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Updated on Wednesday, October 1 at 12:47 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Firespot,©Tony Disley

30 Sep Discovery Park Beaches a gentle reminder [Penny Rose ]
30 Sep Battle Ground Hawk and Vulture Watch [Jim Danzenbaker ]
1 Oct Strangely flocky afternoon: Evening Grosbeaks and TV's in West Seattle ["Tucker, Trileigh" ]
30 Sep White-faced Ibis at Ridgefield River S [Tammy & Tammy ]
30 Sep Northern Pygmy-Owl, 177 Pine Siskin along Beausite Road (West Valley Jefferson Co.) [John Gatchet ]
30 Sep Disco Park Palm Warbler: no [Josh Hayes ]
30 Sep RFI Bar Tailed Godwit [Blair Bernson ]
30 Sep Correction .... not Buffleheads on Lake Joy [Hank ]
30 Sep Bufflehead on Lake Joy [Hank ]
30 Sep Great Horned Owl at Lake Joy [Hank ]
29 Sep Anyone have any info on Sharp-tail Sand at Midway Rd? ["barry " ]
29 Sep Varied Thrush call in Vancouver 9/28 ["Paul Hicks" ]
29 Sep Shorebird Question []
29 Sep RE: Discovery Park- Palm Warbler [Steve Compton scompton1251 ]
29 Sep Discovery Park- Palm Warbler [Joshua Glant ]
29 Sep Re: Simple Camera Question []
29 Sep Re: Shorebird question [Bill Anderson ]
29 Sep Re: Simple Camera Question [Bill Anderson ]
29 Sep no digest yesterday or today ? [Barbara Deihl ]
29 Sep re: Varied Thrush call [Dianna Moore ]
29 Sep Ridgefield White-faced Ibis [AnnMarie Wood ]
29 Sep Re: Simple Camera Question [Marc Hoffman ]
29 Sep Varied Thrush calls - 9/28 and 9/29 [Barbara Deihl ]
29 Sep Bonaparte's Gulls near Hat Island (A.K.A. Gedney Island) East of Whidbey Island [keith ]
29 Sep Re: Simple Camera Question [Mary Austin-Keller ]
29 Sep Broad winged hawk yesterday [Noah Sanday ]
29 Sep Simple Camera Question [Jeff Gibson ]
09 201 Auto Response [Tom Reichner ]
29 Sep Merlin revisiting nesting site: Echo Lake [Clare McLean ]
29 Sep Re: Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many... [Todd Sahl ]
29 Sep No marbled godwits at L River Red Pool, Clark Co this morning [Bob ]
29 Sep No marbled godwits at L River Red Pool, Clark Co this morning [Bob ]
29 Sep Off topic, dragonfly splash bathing. [stan Kostka lynn Schmidt ]
29 Sep Forting Around the Sound [Jeff Gibson ]
28 Sep Shorebird question [Joshua Glant ]
29 Sep Greater White-fronted Geese, Pine Grosbeaks at Dewey Lake, Yakima County [Gary Wiles ]
29 Sep Greater White-fronted Geese, Pine Grosbeaks at Dewey Lake, Yakima County [Gary Wiles ]
29 Sep Western Scrub Jay in Maple Leaf ["helen.gilbert AT juno.com" ]
28 Sep Central Skagit birds today [Scott ]
28 Sep Central Skagit birds today [Scott ]
28 Sep Central Skagit birds today [Scott ]
29 Sep Skamania Northern Goshawk. ["Wilson Cady" ]
28 Sep American Redstart Yard Bird! [Joshua Glant ]
28 Sep Mike the Marmot [Jeff Gibson ]
28 Sep Foster Island, King [Nigel Ball ]
28 Sep Vaux Swift Events & Lurking Merlins [Barbara Deihl ]
28 Sep Whidbey Island field trip [Neil and Carleen Zimmerman ]
28 Sep Re: Western Scrub-Jays [wong ]
28 Sep Re: [Tweeters] Merlins visiting their nesting territories [ck park ]
28 Sep Re: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14 ["Tucker, Trileigh" ]
28 Sep RE: [Tweeters] Merlins visiting their nesting territories ["Diane Bates" ]
28 Sep Possible "Semidi Island" cackling goose at Ridgefield NWR this morning. [Bob ]
28 Sep Possible "Semidi Island" cackling goose at Ridgefield NWR this morning. [Bob ]
28 Sep Re: Ridgefield Ibis ["Randy Hill" ]
28 Sep Re: Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many... [Marie Dymkoski ]
28 Sep Shorebird Defensive Maneuvers at Eide Road [Blair Bernson ]
28 Sep Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many... [Tom Mansfield ]
28 Sep Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many... [Tom Mansfield ]
28 Sep Re: Merlins visiting their nesting territories []
28 Sep Gr. White-fronted Geese eastern Pierce County [Marcus Roening ]
27 Sep Merlins visiting their nesting territories [Barbara Deihl ]
27 Sep Skagit Harris's Sparrow, Golden Eagle [Gary Bletsch ]
27 Sep Re: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14, known nesting near Seattle and range expansion [Barbara Deihl ]
27 Sep Re: Interesting National Geo article [Roger ]
27 Sep Varied Thrush [Steve Pink ]
27 Sep Marbled godwits still at L. River Rd Pool [Bob ]
27 Sep Marbled godwits still at L. River Rd Pool [Bob ]
27 Sep Interesting National Geo article [wong ]
27 Sep scrub-jays in Seattle [pan ]
27 Sep Vashon Sandhill Cranes and Vashon and Blake Island Greater White-fronted Geese ["Ed Swan" ]
27 Sep Merlin sounds... [Caryn Schutzler ]
27 Sep A metalic Tup! [Stewart Wechsler ]
27 Sep Common Loons on Case Inlet [Patty Kennedy ]
27 Sep RE: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14 [Jill Freidberg ]
27 Sep W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
27 Sep Re: Greater White-fronted Geese [Bill Anderson ]

Subject: Discovery Park Beaches a gentle reminder
From: Penny Rose <rosebirding AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:14:43 -0700
A gentle reminder to everyone regarding access to West Point and the beaches of 
Discovery Park. Vehicle access is only allowed with a permit available from the 
Discovery Park Visitor Center. These free, 3 hour permits are available for 
seniors 62 and older, families with children 8 and under, and physical 
handicapped persons with a valid Washington State decal. All others must walk. 
The walking access is quickest and closest from the South Parking Lot off of 
Emerson. 


Penny Rose
Ballard

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Subject: Battle Ground Hawk and Vulture Watch
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:32:38 -0700
Hi tweeters,

After being away from the house for ten days (5 pelagic trips in Oregon and
California), it was good to return to normal and do some Battle Ground,
Clark County "yard" birding.  This time I had my eyes pointed upwards for a
rewarding several hours (noon - 2pm) of hawk and vulture watching as
follows:

Turkey Vulture: 59 (largest kettle was 14)
Red-tailed Hawk: 4 (with the locals also flying which made counting
migrants quite difficult)
Sharp-shinned Hawk: 1
Osprey: 1
Bald Eagle: 1 (adult)
Northern Harrier: 1

Another surprise today was an immature male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD.  Seemed
rather late and it had a difficult time accessing the two hummer feeders
since the local Anna's Hummingbirds have staked claim to both and weren't
in the mood to be ousted.

A single Black-throated Gray Warbler was nice and several Swainson's
Thrushes were busily feeding on the few remaining berries.  A distant flock
of 18 Band-tailed Pigeons was nice as I don't see many of them here.  A few
Vaux's Swifts, Pine Siskins, Evening Grosbeaks, and Purple Finches rounded
out the show.  American Robins and Yellow-rumped Warblers were flowing
overhead nicely although "common" replaced an exact count.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Strangely flocky afternoon: Evening Grosbeaks and TV's in West Seattle
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI AT seattleu.edu>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 02:26:59 +0000
Hi Tweets,

For some reason, this has been quite the day for unusual-to-me yard (and 
sighted-from-yard) birds. Im living in my new home of a couple of months, so I 
wasnt too surprised but still happy to see that the first Downy Woodpecker has 
discovered my suet feeder and visited several times today. 


But the bigger surprise came from a lovely flock of 4-5 Evening Grosbeaks, who 
descended on my birdbaths to drink and bathe. Heres a beautiful 
male, and a pair of 
females 
swallowing 
in tandem. There was also a scruffy juvenile  photos of him and a few others 
are here. Ive never 
seen even one in Seattle before, although a quick check of eBird shows that 
theyve been spotted by numerous observers in Discovery Park this month, and a 
few were spotted in West Seattle in 2010. So that was pretty exciting. I 
realized Id been hearing them at night and occasionally during the day, but 
hadnt known what they were. 


About an hour later I went up on the deck and heard strange gull calls, looked 
toward the Sound and was startled to see a wheeling kettle of Turkey Vultures. 
I did a quick estimate of about 25 birds. Again, I think I may have seen just 
1-2 in Seattle over many years. For what its worth, eBird gives only 3 reports 
of TVs from West Seattle in the past ten years, one of which, with 125 birds, 
was on this exact date (9/30) in 2006. Interesting! 


May your days be full of unexpected ornithological pleasures and treasures,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Lincoln Park, West Seattle
Natural history website: naturalpresencearts.com
Photography: flickr.com/photos/trileigh

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Subject: White-faced Ibis at Ridgefield River S
From: Tammy & Tammy <bjorkmante AT iinet.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:41:59 -0700
Eric and I are looking at the White-faced Ibis actively feeding at the same 
spot previously reported. 

Tammy Bjorkman
Vancouver, WA

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Subject: Northern Pygmy-Owl, 177 Pine Siskin along Beausite Road (West Valley Jefferson Co.)
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:32:56 -0700
This morning I was birding along Beausite Rd. just off West Valley Road and
south of Chimacum.  I was standing at the edge of the road and 15 feet away
from me I heard this thrashing about in the Salal.  I looked and a bird
came blasting out and straight into the air and then flew downslope and
landed in a Western Red Cedar.  It was a NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL.  As it sat I
was able to observe a DARK-EYED JUNCO in it's talons.  I heard GREATER
WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE from this location.

I was able to count with some accuracy 177 PINE SISKIN as they moved
crossing the road from alders to a group cedars.  My estimate was lower and
so I felt fortunate to be able to count them as the moved in small groups.
This is the largest grouping I have seen in more than a year.

At Anderson Lake State Park I saw 6 GOLDEN-CROWNED, 13 WHITE-CROWNED,
2 LINCOLN'S, 1 SAVANNA and many SONG SPARROWS.  An OSPREY was present and 3
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS were vocal and easily seen.  I had great looks at
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, PILEATED WOODPECKER and VARIED THRUSH in flight.

John F. Gatchet
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Subject: Disco Park Palm Warbler: no
From: Josh Hayes <coralliophila AT live.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:42:12 +0000
I went down today and tramped around for a few hours, but no joy in the 
vicinity of the lighthouse or the trees nearby. 

 
I did see a couple of what looked like young-of-year yellow-rumps, but 
absolutely no tail-pumping, so I'm sure they weren't the culprits. Fair number 
of varied thrushes in the woods around Daybreak Star, zillions of chickadees of 
both sorts with a few other small passerines mixed in (some kinglets, some 
yellow-rumps, some nuthatches), and the usual swarms of song sparrows. It was a 
lovely day -- oh, and a single dunlin on the west beach (not the south one), 
but there was a woman out there letting her dogs run up and down the beach, so 
after she left more birds might show up. 

 
Cheers,
 
Josh in North Seattle 
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Subject: RFI Bar Tailed Godwit
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:25:34 -0700
Any recent information - "yes still there" or 
"nope could not find it" on the Bar Tailed Godwit 
that was seen at the Tokeland Marina this weekend...

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmo

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Subject: Correction .... not Buffleheads on Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:40:31 -0700
Hooded Mergansers, not Buffleheads....distance, fog and not listening to Karen 
lead to the error. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom



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Subject: Bufflehead on Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:48:36 -0700
There are seven Bufflehead on Lake Joy, which according to eBird is a rarity 
for this time of year. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom

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Subject: Great Horned Owl at Lake Joy
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:49:50 -0700
This morning at 6:05 Karen and I heard a Great Horned Owl very near our 
property. 


Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, WA
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom

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Subject: Anyone have any info on Sharp-tail Sand at Midway Rd?
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:57:09 -0700
Tweeters,
There's been a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper reported by Ann Mitchell on
Birder's Dashboard at Midway. Ann or anyone else can you fill us in as
to where the exact location is?
All the best
-- 
  barry 
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

-- 
http://www.fastmail.fm - The professional email service

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Subject: Varied Thrush call in Vancouver 9/28
From: "Paul Hicks" <phicks AT accessgrace.org>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 20:24:23 -0400

Tweets, I heard what must have been a Varied Thrush calling in half-voice 
on Sunday, Sept 28, in Vancouver at Heathman Lodge. I discounted it until I 
read the other reports. Took in some of the good birding in Vancouver 
lowlands area and Ridgefield. Highlights other than those already reported: 
likely Willow Flycatcher near end of EOR Memorial Hwy; 6+ White-br Nuthatch 
at Vancouver Lake and 2 at marker #9.5 at Ridgefield. Good birding!
-- Paul Hicks / Tenino / phicks AT accessgrace DOT org 

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Subject: Shorebird Question
From: rbrit AT u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 16:25:18 -0700 (PDT)
Escaped to east side of Decatur Island this weekend. Sunday morning, eightish, 
our attention was drawn to the slapping of bird feet on Rosario Straight at the 
foot of the bluff for five, maybe ten, minutes. We where only able to catch a 
glimpse (naked-eye)thorough the filter of the fog of a flock of what had to be 
conservatively a thousand or more black, maybe chicken sized, birds taking 
flight in groups of 25-50 and heading north. Not only the duration of the 
sound, but the size of the flock was astounding! 

 Any ideas as to how to narrow down what they might have been?  

Rob Britschgi
Ballard

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Subject: RE: Discovery Park- Palm Warbler
From: Steve Compton scompton1251 <scompton1251 AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:57:46 -0400
Palms very common here. Saw abouy 50 on the coast of SC last weekend. I like 
your description for a Palm. Some of them here very dull now. 


Steve Compton
Greenville, SC


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Joshua Glant  
Date: 09/29/2014  6:17 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park- Palm Warbler 
 
Hello Tweeters,

I was birding today at Discovery Park, looking for Western Sandpipers. I did  
it see any shorebirds; however, I saw something much more exciting. 


We were walking out at West Point, and I saw my FOF Mew Gulls, Red-breasted 
Mergansers and Golden-crowned Sparrows (On the beach, over the water, and in 
the rocks and brush around the lighthouse, respectively), and White-crowned and 
Savannah Sparrows. 


When we reached the row of tall trees out at the point, I remarked to my 
father, "You know, this is the kind of place where rare birds show up. Out on a 
point, and isolated trees. They would show up right in here." With this thought 
in mind, I started to look in the leaves. 


In a small pine tree next to the house, a flicker was sheltered from the wind 
and rain. It flew away, and we walked out past the pine. 


A few minutes later, at 2:20 PM I walked back toward the pine, looking for a 
sparrow. I saw the sparrow pop up in the rocks, and then a small bird appeared 
in the pine. I examined the small bird. Warbler-sized, brownish... Pumping 
tail!?!? This bird was a Palm Warbler. 


My heart started to pound. I had seen the wintering Palm Warbler at the UW 
dormitories last winter, and I knew how rare it was in the Seattle area. I 
fumbled for my camera. 


Right as I started to record, I heard a sharp 'chip!' Call note that matched 
the Palm Warbler's call as I had heard it after countless times looking it up 
on Xeno-Canto, dreaming of the day I would find one. I saw the bird clearly 
then, and saw the paler throat that I knew was a feature of a Palm Warbler. 


After that, I lost it, and I think it flew over into the stand of wind-beaten 
willows northeast of the lighthouse. When I went over there, I found a Myrtle 
Yellow-rumped Warbler and a sparrow. 


Field marks I observed: Warbler-sized shape, brownish-buff color overall, pale 
throat patch, constantly pumping tail. I did not see the yellow undertail; the 
bird was in the shade. I heard a 'chip!' note that did not have the buzzy, 
nasal sound of the Myrtle Warbler. The bird's posture as it moved along the 
branch was more horizontal than vertical, rather than the more vertical stance 
of the nearby Myrtle as it called and moved through the willow stand. 


Here are the directions: Drive
out to the lighthouse, park next to the beach, and walk into the fenced area. 
The entrance is at the base of the tall tree row, at the SE corner. The bird 
was originally seen in the small pine next to the north face of the lighthouse 
keeper's house. 


Thanks, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

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Subject: Discovery Park- Palm Warbler
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:17:50 -0700
Hello Tweeters,

I was birding today at Discovery Park, looking for Western Sandpipers. I did it 
see any shorebirds; however, I saw something much more exciting. 


We were walking out at West Point, and I saw my FOF Mew Gulls, Red-breasted 
Mergansers and Golden-crowned Sparrows (On the beach, over the water, and in 
the rocks and brush around the lighthouse, respectively), and White-crowned and 
Savannah Sparrows. 


When we reached the row of tall trees out at the point, I remarked to my 
father, "You know, this is the kind of place where rare birds show up. Out on a 
point, and isolated trees. They would show up right in here." With this thought 
in mind, I started to look in the leaves. 


In a small pine tree next to the house, a flicker was sheltered from the wind 
and rain. It flew away, and we walked out past the pine. 


A few minutes later, at 2:20 PM I walked back toward the pine, looking for a 
sparrow. I saw the sparrow pop up in the rocks, and then a small bird appeared 
in the pine. I examined the small bird. Warbler-sized, brownish... Pumping 
tail!?!? This bird was a Palm Warbler. 


My heart started to pound. I had seen the wintering Palm Warbler at the UW 
dormitories last winter, and I knew how rare it was in the Seattle area. I 
fumbled for my camera. 


Right as I started to record, I heard a sharp 'chip!' Call note that matched 
the Palm Warbler's call as I had heard it after countless times looking it up 
on Xeno-Canto, dreaming of the day I would find one. I saw the bird clearly 
then, and saw the paler throat that I knew was a feature of a Palm Warbler. 


After that, I lost it, and I think it flew over into the stand of wind-beaten 
willows northeast of the lighthouse. When I went over there, I found a Myrtle 
Yellow-rumped Warbler and a sparrow. 


Field marks I observed: Warbler-sized shape, brownish-buff color overall, pale 
throat patch, constantly pumping tail. I did not see the yellow undertail; the 
bird was in the shade. I heard a 'chip!' note that did not have the buzzy, 
nasal sound of the Myrtle Warbler. The bird's posture as it moved along the 
branch was more horizontal than vertical, rather than the more vertical stance 
of the nearby Myrtle as it called and moved through the willow stand. 


Here are the directions: Drive
out to the lighthouse, park next to the beach, and walk into the fenced area. 
The entrance is at the base of the tall tree row, at the SE corner. The bird 
was originally seen in the small pine next to the north face of the lighthouse 
keeper's house. 


Thanks, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

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Subject: Re: Simple Camera Question
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 17:46:57 -0400 (EDT)
Bill,

I have used a Canon Rebel in the field for several years. I get pretty 
good results, once shot a photo of a whale from the rolling deck of a 
boat with one hand with the other hand on the rail as I rushed up the 
deck. I just posted several albums on my facebook site-I invite anyone 
to check there for results. I DO find that warblers in the trees, for 
example, reuire a shift from auto to manual focus, amking it harder. 
Most mid-range shots are easy.

Steve Compton
Greenville, SC

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 5:10 PM, Bill Anderson wrote:

  The principles of shutter speed, aperature opening, and sensitivity of 
the camera  to light (ISO) apply across the board  to both film and 
digital single lens reflex cameras.


If you are not going to take videos, I suggest a Canon Rebel T3i. The 
buttons to control shutter speed, aperature opening, and ISO are easy to 
use and don't require multiple steps through an onscreen menu like some 
of the point & shoots do.


Bill Ander son; Edmonds, WA. USA


On Monday, September 29, 2014 1:19 PM, Marc Hoffman 
 wrote:


Hi Jeff,

Virtually all DSLRs have the setting you need. Depth of field is 
controlled by aperture size: the smaller the aperture, the greater the 
depth of field (note that the aperture size is inverse to the setting: 
f/22 is tiny; f/1.2 is a very large opening). Of course, you also get 
less light admitted with a tiny aperture, so there are very few cases 
where you'd want maximum depth of field, since the camera would have to 
compensate with a very slow shutter speed (more prone to subject- or 
hand-motion blur) and/or very high film/sensitivity speed (which 
increases the graininess of the image). On a DSLR, you would set your 
aperture and set the mode to Aperture Priority and you're there, though 
you might want to monkey around with the film speed/sensitivity (the 
ISO).

That said, it's not all that complicated to shoot in some other mode. 
Shutter Priority (sometimes designated as TV) lets you set the shutter 
speed and will compensate by changing the aperture and/or "film" speed. 
Shooting full manual you need only understand how shutter speed, 
aperture, and film speed (sensor senitivity) affect the amount of light, 
and how aperture affects depth of field. Unless you were shooting film 
in full automatic mode, the DSLR's are no more complicated than that. 
And if that's too complicated, you probably don't want a DSLR and would 
be happier with a mid- to high-end point-and-shoot, which will have many 
of the same modes as a DSLR.

I've been shooting in full manual mode for years now. I never memorized 
any formulas other than understading, for instance, that an aperture one 
stop smaller lets in half the light, as does a film speed that's twice 
as fast, as does a shutter speed that's twice as fast. Mostly I just 
know where to set things based on experience, and shooting digital lets 
you take all the shots you want without spending money on film and 
developing.

Good luck,

Marc Hoffman
  
  

www.songbirdphoto.com  At 12:09 PM 
9/29/2014, Jeff Gibson wrote:
  
I've had such good luck with the occasional query to tweeters I thought 
I'd try it again.

Oh sure, I know I've been a wee bit snarky, in some of my posts, about 
digital technology at times, but I do have a simple camera question that 
maybe one of you nature photographers out there may have a simple answer 
for.

You see, I used to do a lot of nature photography - back when cameras 
had film - and I really haven't made much of a transition to digital 
yet. Using my simple manual Nikon FM, I got real professional -like 
results. What I usually did was use my camera for landscapes, close-ups 
of nature , etc. I put my little camera on a tripod and went for max 
depth of field.

And that's all I wanna do now. No bird photos for me - unless they're 
dead, or dumb as a Ptarmigan, and thus allowing  easy artistic 
close-ups. For some reason bird photography - the process - has always 
left me cold. But that's OK because many of you tweeters already do a 
good job of it. I'll just look at your photos.

Anyway, I'm wondering if there are now simple, and I mean simple, 
digital cameras that allow easy manual operation just like my ol' Nikon. 
An SLR that I can use like I used to - without having to have some sort 
of digital argument with the damn thing, go thru 5 overrides, or 
whatever, just to get a simple in-depth photo. Is that too much to ask?

As a family camera we have a point and shoot Canon Powershot SD850 IS 
which is capable of some pretty good photos - I've taken some remarkably 
good insect photo's with the thing - but it doesn't have any depth of 
field control really. As near as I can tell.

Anyway, if anybody out there has a simple digital SLR out there to 
recommend, I'd love to hear about it!

Jeff Gibson
digitally challenged person
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 
 


_______________________________________________
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http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 

  


------------------------------

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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
 
  

http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 
   
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Subject: Re: Shorebird question
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:20:34 -0700
Sandpipers, including westerns, are visitors to the Edmonds marsh. 
Unfortunately, I have not seen any recently, so maybe the migration has passed 
through. The marsh is on the south side of the Harbor Square complex, located 
across Dayton St. from the Amtrak/Sounder station if you must use public 
transportation. 


EDMONDS MARSH
 

  
             
EDMONDS MARSH
One of Washington’s most picturesque waterfront communities, The City of 
Edmonds offers visitors a seaside ambiance and residents an appealing, 
small-... 

View on www.edmondswa.gov Preview by Yahoo  
  
 
You can see my photos of sandpipers and other birds at the marsh by scrolling 
through this thread. 



Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014

  
          
Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014
At 62 pages, the original Edmonds wildlife thread was getting a bit cumbersome, 
so I am starting a new one for 2014. This will also help me in the year ahead 
recall when I saw a particular bird the previous year. We birders/bird 
photographers often do that. Wesley a... 

View on www.pnwphotos.com Preview by Yahoo  
  
 
 
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
On Sunday, September 28, 2014 9:38 PM, Joshua Glant  
wrote: 

 


Hello Tweeters,

Now that I have reported the American Redstart, I have a birding question: 
Where in the Seattle area can I see migrating shorebirds most reliably? 


My main target bird is the Western Sandpiper, which would be a lifer. I can't 
go to Eide Road, Jetty Island or Ocean Shores, unfortunately. 


Is there a spot within half an hour of downtown where I could see Western 
Sandpipers and other migrating shorebirds? 

​
Thanks, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: Simple Camera Question
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:10:45 -0700
The principles of shutter speed, aperature opening, and sensitivity of the 
camera to light (ISO) apply across the board to both film and digital single 
lens reflex cameras. 



If you are not going to take videos, I suggest a Canon Rebel T3i. The buttons 
to control shutter speed, aperature opening, and ISO are easy to use and don't 
require multiple steps through an onscreen menu like some of the point & shoots 
do. 



Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA


On Monday, September 29, 2014 1:19 PM, Marc Hoffman 
 wrote: 

 


Hi Jeff,

Virtually all DSLRs have the setting you need. Depth of field is
controlled by aperture size: the smaller the aperture, the greater the
depth of field (note that the aperture size is inverse to the setting:
f/22 is tiny; f/1.2 is a very large opening). Of course, you also get
less light admitted with a tiny aperture, so there are very few cases
where you'd want maximum depth of field, since the camera would have to
compensate with a very slow shutter speed (more prone to subject- or
hand-motion blur) and/or very high film/sensitivity speed (which
increases the graininess of the image). On a DSLR, you would set your
aperture and set the mode to Aperture Priority and you're there, though
you might want to monkey around with the film speed/sensitivity (the
ISO).

That said, it's not all that complicated to shoot in some other mode.
Shutter Priority (sometimes designated as TV) lets you set the shutter
speed and will compensate by changing the aperture and/or
"film" speed. Shooting full manual you need only understand how
shutter speed, aperture, and film speed (sensor senitivity) affect the
amount of light, and how aperture affects depth of field. Unless you were
shooting film in full automatic mode, the DSLR's are no more complicated
than that. And if that's too complicated, you probably don't want a DSLR
and would be happier with a mid- to high-end point-and-shoot, which will
have many of the same modes as a DSLR.

I've been shooting in full manual mode for years now. I never memorized
any formulas other than understading, for instance, that an aperture one
stop smaller lets in half the light, as does a film speed that's twice as
fast, as does a shutter speed that's twice as fast. Mostly I just know
where to set things based on experience, and shooting digital lets you
take all the shots you want without spending money on film and
developing.

Good luck,

Marc Hoffman
www.songbirdphoto.com


At 12:09 PM 9/29/2014, Jeff Gibson wrote:

I've had such good luck with the
occasional query to tweeters I thought I'd try it again.
>
>Oh sure, I know I've been a wee bit snarky, in some of my posts, about
digital technology at times, but I do have a simple camera question that
maybe one of you nature photographers out there may have a simple answer
for.
>
>You see, I used to do a lot of nature photography - back when cameras had
film - and I really haven't made much of a transition to digital yet.
Using my simple manual Nikon FM, I got real professional -like results.
What I usually did was use my camera for landscapes, close-ups of nature
, etc. I put my little camera on a tripod and went for max depth of
field.
>
>And that's all I wanna do now. No bird photos for me - unless they're
dead, or dumb as a Ptarmigan, and thus allowing  easy artistic
close-ups. For some reason bird photography - the process - has always
left me cold. But that's OK because many of you tweeters already do a
good job of it. I'll just look at your photos.
>
>Anyway, I'm wondering if there are now simple, and I mean simple, digital
cameras that allow easy manual operation just like my ol' Nikon. An SLR
that I can use like I used to - without having to have some sort of
digital argument with the damn thing, go thru 5 overrides, or whatever,
just to get a simple in-depth photo. Is that too much to ask?
>
>As a family camera we have a point and shoot Canon Powershot SD850 IS
which is capable of some pretty good photos - I've taken some remarkably
good insect photo's with the thing - but it doesn't have any depth of
field control really. As near as I can tell.
>
>Anyway, if anybody out there has a simple digital SLR out there to
recommend, I'd love to hear about it!
>
>Jeff Gibson
>digitally challenged person
>_______________________________________________
>Tweeters mailing list
>Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: no digest yesterday or today ?
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:07:46 -0700
I am a subscriber to Tweeters and usually receive a daily digest (my 
preference) - however, both yesterday and today I failed to receive one in my 
inbox. I've written to the moderator(s) at mailman 1, but haven't received a 
response yet. Meanwhile, I thought some of you Tweets might have an idea or a 
suggestion. 


Thanks.

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net_______________________________________________
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Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: re: Varied Thrush call
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 13:36:49 -0700
Had one here in my neighborhood in Ocean Shores around 8:30am Sunday the
28th...just the call. I couldn't place that sound until I looked it up on
Bird Web just now...thanks to Barb Deihl's post just now describing what
she heard!

Those of us of a certain age may remember trying to make music by blowing
air across a comb and paper? Like two octaves combined into a single note.
Best way I can describe it. But that is what I heard.

Thanks, Barb! And thanks to Seattle Audubon's web site with the sounds. I
know Cornell does it too, as well as National Audubon, but there is nothing
like a local source.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: Ridgefield White-faced Ibis
From: AnnMarie Wood <amw.5737 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 13:26:43 -0700
Carol Riddell and I are watching the bird right now at the south end of
Rest Lk just beyond Marker 11 at Ridgefield River S auto loop.

Ann Marie Wood
Mountlake Terrace_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Simple Camera Question
From: Marc Hoffman <tweeters AT dartfrogmedia.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 13:19:13 -0700
Hi Jeff,

Virtually all DSLRs have the setting you need. Depth of field is 
controlled by aperture size: the smaller the aperture, the greater 
the depth of field (note that the aperture size is inverse to the 
setting: f/22 is tiny; f/1.2 is a very large opening). Of course, you 
also get less light admitted with a tiny aperture, so there are very 
few cases where you'd want maximum depth of field, since the camera 
would have to compensate with a very slow shutter speed (more prone 
to subject- or hand-motion blur) and/or very high film/sensitivity 
speed (which increases the graininess of the image). On a DSLR, you 
would set your aperture and set the mode to Aperture Priority and 
you're there, though you might want to monkey around with the film 
speed/sensitivity (the ISO).

That said, it's not all that complicated to shoot in some other mode. 
Shutter Priority (sometimes designated as TV) lets you set the 
shutter speed and will compensate by changing the aperture and/or 
"film" speed. Shooting full manual you need only understand how 
shutter speed, aperture, and film speed (sensor senitivity) affect 
the amount of light, and how aperture affects depth of field. Unless 
you were shooting film in full automatic mode, the DSLR's are no more 
complicated than that. And if that's too complicated, you probably 
don't want a DSLR and would be happier with a mid- to high-end 
point-and-shoot, which will have many of the same modes as a DSLR.

I've been shooting in full manual mode for years now. I never 
memorized any formulas other than understading, for instance, that an 
aperture one stop smaller lets in half the light, as does a film 
speed that's twice as fast, as does a shutter speed that's twice as 
fast. Mostly I just know where to set things based on experience, and 
shooting digital lets you take all the shots you want without 
spending money on film and developing.

Good luck,

Marc Hoffman
www.songbirdphoto.com

At 12:09 PM 9/29/2014, Jeff Gibson wrote:
>I've had such good luck with the occasional query to tweeters I 
>thought I'd try it again.
>
>Oh sure, I know I've been a wee bit snarky, in some of my posts, 
>about digital technology at times, but I do have a simple camera 
>question that maybe one of you nature photographers out there may 
>have a simple answer for.
>
>You see, I used to do a lot of nature photography - back when 
>cameras had film - and I really haven't made much of a transition to 
>digital yet. Using my simple manual Nikon FM, I got real 
>professional -like results. What I usually did was use my camera for 
>landscapes, close-ups of nature , etc. I put my little camera on a 
>tripod and went for max depth of field.
>
>And that's all I wanna do now. No bird photos for me - unless 
>they're dead, or dumb as a Ptarmigan, and thus allowing  easy 
>artistic close-ups. For some reason bird photography - the process - 
>has always left me cold. But that's OK because many of you tweeters 
>already do a good job of it. I'll just look at your photos.
>
>Anyway, I'm wondering if there are now simple, and I mean simple, 
>digital cameras that allow easy manual operation just like my ol' 
>Nikon. An SLR that I can use like I used to - without having to have 
>some sort of digital argument with the damn thing, go thru 5 
>overrides, or whatever, just to get a simple in-depth photo. Is that 
>too much to ask?
>
>As a family camera we have a point and shoot Canon Powershot SD850 
>IS which is capable of some pretty good photos - I've taken some 
>remarkably good insect photo's with the thing - but it doesn't have 
>any depth of field control really. As near as I can tell.
>
>Anyway, if anybody out there has a simple digital SLR out there to 
>recommend, I'd love to hear about it!
>
>Jeff Gibson
>digitally challenged person
>_______________________________________________
>Tweeters mailing list
>Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Varied Thrush calls - 9/28 and 9/29
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 13:10:14 -0700
Heard what sounded most like a Varied Thrush call, both last evening at dusk 
and this morning, early. Sounded like a juvenile who hasn't yet mastered the 
full double-note whistle. It was moving around a lot in the bushes/trees on my 
property. Anyone else hearing that melancholy sound, foretelling the coolness 
and dampness of the seasons to come? 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net_______________________________________________
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Subject: Bonaparte's Gulls near Hat Island (A.K.A. Gedney Island) East of Whidbey Island
From: keith <seakeithrun AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:47:08 -0700
My son and I were kayaking around Gedney Island yesterday and saw a flock
of around 30 non-breeding Bonaparte's Gulls on the western shore of the
island. It was foggy all morning around Whidbey Island as mention in a
previous post but from the kayak we were able to see the gulls at fairly
close range (20 to 30 feet)

Keith_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Simple Camera Question
From: Mary Austin-Keller <maryaustinkeller AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:26:23 -0700
Hi Jeff -

You might like the physical controls on the new Fuji cameras. They remind me 
more of the old film cameras. I loved the one I rented so much I'm selling most 
of my canon gear and got a Fuji xt-1. 


Since you are familiar with canon you may want to check out the digital rebel. 
Lots of people have canon cameras and you can get lenses fairly easily and 
reasonably priced. Plus lots of YouTube videos and chances are someone with you 
or whom you know will shoot canon and can either help or share lenses if that's 
of interest to you. 


Hope that helps,
Mary


Sent from my iPhone 6 Plus

> On Sep 29, 2014, at 12:09 PM, Jeff Gibson  wrote:
> 
> I've had such good luck with the occasional query to tweeters I thought I'd 
try it again. 

> 
> Oh sure, I know I've been a wee bit snarky, in some of my posts, about 
digital technology at times, but I do have a simple camera question that maybe 
one of you nature photographers out there may have a simple answer for. 

> 
> You see, I used to do a lot of nature photography - back when cameras had 
film - and I really haven't made much of a transition to digital yet. Using my 
simple manual Nikon FM, I got real professional -like results. What I usually 
did was use my camera for landscapes, close-ups of nature , etc. I put my 
little camera on a tripod and went for max depth of field. 

> 
> And that's all I wanna do now. No bird photos for me - unless they're dead, 
or dumb as a Ptarmigan, and thus allowing easy artistic close-ups. For some 
reason bird photography - the process - has always left me cold. But that's OK 
because many of you tweeters already do a good job of it. I'll just look at 
your photos. 

> 
> Anyway, I'm wondering if there are now simple, and I mean simple, digital 
cameras that allow easy manual operation just like my ol' Nikon. An SLR that I 
can use like I used to - without having to have some sort of digital argument 
with the damn thing, go thru 5 overrides, or whatever, just to get a simple 
in-depth photo. Is that too much to ask? 

> 
> As a family camera we have a point and shoot Canon Powershot SD850 IS which 
is capable of some pretty good photos - I've taken some remarkably good insect 
photo's with the thing - but it doesn't have any depth of field control really. 
As near as I can tell. 

> 
> Anyway, if anybody out there has a simple digital SLR out there to recommend, 
I'd love to hear about it! 

> 
> Jeff Gibson
> digitally challenged person
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Broad winged hawk yesterday
From: Noah Sanday <puffleshatchery AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:13:14 -0700
Yesterday I was out bird watching in acme and a broad winged hawk flew over 
Maleng road area heading south and then headed east towards mount baker. 

 
Happy birding 
Noah 
puffleshatchery AT gmail.com
Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
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Subject: Simple Camera Question
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:09:13 -0700
I've had such good luck with the occasional query to tweeters I thought I'd try 
it again. 

Oh sure, I know I've been a wee bit snarky, in some of my posts, about digital 
technology at times, but I do have a simple camera question that maybe one of 
you nature photographers out there may have a simple answer for. 

You see, I used to do a lot of nature photography - back when cameras had film 
- and I really haven't made much of a transition to digital yet. Using my 
simple manual Nikon FM, I got real professional -like results. What I usually 
did was use my camera for landscapes, close-ups of nature , etc. I put my 
little camera on a tripod and went for max depth of field. 

And that's all I wanna do now. No bird photos for me - unless they're dead, or 
dumb as a Ptarmigan, and thus allowing easy artistic close-ups. For some reason 
bird photography - the process - has always left me cold. But that's OK because 
many of you tweeters already do a good job of it. I'll just look at your 
photos. 

Anyway, I'm wondering if there are now simple, and I mean simple, digital 
cameras that allow easy manual operation just like my ol' Nikon. An SLR that I 
can use like I used to - without having to have some sort of digital argument 
with the damn thing, go thru 5 overrides, or whatever, just to get a simple 
in-depth photo. Is that too much to ask? 

As a family camera we have a point and shoot Canon Powershot SD850 IS which is 
capable of some pretty good photos - I've taken some remarkably good insect 
photo's with the thing - but it doesn't have any depth of field control really. 
As near as I can tell. 

Anyway, if anybody out there has a simple digital SLR out there to recommend, 
I'd love to hear about it! 

Jeff Gibsondigitally challenged person 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Auto Response
From: Tom Reichner <tomreichner AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 29 09 2014 07:02:30
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Subject: Merlin revisiting nesting site: Echo Lake
From: Clare McLean <clareishere AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 10:07:41 -0700
Following up to yesterday's requests for Merlin sightings, I heard and saw one 
flying SW from 190th and Wallingford (Echo Lake/Shoreline) yesterday around 2 
pm. (I'm not very familiar with the area or with Merlins, so for a brief 
second, I thought the call was from a deranged Killdeer.) 

I then noticed a Cooper's Hawk on a very high snag; it hung out for at least 15 
mins and endured a noisy and annoyed male Flicker who did some half-hearted 
bombing and then just settled on a nearby branch. 

Clare McLeanSeattle, WAclareishere AT hotmail.com 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many...
From: Todd Sahl <toddsahl AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 09:07:11 -0700
180,000 miles in 6 years. I have been thinking about that all weekend. 


On Sunday, September 28, 2014 7:29 AM, Tom Mansfield  
wrote: 

  


Hey Tweets and Inlanders – Yesterday (9/27/14) was a very special day for me 
in that my quest to be the first person to see 200 species of birds in every 
one of Washington’s 39 counties reached its successful conclusion on 
White’s Island in the Columbia, upriver from Cathlamet in Wahkiakum County. 
Horned Lark, of the rare streaked subspecies, was the bird capping my 6-year 
mission that covered over 180,000 miles of driving, hundreds of hours of 
research/planning, and the pleasure of emailing, meeting and birding with many 
of you all over Washington. And while not proud of my carbon footprint, I can 
say with certainty I made a six-figure contribution to the state’s economy 
– much of it in small, out of the way places. 

 
Your posts to Tweeters, Inland Northwest, BirdYak, BirdKitt, WhatcomBirds, 
LCBirds, Admiralty Audubon, San Juan Audubon Facebook, and eBird have all 
contributed so significantly to the success of this personal mission. And while 
I wished that I could have chartered a larger boat yesterday so that more could 
have been along for the final push (space was so limited the leader, Wahkiakum 
expert/naturalist Andrew Emlen, came by kayak – his preferred mode anyway), I 
was honored to be joined by Andy and Ellen Stepniewski (luckily for me, the 
first birders I ever met when I started birding in 2006), Mike and MerryLynn 
Denny (incredibly skilled and knowledgeable about birds and our natural 
surroundings ), and MaryFrances Mathis and Matt Bartels (my first “regular” 
birding buddies who got me started at Marymoor, helped me get a list going, 
made countless trips/chases with me, taught me so much). My true mentor and the 
Godfather of Washington County 

 Listing, Ken Knittle, was unable to make the assault on White’s, a dredge 
spoils island with no dock or improvements, but he was waiting for us when we 
landed back at the Cathlamet Marina and after a celebratory picnic, joined us 
birding the remainder of the beautiful day in Wahkiakum. 

 
To all who so willing shared their tips, experience, and knowledge – many, 
many thanks. The Washington County Listing gauntlet has been thrown down! There 
are some outstanding young birders (and many not so young) who can take the 
threshold higher than 200 in every county. I hope you do – because we will 
all learn more about the birds of Washington from your efforts along the way. 
Just beware: The listing bug’s bite can change your life forever! 

 
Tom Mansfield headed home to Seattle – but still county listing on the way…
 
 
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Subject: No marbled godwits at L River Red Pool, Clark Co this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 07:47:34 -0700
Just leaving a few shorebirds only

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID_______________________________________________
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Subject: No marbled godwits at L River Red Pool, Clark Co this morning
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 07:47:34 -0700
Just leaving a few shorebirds only

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Off topic, dragonfly splash bathing.
From: stan Kostka lynn Schmidt <lynnandstan AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 06:20:35 -0700
Yesterday in the warm afternoon sun at Lake 22 in Snohomish County I observed a 
dragonfly splash bath. I was very surprised by what I saw. I do not know what 
kind of dragonfly it was. It hit the water four times, along a circular course, 
each hit about six feet apart, separated by some two or three seconds. Between 
hits the dragonfly rose back into the air no more than a foot or two. When I 
saw the first hit I thought it was feeding on something on the water surface, 
but after the fourth and final hit on the water, the dragonfly flew upwards to 
a height of about ten feet or so, then performed a shaking maneuver in which it 
cast off a fine spray of water droplets, easily seen from my vantage because 
the sun was backlighting the scene. The dragonfly fell back toward the water 
slightly in the moment it was shaking off, then flew off normally. This event 
only happened once during my 30 minute observation of the lake. The mid air 
shaking off of water was very similar to what osprey do after they have been in 
the water. I've seen swallows splash bathing , but never before have I ever 
seen a dragonfly do this. 


Has anyone else ever observed a dragon fly splash bath ? such behavior noted in 
the literature ? or am I mistaken in my interpretation of what I observed ? 


Stan Kostka
lynnandstan at earthlink.net
Arlington_______________________________________________
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Subject: Forting Around the Sound
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 04:09:27 -0700
During my current strange stint as eldercare person here in Port Townsend, I 
have been spending a lot of my spare time forting around. Port Townsend is just 
the place for it.Actually, I've been forting around the Sound for decades now, 
not just lately. 

You see, back in the mid, and late, 19th century, folks really got worried 
about defending Puget Sound from something, I'm not sure quite what. So the 
military built a bunch of forts at the entrance to the Sound. The first was 
Fort Townsend, which I've posted about, built to defend "settlers" from upset 
natives. Then some American guy shot an English guy's pig on San Juan Island - 
the pig was eating his potatoes apparently - and a war almost, but not quite, 
happened. 

Then there was the Big Gun Period when forts Casey, Flagler, and Worden were 
built. These forts featured big concrete bunkers hiding giant cannons that 
could blow any "Hun's", "Jap's", Canadians - or whoever else was here to steal 
our stuff- right out of the water. Admiralty Inlet was covered. I read that 
these forts were soon obsolete - because the airplane was invented and those 
big ol' guns weren't nimble enough to shoot those. Oh well. 

The great thing about all of this fort building, is that the above mentioned 
forts are now all State Parks, and the site of the almost Pig War, on San Juan 
Island, is now a National Historical Park.Good birding there too. 

I've spent time in all these places. Here in Port Townsend, Fort Worden is a 
fine place to see all sorts of birds , plants, and sea creatures. Just outta 
town, Fort Townsend has a fine forest, and beach to check out. Years past, I've 
been to Fort Flagler on nearby Marrowstone Island - in my mind I can see fine 
groves of Grand Fir, and vernal forest ponds surrounded by evergreen sedges, 
and shorebirds on the beach. I plan to get over there soon to see how accurate 
my memories are. 

Fort Casey is another great bird spot, over there on Whidbey Island - right 
next to Crockett Lake, that unusual brackish bit, good for unusual shorebirds 
etc. 

There is one fort I especially like - Fort Whitman, "The Lost Fort" as I think 
of it. You see, when all this Sound fort building was going on, some military 
intelligence guys realized that Deception Pass was not covered. I mean, even 
that name - Deception - has trouble written all over it. And what about 
Swinomish Slough? Maybe Japanese women pearl divers, armed with extra sharp 
oyster knives, or raiding northern coast Indians in their cedar canoes, or wild 
hippy artists and poets from La Conner, might get to our cities through those 
treacherous waterways. 

So Fort Whitman was built, on Goat Island, right at the south end of Swinomish 
slough, at the mouth of the Skagit River. It's a wonderful spot pretty much 
accessible only by small boat. Now part of the Skagit WRA, that most tweeters 
are familiar with. 

When I first was introduced to Goat Island back in 1980, I would've thought 
twice about telling too many folks about it.Fort Whitman is like a Northwest 
Ankor Wat, or Tikal, - sorta - an overgrown bit of old ways. Unlike the tidy 
Forts of Casey, Worden, or Flagler, the old fort on Goat Island is pleasantly 
growing into the forest - trees sprouting out of the concrete, stairways 
covered with moss and spring wildflowers. 

Then one year Sunset Magazine printed an article about the place. "Oh, #%$!", I 
thought to myself, and sure enough the next time I went there I found the place 
tagged all to hell, possibly by poorly behaved yuppie larvae, or somebody. Oh 
well - popularity bites, sometimes. Still a cool spot - great birding there at 
the river mouth. 

I could go on about all this Forting around. There are also the ol' prairies of 
Fort Lewis (a place I've only only enjoyed as an Oak- watcher from I-5) that 
tweeters post about, and other forts and military sites around the state and 
country that are valued now as wildlife spots. I think it's kinda interesting 
how all these old forts have turned out. 

Jeff Gibsonforting aroundPort Townsend Wa



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Subject: Shorebird question
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:37:47 -0700
Hello Tweeters,

Now that I have reported the American Redstart, I have a birding
question: Where
in the Seattle area can I see migrating shorebirds most reliably?

My main target bird is the Western Sandpiper, which would be a lifer. I
can't go to Eide Road, Jetty Island or Ocean Shores, unfortunately.

Is there a spot within half an hour of downtown where I could see Western
Sandpipers and other migrating shorebirds?
​
Thanks, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

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Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese, Pine Grosbeaks at Dewey Lake, Yakima County
From: Gary Wiles <wilesharkey AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 04:29:16 +0000 (UTC)
 All,
I spent 5 hours hiking in the Chinook Pass area today, which is located on the 
eastern edge of Mt. Rainier NP along the boundary of Yakima and Pierce 
counties.  I only recorded 9 species of birds, but several were of interest 
and were seen at Dewey Lake in Yakima County.  These included 32 Greater 
White-fronted Geese, 2 Pine Grosbeaks, and a pair of distant grebes that were 
either Horneds or Westerns.  The behavior of the geese was especially 
interesting.  They were 25-75 yds from the water and grazing in several very 
small upland meadows mixed in among stands of forest.  I've never seen any 
geese in Washington in predominately forested habitat like that.  Very odd for 
sure! 

Gary WilesOlympia, WAwilesharkey AT yahoo.com _______________________________________________
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Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese, Pine Grosbeaks at Dewey Lake, Yakima County
From: Gary Wiles <wilesharkey AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 04:29:16 +0000 (UTC)
 All,
I spent 5 hours hiking in the Chinook Pass area today, which is located on the 
eastern edge of Mt. Rainier NP along the boundary of Yakima and Pierce 
counties.  I only recorded 9 species of birds, but several were of interest 
and were seen at Dewey Lake in Yakima County.  These included 32 Greater 
White-fronted Geese, 2 Pine Grosbeaks, and a pair of distant grebes that were 
either Horneds or Westerns.  The behavior of the geese was especially 
interesting.  They were 25-75 yds from the water and grazing in several very 
small upland meadows mixed in among stands of forest.  I've never seen any 
geese in Washington in predominately forested habitat like that.  Very odd for 
sure! 

Gary WilesOlympia, WAwilesharkey AT yahoo.com _______________________________________________
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Subject: Western Scrub Jay in Maple Leaf
From: "helen.gilbert AT juno.com" <helen.gilbert@juno.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 03:56:10 GMT
Hi -- 

A Western Scrub Jay turned up this morning at Henry Noble's and my house in the 
Maple Leaf/North Ravenna neighborhood Sunday morning. It came at the same time 
as a large group of Steller's Jays that were eating acorns from several large 
oaks by our house. Helen GilbertSeattle 
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Subject: Central Skagit birds today
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:46:43 -0700
Tweeters:
 
Was up to retrace the steps of Gary, Kraig and Robert Kuntz today in central 
Skagit County. Amazing what one day can do at this time of year--things were 
very different at each of the sites Gary mentioned. At the Marblemount boat 
launch, the only bird I had for a highlight common with their report was a 
MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER, my latest ever for Skagit County. No sign of the 
notable sparrows. At Howard Miller there was not a single YR Warbler, and 
Corkindale was virtually birdless. But as the fog lifted, there were highlights 
further south... 

 
At Bryson, of 31 species, the most exciting were three WESTERN BLUEBIRDS that 
flew right over me as if coming from the high country west down to the river. 
They flew over the river eastward to points unknown. Then, after hearing a N. 
PYGMY-OWL at close range, my imitations finally brought the bird into view--and 
a second bird answered on the same side of the river but further south. The 
first owl allowed for terrific views at this time, too bad the camera battery 
had expired. I also had great looks at a Purpureus (Eastern) type PURPLE FINCH, 
a female, near the parking spot, as I left. 

 
At Sauk Prairie, on the Skagit County side, the birding was also productive. 
From 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon, there seemed to be a lot of sparrows around--7 
species in fact, including a first-winter CHIPPING in a nice sparrow group at 
the base of Inman Rd., and a FOS SWAMP SPARROW along the main road north. At 
the "T" at the end of the Sauk Rd, the sparrows were numerous and among others 
was another FOS, a male DE (SLATE-COLORED) JUNCO (of the "Cassiar" type). 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com  
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Subject: Central Skagit birds today
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:46:58 -0700
Tweeters:
 
Was up to retrace the steps of Gary, Kraig and Robert Kuntz today in central 
Skagit County. Amazing what one day can do at this time of year--things were 
very different at each of the sites Gary mentioned. At the Marblemount boat 
launch, the only bird I had for a highlight common with their report was a 
MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER, my latest ever for Skagit County. No sign of the 
notable sparrows. At Howard Miller there was not a single YR Warbler, and 
Corkindale was virtually birdless. But as the fog lifted, there were highlights 
further south... 

 
At Bryson, of 31 species, the most exciting were three WESTERN BLUEBIRDS that 
flew right over me as if coming from the high country west down to the river. 
They flew over the river eastward to points unknown. Then, after hearing a N. 
PYGMY-OWL at close range, my imitations finally brought the bird into view--and 
a second bird answered on the same side of the river but further south. The 
first owl allowed for terrific views at this time, too bad the camera battery 
had expired. I also had great looks at a Purpureus (Eastern) type PURPLE FINCH, 
a female, near the parking spot, as I left. 

 
At Sauk Prairie, on the Skagit County side, the birding was also productive. 
From 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon, there seemed to be a lot of sparrows around--7 
species in fact, including a first-winter CHIPPING in a nice sparrow group at 
the base of Inman Rd., and a FOS SWAMP SPARROW along the main road north. At 
the "T" at the end of the Sauk Rd, the sparrows were numerous and among others 
was another FOS, a male DE (SLATE-COLORED) JUNCO (of the "Cassiar" type). 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com  
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Subject: Central Skagit birds today
From: Scott <scottratkinson AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:47:33 -0700
Tweeters:
 
Was up to retrace the steps of Gary, Kraig and Robert Kuntz today in central 
Skagit County. Amazing what one day can do at this time of year--things were 
very different at each of the sites Gary mentioned. At the Marblemount boat 
launch, the only bird I had for a highlight common with their report was a 
MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER, my latest ever for Skagit County. No sign of the 
notable sparrows. At Howard Miller there was not a single YR Warbler, and 
Corkindale was virtually birdless. But as the fog lifted, there were highlights 
further south... 

 
At Bryson, of 31 species, the most exciting were three WESTERN BLUEBIRDS that 
flew right over me as if coming from the high country west down to the river. 
They flew over the river eastward to points unknown. Then, after hearing a N. 
PYGMY-OWL at close range, my imitations finally brought the bird into view--and 
a second bird answered on the same side of the river but further south. The 
first owl allowed for terrific views at this time, too bad the camera battery 
had expired. I also had great looks at a Purpureus (Eastern) type PURPLE FINCH, 
a female, near the parking spot, as I left. 

 
At Sauk Prairie, on the Skagit County side, the birding was also productive. 
From 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon, there seemed to be a lot of sparrows around--7 
species in fact, including a first-winter CHIPPING in a nice sparrow group at 
the base of Inman Rd., and a FOS SWAMP SPARROW along the main road north. At 
the "T" at the end of the Sauk Rd, the sparrows were numerous and among others 
was another FOS, a male DE (SLATE-COLORED) JUNCO (of the "Cassiar" type). 

 
Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson AT hotmail.com  
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Subject: Skamania Northern Goshawk.
From: "Wilson Cady" <gorgebirds AT juno.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 03:12:14 GMT
This evening I spooked a female NORTHERN GOSHAWK out of a small tree next to 
our house on Mt. Pleasant, Skamania County. We get a couple of these birds a 
year here, usually they are attracted by the Band-tailed Pigeons at the feeders 
but this time the large numbers of Robins, Hermit and Varied Thrushes stripping 
our Mt. Ash trees may have been the lure. It glided into the woods instead of 
ripping across the sky. Wilson Cady 

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Subject: American Redstart Yard Bird!
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:38:23 -0700
Hello Tweeters,


This is a rather late report of a rare bird I saw in my backyard.


                On August 26th, at 3:10 PM, I was looking at my yard
outside my kitchen window, near a rhododendron tree where our two suet
cages, seed feeder, bird bath and hummingbird feeder are hung, when I saw
an unusual bird hovering for a moment in front of a leaf, then fluttering
in to a group of roses. I immediately realized that it was something
unusual.


For a few seconds, I thought that this bird could've been a Warbling Vireo
(which I saw earlier this week in the yard, a yard bird!) or a Wilson's
Warbler (also in the tree this week, last night), but when I looked at it
closer, I realized that it was something else. It had a light gray head, a
darker gray back and wings, two yellow-green patches on both sides of the
breast, almost like on a Yellow-rumped Warbler, and a slate-gray tail with
bright yellow-green sides.


After a few seconds of being stumped, something clicked. I suddenly
recognized it as a fall female American Redstart! When it flicked its tail,
revealing a dark T-shape on its rectrices with yellow-green sides, I knew
for certain that that's what it was. Fortunately, my camera was only a few
feet away, so I got good video and two blurry photos! I have not seen the
bird since, but fortunately, most of my family got to see it.



                To my knowledge, the American Redstart is quite rare in the
southern Puget Sound area, with less than a dozen records, excepting a few
birds at the Stillwater Unit of the Snoqualmie Wildlife Area.



Does anyone on Tweeters know the precise number of sightings around the
Seattle area? I know of eight from around the southern Puget Sound, not
counting Stillwater, and one record of a male hybrid on Queen Anne in 2009.



Thanks for reading my first Tweeters message ever! I’m sorry that it’s so
long; I’m just so excited about my sighting!


Thanks again, Joshua Glant


Joshua Glant


Mercer Island, WA


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Subject: Mike the Marmot
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 15:33:12 -0700
Marcus Roening's recent post re: sightings of friendly Marmots at Mt. Rainier's 
Paradise, reminded me of a Marmot I'd met decades ago, when I worked on The 
Mountain. 

After posting awhile back about "my highest bird" - the highest flying bird I'd 
ever seen in Washington State ( a Golden Eagle above Sunrise on Rainier), I 
thought of the highest mammal ( aside from me and my fellow hominids atop 
Rainier's 14'410 ft. summit) I'd seen in the state. 

I worked at Paradise for two summers back in the early 70's. Each of those 
years I made the long slog up to the famed climbers hut - Camp Muir - a 
pilgrimage, if you will. At 10'000 ft the view is astounding. That was back 
when ol' Saint Helen's still had a head. 

Anyhoo, Camp Muir is pretty much stone and snow. My last year, I went up to 
visit a friend who was a volunteer ranger there. Sitting in the thin air by the 
tiny A-frame ranger hut of the time, we watched as a bunch of climbers on a 
guided climb showed up and leaned all of their packs in a row along Muir's rock 
shelter wall, then went off to get a climbing lecture from the professionals. 

It was then that my friend gave me a nudge and a grin and said "check this out 
!", just as a big fat Marmot came out of the rocks. I was really surprised to 
see a Marmot there - at 10'000 ft on Rainier there is almost no vascular plant 
growth to speak of - the nearest marmot meadow forage about 4500 ft below. "How 
can that Marmot be here!" I wondered. 

So we watched as Mike (as the Marmot was known) made that clear. Back in those 
days, Rainier Mountaineering - the Guide service - supplied all the client 
climbers with REI frame packs that had a zippered section in the lower part of 
the pack - so you could get stuff out of the bottom more easily.( I had one of 
those packs myself for a few years). 

Ol' Mike started at one end of the pack row, and grabbing a zipper tab with his 
teeth, neatly opened up a pack and started tossing stuff - socks etc- out over 
his shoulder. Not finding anything good, he went on down the row of packs, 
un-zippering them one after another until finding a score - a big bag of gorp ( 
aka "trail mix", food). Mike hauled off his goodies into the rocks. 

I guess my friend was sort of a lax ranger - hey, he was unpaid, and of course 
ain't rangers supposed to support wildlife? And it was my day off too, and I 
was mostly in charge of litter and toilets in Paradise, so we just enjoyed the 
show. 

Later in the season I heard that Mike had babies, so I guess that made Mike a 
Michelle. The only other animals I ever saw at Camp Muir were Ravens and 
Grey-crowned Rosy Finches. And just for the record, after two years hiking 
everywhere around Paradise, over and over, I never saw a Ptarmigan - so if you 
don't, I wouldn't feel too bad. Years later I saw plenty in the North Cascades. 

Jeff GibsonMemory Lane Wa.
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Subject: Foster Island, King
From: Nigel Ball <nigelj.ball AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 14:32:18 -0700
Hi
Today: A spectacular NASHVILLE WARBLER, FOS HORNED GREBE, and a late
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER (although my awful 'record shots' are more likely to
question than confirm the record). Do let me know if you have other
suggestions.
Happy Birding. Cheers
Nigel

-- 
Nigel Ball
nigelj.ball AT gmail.com
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Vaux Swift Events & Lurking Merlins
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 14:31:16 -0700
I, too have seen at least one Merlin every time I've gone to Monroe to watch 
the swifts - granted, I've only been there 3 times, but 3 out of 3 is a pretty 
good percentage for seeing Merlins. I did see one catch a swift, too. I also 
saw one Peregrine on the scene there the first time I went (8 yrs. ago?) Must 
admit, that was almost as much my reason for going as the swifts themselves ! 
There is likely a Merlin territory (or 2) in that area - wonder if any 
Monrovians that have been aware of nesting Merlins nearby over the past decade 
or more? Or Larry S ? :-) 


Swifts are swift, but so are Merlins - a fairly dependable food source when 
each growing juvenile Merlin needs about 3 birds/day early on, which is the 
month of July, when I believe gangs of swifts are starting to move away from 
their nest areas and head to roosts - I've seen lots of swifts at cliffs in 
June and July over the years, too, like in the Yakima Canyon and across the 
Columbia from Vantage - wonder if kestrels, Peregrines, Merlins and Prairie 
Falcons practice their art on those cliff dwellers? 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Whidbey Island field trip
From: Neil and Carleen Zimmerman <n3zims AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:03:07 +0000 (UTC)
Hello Tweeters, 
I led a field trip to Whidbey Island for Seattle Audubon on Saturday the 27th.. 
It was sometimes very frustrating because of the fog. Many areas we could not 
see more that a 100 yards. We did see a White-throated Sparrow mixed in with 
some White-crowns in the picnic area at Rosario Head. 

I reported on Tweeters large numbers of Black Oystercatchers on Thursday. We 
went to the West Beach at Deception Pass. When we got there, there were no 
oystercatchers to be seen. My participants started grumbling about wanting 
their money back. Well, the trip is free so I promised them double their money 
back if we didn't see any oystercatchers. As we were hanging around staring 
into the fog, a group of about 45 flew by. Then 3 birds landed on the rocks in 
front off us giving us some nice but foggy looks.We then headed over to Ala 
Spit. There, like a couple of days ago, were a least 70 oystercatchers hanging 
out on the beach. It was not foggy here, so we got really nice views of the 
birds. 

The other real high light of the day was the Oak Bay Marina. Brian Bell told me 
about this place several years ago. Every year, Black Turnstones gather on the 
docks and log boom. Yesterday there were about 60-70 Turnstones hanging out on 
the docks. We could hear them as soon as we got out of our cars in the parking 
lot. I have seen well over a hundred here before. There were four Surfbirds 
mixed in with them. What made it special was they came over to a spot right in 
front of us and started feeding on the exposed pilings. The lighting was 
perfect as we watched the Turnstones and Surfbirds feeding not 30 feet from us. 

Crockett Lake was very foggy, we did see some shorebirds but were not able to 
locate the Marbled Godwits that had been hanging around. But they easily could 
have been right in front of us. Over though the day was really good. We ended 
up with 75 species with several very memorable sightings. 


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Subject: Re: Western Scrub-Jays
From: wong <chupaflor AT igc.org>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 12:57:13 -0700
For what it's worth, in our nabe near Phinney/Ballard, these jays have been 
known to nest in recent years. However, I had never seen any on our block until 
a couple of weeks ago, after hearing one for days. He finally showed up at our 
feeder a few days ago. 


good birding,
isadora wong
seattle, wa
chupaflor AT igc.org




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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Merlins visiting their nesting territories
From: ck park <travelgirl.fics AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 12:40:33 -0700
wondering if there is a merlin (or two) testing near frank wagner...  i'm
reasonably sure that *a* merlin has been identified during the Vaux
Happening celebration on a few of the last ten years...

00 caren
http://www.ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork

On Sun, Sep 28, 2014 at 11:02 AM, Diane Bates  wrote:

> We were in Monroe last night to watch the Vaux Swifts go down the chimney
> at
> Frank Wagner Elementary School. They were about to descend when a Merlin
> showed up :( The Swifts took off and didn't come back.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
> [mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Barbara
> Deihl
> Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2014 7:03 PM
> To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Bulk] [Tweeters] Merlins visiting their nesting territories
>
> Caryn's mention of Merlins overhead, calling out a variety of calls, is the
> second reported Merlin surprise I've recently been told about.  Anne G. up
> in the Echo Lake neighborhood of Shoreline, has had a couple of them
> regularly visiting or flying over her block, which is in the center of that
> Merlin nesting territory - she's reported them for a couple of weeks now.
> I
> have yet to be there when the Merlins are so far, but I'm hoping to connect
> with them one of these days.
>
> If you hear or see any Merlins in the Seattle area this fall, especially if
> you notice them in or near one of the following 2014 nest areas, there are
> several of us who would appreciate a hearing about it - a post on Tweeters
> and/or a message to me or anyone else you know who has been following
> Merlins in the Seattle area, would be appreciated.  A few Merlins have been
> banded this year, so if you note bands on any, do notify Ben Vang-Johnson
> or
> Kim McCormick (see the WOS website for more info).
>
> The following areas (neighborhoods) hosted a Merlin nesting situation of
> which I am aware and/or visited:  1. Echo Lake (Shoreline); 2. Olympic
> Hills; 3. Wedgwood; 4. Pinehurst; 5. Mountlake Terrace; 6. Lynnwood; 7.
> Mercer Is.;  8. another site in Shoreline, or so I heard, perhaps near
> Richmond Beach.
>
> Kee kee kee (and other variations on the theme),
>
> Barb Deihl
> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle barbdeihl AT comcast.net
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI AT seattleu.edu>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:15:49 +0000
About 15 years ago, I photographed a family of Scrub Jays from my home (at
the time) in Madison Valley, Seattle. They have also occasionally been
sighted at Seattle University in the past couple of years.

Good birding,
Trileigh

 
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker
Lincoln Park, West Seattle
Natural history blog: naturalpresence arts.com

Photography: flickr.com/photos/trileigh




On 9/27/14, 3:25 PM, "Jill Freidberg"  wrote:

>
>We saw them regularly when we lived in Columbia City. That was as
>recently as two years ago. We'd see them at least once a week. Maybe they
>nest in Seward Park? The Audubon Center there should know.
>
>Jill
>
>________________________________________
>From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
>[tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] on behalf of Barbara Deihl
>[barbdeihl AT comcast.net]
>Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2014 2:18 PM
>To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>Subject: [Tweeters] W. Scrub Jay sighting  AT  Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14
>
>Since Scrub Jays seem to be of the moment now, I'll throw in my sighting
>from Sat. Sept. 13 at around noon.  The jay vocalized its way to some
>trees in the middle of one of the older wetland ponds at Magnuson Park -
>it hung around long enough for me to get a photo, though it's somewhat
>lacking in quality (if you wish to see the pic, I will send it to you in
>an email).  I had first noticed the jaylike calls and knew they were not
>from our usual 'blue jay', the Stellar's Jay.  It was pretty exciting to
>see the Scrub Jay around here.  There seem to have been more Western
>Scrub Jay sightings in the past few years than in previous late
>summers/early falls...  Are they migrating through to the south?  The
>only place I've seen them regularly is in and around Portland, OR.  Have
>they ever nested at the Fill ?  Or in Discovery Park?  Or anywhere else
>in the Puget Sound area that anyone knows of?
>
>Barb Deihl
>Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
>barbdeihl AT comcast.net_______________________________________________
>Tweeters mailing list
>Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>

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Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Merlins visiting their nesting territories
From: "Diane Bates" <dalaine00 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 11:02:38 -0700
We were in Monroe last night to watch the Vaux Swifts go down the chimney at
Frank Wagner Elementary School. They were about to descend when a Merlin
showed up :( The Swifts took off and didn't come back. 

-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Barbara
Deihl
Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2014 7:03 PM
To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Bulk] [Tweeters] Merlins visiting their nesting territories

Caryn's mention of Merlins overhead, calling out a variety of calls, is the
second reported Merlin surprise I've recently been told about.  Anne G. up
in the Echo Lake neighborhood of Shoreline, has had a couple of them
regularly visiting or flying over her block, which is in the center of that
Merlin nesting territory - she's reported them for a couple of weeks now.  I
have yet to be there when the Merlins are so far, but I'm hoping to connect
with them one of these days.

If you hear or see any Merlins in the Seattle area this fall, especially if
you notice them in or near one of the following 2014 nest areas, there are
several of us who would appreciate a hearing about it - a post on Tweeters
and/or a message to me or anyone else you know who has been following
Merlins in the Seattle area, would be appreciated.  A few Merlins have been
banded this year, so if you note bands on any, do notify Ben Vang-Johnson or
Kim McCormick (see the WOS website for more info).

The following areas (neighborhoods) hosted a Merlin nesting situation of
which I am aware and/or visited:  1. Echo Lake (Shoreline); 2. Olympic
Hills; 3. Wedgwood; 4. Pinehurst; 5. Mountlake Terrace; 6. Lynnwood; 7.
Mercer Is.;  8. another site in Shoreline, or so I heard, perhaps near
Richmond Beach.

Kee kee kee (and other variations on the theme),

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: Possible "Semidi Island" cackling goose at Ridgefield NWR this morning.
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:18:41 -0700
It was with some cacklers and white fronted geese on rest lake last seen at 
about 10:00 am. Look for a cackler with a sharp forehead and NO white neck 
collar. Last seen by the tree along the eastside of the lake. This form of 
cackling goose is seen along coastal central Oregon and numbers are extremely 
low possibly below 200 birds. Some feel it should be considered a full sub 
species. 


Randy hill took a few photos but had his small camera. If any of you with the 
big lenses get a photo of the bird send them to me please. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad_______________________________________________
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Subject: Possible "Semidi Island" cackling goose at Ridgefield NWR this morning.
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:18:41 -0700
It was with some cacklers and white fronted geese on rest lake last seen at 
about 10:00 am. Look for a cackler with a sharp forehead and NO white neck 
collar. Last seen by the tree along the eastside of the lake. This form of 
cackling goose is seen along coastal central Oregon and numbers are extremely 
low possibly below 200 birds. Some feel it should be considered a full sub 
species. 


Randy hill took a few photos but had his small camera. If any of you with the 
big lenses get a photo of the bird send them to me please. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Re: Ridgefield Ibis
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 09:40:24 -0700
Still present Sunday morning 9am.
Randy Hill
Ridgefield

Sent via randy's smartphone

----- Reply message -----
From: "Blair Bernson" 
To: "Tweeters" 
Subject: [Tweeters] Ridgefield Ibis
Date: Sat, Sep 27, 2014 9:32 am

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Subject: Re: Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many...
From: Marie Dymkoski <marie-dymkoski AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 08:18:07 -0700
What an accomplishment!  

Marie-Dymkoski AT msn.com
509-595-1650 cellMarie Dymkoski, IOM
Executive Director, Pullman Chamber of Commerce 
marie AT pullmanchamber.com 
509-334-3565
www.pullmanchamber.com


From: birds AT t-mansfield.com
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu; inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:28:42 -0400
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With 
Thanks to Many... 


Hey Tweets and Inlanders  Yesterday (9/27/14) was a very special day for me in 
that my quest to be the first person to see 200 species of birds in every one 
of Washingtons 39 counties reached its successful conclusion on Whites Island 
in the Columbia, upriver from Cathlamet in Wahkiakum County. Horned Lark, of 
the rare streaked subspecies, was the bird capping my 6-year mission that 
covered over 180,000 miles of driving, hundreds of hours of research/planning, 
and the pleasure of emailing, meeting and birding with many of you all over 
Washington. And while not proud of my carbon footprint, I can say with 
certainty I made a six-figure contribution to the states economy  much of it 
in small, out of the way places. Your posts to Tweeters, Inland Northwest, 
BirdYak, BirdKitt, WhatcomBirds, LCBirds, Admiralty Audubon, San Juan Audubon 
Facebook, and eBird have all contributed so significantly to the success of 
this personal mission. And while I wished that I could have chartered a larger 
boat yesterday so that more could have been along for the final push (space was 
so limited the leader, Wahkiakum expert/naturalist Andrew Emlen, came by kayak 
 his preferred mode anyway), I was honored to be joined by Andy and Ellen 
Stepniewski (luckily for me, the first birders I ever met when I started 
birding in 2006), Mike and MerryLynn Denny (incredibly skilled and 
knowledgeable about birds and our natural surroundings ), and MaryFrances 
Mathis and Matt Bartels (my first regular birding buddies who got me started 
at Marymoor, helped me get a list going, made countless trips/chases with me, 
taught me so much). My true mentor and the Godfather of Washington County 
Listing, Ken Knittle, was unable to make the assault on Whites, a dredge 
spoils island with no dock or improvements, but he was waiting for us when we 
landed back at the Cathlamet Marina and after a celebratory picnic, joined us 
birding the remainder of the beautiful day in Wahkiakum. To all who so willing 
shared their tips, experience, and knowledge  many, many thanks. The 
Washington County Listing gauntlet has been thrown down! There are some 
outstanding young birders (and many not so young) who can take the threshold 
higher than 200 in every county. I hope you do  because we will all learn more 
about the birds of Washington from your efforts along the way. Just beware: The 
listing bugs bite can change your life forever! Tom Mansfield headed home to 
Seattle  but still county listing on the way 

_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Shorebird Defensive Maneuvers at Eide Road
From: Blair Bernson <blair AT washingtonadvisorygroup.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 07:33:10 -0700
As I reported earlier when I was at Eide Road on 
Friday afternoon, the main pond was covered with 
ducks and geese probably totaling 250+.  At first 
as I approached I thought perhaps they were decoys 
for hunters.  But no they were moving and the show 
of Greater White Fronts and Cacklers was 
impressive.  There were also a number of Long 
Billed Dowitchers feeding as a small group (maybe 
20 birds) in the center of the pond together with 
a few birds scattered about. As often happens 
there and at Oyhut, suddenly many of them took off 
and I looked for a Peregrine.  Sure enough one 
came buzzing them. What was interesting and 
something I had not seen before was a survival 
technique where many of the shorebirds "hid" 
amongst the geese separating themselves in groups 
of one, two or three sticking very close to their 
new larger friends.  The Peregrine must have made 
5 swoops at the pond.  The "hidden" shorebirds did 
not move while the others (perhaps ten total) flew 
up and tried to outmaneuver the Peregrine.  On the 
fifth swoop, the Peregrine hit a dowitcher and it 
dropped with the Peregrine following up for a 
feast.  The hidden birds continued to feed 
throughout the onslaught apparently feeling (and 
being?) safe amongst the geese.

-- 
Blair Bernson
Edmonds

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Subject: Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many...
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:28:42 -0400
Hey Tweets and Inlanders - Yesterday (9/27/14) was a very special day for me in 
that my quest to be the first person to see 200 species of birds in every one 
of Washington's 39 counties reached its successful conclusion on White's Island 
in the Columbia, upriver from Cathlamet in Wahkiakum County. Horned Lark, of 
the rare streaked subspecies, was the bird capping my 6-year mission that 
covered over 180,000 miles of driving, hundreds of hours of research/planning, 
and the pleasure of emailing, meeting and birding with many of you all over 
Washington. And while not proud of my carbon footprint, I can say with 
certainty I made a six-figure contribution to the state's economy - much of it 
in small, out of the way places. 


Your posts to Tweeters, Inland Northwest, BirdYak, BirdKitt, WhatcomBirds, 
LCBirds, Admiralty Audubon, San Juan Audubon Facebook, and eBird have all 
contributed so significantly to the success of this personal mission. And while 
I wished that I could have chartered a larger boat yesterday so that more could 
have been along for the final push (space was so limited the leader, Wahkiakum 
expert/naturalist Andrew Emlen, came by kayak - his preferred mode anyway), I 
was honored to be joined by Andy and Ellen Stepniewski (luckily for me, the 
first birders I ever met when I started birding in 2006), Mike and MerryLynn 
Denny (incredibly skilled and knowledgeable about birds and our natural 
surroundings ), and MaryFrances Mathis and Matt Bartels (my first "regular" 
birding buddies who got me started at Marymoor, helped me get a list going, 
made countless trips/chases with me, taught me so much). My true mentor and the 
Godfather of Washington County Listing, Ken Knittle, was unable to make the 
assault on White's, a dredge spoils island with no dock or improvements, but he 
was waiting for us when we landed back at the Cathlamet Marina and after a 
celebratory picnic, joined us birding the remainder of the beautiful day in 
Wahkiakum. 


To all who so willing shared their tips, experience, and knowledge - many, many 
thanks. The Washington County Listing gauntlet has been thrown down! There are 
some outstanding young birders (and many not so young) who can take the 
threshold higher than 200 in every county. I hope you do - because we will all 
learn more about the birds of Washington from your efforts along the way. Just 
beware: The listing bug's bite can change your life forever! 


Tom Mansfield headed home to Seattle - but still county listing on the way...

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: Personal Mission Accomplished: 200 X 39 - With Thanks to Many...
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:28:42 -0400
Hey Tweets and Inlanders - Yesterday (9/27/14) was a very special day for me in 
that my quest to be the first person to see 200 species of birds in every one 
of Washington's 39 counties reached its successful conclusion on White's Island 
in the Columbia, upriver from Cathlamet in Wahkiakum County. Horned Lark, of 
the rare streaked subspecies, was the bird capping my 6-year mission that 
covered over 180,000 miles of driving, hundreds of hours of research/planning, 
and the pleasure of emailing, meeting and birding with many of you all over 
Washington. And while not proud of my carbon footprint, I can say with 
certainty I made a six-figure contribution to the state's economy - much of it 
in small, out of the way places. 


Your posts to Tweeters, Inland Northwest, BirdYak, BirdKitt, WhatcomBirds, 
LCBirds, Admiralty Audubon, San Juan Audubon Facebook, and eBird have all 
contributed so significantly to the success of this personal mission. And while 
I wished that I could have chartered a larger boat yesterday so that more could 
have been along for the final push (space was so limited the leader, Wahkiakum 
expert/naturalist Andrew Emlen, came by kayak - his preferred mode anyway), I 
was honored to be joined by Andy and Ellen Stepniewski (luckily for me, the 
first birders I ever met when I started birding in 2006), Mike and MerryLynn 
Denny (incredibly skilled and knowledgeable about birds and our natural 
surroundings ), and MaryFrances Mathis and Matt Bartels (my first "regular" 
birding buddies who got me started at Marymoor, helped me get a list going, 
made countless trips/chases with me, taught me so much). My true mentor and the 
Godfather of Washington County Listing, Ken Knittle, was unable to make the 
assault on White's, a dredge spoils island with no dock or improvements, but he 
was waiting for us when we landed back at the Cathlamet Marina and after a 
celebratory picnic, joined us birding the remainder of the beautiful day in 
Wahkiakum. 


To all who so willing shared their tips, experience, and knowledge - many, many 
thanks. The Washington County Listing gauntlet has been thrown down! There are 
some outstanding young birders (and many not so young) who can take the 
threshold higher than 200 in every county. I hope you do - because we will all 
learn more about the birds of Washington from your efforts along the way. Just 
beware: The listing bug's bite can change your life forever! 


Tom Mansfield headed home to Seattle - but still county listing on the way...

_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
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Subject: Re: Merlins visiting their nesting territories
From: Pterodroma AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 08:08:30 -0400
You can add the Bellevue-Eastgate post nesting season territory  of 3 
(maybe 4) consecutive years to the list of post-nesting returnees.   After a 
busy-noisy-crazy nesting season around here, March thru July, things went quiet 

through all of August and no sightings at all.  During  the first week of 
September, I started seeing at least one immature Merlin again  usually just 
by chance and luck since it was always silent and when  I just happened to 
be looking up and in the right spot at the right time since  the visits were 
always brief, ranging from a few seconds to a few  minutes.  Now, and during 
the past couple weeks, the familiar  'kee-kee-kee-kee-kees' are back 
accompanying the usually short visits, so it's gotten easier again to know when 

one's about without looking and I can even hear  it from inside the house.  I 
figured it was just checking out the  old haunts like you might sometimes 
do in just driving by a place YOU once  lived years ago.  I've haven't seen 
more than one Merlin, just immature(s)  so far, no adult(s), at a time but 
when I do and watch/track it for  awhile, if not just a flyover, it has been 
seen going right  back into the same tree and spot where the nest is/was 
and/or  perches near the tippy tops of the Douglas Firs where the new  
fledglings/juveniles most liked when they were hanging around all through July. 

 
This sort of post-nesting behavior has been observed around here for years  
with occasional brief sightings during nearly every single month during the 
past  three or four years.  So it appears this is not unique to just this  
Bellevue-Eastgate location, rather several around lowland Puget  Sound if 
not all where nesting Merlins have established and maintained  multi-year 
territorial site fidelity.  Hopefully, this is a good sign for  things to come 
in 2015.  Thanks Barb for the heads-up posting on  'tweeters' and very timely 
indeed!
 
Richard Rowlett
Bellevue (Eastgate), WA _______________________________________________
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Subject: Gr. White-fronted Geese eastern Pierce County
From: Marcus Roening <Marcus.D.Roening AT gsk.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 04:13:04 +0000
Hi Tweets,

Just to add to the Gr. White-fronted Goose sightings. On the way to Paradise 
today had a flock of over 300 on the Mountain Highway just north of Dean Kreger 
Road, with a few Canada & Cackling Geese mixed in. On the return I checked out 
the turn off at the Ohop Grange that takes you to the south edge of Silver Lake 
and had a different group of around 200 with a few Cqckling Geese mixed in. 


No Ptarmigan seen today at Paradise, but we did get a consolation chicken of 
three Sooty Grouse on the edge of the trail, along with the friendliest Hoary 
Marmots I've ever experienced. I had to move off the trail so they wouldn't 
have to walk over me. Raptors include 6 RT Hawk, a Sharpie and a Northern 
Harrier. 


It was a gorgeous day to be on the mountain!

Sent from my iPad

Marcus Roening, 
Tacoma. WA
C: 253-988-8313
Marcus.d.roening at gsk.com

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Subject: Merlins visiting their nesting territories
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 19:02:47 -0700
Caryn's mention of Merlins overhead, calling out a variety of calls, is the 
second reported Merlin surprise I've recently been told about. Anne G. up in 
the Echo Lake neighborhood of Shoreline, has had a couple of them regularly 
visiting or flying over her block, which is in the center of that Merlin 
nesting territory - she's reported them for a couple of weeks now. I have yet 
to be there when the Merlins are so far, but I'm hoping to connect with them 
one of these days. 


If you hear or see any Merlins in the Seattle area this fall, especially if you 
notice them in or near one of the following 2014 nest areas, there are several 
of us who would appreciate a hearing about it - a post on Tweeters and/or a 
message to me or anyone else you know who has been following Merlins in the 
Seattle area, would be appreciated. A few Merlins have been banded this year, 
so if you note bands on any, do notify Ben Vang-Johnson or Kim McCormick (see 
the WOS website for more info). 


The following areas (neighborhoods) hosted a Merlin nesting situation of which 
I am aware and/or visited: 1. Echo Lake (Shoreline); 2. Olympic Hills; 3. 
Wedgwood; 4. Pinehurst; 5. Mountlake Terrace; 6. Lynnwood; 7. Mercer Is.; 8. 
another site in Shoreline, or so I heard, perhaps near Richmond Beach. 


Kee kee kee (and other variations on the theme),

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: Skagit Harris's Sparrow, Golden Eagle
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 18:46:19 -0700
Dear Tweeters,

Kraig Kemper, Bob Kuntz, and I had a good day of birding today in the Upper 
Skagit (27 September 2014). 


We saw a lot of the common birds at Howard Miller Steelhead Park, including two 
American Dippers and about 100 Audubon's Warblers. A Northern Pygmy Owl was 
calling in the area where I saw one a few weeks ago, but we didn't see it this 
time. 


At Marblemount Boat Launch we found a nice little flock of good birds near the 
"Fishermen's Access." A Harris's Sparrow perched up in a tree just ten or 
fifteen meters from us, giving good views for a few minutes. Then a 
White-throated Sparrow turned up a few feet away, foraging near a puddle below 
the gate to the Fishermen's Access. A bit later, a female MacGillivray's 
Warbler joined the other birds drinking at this puddle. 


On Sauk Mountain, we found two Sooty Grouse on the way up. At the trailhead 
parking area, we met Doug Schurman, who had already begun hawkwatching. With 
quite a bit of patchy fog and occasional clouds, it was challenging and a bit 
slow, but we stuck it out until after four in the afternoon. We saw a 
Golden-crowned Sparrow up there, for our fourth Zonotrichia sparrow of the day. 
Raptors included three Sharpies, a Merlin, a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk, and a 
Golden Eagle. There were five Band-tailed Pigeons up there as well. 


Bob, Kraig, and I stopped at the mouth of the Baker River on the way back, and 
found at least three, possibly four Ruffed Grouse there, in an area where I 
hadn't seen them in years. All in all, this year has been a good one for Ruffed 
Grouse in Skagit County. 


Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14, known nesting near Seattle and range expansion
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 18:11:18 -0700
Thanks, Vicki.
Also, George Neavoll reports that they seem to be regular visitors at 
Ridgefield. 

And thanks for your input,  Jill F.
And thanks to Alan G. re: nesting records - yes, by all means, please let us 
Tweets know any more data or interesting tidbits any of the rest of you have 
about the Western Scrub Jays. 


Nice to have a 'jay day' instead of a 'gray day' today, although a 'Gray Jay 
day' could also be interesting :-) 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net

> From: Vicki King 
> Date: September 27, 2014 2:39:27 PM PDT
> To: Barbara Deihl 
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] W. Scrub Jay sighting  AT  Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14
> 
> I did the Madison Valley Christmas Bird Count for a number of years and we 
had Scrub Jays in the first 3-5 blocks south of Madison and west of the Bush 
School almost every year. I was told they nest in that area. We had a surprise 
Scrub Jay one winter (5 years ago or so) at Judkins Park, overlooking I-90. 

> 
> They seem to be expanding their range pretty rapidly.
> 
> Vicki King
> On Sep 27, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Barbara Deihl  wrote:
> 
>> Since Scrub Jays seem to be of the moment now, I'll throw in my sighting 
from Sat. Sept. 13 at around noon. The jay vocalized its way to some trees in 
the middle of one of the older wetland ponds at Magnuson Park - it hung around 
long enough for me to get a photo, though it's somewhat lacking in quality (if 
you wish to see the pic, I will send it to you in an email). I had first 
noticed the jaylike calls and knew they were not from our usual 'blue jay', the 
Stellar's Jay. It was pretty exciting to see the Scrub Jay around here. There 
seem to have been more Western Scrub Jay sightings in the past few years than 
in previous late summers/early falls... Are they migrating through to the 
south? The only place I've seen them regularly is in and around Portland, OR. 
Have they ever nested at the Fill ? Or in Discovery Park? Or anywhere else in 
the Puget Sound area that anyone knows of? 

>> 
>> Barb Deihl
>> Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
>> barbdeihl AT comcast.net_______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> 
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Subject: Re: Interesting National Geo article
From: Roger <r_craik AT shaw.ca>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:53:47 -0700
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Subject: Varied Thrush
From: Steve Pink <pirangas AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:51:29 -0700
Hi 
Surprise yard bird this afternoon was an early Varied Thrush in one of the 
Holly trees. Previous early record was 9/29/2006 but mid October is more 
typical. 

Cheers,  Steve

Steve Pink
Edmonds, WA
mailto: pirangas AT hotmail.com
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Subject: Marbled godwits still at L. River Rd Pool
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:44:21 -0700
Three seen at 1715 hrs. Also greater yellowlegs a dunlin and 2 western with 22 
least sandpipers 


Bob Flores

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Subject: Marbled godwits still at L. River Rd Pool
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:44:21 -0700
Three seen at 1715 hrs. Also greater yellowlegs a dunlin and 2 western with 22 
least sandpipers 


Bob Flores

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Subject: Interesting National Geo article
From: wong <chupaflor AT igc.org>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:39:05 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

The following has promoted discussion in various forums across the country. 
Some of you might have seen it via ABA. It's an interesting read, and one I 
recommend. 



http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/09/140923-bird-watching-diversity-environment-science/ 


Thanks and good birding,
isadora wong	
seattle, wa
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Subject: scrub-jays in Seattle
From: pan <panmail AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 16:53:29 -0700
It'll be a long time till I get the records digitized (I'm steadily
working on it), but somewhere I have note of the earliest breeding
scrub-jays I observed in Seattle.  It was in Madison Valley sometime
about a dozen years ago, give or take a few.  I remember them expanding
into Seattle within the last 20 years.  Let us know if you have earlier
records.

Cheers,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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  pan
  panmail AT fastmail.fm

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Subject: Vashon Sandhill Cranes and Vashon and Blake Island Greater White-fronted Geese
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 16:29:15 -0700
Yesterday Margie Morgan saw 10 Sandhill Cranes flying over Vashon Island.

 

Also yesterday, six Greater White-fronted Geese flew low overhead at the
boat dock at Blake Island and may have been grazing on part of the park
meadow.  A little later about 30 were flying south at medium height just
east of Blake.  Thursday night I could hear a flock of Greater White-fronted
Geese heading overhead in the dark around 10pm.

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new The Birds of Vashon Island at

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: Merlin sounds...
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 15:57:00 -0700
Hi Tweeters -

What a gorgeous day! I'm outside pruning and snipping and just heard the "kee 
kee kee" sound first and then saw one (at least) fly overhead north. Was doing 
the really fast keeing, but then a nice, slow clic-kee, like morse code, which 
I have not heard before. 


Back to the task(s) at hand.

Caryn / Wedgwood




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Subject: A metalic Tup!
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 15:35:03 -0700
I was on my daily rounds in Lincoln Park, West Seattle, and heard a couple
of metalic "Tup!" call notes.  I thought it was a call note I used to know,
but needed to see the bird to remind myself.  I then saw some twisting
flight through the understory, and thought VARIED THRUSH.  Sure enough a
moment later two or three showed their field marks, and I had my First of
Fall Varied Thrushes for Seattle.

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Subject: Common Loons on Case Inlet
From: Patty Kennedy <pcflyer AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 15:27:36 -0700
Last weekend on the Vaughn Bay sand-spit overlooking Case Inlet (lower Puget 
Sound) we had the pleasure of a close observation of four COMMON LOONS going 
about their business of finding dinner. Three juveniles and one non-breeding 
adult dabbled, dove and vocalized directly in front of us, as close as 20 feet 
from shore, then continued past our observation point following the line of the 
sand-spit. They remained in the area and one abbreviated call-of-the north 
hoot attracted another loon from across the inlet, 1/2 mile or more away. We 
watched until dark, counting heads and eventually seeing a total of six loons 
interacting, sometimes as three pairs, sometimes in other configuration. Hoping 
they overwinter here. 

PCKennedy
Vaughn Bay, WA


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Subject: RE: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14
From: Jill Freidberg <JFreidberg AT uwb.edu>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 22:25:59 +0000
We saw them regularly when we lived in Columbia City. That was as recently as 
two years ago. We'd see them at least once a week. Maybe they nest in Seward 
Park? The Audubon Center there should know. 


Jill

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From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] on behalf of Barbara Deihl 
[barbdeihl AT comcast.net] 

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2014 2:18 PM
To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] W. Scrub Jay sighting  AT  Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14

Since Scrub Jays seem to be of the moment now, I'll throw in my sighting from 
Sat. Sept. 13 at around noon. The jay vocalized its way to some trees in the 
middle of one of the older wetland ponds at Magnuson Park - it hung around long 
enough for me to get a photo, though it's somewhat lacking in quality (if you 
wish to see the pic, I will send it to you in an email). I had first noticed 
the jaylike calls and knew they were not from our usual 'blue jay', the 
Stellar's Jay. It was pretty exciting to see the Scrub Jay around here. There 
seem to have been more Western Scrub Jay sightings in the past few years than 
in previous late summers/early falls... Are they migrating through to the 
south? The only place I've seen them regularly is in and around Portland, OR. 
Have they ever nested at the Fill ? Or in Discovery Park? Or anywhere else in 
the Puget Sound area that anyone knows of? 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
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Subject: W. Scrub Jay sighting @ Magnuson Pk. on 9/13/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 14:18:51 -0700
Since Scrub Jays seem to be of the moment now, I'll throw in my sighting from 
Sat. Sept. 13 at around noon. The jay vocalized its way to some trees in the 
middle of one of the older wetland ponds at Magnuson Park - it hung around long 
enough for me to get a photo, though it's somewhat lacking in quality (if you 
wish to see the pic, I will send it to you in an email). I had first noticed 
the jaylike calls and knew they were not from our usual 'blue jay', the 
Stellar's Jay. It was pretty exciting to see the Scrub Jay around here. There 
seem to have been more Western Scrub Jay sightings in the past few years than 
in previous late summers/early falls... Are they migrating through to the 
south? The only place I've seen them regularly is in and around Portland, OR. 
Have they ever nested at the Fill ? Or in Discovery Park? Or anywhere else in 
the Puget Sound area that anyone knows of? 


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach - NE Seattle
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Subject: Re: Greater White-fronted Geese
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 20:45:29 +0000 (UTC)
Speaking of greater white fronted geese, I saw one land at the Edmonds marsh 
yesterday (Fri. 9/26).  It may have been the same one I saw at the Edmonds 
Civic Playfield two days earlier. 


Scroll down page 55 for photos.
 Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA 

 On Saturday, September 27, 2014 12:56 PM, Hugh Jennings  
wrote: 

   

 This morning, Sat.,    6 Greater White-fronted Geese flew in and landed at 
Larsen Lake which is in the Lake Hills Greenbelt in SE Bellevue, Hugh 
JenningsBellevue, WAh2ouzelATcomcast.net 

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