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Updated on Friday, December 19 at 03:57 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black and Yellow Broadbill,©Barry Kent Mackay

19 Dec pix -- dark-backed Lesser Goldfinch ... [Lyn Topinka ]
19 Dec pix -- dark-backed Lesser Goldfinch ... [Lyn Topinka ]
19 Dec Chelan Acorn Woodpecker [Tom Mansfield ]
19 Dec Sequim-Dungeness CBC preliminary results [Bob Boekelheide ]
19 Dec sikes lake golden eagles [Dave Templeton ]
18 Dec Long-tailed Duck continues at Browns Point Lighthouse Park, Tacoma. [Shep Thorp ]
18 Dec re Long-tailed Duck [Jack Stephens ]
18 Dec Okanogan County birding, Dec. 16 ["Wayne Weber" ]
18 Dec Sikes Lake golden eagle - continued ["Mike Hamilton" ]
18 Dec Okanogan County birding, Dec. 16 [Wayne Weber ]
18 Dec Marymoor Park (Redmond, WA) 2014-12-18 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
18 Dec Pine Grosbeak [Carol Riddell ]
18 Dec More on Wylie Slough and Environs - Rusty Blackbird and a Possible Modification [Blair Bernson ]
18 Dec one "Gutsy Glaucous Gull" !!!!!!!!!!! [Lyn Topinka ]
18 Dec one "Gutsy Glaucous Gull" !!!!!!!!!!! [Lyn Topinka ]
18 Dec Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 12-18-2014 [Denis DeSilvis ]
18 Dec Harlan's Hawk at Wylie Slough [Blair Bernson ]
18 Dec 2nd printing of Sibley's 2nd edition ["Charles Desilets" ]
18 Dec Sibley's 2nd edition [Dianna Moore ]
18 Dec Re Sibley's second printing [polofan ]
18 Dec RE: RFI - Long Tailed Ducks ["Ed Swan" ]
18 Dec Native trees - new book ["Martha Jordan" ]
18 Dec RFI - Long Tailed Ducks [elynde ]
18 Dec article on birds on MSNBC today-Tiny Birds Knew Killer Tornadoes Were Coming [Megan Lyden ]
18 Dec Acorn woodpecker,cashmere ,12:30pm,wed.17dec,2014 [Maxine Reid ]
18 Dec Chelan Acorn Woodpecker [Tom Mansfield ]
17 Dec Lambert Road Ruffed Grouse [Scott Ramos ]
17 Dec Nisqually NWR 12/17/14 []
17 Dec Vashon Four Loon, 5 Grebe Species day ["Ed Swan" ]
17 Dec 2nd printing Sibley guide 2nd edition ["Charles Desilets" ]
17 Dec Washington Park Pine Grosbeak []
17 Dec North Portland - Glaucous NO Franklin's YES [Lyn Topinka ]
17 Dec Seattle Arboretum Pine Grosbeak - yes ["Louise Rutter" ]
17 Dec Swamp Sparrow at Nisqually NWR [Shep Thorp ]
16 Dec Cle Elum CBC results ["Michael Hobbs" ]
16 Dec WA Park Arboretum Pine Grosbeak relocated today 12/16 ["Charles Desilets" ]
16 Dec Pied-billed Grebes Digesting Fish at Sikes Lake [Hank ]
16 Dec Kittitas County []
16 Dec Arboretum Pine Grosbeak ["Diane W" ]
16 Dec Pine Grosbeak - yes ["Janeanne Houston" ]
16 Dec Best Nature Books of 2014 [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
16 Dec Skagit and Stilliguamish Deltas 12-14-14 []
16 Dec Arboretum Pine Grosbeak - Yes! [Kathy Hartman ]
16 Dec 12/5 Vashon YB LOON [chazz ]
15 Dec Sikes Lake Golden Eagle [Hank ]
15 Dec RE: Ebird & Google maps ["Louise Rutter" ]
15 Dec Ebird & Google maps [Larry Schwitters ]
15 Dec Walla Walla CBC results [Mike & MerryLynn ]
15 Dec Yellow Bill loon Edmonds [Claudia Turner ]
15 Dec Cooper's or Sharp-shinned @ Sikes Lake yesterday ? [Barbara Deihl ]
15 Dec Pygmy Nuthatches YES Skamania [Lyn Topinka ]
15 Dec Sikes Lake Golden Eagle [Hank ]
15 Dec Pine grosbeak [liron ziv ]
15 Dec Stanwood []
15 Dec Pine Grosbeak ["Mary Anne Thorbeck" ]
15 Dec Binoculars for sale [Susan Myers ]
15 Dec Pine Grosbeak [wong ]
15 Dec RFI: Cuba [Randy Robinson ]
15 Dec Cashmere Acorn Woodpecker [Debra Sutherland ]
15 Dec Re: Seattle Mountain Chickadee continues [Marc Hoffman ]
15 Dec the best bird books of 2014 [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
15 Dec Sikes Lk Afternoon - 12/14/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
15 Dec Re: Drano Lake Pygmy Nuthatches (Skamania Co) ["Wilson Cady" ]
15 Dec Blaine, Semihamoo, Birch Bay. Terrell Lake [Neil and Carleen Zimmerman ]
14 Dec Pine Grosbeak was seen at 3:50pm [Qinglin Ma ]
14 Dec Drano Lake Pygmy Nuthatches (Skamania Co) [Stefan Schlick ]
14 Dec Death In The Playground [Jeff Gibson ]
15 Dec Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on December 14, 2014 []
14 Dec Re: Acorn Woodpecker in Chelan county [Lorna Tangren ]
14 Dec Bird description - just had to share ... [Lyn Topinka ]
14 Dec Pine Grosbeak continues at the arboretum [Kathy Hartman ]
14 Dec Yellow-billed Loon continuing Sunday [William Ehmann ]
14 Dec eBird Report - St. Edward's SP, Dec 13, 2014 [Andrew McCormick ]
14 Dec Acorn Woodpecker in Chelan county [Debra Sutherland ]
14 Dec Vashon Yellow-billed Loon, Long-tailed Duck, and White-breasted Nuthatch continue ["Ed Swan" ]
14 Dec birders who kayak: looking for birders January 1st (CBC) [Scott ]

Subject: pix -- dark-backed Lesser Goldfinch ...
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:24:08 -0800
hi all ... I finally got some good looks at the dark-backed Lesser 
Goldfinch which has been hanging around our neighborhood for a week 
or so ... he's not totally black on the back but just very dark ... 
he definitely stands out ... this is the first time we've seen him on 
the seed sock ... images shot through a double-paned plate-glass 
window ... enjoy, Lyn



http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vancouver_lesser_goldfinch_dark-backed_12-19-14.jpg 




http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vancouver_lesser_goldfinch_dark-backed_12-19-14_B.jpg 


a more "normal" patterned Lesser on the left, dark-backed on the right ...

http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vancouver_lesser_goldfinch_dark-backed_12-19-14_C.jpg 






Lyn Topinka,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com

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Subject: pix -- dark-backed Lesser Goldfinch ...
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:24:08 -0800
hi all ... I finally got some good looks at the dark-backed Lesser 
Goldfinch which has been hanging around our neighborhood for a week 
or so ... he's not totally black on the back but just very dark ... 
he definitely stands out ... this is the first time we've seen him on 
the seed sock ... images shot through a double-paned plate-glass 
window ... enjoy, Lyn



http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vancouver_lesser_goldfinch_dark-backed_12-19-14.jpg 




http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vancouver_lesser_goldfinch_dark-backed_12-19-14_B.jpg 


a more "normal" patterned Lesser on the left, dark-backed on the right ...

http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vancouver_lesser_goldfinch_dark-backed_12-19-14_C.jpg 






Lyn Topinka,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com



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Subject: Chelan Acorn Woodpecker
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 14:04:59 -0500
As of the time of this post the ACWO in Cashmere continues to favor the tallest 
utility pole at Riverfront and Parkhill. Flying around the neighborhood. 


Tom Mansfield in Cashmere 

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Subject: Sequim-Dungeness CBC preliminary results
From: Bob Boekelheide <bboek AT olympus.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 09:09:33 -0800
Hello, Tweeters,

We held the Sequim-Dungeness CBC last Monday, Dec 15. The preliminary species 
total looks to be 140, slightly below our average for the last 20 years, but 
Im still waiting for better details on a couple birds. Weather was 
challenging, with a strong easterly wind all day. Even though the winds gusted 
to 45 mph at the Dungeness lighthouse in late morning, all our field parties 
hung in there and did a great job. Just our luck  the winds were calm the day 
before and the day after. 


Interesting species for our count:

Snow Goose - 5 near 3 Crabs
Yellow-billed Loon - 3 counted by our boat party (which bravely went out 
despite the rough seas) 

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 roosting in Dungeness (Gale and Windy), who have 
been present this fall and past falls 

Golden Eagle - one count-week immature soaring in the Olympic Foothills
Marbled Godwit - 45 in Dungeness Bay. (Could some Willipa Bay godwits be 
wintering further north this year?) 

Whimbrel - 1 with the godwits
Western Bluebird - 4 off Knapp Road, on the east side of our count circle
White-throated Sparrow - record high count of at least 10, recorded by multiple 
groups 

Rusty Blackbird - 1 hanging with the blackbird flock at Maple View dairy near 
Washington Harbor 

Pine Grosbeak - 1 likely immature male at Graysmarsh, loosely associated with a 
flock of Red Crossbills 


I let you know more after all the data are entered.

Happy Holidays!
Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness





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Subject: sikes lake golden eagles
From: Dave Templeton <crazydave65 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 06:28:03 -0800
hi,

i take a moment to note that several posts about sikes lake refer to 'the'
golden eagle.  over the past few weeks there have been at least two golden
eagles present at sikes lake, and i saw two at one time a couple weeks
ago.  those birds were distinguishable in that one has the diamond patches
on the wngs characteristic of first year birds, and the second has the
splotchy body and subterminal white band on the tail characteristic of
second year birds.

i thought i saw a full adult about four weeks ago, but the sighting was too
brief to be sure.

regards,

t

-- 
dave templeton
fall city, wa

crazydave65atgmaildaughtcom

"Don't worry about the world coming to an end today; it's already tomorrow
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Subject: Long-tailed Duck continues at Browns Point Lighthouse Park, Tacoma.
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 22:21:18 -0800
Hi Tweets,

the Long-tailed Duck first found by Hans Feddern several weeks ago just off
the northeast beach of Browns Point Lighthouse Park in Tacoma is still
hanging around.  I had nice views with my binoculars 300 feet from shore at
3:30pm today.

Good birding,
Shep

-- 
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
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Subject: re Long-tailed Duck
From: Jack Stephens <jstephens62 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 20:55:06 -0800
I was just up at Semiahmoo today, and had several Long-tailed Ducks 
fairly close in. As a bonus there are some Black Scoters nearby as well.

http://jackstephens.zenfolio.com/p831100157

Jack Stephens
Edmonds, WA
jstephens62 AT comcast.net
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Subject: Okanogan County birding, Dec. 16
From: "Wayne Weber" <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:12:36 -0800
Birders,

 

Last Tuesday, I spent almost the whole day birding in Okanogan County.
Rather than focussing on the Okanogan Highlands, as many birders do, I
decided to look for birds along Osoyoos Lake and along the Okanogan River
from Oroville south to Ellisforde.

 

The first spot I checked (after crossing through the international border
from B.C.) was Boundary Point on the west side of Osoyoos Lake. A big flock
of about 300 BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS was milling about near the turnoff to
Boundary Point Road, then flew north into BC. There were lots of waterfowl
on Osoyoos Lake, mostly CANADA GEESE and MALLARDS, but out on the lake were
6 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS. This species is uncommon, but somewhat regular in
occurrence on Osoyoos Lake in the winter. An immature NORTHERN SHRIKE was
perched on a shrub just west of Highway 97.

 

Next on the agenda was Westlake Road, which follows near the edge of Osoyoos
Lake for a little over 2 miles till it rejoins Highway 97 at the north edge
of Oroville.

About halfway along is Deep Bay Park, which gives a good view of the
southern part of Osoyoos Lake. From here, among other things, I could see 3
COMMON LOONS, 8 TRUMPETER SWANS near the shore north of the park, 4 more
RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, and a tight flock of about 30 COMMON MERGANSERS.
Elsewhere along Westlake Road, a TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE was singing (!) from
the top of a Lombardy poplar, and a flock of 30 CALIFORNIA QUAIL were
feeding in the middle of a large group of free-range chickens in an
orchard--  an interesting combination of fowl!

 

I spent about 90 minutes birding in the town of Oroville itself. From
previous experience, I knew there were likely to be quite a few birds on the
Okanogan River in the middle of town. The species I saw included 6
RING-NECKED DUCKS, a drake BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, 6 TRUMPETER SWANS, and a
PIED-BILLED GREBE. Other typical urban birds were seen, including 20
EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES and 83 ROCK PIGEONS.  Two FOX SQUIRRELS were
involved in a chase in the middle of town, and I saw what looked like
several leaf nests of Fox Squirrels in shade trees.

 

After lunch at the Oroville Subway, I headed south on "Highway 7", also
known as the Janis-Oroville Road, which parallels Highway 97, but on the
opposite (west) side of the Okanogan River. This route proved very
productive for birds of prey. Along Highway 7, I tallied a total of 18
RED-TAILED HAWKS, 9 BALD EAGLES, one GOLDEN EAGLE, 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS, and
a COOPER'S HAWK. I counted an impressive total of 53 BLACK-BILLED MAGPIES,
including 2 large flocks. I made a short side trip to the east on Truman
Nelson Road, which gives a good view over a large area of floodplain; a
highlight here was a PRAIRIE FALCON which flew in and landed atop a leafless
tree, giving great views through the scope before it flew off a couple of
minutes later. Nearby were 2 more flocks of BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS, totalling
another 98 birds. Farther south on Highway 7, another NORTHERN SHRIKE was
perched near the road. A second highlight, accompanying a flock of 39 CANADA
GEESE in a field, was a single GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE--  completely
unexpected, and a new species for my all-time Okanogan County list!

 

By now, it was almost 3 PM--  not much daylight left. I crossed over to the
hamlet of Ellisforde on Highway 97 via the Ellisforde Bridge Road. As I
headed north on Highway 97, I tallied one more species of raptor--  a
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK perched close to the highway. Then I decided to head for
Havillah in the Okanogan Highlands via the Swanson Mill Road, a well-graded
gravel road which I had not driven before. This road traverses a nice
stretch of ponderosa pine forest, but in the late afternoon, birds were few,
other than a third NORTHERN SHRIKE on the way up the hill, and a huge covey
of 60 more CALIFORNIA QUAIL near a house in the lower part of the pine
forest.

 

Though it was late, I hoped to perhaps see or hear an owl species or two
near Havillah; I drove in to the Highlands Sno-Park, where there was only an
inch or two of snow on the ground. Despite my best attempts at hooting, no
owls appeared. However, a pleasant surprise--  and one of my best birds of
the day-was a flock of 34 WILD TURKEYS which crossed Dry Gulch Road only
about 500 yards north of the Havillah Road, and ran up a nearby bank, about
15 minutes after sunset. This was the biggest flock of Turkeys I had ever
seen in Washington, and a new species for my year list!

 

I will probably check out the Okanogan Highlands in January or February, as
many of us often do, but it was a nice change of pace to spend a day mostly
in the valley bottom. The day produced a list of 40 species, including some
that I rarely see in Okanogan County.

 

Good luck and good birding,

 

Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus AT telus.net

 

 

 
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Subject: Sikes Lake golden eagle - continued
From: "Mike Hamilton" <mikeham44 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:11:59 -0800
The golden eagle at Sikes Lake was again on the scene today. Photos on my 
website show him arriving at a favorite perch across the road from the lake. He 
joined a bald eagle at the top of the fir. After preening and looking around, 
he left, accompanied by the bald eagle. There seemed to be some unfriendly 
jostling going on. 


Continuing with the theme of antagonism, minutes after they left a peregrine 
falcon was seen attacking a juvenile northern harrier. They were sort of far 
off but you’ll get the idea. This is most likely the same harrier seen 
annoying the golden eagle recently. A little give and take. 


Photos at:  http://www.mikehamilton.biz

Mike Hamilton
Sammamish, WA
mikeham44 AT comcast.net_______________________________________________
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Subject: Okanogan County birding, Dec. 16
From: Wayne Weber <contopus AT telus.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:12:36 -0800
Birders,

 

Last Tuesday, I spent almost the whole day birding in Okanogan County.
Rather than focussing on the Okanogan Highlands, as many birders do, I
decided to look for birds along Osoyoos Lake and along the Okanogan River
from Oroville south to Ellisforde.

 

The first spot I checked (after crossing through the international border
from B.C.) was Boundary Point on the west side of Osoyoos Lake. A big flock
of about 300 BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS was milling about near the turnoff to
Boundary Point Road, then flew north into BC. There were lots of waterfowl
on Osoyoos Lake, mostly CANADA GEESE and MALLARDS, but out on the lake were
6 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS. This species is uncommon, but somewhat regular in
occurrence on Osoyoos Lake in the winter. An immature NORTHERN SHRIKE was
perched on a shrub just west of Highway 97.

 

Next on the agenda was Westlake Road, which follows near the edge of Osoyoos
Lake for a little over 2 miles till it rejoins Highway 97 at the north edge
of Oroville.

About halfway along is Deep Bay Park, which gives a good view of the
southern part of Osoyoos Lake. From here, among other things, I could see 3
COMMON LOONS, 8 TRUMPETER SWANS near the shore north of the park, 4 more
RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, and a tight flock of about 30 COMMON MERGANSERS.
Elsewhere along Westlake Road, a TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE was singing (!) from
the top of a Lombardy poplar, and a flock of 30 CALIFORNIA QUAIL were
feeding in the middle of a large group of free-range chickens in an
orchard--  an interesting combination of fowl!

 

I spent about 90 minutes birding in the town of Oroville itself. From
previous experience, I knew there were likely to be quite a few birds on the
Okanogan River in the middle of town. The species I saw included 6
RING-NECKED DUCKS, a drake BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, 6 TRUMPETER SWANS, and a
PIED-BILLED GREBE. Other typical urban birds were seen, including 20
EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES and 83 ROCK PIGEONS.  Two FOX SQUIRRELS were
involved in a chase in the middle of town, and I saw what looked like
several leaf nests of Fox Squirrels in shade trees.

 

After lunch at the Oroville Subway, I headed south on "Highway 7", also
known as the Janis-Oroville Road, which parallels Highway 97, but on the
opposite (west) side of the Okanogan River. This route proved very
productive for birds of prey. Along Highway 7, I tallied a total of 18
RED-TAILED HAWKS, 9 BALD EAGLES, one GOLDEN EAGLE, 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS, and
a COOPER'S HAWK. I counted an impressive total of 53 BLACK-BILLED MAGPIES,
including 2 large flocks. I made a short side trip to the east on Truman
Nelson Road, which gives a good view over a large area of floodplain; a
highlight here was a PRAIRIE FALCON which flew in and landed atop a leafless
tree, giving great views through the scope before it flew off a couple of
minutes later. Nearby were 2 more flocks of BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS, totalling
another 98 birds. Farther south on Highway 7, another NORTHERN SHRIKE was
perched near the road. A second highlight, accompanying a flock of 39 CANADA
GEESE in a field, was a single GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE--  completely
unexpected, and a new species for my all-time Okanogan County list!

 

By now, it was almost 3 PM--  not much daylight left. I crossed over to the
hamlet of Ellisforde on Highway 97 via the Ellisforde Bridge Road. As I
headed north on Highway 97, I tallied one more species of raptor--  a
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK perched close to the highway. Then I decided to head for
Havillah in the Okanogan Highlands via the Swanson Mill Road, a well-graded
gravel road which I had not driven before. This road traverses a nice
stretch of ponderosa pine forest, but in the late afternoon, birds were few,
other than a third NORTHERN SHRIKE on the way up the hill, and a huge covey
of 60 more CALIFORNIA QUAIL near a house in the lower part of the pine
forest.

 

Though it was late, I hoped to perhaps see or hear an owl species or two
near Havillah; I drove in to the Highlands Sno-Park, where there was only an
inch or two of snow on the ground. Despite my best attempts at hooting, no
owls appeared. However, a pleasant surprise--  and one of my best birds of
the day-was a flock of 34 WILD TURKEYS which crossed Dry Gulch Road only
about 500 yards north of the Havillah Road, and ran up a nearby bank, about
15 minutes after sunset. This was the biggest flock of Turkeys I had ever
seen in Washington, and a new species for my year list!

 

I will probably check out the Okanogan Highlands in January or February, as
many of us often do, but it was a nice change of pace to spend a day mostly
in the valley bottom. The day produced a list of 40 species, including some
that I rarely see in Okanogan County.

 

Good luck and good birding,

 

Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus AT telus.net

 

 

 
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, WA) 2014-12-18
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 17:15:36 -0800
We had a fine morning, since the rain held off until noon, and even then 
started out just as very light rain. Unlike many such mornings, it didn’t 
feel like rain was imminent. The sun frequently poked its way through the 
overcast, and while I don’t think we ever saw our shadows, there was at least 
yellowish light. Temps were in the 40’s, with no wind, so it was quite 
pleasant. It was pretty birdy, too, with several surprises. 


Highlights:

Gr. White-fronted Goose    At least 4 with a large flock of Cacklers
Northern Pintail                  Male in slough below weir, more as flybys
Horned Grebe                     Two visible well out from Lake Platform
GREEN HERON                   West shore, from Lake Platform. 1st since Sept.
Cooper’s Hawk                  Two juveniles, 1 mobbed by crows
Belted Kingfisher               A female has been at RC ponds this Dec.
PEREGRINE FALCON          Stooped on flying Mew Gulls
Northern Shrike                 Juvenile north of Fields 7-8-9
BARN SWALLOW               1-2 flying around south of Dog Meadow
American Goldfinch          1 at Compost Piles; scarce this winter

Just before 8:00 a.m., the MEW GULLS that often gather on the grass soccer 
fields were up in the air, swirling back towards the lake with energy. They’d 
been notably active already. Then we noticed a PEREGRINE FALCON streaking 
south. It came in high, then folded its wings and arrowed towards the gyre of 
gulls, flaring its wings when it neared, but failing to nab any gull. It then 
dropped down on some gulls lower down, but I believe it again came up empty. 
Later, we saw the Peregrine flying towards the lake as we walked the boardwalk. 


There were probably 200 gulls total that we saw today, but they were 
unsurprisingly jumpy, and we never had an opportunity to see them on the ground 
except from extreme distance, so we were not able to sort through them for 
Ring-billed or California. Clearly, the vast majority were Mews, as we could 
hear their calls, and we scanned many birds that flew overhead. 


As for BARN SWALLOWS, this is just the 4th winter sighting at Marymoor, with 
all of those sightings coming in December. We’ve had one sighting from the 
first week in November, but all other sightings are limited to mid-March 
through mid-October. 


For the day, 58 species. Next week, we do the walk on Christmas Eve, instead of 
Christmas. 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com

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Subject: Pine Grosbeak
From: Carol Riddell <cariddellwa AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 16:26:00 -0800
I just got back into town last night so I decided to try for the Washington 
Park Arboretum Pine Grosbeak this afternoon. I waited about 40 minutes for her 
to arrive on stage. In the meantime, I enjoyed the Varied Thrushes and Robins 
while I waited. A few photos are attached to this ebird checklist: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20948686 . 


If you still haven't gone to see her, wait by the several trees that still have 
an abundant load of very bright red berries at the north end of the Mountain 
Ash collection. It seemed easiest to park at the Visitor Center and then walk 
up the restricted road to the area where she is being seen. If you have a 
disabled parking sticker or license plate, you can drive in the road and park 
very near. 


Carol Riddell
Edmonds, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: More on Wylie Slough and Environs - Rusty Blackbird and a Possible Modification
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 16:16:17 -0800
I just returned from visit to Wylie Slough area 
where the main objective was a picture of the 
Swamp Sparrow reported by Ryan Merrill and Brad 
Waggoner yesterday.  Brad provided excellent 
specific directions and I was very excited when I 
got to the end of the dike trail and saw what 
appeared to be a small sparrow foraging on the 
ground just where he described it.  As I 
approached for a possible shot and good look, 
however, it flew off into the reeds and despite 
many attempts to call it in, it never reappeared 
and I did see at least two Song Sparrows there so 
no no photo and perhaps it was not even what I 
saw...  HOWEVER today (unlike some recent failed 
chases) there were wonderful consolation prizes.  
I earlier reported a Haralan's Hawk which was 
spectacular - very dark seemingly black and white 
but I may have to change it to a dark juvenile 
Western.  I have never seen a Red Tail that dark.  
Some other treats were seeing Pacific, Bewick's 
and Marsh Wrens and hearing at least two and 
seeing one Virginia Rail.  I also had a very brief 
glimpse of what I expect is the same Northern 
Waterthrush that I saw and photographed earlier 
this month.  The best find, however, was what I 
believe is a male winter plumaged Rusty Blackbird 
in a very large flock of mixed blackbirds on Wylie 
Road.  The flock was skittish as usual and moved 
constantly between the fields, powerlines and the 
farm buildings just to the North and barely west 
of the road itself.  The individual was striking 
in its rusty head and breast/back with a very 
bright yellow eye with a dark center.  
Interestingly too, although there were a number of 
starlings nearby, they remained mostly out of the 
flock and greatly favored the powerlines. 
Brewer's, Red Winged and Cowbirds were in the 
flock.  Still want that Swamp Sparrow picture but 
this was a fun "miss".

Blair Bernson Edmonds
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Subject: one "Gutsy Glaucous Gull" !!!!!!!!!!!
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:23:43 -0800
Rainy, overcast, cold, and in the distant, but still fun pictures ... 
this was one "Gutsy Glaucous Gull" !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ...


http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vanport_wetlands_gutsy_glaucous_gull_12-18-14.jpg 


he didn't win the prize but he tried ... at Vanport Wetlands, Portland, Oregon


enjoy,
Lyn







Lyn Topinka,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com



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Subject: one "Gutsy Glaucous Gull" !!!!!!!!!!!
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:23:43 -0800
Rainy, overcast, cold, and in the distant, but still fun pictures ... 
this was one "Gutsy Glaucous Gull" !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ...


http://northwestbirding.com/Images14Dec/vanport_wetlands_gutsy_glaucous_gull_12-18-14.jpg 


he didn't win the prize but he tried ... at Vanport Wetlands, Portland, Oregon


enjoy,
Lyn







Lyn Topinka,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com

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Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 12-18-2014
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:56:32 -0800
Tweeters,

The nine of us on the JBLM Eagles Pride bird walk kept mostly dry until the
last half of the walk. Highlights and details as noted in the eBird/NW
report below.

 

The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at
8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf
Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the
following:

.        January 15

.        February 19

.        March 19

 

Anyone is welcome to join!

 

Eagles Pride GC, Pierce, US-WA

Dec 18, 2014 8:04 AM - 11:24 AM

Protocol: Traveling

3.7 mile(s)

Comments:     Cloudy and damp at start - 42degF - with almost no wind;
occasional raindrops turned to steady, light rain about half-way through
walk. Highlights included first-of-season AMERICAN WIGEON (94) plus one
likely being a Eurasian X American hybrid; an "intergrade" NORTHERN FLICKER
among five flickers feeding together; and 40 RED CROSSBILLS in various
locations along the route. Misses include Golden-crowned Sparrow and House
Finch.

28 species (+2 other taxa)

 

Canada Goose  45

American Wigeon  94

Eurasian x American Wigeon (hybrid)  1     At Hodge Lake - yellow-gold
forehead with otherwise reddish/dark feathers on head, but with typical
American Wigeon patterning. Bird stood out among all the other wigeon.

Mallard  12

Ring-necked Duck  39     At Hodge Lake

Bufflehead  10     At Hodge Lake

Red-tailed Hawk  2

Western/Glaucous-winged Gull  1     Glaucous-winged Gull "type"

Anna's Hummingbird  1

Downy Woodpecker  1     Heard only

Northern Flicker  9     Includes one Yellow-shafted/Red-shafted hybrid

Steller's Jay  3

American Crow  124

Black-capped Chickadee  8

Chestnut-backed Chickadee  12

Red-breasted Nuthatch  11

Brown Creeper  1

Pacific Wren  4

Bewick's Wren  1

Golden-crowned Kinglet  21

Ruby-crowned Kinglet  4

American Robin  18

Varied Thrush  5

European Starling  53

Spotted Towhee  3

Fox Sparrow  1

Song Sparrow  3

Dark-eyed Junco  21

Red Crossbill  40

Pine Siskin  1

 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20947646

 

May all your birds be identified,

 

Denis DeSilvis

Roy, WA

avnacrs4birds at outlook dot com

 

 

 

 
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Subject: Harlan's Hawk at Wylie Slough
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:29:00 -0800
Great raptors at Wylie Slough this afternoon.  Both Sharp Shinned and Coopers, 
Red Tail, Harrier, Eagles, Peregrine and Rough Legged (just before WMA) but 
highlight was a very dark Harlan's Hawk.   Gorgeous bird. 



Blair Bernson
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Subject: 2nd printing of Sibley's 2nd edition
From: "Charles Desilets" <csdesilets AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 13:09:38 -0800
Thanks to all of you tweeters who responded to my request for help in
finding the 2nd printing of Sibley's 2nd edition.  For those who don't know,
the 1st printing's type color was a light gray which many reviewers
complained about.  In addition there were a few errors, and the red and
green colors were not true to Sibley's paintings.  These issues were
supposedly corrected in the 2nd printing run in July 2014.  The date can be
found on the back of the title page of the book.  All the standard retailers
either only have the 1st printing, or don't recognize the printing at all in
their description.

 

For those looking for the 2nd printing, Sharon emailed me today noting that
Buteo Books carries both printings and you need to check the 2nd  printing
box if you want to get it.  I failed to notice this point when I checked
Buteo Books the first time I looked.

 

Charles Desilets

Mukilteo
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Subject: Sibley's 2nd edition
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:39:16 -0800
amazon.com/books has it

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re Sibley's second printing
From: polofan <polofan AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:29:52 -0800
You might try this website.

http://www.buteobooks.com/product/SIBL2.html

Be sure to check the Second Printing box.

Sharon

Message: 4
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:21:49 -0800
From: "Charles Desilets" 
Subject: [Tweeters] 2nd printing Sibley guide 2nd edition
To: "Tweeters" 
Message-ID: <000001d01a47$da5ef200$8f1cd600$ AT comcast.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Anybody know of a brick-and-mortar or online bookstore that has the July
2014 (2nd printing) of Sibley's new guide?



Charlie Desilets

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Subject: RE: RFI - Long Tailed Ducks
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 11:08:04 -0800
Those places are really good spots. If you want a closer one that wouldn’t 
quite be so dependable, you might try the Tramp Harbor fishing pier on Vashon 
Island where the Yellow-billed Loon is showing up. One to two Long-tailed Ducks 
have been hanging out for the last two weeks. Yesterday one was diving about 10 
meters out and wasn’t bothered by a dock full of birdwatchers and fishermen. 
Both birds have been regular lately but also could leave at any time. 


Ed

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

  www.theswancompany.com

  edswan AT centurytel.net

206.463.7976

 

 

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of elynde 

Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2014 10:46 AM
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI - Long Tailed Ducks

 

Reading past messages it looks like Blaine Marina and Semiahoo Spit are the 
best bets for viewing Long Tailed Ducks. 


 

Is that generally the case, or could someone suggest any other spots? Planning 
a day trip from Seattle. 


 

Thanks!  

 

Lynde Eller

Renton, WA

elynde at cox dot net 
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Subject: Native trees - new book
From: "Martha Jordan" <mj.cygnus AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 10:48:12 -0800
Birds are our main focus, and many use or live in and around trees. 
Check out the newest book: Native Trees of Washington by WSU Extension Forestry 
Professor Kevin Zobrist 


You can learn more about it at this site, including talks and book signings.  

http://forestry.wsu.edu/nps/events/nativetrees/

Martha Jordan
Everett_______________________________________________
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Subject: RFI - Long Tailed Ducks
From: elynde <elynde AT cox.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 10:45:38 -0800
Reading past messages it looks like Blaine Marina and Semiahoo Spit are the 
best bets for viewing Long Tailed Ducks.  


Is that generally the case, or could someone suggest any other spots? Planning 
a day trip from Seattle.  


Thanks!  

Lynde Eller
Renton, WA
elynde at cox dot net _______________________________________________
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Subject: article on birds on MSNBC today-Tiny Birds Knew Killer Tornadoes Were Coming
From: Megan Lyden <meganlyden AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 09:51:33 -0800
 

Hi Tweets,

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/feathered-forecasters-tiny-birds-
knew-killer-tornadoes-were-coming-n270381

 

Megan Lyden

Bellevue, WA
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Subject: Acorn woodpecker,cashmere ,12:30pm,wed.17dec,2014
From: Maxine Reid <baconmf AT mail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 06:56:53 -0800
Hi tweets
We were returning from Mazama skiing and saw the ACWO at the corner of 
RIVERFRONT AND PARKHILL in a large bare tree with a small house across from the 
power substation in Cashmere. Same area as described earlier. It flew in a 
short time into large evergreen 

And disappeared..time was 12:30pm.
In the methow HIGHLITES were 3american dippers, a flock of pine grosbeaks up 
the E.chewuck rd. 1/4 mile past the lake Pearrygin rd . Turnoff , 
mtn,chickadees at mamaza, and a PYGMY owl beside the trail from Mazama to 
freestone inn ,just south of the bridge on the highway 20 to Mazama road. 

Cheers and good birding,
Maxine reid

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Subject: Chelan Acorn Woodpecker
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 09:03:24 -0500
Hey Tweets - Anyone know if the ACWO continues in Cashmere? The last report I 
could find was on eBird from Tuesday, 12/16. Thanks, Tom Mansfield in Seattle. 
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Subject: Lambert Road Ruffed Grouse
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 22:25:22 -0800
During the Cle Elum CBC, our group of 4 explored Lambert Road, among other 
areas. In the morning, we flushed a Ruffed Grouse, getting a view of only a 
startled escape flight. It would have to do as a life bird for one of us. 
Later, on our return to Cle Elum, we decided on one more visit to Lambert Road. 
We passed another grouse, this time perched in an easy view. Maneuvering the 
car as a blind, we were able to get remarkably close to the bird without 
spooking it into flight. And the result was a precious photo op of a gorgeous 
bird. 


RUGR Photo:

https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/LambertRoad#6094049661131916818 
 

Video:
http://youtu.be/cIkcQRDwB-Y

Not far from this spot, we were on foot looking for other birds and ran across 
a couple of carcasses just off the road: pig and what appeared to be deer. At 
that moment, a Mountain Chickadee dropped in and began feeding off the latter 
carcass. We thought it might be picking bugs from the carcass; a closer look at 
the video shows it to be prying off small chunks. 


MOCH video:
http://youtu.be/s2Ekfts5E_c

Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Nisqually NWR 12/17/14
From: scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 22:47:00 -0500
Tweets,

Today 24 of us enjoyed a great day at Nisqually. We had a 13.4 high tide at 
1:14 and pretty calm conditions. 


The highlight of the day was a pair of SWAMP SPARROWS out near the start of the 
estuary boardwalk. The were actively calling and bouncing around the cattails 
and put on quite a show. 


Another highlight was a single SNOW GOOSE in with a small flock of GREATER 
WHITE-FRONTED GEESE that flew toward the freeway, circled around and landed on 
the dike just past the twin barns, providing everyone with decent looks. 


There is lots of water in all the ponds and last weeks wind knocked down much 
of the vegetation so spotting is much easier than it was. Waterfowl numbers are 
up but they are spread out. We are short one MALLARD that became prey for a 
BALD EAGLE. The EAGLE carried the bird into the cottonwoods near the twin barns 
and proceeded to enjoy lunch with about 20 birders watching. Someone said the 
EAGLE swallowed a duck leg whole. 


Speaking of EAGLES there were lots of birds of prey about today. We saw several 
RED-TAILED HAWKS, several NORTHERN HARRIERS , including a male, at least two 
PEREGRINE FALCONS, a COOPER'S HAWK, and a NORTHERN SHRIKE. Not a good day to be 
a prey species today. At one point the COOPER'S HAWK was on a snag in the 
reclamation area and two PEREGRINE FALCONS were in a tree at the edge of the 
area. The COOPER'S HAWK was keeping an eye on the FALCONS just in case. 


Passerines were scarce today but we did see most of the expected species 
including LINCOLN'S SPARROW in addition to the SWAMP SPARROWS. 


For the day I had 51 species with the SWAMP SPARROW being new for the year 
giving me 147 species for the year. 


Mammals seen included COTTONTAILED RABBIT, MINK, MUSKRAT, and HARBOR SEAL.

Until next week when we walk as usual on Wednesday......


Phil Kelley
scrubjay323 AT aol.com
Lacey, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Vashon Four Loon, 5 Grebe Species day
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:58:38 -0800
For the Seattle Audubon Society field trip to Vashon today, we had
Yellow-billed Loon and Common Loon in Tramp Harbor as well as Horned, Eared
and Red-necked Grebe.

 

In outer Quartermaster Harbor there was a nice flock of Red-throated Loons
and a few Pacific Loons mixed in with a flock of Western Grebes.

 

We picked up our fifth grebe, Pied-billed, at Fisher Pond where there were
also about a dozen Wilson's Snipe feeding in the mud.  

 

All three cormorant species sat posed next to each other on the pilings next
to the Vashon dock and also on a small square dock in outer Quartermaster
Harbor.

 

We dipped on the Virginia Rails at Monument Road, there was too much road
noise from re-directed traffic from Tramp Harbor.  Otherwise they're usually
pretty cooperative even at mid-day.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new second edition of The Birds of Vashon Island at:

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: 2nd printing Sibley guide 2nd edition
From: "Charles Desilets" <csdesilets AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:21:49 -0800
Anybody know of a brick-and-mortar or online bookstore that has the July
2014 (2nd printing) of Sibley's new guide?

 

Charlie Desilets

Mukilteo
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Subject: Washington Park Pine Grosbeak
From: <mlfrey AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:20:33 -0800
A group of us searched for nearly half an hour in the Sorbus section today 
before a woman with very sharp eyes 

spied the bird in a mix of branches. She eventually flew into a deciduous tree 
where she appeared to fall asleep. 

We could understand why because she’s rather plump with all of her feasting!

Mary Frey
Covington_______________________________________________
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Subject: North Portland - Glaucous NO Franklin's YES
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 13:20:02 -0800
hi all ... went to Force Lake, Heron Lakes Golf Course, VanPort, and Delta Park 
today (north Portland, near I-5 bridge) looking for gulls, hoping for the 
Glaucous or the Franklins as spotted by Tait A. yesterday ... not many gulls 
around ... no Glaucous seen at all but I did find the Franklins ... it was an 
easy find (grin) ... he was walking down the road leading into the golf course 
... I stopped the car even so he could get to the other side ...  


Lyn




Lyn Topinka
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Subject: Seattle Arboretum Pine Grosbeak - yes
From: "Louise Rutter" <louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:14:41 -0800
With some patient observation under backlight conditions, I was able to get
distant views of the female pine grosbeak at 11.30am. She was with a flock
of robins at the top of a bare tree on the other side of the fence from the
mountain ash collection. I was told that both grosbeak and robins had been
feeding in the mountain ash earlier in the morning.

 

Louise Rutter

Kirkland
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Subject: Swamp Sparrow at Nisqually NWR
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 11:47:35 -0800
Hi Tweets,
Phil Kelly and the Wednesday walk have spotted a Swamp Sparrow on the fresh 
water side of the Nisqually Estuary Trail or new dike just directly across from 
the entrance of the boardwalk or Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail. The bird 
perched up in the cattails providing good looks for many around 11:30 am. 

Good birding,
Shep Thorp

Shep Thorp, VMD
The Animal Emergency Clinic
Puget Sound Veterinary Referral Center
BluePearl Veterinary Partners
5608 South Durango Street
Tacoma, WA 98409

sheppard.thorp AT bluepearlvet.com
253-370-3742

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Subject: Cle Elum CBC results
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:38:30 -0800
We had a good, if rather unusual 10th Cle Elum Christmas Bird Count. With the 
complete lack of snow, we had access to every road and trail in the count 
circle. But perhaps because of the lack of wintry weather, the birds may not 
have moved down from northern latitudes and/or high elevations yet. In any 
case, we had FEWER total birds than average (3224 vs. 3574 average), and only 
matched our average number of species seen at 68. Sparrows and finches were 
especially scarce. 


We did find three species never before recorded on our Christmas Bird Count: 
Two SHORT-EARED OWLS near the Swauk Grange, a PEREGRINE FALCON seen from the 
Iron Horse trail, and three ROCK WRENS seen on Swauk Ranch (private access). 
Short-eared Owls and Peregrine Falcons are not common any time in Kittitas 
County. Rock Wrens are seen regularly in summer, but they usually migrate south 
for the winter. We’ve now seen 106 species cumulatively on the count. 


Other notable birds included 2 TRUMPETER SWANS along I-90, and a RED-NAPED 
SAPSUCKER, I believe on Bettas Rd. And there were about 40 BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS in 
the trees near the barbecue restaurant in South Cle Elum (follow the signs). 


High counts were noted for Green-winged Teal (+9 to 18), Bufflehead (+9 to 37), 
Red-tailed Hawk (+13 to 80), Eurasian Collared-Dove (+29 to 71), Hairy 
Woodpecker (tied high count of 13), White-headed Woodpecker (tied at 3), 
Pileated Woodpecker (+1 to 5), American Kestrel (tied at 14), and Brown Creeper 
(tied at 13). 


We had some notable misses: American Robin, Cedar Waxwing, and Red Crossbill. 
It’s the first time we’ve missed American Robin, though on 5 counts we’ve 
had three or fewer during the previous 9 counts. 


So far, we’ve had two additional Count Week species: Golden Eagle and Evening 
Grosbeak. 


MANY THANKS to the 23 participants!

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: WA Park Arboretum Pine Grosbeak relocated today 12/16
From: "Charles Desilets" <csdesilets AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:36:43 -0800
The female Pine Grosbeak previously reported in the Sorbus (Mountain Ash)
collection area was relocated around 12 PM today.  Two ladies had found it
when I walked up, located near the top of the relatively large Sorbus
Hybrida (marked) specimen at the south end of the Sorbus "zone" on the west
side of the trail.  It was seemingly oblivious to us birders and was gorging
itself on berries.  The tree still has a lot of dead leaves on it which gave
the bird a good cover while making it difficult to spot for birders.  It was
still there when I left 20 minutes later.

 

Charlie Desilets

Mukilteo
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Subject: Pied-billed Grebes Digesting Fish at Sikes Lake
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:15:08 -0800
> 
> Hopefully this Pied-billed Grebe is digesting a large fish and doesn't have 
some problem: 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15418953483/
> 
> This Pied-billed Grebe will soon be digesting a large fish:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15418953553/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom_______________________________________________
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Subject: Kittitas County
From: <mlfrey AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 14:49:42 -0800
I enjoyed a great field trip in Kittitas County lead by Charlie Wright & Roger 
Orness on Sunday. We were in an older residential neighborhood 

in Cle Elum when Charlie spotted a flock of Bohemian Waxwings. A larger flock 
was seen a little later in another area. We saw 

many, many raptors in the Kittitas countryside including a Prairie Falcon, 
American Kestrels, Rough-Legged Hawks, Bald Eagles, Cooper’s Hawks & 

Red-tailed Hawks. One RTHA had a prominent white chest. Near Vantage we got 
great looks at a Loggerhead Shrike. On the drive back, (thanks 

Ed & Kay Pullen for driving) Trumpeter Swans were in the Yakima River & in a 
pond near Cle Elum. Great day! 


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Subject: Arboretum Pine Grosbeak
From: "Diane W" <diane_weinstein AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 14:15:25 -0800
I saw the Arboretum Pine Grosbeak today shortly after noon. She was feeding in 
a berry tree next to the path at the south end of the Mountain Ash area. This 
made up for the trip this past weekend to see the Pine Grosbeaks at Padilla 
Bay, where I was told I just missed them by about 40 minutes. 


Diane Weinstein
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Subject: Pine Grosbeak - yes
From: "Janeanne Houston" <houstojc AT plu.edu>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 14:06:36 -0800
We took a couple of hours to walk and bird this a.m. in the Arboretum, and
saw the female Pine Grosbeak in the Sorbus (mountain ash) area near the golf
course fenceline.  Walking from visitor's center, the bird was in a lichen
covered ash hybrid to the right of the footpath.  The ash is growing against
a Christmas-tree-shaped cedar.  The bird blends in really well with the
colors on the tree.  Two lovely women with a small dog located it first.
We watched it  from 11:45-12:30.  After gorging on berries, the Grosbeak
flew into a conifer by the golf course fence.  Also in the area, a Merlin
was hunting.  Thanks to all who have posted about this bird.  
 
Janeanne Houston
 

Senior Lecturer in Voice
Pacific Lutheran University
houstojc AT plu.edu




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Subject: Best Nature Books of 2014
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 20:42:51 +0000
Hello everyone,

I just shared my choices for the best nature books choices for 2014:

http://gu.com/p/44773/stw

these books, all beautifully written, explore the connection between people
and plants or animals, and also how this connection is facilitated by
modern technology, especially citizen science via the internet. all
interesting themes, and all worth spending some time reading and thinking
about. And all are worthy books for anyone's christmas or holiday gift
list, either for others or for yourselves!

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

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Subject: Skagit and Stilliguamish Deltas 12-14-14
From: buz13 AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 20:39:22 +0000 (UTC)
A number of Harriers, two Bitterns and Bald Eagles and a good number of 
Trumpeter Swans seen.  A large flight of Snow Geese was seen over the south 
end of the Skagit Delta but we were unable to find any on the ground on either 
delta. 

  
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Subject: Arboretum Pine Grosbeak - Yes!
From: Kathy Hartman <kathartman AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 19:58:27 +0000 (UTC)
I was standing/walking around with Todd S., Doug B., and Tina C. (hope I got 
everyone's name right) from about 8:45 to 10:00 - no bird. I walked over to 
the lake for a bit, then ran into Doug and Tina again by the visitor center - 
still no bird. Then I was walking home through the mountain ash area, and the 
grosbeak was there at the top of one of the mountain ashes that she's been seen 
in a lot. So Todd, Doug, and Tina, go back and try again! 

I attached a pic of the tree she was in to my ebird checklist. The tree is at 
the south end of the mountain ash area, and the picture was taken looking 
south. She was in the middle tree. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20927712
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Subject: 12/5 Vashon YB LOON
From: chazz <chazz AT hesselein.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 07:44:22 -0800
The Tramp Harbor YB Loon was easily found in the vicinity of the fishing dock. 
It can be found with binoculars but it was pretty distant. Dickson Rd is closed 
due to construction. I hoofed it to the dock by parking near Quartermaster Rd. 
Didn't really have to walk to the dock, I first found the bird where the road 
was blocked. Ran into two other parties who had seen the bird; it's not shy, 
just distant.  


Chazz Hesselein
Port Orchard, WA


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Subject: Sikes Lake Golden Eagle
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 22:13:39 -0800
> 
> Here is a photo of the Golden Eagle that I saw at Sikes Lake at 2;25 p.m. 
today, Monday 12/15/14. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15413762443/
> 
> Also here is a photo looking straight down at an American Bittern with the 
bittern looking up towards the camera: 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/15413762323/
> 
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> Carnation, WA
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Subject: RE: Ebird & Google maps
From: "Louise Rutter" <louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 21:31:25 -0800
Currently you can't map an observation location either. It seems as if ebird
has grown too popular for the amount of money Cornell pays to use google map
functions.

Louise Rutter
Kirkland

-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Larry
Schwitters
Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 8:56 PM
To: Tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Ebird & Google maps

Am I the only one who can't get the ebird explore data function to display?
I would think not.  Check it out.  It looks like Google wants money.

Larry Schwtters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: Ebird & Google maps
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 20:56:21 -0800
Am I the only one who can't get the ebird explore data function to display? I 
would think not. Check it out. It looks like Google wants money. 


Larry Schwtters
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Subject: Walla Walla CBC results
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 20:47:22 -0800
Hello all,
Thanks to the 40 counters and 6 feeder watchers we had a great count 
this year despite the usual fog which covered even the foothills - just 
giving us tantalizing views of the sun thru the fog.
85 species were found which includes Western Meadowlark - the only count 
week bird so far - -
Three NEW species to our count - this is our 41st count here:
VIRGINIA RAIL - I played Screech Owl before dawn at Big 5 and 3 rails 
started calling very loudly!
GREAT EGRET - along Mill Creek
BARRED OWLS - 1 bird found in the afternoon, TWO birds photographed 
after dark.
High numbers:
WOOD DUCK - 101 - previous high 24
GREAT HORNED OWL - 22, 16
DOWNY WOODPECKER - 46, 44
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE - 258, 252
SPOTTED TOWHEE - 21, 18
Also found:
SNOW GOOSE - 3rd time
SAY'S PHOEBE -  only the 2nd time - last one in 1984 - although last 
year one was seen the day before count week!
BLUE JAY - 6th time on the count
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW - also 6th time
LESSER GOLDFINCH - 2nd time on the count
Common Redpolls - 29 up Mormon Grade
Pine Grosbeaks - 3 "
Only 1 Red Crossbill
White-throated Sparrows - 3
Fox Sparrow - 3
The only Norther Saw-whet Owl found on the count was a roadkill - so sad!
No real misses - coot, gw teal - don't see them every year.
THANKS MUCH to all the participants
Later, M&ML
*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't birded, you haven't lived"
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Subject: Yellow Bill loon Edmonds
From: Claudia Turner <cjmackturner1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 18:27:08 -0800
Late afternoon Dec. 13 we spotted a lone juvenile Yellow Bill Loon just off the 
fishing pier in Edmonds. Sorry it took so long to post this. 


Claudia 
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Subject: Cooper's or Sharp-shinned @ Sikes Lake yesterday ?
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:46:00 -0800
As usual, it was tricky to do ID analysis with limited views and photos. I now 
have looked more closely at the 2 accipiters' legs, necks, tails and head size 
and do think it is possible that the adult bird was a Sharpie, due to a shorter 
neck, tail, a smaller head and the hints of a more squared-off tail - too bad I 
didn't get to see if he had skinny legs. Any thoughts on the ID's of the 2 
birds? See my post "Sikes Lk Afternoon" in today's digest (Mon.) for the photo 
link. 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Pygmy Nuthatches YES Skamania
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:23:15 -0800
hi all ... Gene and I headed out to Drano Lake today to see if we could find 
the Thayers Gull and the Pygmy Nuthatches, as reported yesterday by Stefan 
Schlick ... we found the Pygmies !!! ... or rather, they found us ... as I was 
heading back to the car to warm up, after scoping every blasted gull out there, 
this noisy flock of 5-6 little guys flew right by my head !!! ... they 
leap-frogged from tree to tree along the lake, never letting me get good looks 
... I finally managed to get views of ONE before the flock flew back across the 
road and disappeared up the hill ... yea .. my 100th bird for Skamania County 
!!! 


no luck on the Thayers ... if it was there it was beyond my ability to ID ...

Lyn






Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
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Subject: Sikes Lake Golden Eagle
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 14:55:35 -0800
Today (Monday) at 2:25 p.m. the Golden Eagle flew over Sikes Lake east to west. 
I will upload photos later this evening. Jim Kraft was also present and got 
some nice photos. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom 

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Subject: Pine grosbeak
From: liron ziv <lironziv AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 14:22:07 -0800
Hi all
This is my first post to Tweeters , thank you all for your interesting
posts i enjoyed reading them .

 i shot a short video of the pine grosbeak today at Seattle arboretum at
noon , the bird showed well , what a great bird !

you can watch the video in this link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL6i3iqEHJQ&feature=youtu.be

good birding


Liron Ziv
Seattle ,WA
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Subject: Stanwood
From: juniper.mj AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 13:36:09 -0800
Any snowy owls seen near Stanwood?

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Subject: Pine Grosbeak
From: "Mary Anne Thorbeck" <maryannethorbeck AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 12:21:42 -0800
The female Pine Grosbeak continues this morning in the Washington Park
Arboretum.  Searched the Sorbus area and fence line (next to the golf
course) where there are multiple berry trees.  A cooper's hawk was in the
area and shut down the bird activity near the tree where the grosbeak was
seen previously yesterday and the day before.  Patience paid off and the
grosbeak made an appearance a bit before 10am a bit south of the previously
mentioned feeding area.  Many robins and varied thrush in the area along
with other expected birds at this location. We (Anne Jacobs, Barry Levine
and Hank Elliot) had good long looks in petty good light as the grosbeak was
actively feeding in a sorbus hybridia.  Thanks to Anne for spotting the
bird.  Her report is on eBird.  The bird did vocalize before it was spotted
in the tree but we did not hear any more vocalizations once it was spotted.
We watched her for more than 20 minutes before taking off.

Mary Anne Thorbeck
Seattle

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Subject: Binoculars for sale
From: Susan Myers <myers_susan AT yahoo.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 12:23:23 -0800
Hi all, 

This is my first post to Tweeters, so to start with I’d like to thank you all 
for this wonderful resource and your generosity with posting birding info here. 
It’s a great resource! 


Anyway, my posting now concerns a pair of Swarovski binoculars I am selling. 
Hope nobody minds me posting this here, I was advised that it would be fine to 
do so. Details as follows:  

Swarovski SLC 10x42 WB
recently totally refurbished with new strap, cap and casing, they are like new
price: $900
They are brilliant binoculars and I’m only selling them because I have a 
couple of lighter pairs. That said, even though they are a bit on the heavy 
side, the quality of the optics are second to none.  


If by any chance you are interested, please drop me a line at 
myers_susan AT yahoo.com.au.  


cheers,
Susan

— — — — —
Susan Myers
Senior Leader for WINGS
wingsbirds.com
susanmyersphotography.com
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Subject: Pine Grosbeak
From: wong <chupaflor AT igc.org>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 11:34:02 -0800
We watched the female PINE GROSBEAK yesterday for about 20 minutes. (Thank you 
to Alan Grenon for giving us good directions to the exact location.) 


What a beautiful sight to watch her feeding quietly. I personally didn't hear a 
peep out of her, as she was too busy eating berries. She only switched branches 
a couple of times while we were there. When we left, she was still actively 
feeding. (this was at about 1 pm.) Those berries must've been mighty tasty. 


Lovely bird! I hope she sticks around for others to see.

good birding,
isadora wong
seattle, wa
chupaflor AT igc.org

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Subject: RFI: Cuba
From: Randy Robinson <rwr.personal AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:55:52 -0800
A friend is interested in visiting Cuba. Can any of you recommend tour
companies that offer birding as part of their tours? Are there tour
companies to avoid? I would appreciate any information. You can contact me
directly.

Thanks,

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Subject: Cashmere Acorn Woodpecker
From: Debra Sutherland <shadowfax4jctm AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 08:55:33 -0800
The ACWO is still hanging around the corner of Riverfront and Parkhill as
of this morning, Monday 8:20am.
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Subject: Re: Seattle Mountain Chickadee continues
From: Marc Hoffman <tweeters AT dartfrogmedia.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 08:27:03 -0800
We continue to have regular sightings of our Mountain Chickadee in 
Duvall, several days at a time since October 31st. It seems to enjoy 
the company of Juncos.

Marc Hoffman
Duvall, WA

At 02:34 PM 12/13/2014, pan wrote:

>Hello,
>
>The Mountain Chickadee continues at the north end of Beer Sheva Park in
>Seattle.  Mid-day today, it was with other birds visiting a neighboring
>feeder and the park's trees.
>
>Shortly thereafter, a male and at least four brown Purple Finches were
>eating ash seeds at Martha Washington Park.  (I didn't find a
>solitaire.)  A Common Loon was in Lake Washington north of Seward Park.
>
>13 December, 2014,
>
>Alan Grenon
>Seattle
>--
>   pan
>   panmail AT fastmail.fm
>
>--
>http://www.fastmail.com - Or how I learned to stop worrying and
>                           love email again
>
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Subject: the best bird books of 2014
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:15:47 +0000
hello everyone,

those of you who have read my blog for more than a decade (and my private
emails for longer than that!) know that i've never before compiled a list
of what i consider to be the best bird books of the year. but it seems that
there are very few people out there (and no one in the MSM) who actually
focus on such things as "bird lit".

so i felt it was my duty to fill that gaping hole with my"best bird books
of 2014" list, which is here:

short:

http://gu.com/p/4475z/stw

long:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/dec/15/the-best-bird-books-of-2014 


these books are a nice mix between personal stories with conservation,
pets, falconry, language, evolution, monograph, and of course, the
encyclopedic -- something for everyone.

the only requirements i had are that the book is about birds (duh!) and
that it was published in 2014. if you have additions to make to this list,
i'd be thrilled if you share them on the guardian where everyone can read
about them, and add them to their own holiday gift purchase lists. i am
sure the books' authors would love to read your comments as to why you
chose their book or books as your "best of 2014".

i also am working on a "best of" naturalists' book list, which i will
likely publish tomorrow.

of course, i am interested to read what you think are the best books of
2014 published about natural history -- do email me at
grrlscientist AT gmail.com

many thanks!

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

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Subject: Sikes Lk Afternoon - 12/14/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 00:55:28 -0800
After taking a circuitous route to get to Carnation Farm Rd., friend Anne and I 
immediately pulled over to watch a coyote hunt and take a slow amble in a field 
in the distance - used scope and binoculars to follow it and I managed a fun 
series of photos, despite shooting into the sun at quite the distance - it was 
a healthy-looking doggy. We watched it for some minutes, but after trying to 
pounce on something, without success, the coyote finally became less perky, 
sort of had a 'hang-dog" look and gave up for awhile - we gave up on the coyote 
as well, with the prospect of seeing the Golden Eagle that Mike Hamilton and 
Hank Heiberg had seen and nicely photographed last week, pushing us on down (or 
was it up?) the road. 


Views of ducks, coots, geese, cormorants and herons were next - we identified 
the following: Mallard, American Wigeon, Northern Pintail, Pied-billed Grebe, 
American Coot, Double-crested Cormorant, Canada Goose (may have been Cackling 
Goose there, too, by the sounds some of the hundreds were making), Greater 
White-fronted Goose (a solitary one in the grass next to the lake). A gal and 
her daughter came along and told us they were looking for more swans - they 
pointed out the 2 they had found along the bank of the lake (1 adult, 1 
juvenile). Not too long after that a formation of 8 trumpeted and flew over and 
we saw them the rest of the time we were there. The young girl (maybe in 
middle-school?) was very into birding, which her mother and Anne and I all 
found to be wonderful :-) 

 
A couple of Belted Kingfisher were heard and Anne followed one flying until it 
disappeared. Lots of blackbirds in the fields and crows mobbing hawks over near 
the farms across the Snoqualmie Valley Rd. 


The first raptor we saw was on a utility pole right near where we parked - a 
juvenile Cooper's Hawk - we watched it fly off and be joined by another one - 
the two kibbutzed (?) around a bit and then split up again. The other one was 
likely the adult Cooper's we saw later, also using the same utility-pole 
lookout perch - that one we watched go after something on the ground, but we 
couldn't see if it caught anything or not. We all spent some time trying to ID 
both accipiters, but once I got home and looked in more books, I am sure that 
instead of 1 Sharp-shinned Hawk and one Cooper's, both birds were Cooper's, 
likely 2 males. But I could be wrong... 


Next we saw a Red-tailed Hawk on a short stump - it stayed in that area for 
awhile and then moved closer to us and scouted for prey from a bush near the 
water's edge. 


A Northern Harrier made an appearance a couple of times as we stood on the 
bridge. 


The Golden Eagle remained unsighted for us and some other friends who tried for 
it earlier in the day, but the gray morph Gyrfalcon more than made up for it - 
oh, OK, I'm just pulling your leg on the Gyr, but I sure wonder if one will 
show up in the Monroe area like it did last year and the 2 years before that... 


When we spotted something with a large wingspread glide over the field to the 
south of us, scaring up the ducks, a closer look revealed it to be a 
remote-controlled glider, in Seahawk colors :-) Another "Big Bird" was prepared 
for flight a bit later, but we were busy with the Cooper's Hawkwatch about the 
time it might have been flying - nice that these 2 aerial flyers were so 
silent... 


The afternoon started out almost 'hot' and ended up back to frigid cold by the 
time we packed up to leave. Just before we left, we saw a redtail fly into a 
tree along Snoqualmie Valley Rd and saw another silhouetted in a big tree 
farther up the road as we headed off to Woodinville for a warm-up coffee before 
getting back on 522 heading west. 


A very nice afternoon in the Snoqualmie Valley. Will have to return again to 
try to connect with the Golden Eagle. 


a link to my photos in a Flickr album "Sikes Lk Afternoon" : 
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk3kEMpE 


Barb Deihl
North Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: Re: Drano Lake Pygmy Nuthatches (Skamania Co)
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 07:11:41 GMT
Stefan and Tweeters,This is an excellent find in Skamania County. There is only 
one other record of Pygmy Nuthatches in the county and that was from August 26, 
2007. Wilson Cady 

Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Stefan Schlick 
To: TWEETERS TWEETERS 
Subject: [Tweeters] Drano Lake Pygmy Nuthatches (Skamania Co)
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 22:48:32 -0500


I ended up in Skamania Co mid morning and had a pretty good day, finally 
reaching 125 for the county. My "knittle" (take the sum of the codes listed in 
www.wabirder.com for all your birds and divide it by the #species that you have 
for the county) for Skamania improved significantly with today's finds. :-) 
Franz Lake NWR is a miserable place when the sun is up in winter as access is 
already very difficult. Still, I found about 6 TRUMPETER SWANS mixed in with 
the Tundras. At Drano Lake east of Carson, it was windy and overcast. Halfway 
down the road to the Little White Salmon Fish Hatchery I pulled over to scope 
the ducks that had congregated in the inlet (about 25 Barrow's Goldeneyes) when 
I heard a familiar note uphill. I first heard then saw 3-4 PYGMY NUTHATCHES 
which is likely a highly uncommon bird for the area. Also within the flock was 
a WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. A first-cycle THAYER'S GULL was among the about 15 
Glaucous-winged and Olympic Gulls. 10+ Bald Eagles and several calling American 
Dippers near the fish hatchery rounded out the tally. It was very active. A 
Merlin was at the Spring Hill Fish Hatchery. On the way back on the OR side, I 
briefly checked for the Hood River Black-crowned Night-herons and found 6 birds 
(all adults) at the Nichols Boat Basin. Isn't this well worth a quick detour 
across the bridge, even for the WA state birder? Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR 
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Subject: Blaine, Semihamoo, Birch Bay. Terrell Lake
From: Neil and Carleen Zimmerman <n3zims AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 05:48:19 +0000 (UTC)
Hello Tweeters, 
My wife, Carleen and I led a Seattle field trip to the land of Joe. We started 
out at Blaine Marina. There was very little wind so the viewing was great. We 
had nice looks at Long-tailed Ducks, Common Loons, Goldeneyes, Scoters, Eared 
and Horned Grebes. The marina is always a good place to get close-up looks at 
the water birds. We actually heard one of the Long-tailed Ducks calling. We 
then went over to Semihamoo Spit. We stopped at the parking area on the left 
side and checked out the birds. It was scoter city. There were hundreds of 
scoters, Surf, White-winged and Black, close to shore. Also many more Common 
Loons and Buffleheads on the water. A walk across the road gave us looks at N 
Pintails, A Wigeons and Canada Geese. Three Red-throated Loons swam by and gave 
a comparison with the numerous Common Loons. 

We headed to the end of the spit and enjoyed the flat water which was perfect 
for viewing the water birds. Not many new species but the Long-tailed Ducks are 
always a hit. 

We had lunch at the Semihamoo Marina Cafe. My group was teasing me for a late 
7:00 am starting time and then a official lunch stop at a cafe. I guess I am 
getting old and soft. They weren't really complaining. 

At stop at Terrell Lake gave us a few more species on on list. Most surprising 
to me were the four Mute Swans. 

We decided to end our day looking for owls at the West 90. The weather was not 
our typical December weather. It was sunny and calm. We got to the W 90 about 
3:30. As the sun was setting we watched at least a dozen Short-eared Owls and 
the same number of N Harriers hunting. There were a couple of Rough-legged and 
Red-tailed Hawks also present. We also saw one N Shrike. There were about 150 
Red-winged Blackbirds swirling around to settle in the cattails for the night. 
The cloud of blackbirds, hunting owls and the fog forming made for an amazing 
evening. 


A very good trip. The kind that reminds us why we like to lead trips. 

Neil Zimmerman 
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Subject: Pine Grosbeak was seen at 3:50pm
From: Qinglin Ma <qinglineric AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 20:31:17 -0800
Hi Tweets,

Just an update on the Pine Grosbeak at the Arboretum. I went this afternoon
at 3:30pm. A few of us waited at the Mountain Ash tree that was loaded with
berries. The bird was not there but lots of Varied Thrushes. At about
3:50pm  I heard its chirping and found it about 200ft further down south of
the trail on the top of a tree. A Robin came and chased it away. It took
off towards the Golf Course. Later I heard its chirping from further away
again once but could not find it. I waited at the Mountain Ash tree until
4:30pm but the Bird was not back.

Good luck tomorrow if you go,

Qinglin Ma
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Subject: Drano Lake Pygmy Nuthatches (Skamania Co)
From: Stefan Schlick <greenfant AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 22:48:32 -0500
I ended up in Skamania Co mid morning and had a pretty good day, finally 
reaching 125 for the county. My "knittle" (take the sum of the codes listed in 
www.wabirder.com for all your birds and divide it by the #species that you have 
for the county) for Skamania improved significantly with today's finds. :-) 

Franz Lake NWR is a miserable place when the sun is up in winter as access is 
already very difficult. Still, I found about 6 TRUMPETER SWANS mixed in with 
the Tundras. 

At Drano Lake east of Carson, it was windy and overcast. Halfway down the road 
to the Little White Salmon Fish Hatchery I pulled over to scope the ducks that 
had congregated in the inlet (about 25 Barrow's Goldeneyes) when I heard a 
familiar note uphill. I first heard then saw 3-4 PYGMY NUTHATCHES which is 
likely a highly uncommon bird for the area. Also within the flock was a 
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. A first-cycle THAYER'S GULL was among the about 15 
Glaucous-winged and Olympic Gulls. 10+ Bald Eagles and several calling American 
Dippers near the fish hatchery rounded out the tally. It was very active. 

A Merlin was at the Spring Hill Fish Hatchery.
On the way back on the OR side, I briefly checked for the Hood River 
Black-crowned Night-herons and found 6 birds (all adults) at the Nichols Boat 
Basin. Isn't this well worth a quick detour across the bridge, even for the WA 
state birder? 

Stefan SchlickHillsboro, OR

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Subject: Death In The Playground
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 19:11:56 -0800
Back in Everett for a few days, after being in Port Townsend for most of the 
month (and year). These two Puget Sound sites - which could easily be visible 
to one another, except for a few view-blocking islands - are remarkably 
different. For example; this morning I awoke to the wonderful honking of 
hundreds of Everett's flying "commuter geese", down from the Skagit for a day 
of clipping Snohomish County grass out in the valley. You ain't gonna hear that 
in ol' dryish Port Townsend. 

Around noon I heard a big Crow commotion in the neighborhood park just next 
door. Around here, such a commotion usually means one of the local Bald Eagles, 
but in the park there are no trees, so I really was wondering. Rushing to the 
nearest windows -old rippled-glass windows replete with condensation - I saw a 
watery figure out on the park lawn. At first I thought it might be George. 
George is a name we have applied to our 15year old bantamweight tomcat, whom, 
do to his senile inability to use a catbox anymore, has been relegated to the 
Great Outdoors. Bird rights advocates need not be alarmed, because George, in 
his dotterage couldn't catch his own shadow. Checking on him last night on the 
back-porch, I found him calmly waiting nearby as a Opposum,about three times 
his size, was chowing down on his cat food. That's the way it goes sometimes. 

Anyhoo, grabbing my binocs, and finding a dry window with new glass, I 
discovered the figure was not ol' George, but a big mama Coopers Hawk with a 
freshly nailed Rock Dove. I snuck out the back door, and behind some shrubbery 
for a clearer look. The pigeon wasn't dead yet, the hawk patiently gripping it 
to death in it's talons. It took awhile. This is the part, where you might 
wanna hit the delete button, because the dove wasn't done kicking yet, as the 
hawk started plucking it. Soon the hawk was dipping into red meat, not just 
feathers. This went on for a bit. 

Then, a group of goofy kids ran into the previously empty (except for birds) 
park - headed for the nearby playground equipment. One of them spotted the 
hawk. "Oh no" I thought, having seen a lot of poor hominid playground behavior 
over the years. But no - these kid's knew a hawk. "Hey look, its a hawk!" 
several exclaimed excitedly, and started to walk toward the Cooper's. This is 
when my inner Control Freak flared up, but I quietly remained behind the 
shrubbery, not wanting to be coming off as a binocular- toting neighborhood 
child & bird watching pervert. Plus, what would I do except scare off the hawk 
myself. So I spied from behind the bush. 

What ensued warmed my heart. The kids, while finally getting too close, were 
pretty careful about it- lacking binocs, they just wanted a closer look, just 
like me. The big mama Coopers finally flew - whisking that Rock Dove away with 
amazing ease. All the folks watching - the young, and the 'old guy' unseen in 
the bushes - thought that was pretty exciting. The kid's ran off to tell 
somebody else about it. That's the way the world goes round. 

Jeff Gibsonlurking in Everett Wa

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Subject: Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on December 14, 2014
From: ErikKnight05 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 00:04:51 GMT
This report was mailed for Erik Knight by http://birdnotes.net



Date: December 14, 2014

Location: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington



Wind direction: NE

Prevailing wind speed: < 1 km/h gusting to: 6-11 km/h

Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 20%

Precipitation: none



from 11:02AM to 4:39PM.



Birds seen (in taxonomic order):



Greater White-fronted Goose        10 [1] 

Canada Goose                       50

Cackling Goose                    700 [2] 

Trumpeter Swan                      1 [3] 

Tundra Swan                       600

Gadwall                            25

Eurasian Wigeon                     1 [4] 

American Wigeon                   300

Mallard                           400

Northern Shoveler                 380

Northern Pintail                  650

Green-Winged Teal                 250

Ring-necked Duck                   90

Lesser Scaup                        5

Bufflehead                         60

Hooded Merganser                   10

Ruddy Duck                         45

Pied-billed Grebe                   9

Double-crested Cormorant            2

Great Blue Heron                   14

Great Egret                         6

Bald Eagle                          6 [5] 

Northern Harrier                    4

Red-tailed Hawk                     4

American Coot                     430

Sandhill Crane                     40

Killdeer                            4

Common Snipe                       20

Great Horned Owl                    1 [6] 

Anna's Hummingbird                  1

Belted Kingfisher                   1

Downy Woodpecker                    1

Northern Flicker                    5

Steller's Jay                       1

Western Scrub-Jay                   7

Black-capped Chickadee             12

Bushtit                             4

Red-breasted Nuthatch               1

White-breasted Nuthatch             1

Brown Creeper                       3

Bewick's Wren                       1

Winter Wren                         7

Golden-crowned Kinglet             15

Ruby-crowned Kinglet                2

American Robin                      5

Varied Thrush                       3

European Starling                  50

Spotted Towhee                     10

Fox Sparrow                         1

Song Sparrow                       20

Golden-crowned Sparrow             15

Dark-eyed Junco                     1



Footnotes:



[1]  Carty Unit

[2]  100 Taverner's 

[3]  Carty Unit

[4]  drake, Canvasback Lake

[5]  adults, juvenile, 2nd year, 3rd year

[6]  Carty Unit



Total number of species seen: 52



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Subject: Re: Acorn Woodpecker in Chelan county
From: Lorna Tangren <kloshe AT icloud.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 15:38:39 -0800
Thanks Debbie! Caught up with her right after lunch today. She was perched on 
the very top of the pole across the street from the substation. 


-- Jerry Tangren
East Wenatchee, WA


On Dec 14, 2014, at 9:36 AM, Debra Sutherland  wrote:

> Hi Tweets!
> 
> The female ACWO is still in the area of the powerstation on the corner of 
Parkhill and Riverfront streets in Cashmere as of 9am this morning. It looks 
like she is storing acorns in the tops of the power poles around there. .This 
power station is also right near the Wenatchee river and close to the STP. 

> 
> Debbie Sutherland
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Bird description - just had to share ...
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 15:22:21 -0800
hi all ... just have to share this bird description sent to me by a non-birder 
friend who put up her first feeder .. it's spot-on descriptive ... 


"... the striped headed skunk like woodpecker wearing a red beanie ..."

PERFECT !!!
enjoy,
Lyn





Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa,
NorthwestJourney.com
NorthwestBirding.com
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Subject: Pine Grosbeak continues at the arboretum
From: Kathy Hartman <kathartman AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 21:36:40 +0000 (UTC)
The female Pine Grosbeak was very active this morning, flying around in the 
mountain ashes and eating loads of berries. She was still there when I left at 
about 12:30.  

I often located her by the call, which you can hear on the Cornell Lab Macauley 
library website, recording #6 (the first 45 seconds should do it). If this link 
doesn't work, just go to macaulaylibrary.org and search for Pine Grosbeak. 


http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?&asset_format_id=1000&collection_type_id=1&layout=1&taxon=Pine%20Grosbeak&taxon_id=12014659&taxon_rank_id=67&sort=21 



There were also TONS of Varied Thrushes, and a few Hermit Thrushes thrown in 
for good measure.  

And, it was fun to meet all the people who were standing out in the cold with 
me. My feet are finally warming up. 


Kathy
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Subject: Yellow-billed Loon continuing Sunday
From: William Ehmann <wjehmann AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 13:08:57 -0800
Seen through scope at 1 pm from Fisherman's Pier, east side of Vashon Isl. as 
others described yesterday. Scanned from 12 o'clock to 2 o'clock position from 
end of pier, fairly far out. Large bird. Consistently up-turned yellow bill, 
light brown lower neck band. With grebes nearby. Seen with Audubon trip member 
who saw it yesterday. 


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Subject: eBird Report - St. Edward's SP, Dec 13, 2014
From: Andrew McCormick <andy_mcc AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 11:51:57 -0800


Hello Tweets, 
 
On Saturday four birders, Nancy Hubley, Linda Phillips, Carol Ray and Andy 
McCormick conducted the monthly Eastside Audubon survey of St. Edward's State 
Park in Kenmore, WA. This list is my personal checklist. Other members of the 
group also saw HERMIT THRUSH, BALD EAGLE, and ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD which are 
included on the Eastside Audubon account checklist. It was a fine morning with 
considerable bird activity. The full report follows. 

> Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 14:38:35 -0500
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> To: andy_mcc AT hotmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - St. Edward's SP, Dec 13, 2014
> 
> St. Edward's SP, King, US-WA
> Dec 13, 2014 7:30 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.5 mile(s)
> Comments: This checklist is for the Feb 2014 to Jan 2015 monthly survey of St 
Edward State Park in Kenmore, WA, on behalf of Eastside Audubon Society. The 
morning was sunny, 43-48F mostly calm winds throughout. The birds census was 
conducted by Andy, Carol, Linda and Nancy. Other critters: 4 Doug Squirrels and 
3 Eastern Gray and 2 Muskrats at the edge of Lake Washington. The route we 
followed began at the North Parking Lot east to the trail by the storage sheds 
to about 50 yards past the intersection of the Entrance and Arrowhead Trails. 
Then south along the park road past the seminary building then east along the 
Water Tower trail for about 150 yards returning to the orchard area. Then along 
the right fork of the Orchard Loop and west along the South Canyon Trail to the 
lakeshore. Then north along the Beach Trail and up the North Trail returning to 
the North Parking Lot. 

> 36 species (+2 other taxa)
> 
> Gadwall  5
> Mallard  9
> Ring-necked Duck  1
> Bufflehead  35
> Common Goldeneye  15
> Common Merganser  16
> Horned Grebe  1
> Red-necked Grebe  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  1
> Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
> American Coot  60
> Glaucous-winged Gull  1
> gull sp.  1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Hairy Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  2
> Pileated Woodpecker  2
> woodpecker sp.  1     Heard drumming at a distance.
> American Crow  64
> Common Raven  2
> Black-capped Chickadee  38
> Chestnut-backed Chickadee  12
> Bushtit  14
> Red-breasted Nuthatch  8
> Brown Creeper  6
> Pacific Wren  19
> Bewick's Wren  3
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  23
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  6
> American Robin  15
> Varied Thrush  3
> Spotted Towhee  3
> Song Sparrow  6
> Dark-eyed Junco  18
> Red Crossbill  15
> Pine Siskin  100
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20881513 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) Andy 
McCormickBellevue, WA 

 
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Subject: Acorn Woodpecker in Chelan county
From: Debra Sutherland <shadowfax4jctm AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 09:36:13 -0800
Hi Tweets!

The female ACWO is still  in the area of the powerstation on the corner of
Parkhill and Riverfront streets in Cashmere as of 9am this morning.  It
looks like she is storing acorns in the tops of the power poles around
there. .This power station is also right near the Wenatchee river and close
to the STP.

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Subject: Vashon Yellow-billed Loon, Long-tailed Duck, and White-breasted Nuthatch continue
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 08:46:49 -0800
Yesterday multiple people re-found the Yellow-billed Loon in Tramp Harbor,
including Islanders Gary Shugart, and Harsi and Ezra Parker, leading a
Vashon Audubon field trip.  It tends to be to the SE toward Maury Island
(the land mass nearby connected to Vashon a quarter mile to the south of the
fishing pier at Tramp Harbor).

 

They also re-found two Long-tailed Duck.  Matt Bartells had told me about
the Long-tailed Duck when he came for the loon last weekend.  Gary had this
to say about the Long-tailed Duck:  "On age and sex, LTDU2 with the solid
color bill is an adult female, but unknown what a imm (6 mo old) fem looks
like at this stage.  LTDU1, with the bicolored bill could be an imm male,
but both have distinct breast and white neck which is more femaleish."

 

Rich Siegrist reported that the White-breasted Nuthatch continues to visit
his feeder but unpredictably and not apparently associating with other
birds.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: birders who kayak: looking for birders January 1st (CBC)
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 08:13:27 -0800


Tweeters:
 
The Everett-Marysville CBC seeks an experienced birder or two to bird Steamboat 
and Ebey sloughs with experienced kayakers. The general route is launching 
close to Marysville and heading southward all the way to the north end of Ebey 
Island. This area is surprisingly remote and interesting, and there is an 
uninhabited island just north of Ebey, Otter Island, that is entirely forested 
with stunted Sitka Spruce. A passageway through the middle sometimes allows 
inner access. The kayakers are very experienced (the North Sound Sea Kayakers 
Association) and have all the equipment, yet need an experienced birder or two 
to make the trip a success. Last year's effort was highly successful and the 
teams had a blast. There were two teams, including 12 kayakers, that found 54 
species. The area holds the possibility of detecting some of the less-common 
herons, raptors and ducks, so please contact me if this is of interest. Scott 
AtkinsonLake Stevensmail to: scottratkinson AT hotmail.com 


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