe
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 21:15:45 -0700
It's cool enough for the Monroe Wagner chimney to be the place to be tonight. 
Looks like about 200 Vaux's Swifts in there tonight. 
http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Subject: Am White Pelican at Columbia River on WA side of Astoria Bridge
From: Foxwinter AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 00:09:59 -0400 (EDT)
 
Today, about 1:30 pm, a single American White Pelican was 100 yards east of 
 the Astoria-Megler bridge on the Washington side. It was on a flat rock,  
preening, along with a very watchful group of about 30 Canada Geese. It slid 
 into the water, picked at the shoreline rocks, and shallow water areas, 
then  swam east thru the pilings, and turned south and drifted out to the open 
 water.
 
 
The bill is light yellow, with flesh colored pouch. Has some black showing  
along the side under its wings. Feet pinkish/flesh color. Perhaps it is  
juvenile.
I have some nice pictures, and can send a few if you reply to me  directly.

Location: just a few hundred yards east of the bridge. I pulled into a  
gravel drive, on the river side of Hwy 401. It has a concrete structure  
waterside that looks like a bridge or landing support. Sign on the tree says:  
"For Sale". It was just below on the rocks. Tide was low, but coming in. 
Nice birding today at the sunny coast.  Barbara Fox at Welches, OR _______________________________________________
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Subject: Black-headed Grosbeak fledgling
From: Greg Pluth <gjpluth AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 19:34:32 -0700
I too watched a female BHGR feeding sunflower seed to the the bird in the
images with the black patch background on July 6. I noticed them back again
soon after, but then only the fledgling who must have gotten the hang of
feeding itself has been regular. The little guy must have been recently out
of the nest because I, like Linda Philips, found no representation of that
stage of feathering in my various books. Had it not been for the adult
female, I wouldn't have been sure.The head tufts are both interesting and
cute! I thought the bird has been regular now for the last few weeks, but
now since taking the other two pics here, I believe I have a fledgling
House Finch to confuse me with its head tufts.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/73779366 AT N04/sets/72157645374967318/

Regardless of species, the tufts are new to me.

Greg Pluth
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Subject: Rufous Hummingbird enjoying Honeysuckle at Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 19:23:17 -0700
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14683987794/
> 
> 
> Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
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Subject: Birds of North America (with link)
From: pan <panmail AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 17:40:11 -0700
Sorry, all,

I forgot that the Tweeters list mechanism strips out links if not
packaged just so...  (That's why that period was off by itself in my
last post.)  

Let's try this again.

http://bna.birds.cornell.edu.ezproxy.spl.org:2048/bna/

Cheers,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Subject: Birds of North America database
From: pan <panmail AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 17:27:56 -0700
All,

Martin's right about that next sentence about Great Blue Herons.  

["In the Food Habits section: Drinking, Pellet-casting, And Defecation.
"Mammal hair is cast in pellets, and bones are digested."

For another fascinating piece of heron trivia you should go to BNA
(subscribe) 
and read the sentence after the one quoted here..."]

I write to remind Seattle residents that your library card gets you
access to the public library's subscription to Birds of North America
.  

Other library systems may also have such.

Now we need to work on the new(er) Handbook of Birds of the World
database.  

Cheers,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Subject: Black-headed Grosbeak question
From: Linda Phillips <linda_phillips1252 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 16:59:56 -0700
I saw a BH groseak feeding a chick. After watching for a while I began to 
wonder if the baby bird I was seeing was a cowbird. One of my books says BHGR 
are rare cowbird hosts but the baby doesn't look like Sibley's illistration of 
a imm. BHGR. 


I know they are terrible pictures but can someone tell me if this is a baby 
grosbeak or is the parent feeding a cowbird? 

 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/88699795 AT N03/

 

Linda Phillips

Kenmore
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Subject: Baby Elf Owls rescued from Acorn Woodpecker assault
From: Ed Newbold <ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 16:49:53 -0700
Hi all,

We had to visit the Southwest recently, where, thankfully, the rains are off to 
a pretty good start.  When we stopped by at the Cave Creek Ranch in Portal, 
AZ, we were shown a baby Elf Owl that along with a sibling had survived a 
concerted Acorn Woodpecker assault.  Apparently there is bad blood between 
these two species: who knew?  A shot of the birds and more on the story, 
unfortunately Paul Bannick wasn't along or they'd be much better, are at my 
blog at: 



http://ednewbold.com/rescue-babies-and-rattling-cocktail-guests-in-the-desert/

scroll past the hummer, Grosbeak and Gray Fox shots.


Thanks all,
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Subject: Re: Do herons cough up pellets?
From: Martin Muller <martinmuller AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 15:11:50 -0700
Terry P asked if herons cough up pellets (after seeing the video of a Great 
Blue Heron spearing and devouring a gopher). 


I can just hear my mom’s reaction (starting some 50 years ago): well, there’s 
one good way to find out. Look it up! 


So I did. Birds of North America online (subscriptions start at $ 42 a year):
Vennesland, Ross G. and Robert W. Butler. 2011. Great Blue Heron (Ardea 
herodias), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell 
Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: 
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/025doi:10.2173/bna.25 


In the Food Habits section: Drinking, Pellet-casting, And Defecation.
[…] Mammal hair is cast in pellets, and bones are digested […].

For another fascinating piece of heron trivia you should go to BNA (subscribe) 
and read the sentence after the one quoted here….. 


Martin Muller, Seattle
martinmuller AT msn.com
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Subject: Predators & Prey | Union Bay Watch
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 14:19:56 -0700
Tweeters,

This post is about birds of prey seen this week around Union Bay. The majority 
eat fish but there is one other example in case sushi is not your thing. 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2014/07/predators-prey.html 

Have a great day around Union Bay…where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: BirdNote - last week, and the week of July 20, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123imagine.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 12:04:03 -0700
Hey, Tweeters

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Turkey Vulture - Sky Sailor
http://bit.ly/13fQAnf

* The Stock Tank - A Southwestern Oasis
http://bit.ly/LA6Kjb

* David Sibley - Sketching and Painting Impressions of Birds
(With a link to the video of David doing a sketch)
http://bit.ly/1wJaCkp

* Message of the Mourning Dove
http://bit.ly/Ui0VNj

* What Do Desert Birds Drink? - With a gorgeous photo of a Black-throated 
Sparrow! 

http://bit.ly/Wrfekp

* Birds on the Menu - Fun on Friday
http://bit.ly/1u31US2

* Gaping Blackbirds, By Gordon Orians, Icterid expert
http://bit.ly/1kGvx1Y

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://p0.vresp.com/zSuZuY
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a show, 
plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the 
website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find nearly 1200 episodes in the 
archive. 


Thanks for listening!
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Subject: Where have all the Anna's gone?
From: jbroadus AT seanet.com
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 11:20:10 -0700
> Subject: Where have all the Anna's gone?
> 
> (Sung to the Kingston trio tune)
> So up until a couple of weeks ago I had a couple of Anna's hummers stalking 
everything on the yard after being the only hummers all 

> Winter long and then 
> POOF!
> Gone!
> Now a couple
> Of rufous hummers guard
> The Yard
> What happened?
Clarice Clark
Puyallup, WA. 98371
mailto:jbroadus AT seanet.com
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Subject: Re: Great Blue Heron hunting video
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 08:27:13 -0700
great blue herons are quite opportunistic.  i have photos of them consuming
what i believe was a norway rat (juanita bay park) and a vole (ridgefield),
and attempting to down a salmon that probably outweighed the bird by quite
a bit (also juanita bay park)...  oh, and fish...  they like fish  :)

if it fits, it eats...

00 caren
http://www.ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork


On Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 10:23 PM,  wrote:

>   Terry and Tweets,
>
> This is really amazing.  Along the line of surprising bird meals, when my
> husband and I were down at the Imperial Beach Pier in S. Cal. last weekend,
> we saw a Western Gull killing and eating a crow.  We didn’t see if it
> killed the crow “all by itself,” or if the crow was somehow already
> impaired, but we did see it finish the crow off and start pulling the
> feathers out.  We didn’t stay for the feast we assumed was inevitable.
>
> Penny Koyama, Bothell
> plkoyama at comcast dot net
>
>  *From:* Terry Sargent Peart 
> *Sent:* Friday, July 18, 2014 7:49 PM
> *To:* Tweeters 
> *Subject:* [Tweeters] Great Blue Heron hunting video
>
>  Tweets,
> I don't know if you will all be able to access this, but I saw this video
> and couldn't hardly believe it.  I don't know the man that videoed this,
> but it appears he lives in Toppenish or somewhere near there.
>
>
> 
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10204262495191468&set=vb.1500784159&type=2&theater 

>
> Terry P
> West Seattle
>
> ------------------------------
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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>
>
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Great Blue Heron hunting video
From: Terry Sargent Peart <terry.peart AT outlook.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 05:55:13 -0700
Tweets,One of my friends has asked me, after seeing the Heron video, does the 
Heron cough up a pellet or what?Does anyone know? 

Thanks,Terry PWest Seattle



 


Tweets,I don't know if you will all be able to access this, but I saw this 
video and couldn't hardly believe it. I don't know the man that videoed this, 
but it appears he lives in Toppenish or somewhere near 
there.https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10204262495191468&set=vb.1500784159&type=2&theaterTerry 
PWest Seattle 

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Subject: From the Fill
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 05:54:23 -0700
Hey tweets, the Fill continues to be very quiet these days. A lot of the ducks 
have gone into seclusion while they molt, and the remaining ones are either 
hard to see or consciously hiding, as was the mother Wood Duck with her four 
(or possibly five) babies screened by tall water lilies near the Turtle Logs. 
The juvenile Brown-headed Cowbirds are out and about, not that I'm glad to see 
how well they've done. The goldfinches have begun to lose their bright gold, 
and the return of kettles of Mew Gulls announces that fall is on the way, thank 
goodness. 


In the absence of hordes of birds, I turn my attention to the people who 
frequent the Fill, a real community of folks who say hello to all they meet, 
exchange news of the day, and talk about (what else?) the weather. Like most 
true communities, you don't always get to choose who belongs, and we have our 
share of curmudgeons and scoflaws. In my most positive frame of mind, they 
exist to be cozened into cheerfulness or chivvied into compliance with the 
rules that make it possible for us to coexist with wild nature in the heart of 
a big city. On days when I am feeling less charitable, I retreat to Main Pond, 
set up my camp stool and try to let my spirit float peacefully along with the 
sleeping Gadwalls, whose bills are tucked into their backs and who rock gently 
in the wavelets that dance across the water's surface in the light breeze. 


The people remind me that birding is a very human activity - the birds don't 
care whether we watch them or not. If fact, if they had their druthers, 
probably not. Thus, birding is a human construct, a cultural creation. Unlike 
many another cultural artifact, though, it is intimately tied to nature and the 
wild planet that sustains all life. 


Here is a poem for you today:

Most people see a mean old man 
hunching his way on the Loop Trail. 
I see courage to set one foot after the next, 
bravery bent but not bowed.

- Connie, Seattle


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Subject: Discovery Park Question
From: Miles Brengle <mbrengle154 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 23:15:19 -0700
Hi Tweeters,
                     I'm a Massachusetts birder visiting Seattle for a
little while and I plan to do some birding at Discovery Park.  If someone
could provide some insight on what some good trails or areas of Discovery
Park are I would appreciate that! Thanks.   Miles Brengle

-- 
Miles Brengle
Ipswich, Mass.
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Subject: Re: Great Blue Heron hunting video
From: <plkoyama AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 22:23:02 -0700
Terry and Tweets,

This is really amazing. Along the line of surprising bird meals, when my 
husband and I were down at the Imperial Beach Pier in S. Cal. last weekend, we 
saw a Western Gull killing and eating a crow. We didn’t see if it killed the 
crow “all by itself,” or if the crow was somehow already impaired, but we 
did see it finish the crow off and start pulling the feathers out. We didn’t 
stay for the feast we assumed was inevitable. 


Penny Koyama, Bothell
plkoyama at comcast dot net

From: Terry Sargent Peart 
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 7:49 PM
To: Tweeters 
Subject: [Tweeters] Great Blue Heron hunting video

Tweets, 
I don't know if you will all be able to access this, but I saw this video and 
couldn't hardly believe it. I don't know the man that videoed this, but it 
appears he lives in Toppenish or somewhere near there. 



https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10204262495191468&set=vb.1500784159&type=2&theater 


Terry P
West Seattle



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

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Subject: Great Blue Heron hunting video
From: Terry Sargent Peart <terry.peart AT outlook.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 19:49:58 -0700
Tweets,I don't know if you will all be able to access this, but I saw this 
video and couldn't hardly believe it. I don't know the man that videoed this, 
but it appears he lives in Toppenish or somewhere near there. 


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10204262495191468&set=vb.1500784159&type=2&theater 

Terry PWest Seattle 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: black swifts at Sauk Mountain
From: wheelermombi AT comcast.net
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 02:21:02 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Tweeters, 

I hiked up the Sauk Mountain trail today with Wendy Smith. Much of the hike is 
through meadow, so not a lot of bird species on the way up; some singing HERMIT 
THRUSHES, a few small flocks of PINE SISKINS in the occasional stands of trees, 
and a few other expected species. The wild flowers were in full bloom, 
butterflies were everywhere, and the scenery was spectacular. As we were 
reaching the end of the trail near the summit, I began to hear a high-pitched 
bird call that I couldn't place. When we made it to the top, I spotted a BLACK 
SWIFT maybe 30 feet above us. It soon flew off, but a few minutes later 3 Black 
Swifts appeared, calling to one another. They came fairly close a few times, 
often below where we were sitting. It was the clearest look that I have had of 
this species, and it was fascinating watching them while they swooped about. 
Their wing beats were much slower than our other two species of swifts, and 
they frequently glided. They vanished for a final times after a few minutes. An 
unusually curious pika would occasionally pop out of the rocks nearby and watch 
us briefly. A really nice day to be in the mountains. 


Good birding, 

Lonnie Somer 
Kent 
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Subject: Hummingbirds and artificial sweeteners
From: "Rachel Lawson" <rwlawson AT q.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:59:38 -0700
I have always wondered about the criteria hummingbirds use to determine what 
makes a nectar source worth using, including how they might react to artificial 
sweeteners. My daughter Clare Brown found the following article: 


 


Stromberg, M. R. and P. B. Johnsen (1990). "Hummingbird Sweetness Preferences: 
Taste or Viscosity?" The Condor 92(3): 606-612. 


Black-chinned Hummingbirds (Archilochus alexanderi) were offered combinations 
of sucrose and artificial sweeteners (saccharin, aspartame) at various 
concentrations and viscosity levels. Sucrose at 40% concentration was preferred 
over lower concentrations. Sucrose at 20% was preferred over artificial 
sweeteners, plain water, and low sucrose/high viscosity samples. Additions of 
artificial sweeteners to sucrose samples had no effect on nectar consumption 
and, therefore, were judged to be ineffective stimuli rather than aversive. 
Artificial increases in viscosity had no effects on the amount of nectar 
removed as long as a minimum of 15% sucrose was present. Hummingbirds responded 
to decreased sucrose concentrations by increasing sampling behavior at feeders; 
at increased sucrose levels, sampling behavior decreased. Chemosensory 
mechanisms rather than physical measures of viscosity are responsible for the 
sensory evaluation and the subsequent selection of sucrose nectars. 


 

If anyone is interested, I will send the link to the whole paper.

 

Rachel Lawson

Seattle

rwlawson AT q.com

 

 

 
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Subject: King/Kittitas birding
From: Tim Brennan <tsbrennan AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:14:56 +0000
Hey Tweets!
 
I'd made a promise to my nephew to go visit the ghost town of Lester, near 
Stampede Pass, so I took him and my son up for a night of camping, and then a 
hike into Lester. Thursday night, we stayed at Lake Kachess, almost 
accidentally as I missed an exit. It was actually a great spot - beautiful view 
of the lake from a hundred feet away, and there were actually a ton of birds 
there, with dense forest, a large open lake, and some riparian sections all 
near the campsite. I haven't added up species yet, but I had Willow and Dusky 
Flycatchers, Western Wood-Pewee, Warbling vireo, Gray Jay, Steller's Jay, 
Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Swainson's, Varied and Hermit Thrushes, and two 
species of owls (Barred calling in the middle of the night, and a brief visit 
from Northern Pygmy-Owl in the morning). 

 
Friday morning we drove FR 5400 towards Stampede Pass, passing into King County 
as we crossed over the pass. I rolled the windows down as soon as we did, 
completely unfamiliar with this corner of King. I'm missing House Wren for King 
County (or was), so I found myself stopping at nearly every clear cut, thinking 
each one looked like the most magical habitat for House Wren. On the way in to 
Lester, I had none, but may have done a little better, finding a DUSKY 
FLYCATCHER, 'whit'-ing away in the brush of one of those clear cuts right off 
of the side of the road. The two or so mile hike from the gate to the little 
ghost town (down to four or so buildings now), was full of Chipping Sparrows, 
and MacGillivray's Warblers, as well as a few Cassin's Finches. Again, I 
haven't got a species total yet, but it will be pretty high, with several 
species of swallows, Ravens, Turkey Vultures, Common Yellowthroats, Lazuli 
Buntings... it was a well mixed list. Incidentally, on the way out, I spoke 
with a City of Tacoma Watershed worker who drove through in his truck. He noted 
that Wild Turkeys have been seen for a few years now in numerous spots just 
inside King County, which fits with the WITU report from FR-5400 last year. On 
the way back out on FR-5400, I stopped at a clear cut where there had been a 
suspicious small brown bird on the way in. I was able to pull it up and view my 
first HOUSE WREN in King County. 

 
The only other birds of note on the way out - five Band-tailed Pigeons on 
FR-5400 (back over Stampede) were my first in Kittitas County, and Gold Creek 
Pond had some wonderfully vocal Spotted Sandpipers. 

 
Happy Birding, 
 
Tim Brennan 
Renton
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Subject: Request: Observations of jaeger/falcon interactions
From: Todd S Hass <thass AT uw.edu>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:17:51 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

During the past two Septembers, I have seen brief (but impressive!) aerial
tangles between Parasitic Jaegers and falcons over Puget Sound. I'd like to
see if others have documented similar interactions in the past.

If you have noted such behaviors, please let me know by email (offline), or
if you prefer - in a reply to tweeters.  If there is an interesting
pattern, I may compile the anecdotal observations for a potential note in
Washington Birds, crediting the contributors and the tweeters forum for
crowd-sourcing this request.

In order to keep the data somewhat consistent/comparable, please note the
date, location, species and ages involved (if known), and a short
description of the interaction.

Thanks,
Todd

Lake Forest Park, WA
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Subject: Pine Siskins
From: "Ken and Tina Grant" <kenandtina AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 07:39:31 -0700
Tweets,

 

Saw my first pine siskins yesterday in Snoqualmie for W. Washington. 

They have been absent as of late.

 

Ken Grant

North Bend
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Subject: Shorebirds at Midway and Bottle Beach - Not a RED NECKED STINT Turns into a SANDERLING
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 07:20:08 -0700
I headed off to the Coast yesterday hoping to head 
further south and look for the Brown Thrasher that 
had been reported.  When I spoke to the person who 
had seen it and learned it was from 9 days earlier 
and had not been seen again, the choice then 
became to go to the Westport area or to Ocean 
Shores.  I chose the former and while, despite a 
momentary adrenaline rush to the contrary, there 
were no real specialties, the birds were super and 
it was a great day.

My first stop was driving the beach along Midway 
and Grayland hoping to find a Snowy Plover as I 
had not been able to get a photo of one earlier.  
Weather was PERFECT with great light and a 
soothing ocean breeze that was great relief from 
the heat of Puget Sound the past few days.  I 
quickly came upon a mixed group of shorebirds.  
First highlight was a trio of RUDDY TURNSTONES in 
their breeding plumage splendor.  Other birds in 
the flock were numerous WESTERN SANDPIPERS,  some 
LEAST SANDPIPERS, and bright SEMIPALMATED 
PLOVERS.  I found several similar groups (less the 
RUDDIES).  A bit later I found a mix of birds that 
included at least one that got my heart racing.  
One of the sandpipers had a fairly bright "reddish 
brown" head and neck with white undersides and 
some spots below the neck.  Just under a year ago, 
I had seen the RED NECKED STINT at Bottle Beach 
and this bird had some similarities.  Except it 
seemed somewhat larger (not smaller) than the 
WESTERNS and while the bill was different - it too 
was not smaller.  And wing length was also not 
right.  I relaxed and for the moment figured it 
was a WESTERN in somewhat different full breeding 
plumage and determined to research it when I got home.

I continued my drive and found more of the same in 
different groups - but no SNOWY although one group 
had a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER.  One interesting 
find was a group of gulls and TURKEY VULTURES 
picking at the remains of what I later found out 
was one of two HUMPED BACKED WHALES that been 
ashore for almost two months.  I ran into Cindy 
Sundstrom (spelling?) who I had seen there two 
years earlier.  She monitors the area for DFW and 
bands the SNOWIES among other duties. She has a 
wealth of knowledge and experience and it was a 
great talk.  When I had seen her there in 2012, we 
had been casually watching a group of shorebirds 
on the beach as we talked.  One was "different" 
but I did not do a good job of really honing in on 
details.  Something spooked the flock and our 
"different" bird had a white rump that was clearly 
if only briefly visible (to both of us).  I 
chalked it up as a WHITE RUMPED SANDPIPER which 
was rejected by the Bird Committee (wish I had 
paid more and better attention) but we both had 
the white rump and I am almost certain it was not 
a CURLEW SANDPIPER so at least for my list I still 
go the former.

As we were talking Cindy nonchalantly pointed over 
my shoulder on the hard pack behind me and said 
"there's your SNOWY PLOVER".  Sure enough it was 
there on the beach and I excused myself to get a 
photo.  Cindy knows every bird and this one is 
"Gimpy" because its band has slipped down over its 
foot and causes it to limp around a bit.  SHe said 
however that it has in no way curtailed his 
activities and he is a good breeder - maybe the 
ladies feel sorry for him.

Later I went to Tokeland but as it was still low 
tide, almost nothing there except for a single 
WHIMBREL and 72 (I counted each one) GREAT BLUE 
HERONS.  After a stop in Westport and driving 
miscellaneous areas I went to Bottle Beach hoping 
for - well anything.  High tide was scheduled at 
5:50 PM and I hit the beach at 2:20 PM.  Lots of 
sand and mud but no birds (TV, RED TAIL and 
HARRIER over the field).  I have followed the 
general rule that the time to get to Bottle Beach 
is 3 hours before high tide.  At exactly 2:50 the 
first flock of birds arrived - far out on the 
mud.  It was a mixed flock of SHORT BILLED 
DOWITCHERS and BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS. For the next 
90 minutes more and more birds flew in.  Mostly 
the same as the first but also included were a few 
LEAST SANDPIPERS, many more WESTERNS, some 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, a few DUNLIN (in almost full 
breeding plumage), and again three RUDDY 
TURNSTONES. The latter stayed together exactly as 
they had at Midway Beach earlier and I wondered if 
they could be the same birds.

At the peak of the show, I would estimate that 
there were perhaps 1000 SHORT BILLED DOWITCHERS 
and 150 BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS and no more than 40 
WESTERNS.  At almost exactly 90 minutes later 
almost all of the birds flew off to ... ???

Back to the Red Necked NOT STINT:  I looked on 
line and could find no pictures of a WESTERN 
SANDPIPER in breeding plumage that came even close 
to my bird.  REally did look more like a RED 
NECKED STINT but there were those doggone size and 
bill issues.  Steve Pink came to my rescue - he 
correctly identified it as a breeding plumage 
SANDERLING.  I do not recall seeing this plumage 
here and it was simply not even on my radar 
screen.  Going back over other pictures I think 
there were at least a few.

Fall migration is truly fun - I wonder what will 
come next (and what I may have missed at Ocean 
Shores).

Some pictures, including the SANDERLING are at - 

https://picasaweb.google.com/103072475474183849815/MidwayBeachJuly17?authkey=Gv1sRgCMOTor6NxZjJSQ# 


-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Bombing Robins - Yard Changes - Babies (kinda long)
From: Rob Conway <robin_birder AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:07:45 +0000

For about the past month whenever we have gone out our front
door there have been a pair of adult American Robins showing aggression toward
us, flying close,  vocalizing loudly, and
generally showing signs of defending territory and/or a nest or young. Finally 
yesterday I found the cause, a Robins 

nest with three half grown birds right on the top of the ivy covered brick wall
that makes up the outside of the front porch. 
I was watering my potted plants on the porch and tried to peek to find
the birds – the noise I made in the ivy probably made them think I was mom or
dad, but when they saw me they absolutely froze in their open mouth – open eyes
– necks outstretched position, too funny. 


 The babies are at the cuteugly stage – all mouth and eyes
and some starts at feathers.  Now that we
know where they are we can watch through our front porch window to see the
parents feeding these voracious little guys and fending off whatever is alive
and comes anywhere within 30 feet of the nest.  
Always kind of fun to have an observable nest without needing to disturb
the residents.

 Birds around the house have been changing. As of this week I have no swallows 
where 

earlier in the spring I had hundreds – I’m guessing nesting is through and they
have headed to the grassy meadows along the Washougal and Columbia Rivers to
feed on the numerous hatching insects. Interestingly I did have 5 black swifts 
up very high on a recent cloudy morning. I 

have as many as 12 Black Headed Grosbeaks visiting my feeders at once now – 5 
adults 

and 7 young.  Talk about eating out of
house and home these birds along with 20 or so beautiful House Finches (all 
color phases) are 

going through 3-5 pounds of seed daily.  
The Scrub and Steller’s Jays are eating almost a pound of peanuts a day
out of a feeder – they were gobbling that many in 10 minutes in an open tray.

 I’ve been concentrating more on the birds on the edge of my
lot along the forest and creek boundaries and have expanded my yard list in
doing so.   I’ve added Olive-sided , Willow,
and Western Flycatchers, Western Wood Pee-Wee, a Say’s Phoebe, and what I think
is a Hannond’s Flycatcher (not a good enough look). There is a Hermit Thrush 
who works my worm 

filled compost pile daily.  Cedar
Waxwings are chowing down on red berries and flycatching (also hitting
windows).  The White-breasted Nuthatch continues
visiting the peanut feeder.  I found
House Wrens using a less than Ÿ” hole in a small dead fir tree as a nest site –
babies following them around this week. A pair of Bewick’s Wren were nesting in
a small house in a clematis hedge, but they have disappeared altogether. A 
family of Brown Creepers left the bark 

crack nest yesterday and already seem to be dispersing.

 I still have Ruby Crowned Kinglets for some reason and the
number of Bushtits indicates a very successful nesting season. The mixed 
fall/winter flocks are already starting to form with Bushtits, Warblers, 
Kinglets, Chickadees, Creepers, Nuthatches, and others moving quickly from tree 
to tree gleaning the many many insects that are at their peak. Concentrating on 
warblers for a couple of 

mornings I confirmed Yellow, Yellow Rumped (both Audubon’s and Myrtle), Orange
Crowned, Wilson’s, Townsends, Black Throated Grey, Nashville, Hermit (way way
way up), MacGillivray’s, and Common Yellowthroat in the riparian strip of
willow, vine maple, bigleaf maple, Oregon ash, cottonwood, aspen, and
ornamental trees along the creek and open space boundary. I found Huttons and 
Red-eyed Vireo and hear Warbling Vireo all day, but can't seem to get them in 
scope. Red Crossbills continue to visit the stream/waterfall/tiny ponds on a 
daily basis (20 or so). I'm down to just 5 Anna's and 2 Rufous Hummers at the 
feeders. Straggler birds include a couple of Western Tanagers over the past 
week and a single Bullock's Oriole. The sky is filled with hawk calls all day 
long as our Red-Tailed pair has for the second year in a row raised 3 gorgeous 
kids in the open space above the house all of which vocalize constantly while 
flying, perched, eating, sleeping...just all of the time from 3;45 AM to 10PM. 
The babes are now perching regularly in the 2 very big snags at the edge of my 
lot giving me great looks. Two of the birds are very dark with a neat blackish 
collar and nearly unstreaked breast while the 3rd bird is a typical red tail 
with bright red tail, brownish flight feathers, streaked breast with weak 
collar and an acrobatic streak. These adolescents have daily encounters with 
Turkey Vultures, Bald Eagles, Red Shouldered Hawks, Ravens, and on occassion 
other large Buteos...I think I'm going to start calling the canyon in front of 
me Hawk Point. Enjoying the birds! Rob 




Rob Conway 
Camas, WA
45.58°N 122.44°W - elevation 310 ft.
robin_birder AT hotmail.com

 

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Subject: Active Fledgling Day Today in the Wedgwood Neighborhood? - 7/18/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 01:03:30 -0700
It certainly was yesterday, all day long, with peaks being early morning and 
around 6 p.m. Come see what's in store for us watchers anytime today. If you 
don't know the location, you can contact me or someone else whom you think is 
in the know - Seattle Audubon Nature Shop is very nearby and those volunteers 
and staff definitely could point you to the main block that has the nest tree 
(not being used anymore). The birds will likely be heard and found within a few 
blocks of the nest site, if yesterday is any indication. 


Kee kee kee !

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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