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Updated on Friday, August 22 at 07:26 PM EST
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Whiskered Treeswift,©BirdQuest

22 Aug Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park [Mark Vernon ]
22 Aug Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park Today [Mark Vernon ]
22 Aug Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Today [Mark Vernon ]
22 Aug Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park [Mark Vernon ]
22 Aug Willet at tulalip bay,sno.co. [Maxine Reid ]
22 Aug Re: more insect inquiries [Kelly Cassidy ]
22 Aug Frenchman's Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
22 Aug Frenchman's Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob ]
22 Aug RE: more insect inquiries [Jeff Gibson ]
22 Aug Do "Stalking Heron" [Jeff Gibson ]
22 Aug RE: more insect inquiries [Danver Hartop ]
22 Aug Re: more insect inquiries [Kelly Cassidy ]
22 Aug a bird-themed citizen science video game [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
21 Aug Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course Monthly Bird Walk 8-21-2014 [Denis DeSilvis ]
21 Aug Chelan Hawkfest []
21 Aug Ruff Photos [Tim Boyer ]
21 Aug Ocean Shores ["Bruce LaBar" ]
21 Aug some Skagit birds [Gary Bletsch ]
21 Aug Nisqually NWR, Aug 20, 2014 [Eric Slagle ]
21 Aug Green Heron [Caryn Schutzler ]
21 Aug RE: Elegant terns in Oregon [Josh Adams ]
21 Aug Elegant terns in Oregon []
21 Aug Fill help: Loosestrife photos [Connie Sidles ]
21 Aug Ruff [Tim ]
21 Aug Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-08-21 ["Michael Hobbs" ]
21 Aug Merlin and Crow Interaction and Chase [John Gatchet ]
21 Aug yard visit surprises [Barbara Deihl ]
21 Aug Yard bird update...and much non-bird rambling... [Vicki Biltz ]
20 Aug A Shorebird Moment [Jeff Gibson ]
20 Aug Vaux's Happening [Larry Schwitters ]
20 Aug September 5-6 WOS field trip [Jim Danzenbaker ]
20 Aug Black Phoebe near Black River/Waterworks Garden 8/19/14 [Barbara Deihl ]
20 Aug Re: warm weather and late broods? [Dennis Paulson ]
20 Aug SAS Vashon field trip first of season birds ["Ed Swan" ]
20 Aug Battle Ground Yard Birding and Night Flight [Jim Danzenbaker ]
20 Aug Battle Ground Yard Birding and Night Flight [Jim Danzenbaker ]
20 Aug Buff breasted sandpiper @ Ocean shores [FanterLane ]
20 Aug Bottle Beach/Midway Beach / Midway (Am. Bittern) / Caryn away from Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler ]
20 Aug White-headed Woodpeckers [Dave Hanscom ]
19 Aug Rufous-less in Kalama ["A & S Hill" ]
19 Aug Geocaching Birders ["A & S Hill" ]
19 Aug Rufous-less in Kalama ["A & S Hill" ]
19 Aug shorebirds and others at Everett Marina ["Terrance and Gilala Dunning" ]
19 Aug warm weather and late broods? [Christine Southwick ]
19 Aug re SAS Mt. Rainier trip [Jon Houghton ]
19 Aug SAS Mt. Rainier Trip 8/17 [Jon Houghton ]
19 Aug RE: RE: Port Townsend Purple Martins [Jeff Gibson ]
19 Aug RE: Port Townsend Purple Martins [Jeff Gibson ]
19 Aug Frenchman's bar park Clark County Washington [Bob ]
19 Aug Frenchman's bar park Clark County Washington [Bob ]
19 Aug Re: Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA [Bob ]
19 Aug Re: [Tweeters] Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA [Bob ]
19 Aug Edmonds marsh mystery sandpiper 8-18-14 [Bill Anderson ]
19 Aug Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA [Bob ]
19 Aug Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA [Bob ]
18 Aug Paradise Ptarmigan [Scott Ramos ]
18 Aug Slaty-backed Gull at Gog-le-hi-te Wetlands []
19 Aug More Shorebirds at Warm Beach, Snohomish County [Marcus Roening ]
18 Aug Frenchmans Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA and shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR [Bob ]
18 Aug Frenchmans Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA and shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR [Bob ]
18 Aug Re: Edmonds Marsh Merlin [Bill Anderson ]
18 Aug Edmonds Marsh Merlin ["Mike McAuliffe" ]
18 Aug Long-tailedJaeger from shore [Mark Oberle ]
18 Aug hot links to songbird videos [Barbara Deihl ]
18 Aug RE: dippers and banding [Christine Southwick ]
18 Aug 2 special songbirds in video - by Ray Hamlyn [Barbara Deihl ]
18 Aug P&R choices for birding trips [Qinglin Ma ]
18 Aug Re: Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA [Bob ]
18 Aug Re: [Tweeters] Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA [Bob ]
18 Aug Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA [Bob ]
18 Aug Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA [Bob ]
18 Aug Neah Bay Pelagic Trip, Saturday, Aug 30 [Boekelheide ]
17 Aug Re: Sense of Scale [Jason Hernandez ]
17 Aug American Bittern feeding at Crescent Lake, Snohomish County [Hank ]
17 Aug Tuck and Robin Lakes, Kititas Co. 8/11-14 [amy schillinger ]
17 Aug Tuck and Robin lakes 8/11-14 [amy schillinger ]

Subject: Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park
From: Mark Vernon <ma_vern AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:56:49 -0700
This posting has bounced a lot today, I think I must be out of practice posting 
on Tweeters! 


There was a Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park today, in the channel that runs 
parral to the river and the trail. This is near the start of the dog area. The 
bird landed quite near to me, and much to my surprise. It was wonderful to see 
it stretch it's wings upward when it landed. There were two Killdeers in close 
proximity. I first saw it at 8:30 am and again at 11. 


Mark Vernon
Auburn, WA
ma_vern AT yahoo.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park Today
From: Mark Vernon <ma_vern AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:49:07 -0700
There was a Solitary Sandpiper in the channel that runs parallel to the 
Samammish River and the trail, near the beginning of the dog area. I first saw 
it at 8:30 am and saw it again at 11. It was accompanied by two Killdeers. 


-Mark Vernon
Auburn, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Today
From: Mark Vernon <ma_vern AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:43:14 -0700
This morning there was a Solitary Sandpiper in the channel just above the dam 
and near the beginning of the dog area. It gave a good show and was accompanied 
by two Killdeers. I first saw it at 8:30 am and found it again at 11. 


Mark Vernon
Auburn, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Solitary Sandpiper at Marymoor Park
From: Mark Vernon <ma_vern AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 12:56:35 -0700
A Solitary Sandpiper was at Marymoor Park this morning; just above the dam and 
where the dog park begins. It was wading in the channel that has puddles in it. 
Nearby were two Killdeers. I first saw it about 8:30 am, and it was till there 
when I checked at 11. 


Despite all of the park activities it was a good day for birds. I had wonderful 
views of a Yellow Wabler, a Black- throated Gray Warbler and at least two 
Townsend's warblers. I may have seen the Snipe in flight. 


Mark Vernon
Auburn, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Willet at tulalip bay,sno.co.
From: Maxine Reid <baconmf AT mail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 12:53:49 -0700
Hi tweeters.
Not a ruff but first time for a Willet .in front of my house at east end of 
Tulalipbat 

Now,12:45pm.
Code 5 for Snoco.
Maxine Reid 
Phone: 3606587391 ,best  seen from our house.

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Subject: Re: more insect inquiries
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:39:59 -0700
Jeff, you get bonus gross-out points just for telling that story.

Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA

> On Aug 22, 2014, at 10:10 AM, Jeff Gibson  wrote:
> 
> I don't know how regularly they do it, but I have seen a Western Tanager 
eating a Yellowjacket. It held it in it's largish beak and beat it against the 
limb it was perched on repeatedly to presumably stun it or kill it before 
eating. Looked like it knew what it was doing. 

> 
> While not a routine part of my diet, I used a similar technique myself back 
in high school when I ate a Yellowjacket on a dare. 

> 
> It all started in Biology class when I slapped a Yellowjacket which was 
crawling around on a table which happened to be seated by a bunch of bullies 
I'd been putting up with all through high school. Bullies are often cowards, as 
these guys were - getting all hysterical about a bug. So walking by I 
nonchalantly slapped it - which can be done if you're careful, and fast. 

> 
> That impressed the bullies, for about 5 seconds - then they dared me to eat 
it. So I quickly picked up the severely stunned insect, carefully by the 
stinger held flat between thumb and finger and ate it . The trick, unnoticed by 
these rubes, was that I had the stinger still pinched between my fingers where 
it couldn't hurt me. 

> 
> It was a fairly successful gross-out - those guys never really bugged me 
again after that. By the way, if the bug is still moving when you eat it, you 
get bonus gross-out points for that. 

> 
> Jeff Gibson
> Insectivore 
> 
> From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
> Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:57:49 -0700
> To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> CC: 
> Subject: [Tweeters] more insect inquiries
> 
> This time my questions are the following:
> 
> Do any birds or mammals routinely eat wasps and bees ? - I've heard that the 
larvae are sweet tasting, but it seems the flying adults would give them quite 
a 'zing on the wing' or cause quite a 'yowl on the prowl', and not be very 
tasty or worth the pain... Yes, I've seen Merlins snap at (and perhaps swallow 
)a yellowjacket, but don't know if they do it more than once, when they are 
curious juveniles. Quick learning curve? Do most of the mammals that go for the 
honeycomb nest structures, just have 'thick skin' or fur, and put up with the 
stings and bites, in order to savor the sweet, heavenly ambrosia? 

> 
> Wasp and bee venom - I just read an article (OK, it was just 'on the 
internet' and from no acclaimed scientific source). The article (URL below - 
you'll probably have to copy & paste it into your browser). The article 
concerns bee venom research and states that early tests on it show some promise 
for treating a couple types of cancer (examples given are melanoma and breast 
cancer). 

> 
> 
http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-News/bee-venom-cancer-treatment/2014/08/14/id/588823/?ns_mail_uid=58247323&ns_mail_job=1581826_08172014&s=al&dkt_nbr=9d7jozbq 

> 
> This on the heels of an experience I just had on Friday, when a 
neighbor-referred wasp eradicator (no poisons used, just a vacuum tube and dry 
ice) came by to liberate some nesting yellowjackets from one of the eaves on my 
house. This fellow not only employed an excellent technique, but, instead of 
tossing the spent little bodies of the wasps in the yard waste or compost heap, 
he has a working agreement with some wasp-venom researchers, and sends them the 
dead wasps for their research. Seems like a good way to re-use these helpful, 
but sometimes pesky and poke-y insects. A win-win-lose-win situation (the 
wasps, of course, get an untimely death, even though they would die eventually 
by fall). 

> 
> Here's a link to some photos with an introductory story, about this event we 
had over at the Barboretum that calm afternoon! 

> 
> https://flic.kr/s/aHsk1TGmBW
> 
> I did ask WaspMan the question I started this post with - his answer was that 
raccoons and crows have been known to tear apart the big paper nests in late 
summer/early fall, to feast on the yummy contents within. This guy isn't a 
schooled naturalist, but certainly has observed a lot about Vespids since his 
start trapping them in 1986. Some of you more 
scientifically/naturalistically-oriented folks likely have a few answers and 
anecdotes to add to this. Again, either post on Tweeters or send to me 
off-list, or both. This reminds me that I have more anecdotes from a Tweet or 2 
to add to the Merlin/dragonfly thread - will share them soon. 

> 
> And to all of you who dredged up memories or articles or thoughts about 
raptors and dragonflies and eating on the wing, THANKS ! 

> 
> Barb Deihl
> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
> barbdeihl AT comcast.net 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________ Tweeters mailing list 
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters 

> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
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Subject: Frenchman's Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:34:23 -0700
Ryan Abe and I had a good day at the park the wind was a bit bothersome and we 
had no usual birds just good numbers. Here are highlights 


WARBLERS
Wilson's  6
Yellow  4
Black-throated gray  41
Townsend's  2
Orange-crowned 4

Flycatcher
Pacific-sloped  1
Hammond's  2

Warbling vireo  32
Western tanager  6
Brown creeper  4

I was surprised we only had 2 black-headed grosbeak and again we found the 
large flock of young cowbirds there were atleast 40 in it. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Frenchman's Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:34:23 -0700
Ryan Abe and I had a good day at the park the wind was a bit bothersome and we 
had no usual birds just good numbers. Here are highlights 


WARBLERS
Wilson's  6
Yellow  4
Black-throated gray  41
Townsend's  2
Orange-crowned 4

Flycatcher
Pacific-sloped  1
Hammond's  2

Warbling vireo  32
Western tanager  6
Brown creeper  4

I was surprised we only had 2 black-headed grosbeak and again we found the 
large flock of young cowbirds there were atleast 40 in it. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: RE: more insect inquiries
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 10:10:11 -0700
I don't know how regularly they do it, but I have seen a Western Tanager eating 
a Yellowjacket. It held it in it's largish beak and beat it against the limb it 
was perched on repeatedly to presumably stun it or kill it before eating. 
Looked like it knew what it was doing. 

While not a routine part of my diet, I used a similar technique myself back in 
high school when I ate a Yellowjacket on a dare. 

It all started in Biology class when I slapped a Yellowjacket which was 
crawling around on a table which happened to be seated by a bunch of bullies 
I'd been putting up with all through high school. Bullies are often cowards, as 
these guys were - getting all hysterical about a bug. So walking by I 
nonchalantly slapped it - which can be done if you're careful, and fast. 

That impressed the bullies, for about 5 seconds - then they dared me to eat it. 
So I quickly picked up the severely stunned insect, carefully by the stinger 
held flat between thumb and finger and ate it . The trick, unnoticed by these 
rubes, was that I had the stinger still pinched between my fingers where it 
couldn't hurt me. 

It was a fairly successful gross-out - those guys never really bugged me again 
after that. By the way, if the bug is still moving when you eat it, you get 
bonus gross-out points for that. 

Jeff GibsonInsectivore 

From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:57:49 -0700
To: Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
CC: 
Subject: [Tweeters] more insect inquiries

This time my questions are the following:
Do any birds or mammals routinely eat wasps and bees ? - I've heard that the 
larvae are sweet tasting, but it seems the flying adults would give them quite 
a 'zing on the wing' or cause quite a 'yowl on the prowl', and not be very 
tasty or worth the pain... Yes, I've seen Merlins snap at (and perhaps swallow 
)a yellowjacket, but don't know if they do it more than once, when they are 
curious juveniles. Quick learning curve? Do most of the mammals that go for the 
honeycomb nest structures, just have 'thick skin' or fur, and put up with the 
stings and bites, in order to savor the sweet, heavenly ambrosia? 

Wasp and bee venom - I just read an article (OK, it was just 'on the internet' 
and from no acclaimed scientific source). The article (URL below - you'll 
probably have to copy & paste it into your browser). The article concerns bee 
venom research and states that early tests on it show some promise for treating 
a couple types of cancer (examples given are melanoma and breast cancer). 


http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-News/bee-venom-cancer-treatment/2014/08/14/id/588823/?ns_mail_uid=58247323&ns_mail_job=1581826_08172014&s=al&dkt_nbr=9d7jozbq 

This on the heels of an experience I just had on Friday, when a 
neighbor-referred wasp eradicator (no poisons used, just a vacuum tube and dry 
ice) came by to liberate some nesting yellowjackets from one of the eaves on my 
house. This fellow not only employed an excellent technique, but, instead of 
tossing the spent little bodies of the wasps in the yard waste or compost heap, 
he has a working agreement with some wasp-venom researchers, and sends them the 
dead wasps for their research. Seems like a good way to re-use these helpful, 
but sometimes pesky and poke-y insects. A win-win-lose-win situation (the 
wasps, of course, get an untimely death, even though they would die eventually 
by fall). 

Here's a link to some photos with an introductory story, about this event we 
had over at the Barboretum that calm afternoon! 

https://flic.kr/s/aHsk1TGmBW
I did ask WaspMan the question I started this post with - his answer was that 
raccoons and crows have been known to tear apart the big paper nests in late 
summer/early fall, to feast on the yummy contents within. This guy isn't a 
schooled naturalist, but certainly has observed a lot about Vespids since his 
start trapping them in 1986. Some of you more 
scientifically/naturalistically-oriented folks likely have a few answers and 
anecdotes to add to this. Again, either post on Tweeters or send to me 
off-list, or both. This reminds me that I have more anecdotes from a Tweet or 2 
to add to the Merlin/dragonfly thread - will share them soon. 

And to all of you who dredged up memories or articles or thoughts about raptors 
and dragonflies and eating on the wing, THANKS ! 

Barb DeihlMatthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattlebarbdeihl AT comcast.net 
 



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Subject: Do "Stalking Heron"
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 09:15:31 -0700
A few years ago I posted about "Be A Stump" which is what I call sitting down 
and being quiet in one spot for awhile to see what birds or other creatures 
come by. It works great .If you like that you might also try "Stalking Heron". 

"Stalking Heron" sounds like a yoga pose maybe, but really it's a naturalist 
pose. The only equipment I use are my close - focusing binoculars and, 
sometimes, rubber boots. 

Walking along a freshwater or saltwater shore, or anywhere really, do "Stalking 
Heron" - walk slowly and quietly until you see something interesting along the 
shore or in the water, then be still and watch. If you don't see much at first, 
stop at a likely spot and be still until you do see something. 

Since I don't have the eyesight of a Heron, close-focusing binoculars make all 
the difference in seeing water creatures clearly with out getting too wet, 
sandy, having to put a snorkel and mask on, wear hip-waders, or haul around a 
bathyscope. Go light - that's the way I roll. 

I've been "doing the heron" quite a bit in Port Townsend this year while I'm 
here for my temp job of herding the elderly. North Beach is my favorite spot 
because of its mix of rocky and sandy shore - lots of inter-tidal diversity. A 
good bird spot too. 

Sometimes, when I don't see much moving around in the tidepool's etc. I just 
pick a spot in the water nearby and watch with my binocs until something moves 
in my chosen field of vision. Doing this the other day I discovered the 
interesting sessile Jellyfish (Haliclystus stejnegiri) which doesn't float 
around like a typical jelly, and with its eight 'lobes' doesn't look like one 
either. This little (less than 3/4" across) critter was half hidden in the sea 
algae it was attached to. Took a while to notice it. 

As I stayed still, like a heron, peering at my little spot, I noticed a area 
where there was quite a current - tiny bits of floating debris drifting past 
this spot in the sand, would suddenly shoot away! As I peered more closely I 
realized I was looking at the siphon of a big Horse Clam, the current being the 
out-flow of this filter feeder, circulating water. Then, as I looked even 
closer, I saw tiny copepods jerking around, some about the size of a comma in 
this post - others even smaller were at the limits of my focus. All this was 
happening in an area about 6 X 6 inches square. 

While all this was happening, my role model, an actual Great Blue Heron about 
50 ft away, was doing the heron in the largest tidepool on this stretch of 
beach. I had found this beautiful pool, full of giant Laminaria, and Feather 
Boa algae, surfgrass etc. to be a good fish watching spot on past trips. With a 
jab, the Heron snagged a wiggly eel-like blenny, and gulped it down. Nice to 
watch an expert in action. And non -action. 

One caveat about this technique ; when practicing "Stalking Heron" in public, 
you may be taken for an idiot, or worse (" johnny, stay away from that man!) by 
unsuspecting citizens, as you stare at the water at your feet with binoculars. 
Of course someone might be curious - one of those "teachable moments" maybe. 
Just sayin'. 

Jeff Gibsondoing the heron, inWherever Wa





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Subject: RE: more insect inquiries
From: Danver Hartop <dan AT hartop.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 08:47:21 -0700
When I lived in California I used to love to watch the Say's Phoebes darting 
around catching bees. At first I was intrigued by their aerial maneuvers 
thinking they were catching flies and such. After grabbing my telephoto lens, I 
caught one sitting on a roof with what was clearly a bee. Their beak is long 
enough to hold it securely, and they would sometimes wipe against something. 
Between them squishing with their beak, and wiping it, im sure they kill it 
before swallowing. They would also hold it in their mouth for quite some time. 


The one thing I couldn't determine was if there was more to all their darting 
in the sky, like perhaps to line up a certain wat. For the few I managed to see 
sitting with a bee, the bee always seemed to be sideways in their beak, so 
perhaps they always perform a side attack? It did seem to be their favorite, 
because I don't ever recall seeing them with other insects in their mouth. A 
quick search seems to confirm this as their dietary first choice. 


Danver Hartop
Sammamish
dan AT hartop.com

-----Original Message-----
From: "Kelly Cassidy" 
Sent: ‎8/‎22/‎2014 7:59 AM
To: "Barbara Deihl" 
Cc: "Tweeters AT u.washington.edu" 
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] more insect inquiries

I'd heard some time ago (don't remember the source) that House Wrens eat wasps. 
I did a web search after your post, however, and the information I found 
suggested that wasps are a very small part of House Wren diet, but ran across a 
few tidbits of info suggesting that titmice eat a fair number of wasps. 



That said, at our place among the wheat fields south of Pullman, there seems to 
be an inverse correlation between House Wrens and wasps. In years in which we 
have a nesting pair of House Wrens, my impression is of fewer wasps. This year, 
I'm fairly certain there were 2 nesting pairs (unless the females also sing; I 
heard 2 wrens singing from opposite ends of the yard during much of spring). 
We've had very few paper wasps or yellow jackets (not sure which) this year. 
Coincidence? 



I presume that many birds that prey on stinging insects make their attacks on 
cool mornings when the insects move slowly. Or perhaps the tiny quick-moving 
birds like House Wrens and titmice can move quickly enough to outmaneuver the 
insects. 


Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA

On Aug 17, 2014, at 1:57 PM, Barbara Deihl  wrote:


This time my questions are the following:


Do any birds or mammals routinely eat wasps and bees ? - I've heard that the 
larvae are sweet tasting, but it seems the flying adults would give them quite 
a 'zing on the wing' or cause quite a 'yowl on the prowl', and not be very 
tasty or worth the pain... Yes, I've seen Merlins snap at (and perhaps swallow 
)a yellowjacket, but don't know if they do it more than once, when they are 
curious juveniles. Quick learning curve? Do most of the mammals that go for the 
honeycomb nest structures, just have 'thick skin' or fur, and put up with the 
stings and bites, in order to savor the sweet, heavenly ambrosia? 



Wasp and bee venom - I just read an article (OK, it was just 'on the internet' 
and from no acclaimed scientific source). The article (URL below - you'll 
probably have to copy & paste it into your browser). The article concerns bee 
venom research and states that early tests on it show some promise for treating 
a couple types of cancer (examples given are melanoma and breast cancer). 




http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-News/bee-venom-cancer-treatment/2014/08/14/id/588823/?ns_mail_uid=58247323&ns_mail_job=1581826_08172014&s=al&dkt_nbr=9d7jozbq 



This on the heels of an experience I just had on Friday, when a 
neighbor-referred wasp eradicator (no poisons used, just a vacuum tube and dry 
ice) came by to liberate some nesting yellowjackets from one of the eaves on my 
house. This fellow not only employed an excellent technique, but, instead of 
tossing the spent little bodies of the wasps in the yard waste or compost heap, 
he has a working agreement with some wasp-venom researchers, and sends them the 
dead wasps for their research. Seems like a good way to re-use these helpful, 
but sometimes pesky and poke-y insects. A win-win-lose-win situation (the 
wasps, of course, get an untimely death, even though they would die eventually 
by fall). 



Here's a link to some photos with an introductory story, about this event we 
had over at the Barboretum that calm afternoon! 



https://flic.kr/s/aHsk1TGmBW


I did ask WaspMan the question I started this post with - his answer was that 
raccoons and crows have been known to tear apart the big paper nests in late 
summer/early fall, to feast on the yummy contents within. This guy isn't a 
schooled naturalist, but certainly has observed a lot about Vespids since his 
start trapping them in 1986. Some of you more 
scientifically/naturalistically-oriented folks likely have a few answers and 
anecdotes to add to this. Again, either post on Tweeters or send to me 
off-list, or both. This reminds me that I have more anecdotes from a Tweet or 2 
to add to the Merlin/dragonfly thread - will share them soon. 



And to all of you who dredged up memories or articles or thoughts about raptors 
and dragonflies and eating on the wing, THANKS ! 



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net 


 






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Subject: Re: more insect inquiries
From: Kelly Cassidy <highsteppe AT icloud.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 07:59:08 -0700
I'd heard some time ago (don't remember the source) that House Wrens eat wasps. 
I did a web search after your post, however, and the information I found 
suggested that wasps are a very small part of House Wren diet, but ran across a 
few tidbits of info suggesting that titmice eat a fair number of wasps. 


That said, at our place among the wheat fields south of Pullman, there seems to 
be an inverse correlation between House Wrens and wasps. In years in which we 
have a nesting pair of House Wrens, my impression is of fewer wasps. This year, 
I'm fairly certain there were 2 nesting pairs (unless the females also sing; I 
heard 2 wrens singing from opposite ends of the yard during much of spring). 
We've had very few paper wasps or yellow jackets (not sure which) this year. 
Coincidence? 


I presume that many birds that prey on stinging insects make their attacks on 
cool mornings when the insects move slowly. Or perhaps the tiny quick-moving 
birds like House Wrens and titmice can move quickly enough to outmaneuver the 
insects. 


Kelly Cassidy
Pullman, WA

> On Aug 17, 2014, at 1:57 PM, Barbara Deihl  wrote:
> 
> This time my questions are the following:
> 
> Do any birds or mammals routinely eat wasps and bees ? - I've heard that the 
larvae are sweet tasting, but it seems the flying adults would give them quite 
a 'zing on the wing' or cause quite a 'yowl on the prowl', and not be very 
tasty or worth the pain... Yes, I've seen Merlins snap at (and perhaps swallow 
)a yellowjacket, but don't know if they do it more than once, when they are 
curious juveniles. Quick learning curve? Do most of the mammals that go for the 
honeycomb nest structures, just have 'thick skin' or fur, and put up with the 
stings and bites, in order to savor the sweet, heavenly ambrosia? 

> 
> Wasp and bee venom - I just read an article (OK, it was just 'on the 
internet' and from no acclaimed scientific source). The article (URL below - 
you'll probably have to copy & paste it into your browser). The article 
concerns bee venom research and states that early tests on it show some promise 
for treating a couple types of cancer (examples given are melanoma and breast 
cancer). 

> 
> 
http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-News/bee-venom-cancer-treatment/2014/08/14/id/588823/?ns_mail_uid=58247323&ns_mail_job=1581826_08172014&s=al&dkt_nbr=9d7jozbq 

> 
> This on the heels of an experience I just had on Friday, when a 
neighbor-referred wasp eradicator (no poisons used, just a vacuum tube and dry 
ice) came by to liberate some nesting yellowjackets from one of the eaves on my 
house. This fellow not only employed an excellent technique, but, instead of 
tossing the spent little bodies of the wasps in the yard waste or compost heap, 
he has a working agreement with some wasp-venom researchers, and sends them the 
dead wasps for their research. Seems like a good way to re-use these helpful, 
but sometimes pesky and poke-y insects. A win-win-lose-win situation (the 
wasps, of course, get an untimely death, even though they would die eventually 
by fall). 

> 
> Here's a link to some photos with an introductory story, about this event we 
had over at the Barboretum that calm afternoon! 

> 
> https://flic.kr/s/aHsk1TGmBW
> 
> I did ask WaspMan the question I started this post with - his answer was that 
raccoons and crows have been known to tear apart the big paper nests in late 
summer/early fall, to feast on the yummy contents within. This guy isn't a 
schooled naturalist, but certainly has observed a lot about Vespids since his 
start trapping them in 1986. Some of you more 
scientifically/naturalistically-oriented folks likely have a few answers and 
anecdotes to add to this. Again, either post on Tweeters or send to me 
off-list, or both. This reminds me that I have more anecdotes from a Tweet or 2 
to add to the Merlin/dragonfly thread - will share them soon. 

> 
> And to all of you who dredged up memories or articles or thoughts about 
raptors and dragonflies and eating on the wing, THANKS ! 

> 
> Barb Deihl
> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
> barbdeihl AT comcast.net 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: a bird-themed citizen science video game
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:35:16 +0100
hey tweets,

thanks to my pals, currently at IOC26 in Tokyo who are sharing so many
wonderful things with me via twitter, i've got something fun to share with
all of you, too.

do you love hidden object video games? do you like helping scientists with
their research? if so, you will LOVE this research project into the
evolution of egg camouflage for three species of ground-nesting birds. it's
citizen science and yes, it's so much fun! give it a go here:

https://nightjar.exeter.ac.uk/egglab/

i warn you: it's fun, it's interesting and dang, but it's addictive.

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]_______________________________________________
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Subject: Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course Monthly Bird Walk 8-21-2014
From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:32:24 -0700
Tweeters,

Although it was cool starting out (~50degF), it warmed up as we traveled,
ending at ~72degF; little or no wind, mostly sunny -- a fine day. Walked the
usual route. A flying GREAT BLUE HERON was the first one we've tallied -
they're in the area, but the is the first time we actually had one on bird
walk day. Notable numbers of RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH (16), RED CROSSBILL (15),
and PINE SISKIN (30), with crossbills and siskins evident during most of our
route. The HOODED MERGANSER at the pond near the driving range had captured
a newt, and was battering/washing it for the entire 5+ minutes we watched.
We hit a pronounced "hot-spot" in the open area (Garry oak, Douglas-fir,
hazelnut predominant vegetation) along the road behind Hodge Lake: a loose
flock of ORANGE-CROWNED and WILSON'S WARBLERS, BLACK-CAPPED and
CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, and a DOWNY WOODPECKER
kept our attention for nearly 20 minutes. (eBird report follows.)

 

The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at
8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf
Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the
following:

.       September 18, 2014

.       October 16, 2014

.       November 20, 2014

 

Anyone is welcome to join us!

 

Eagles Pride GC, Pierce, US-WA

Aug 21, 2014 8:15 AM - 12:35 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.5 mile(s)

 

39 species (+1 other taxa)

 

Canada Goose  9

Wood Duck  3     Pair (or at least a male and female) at pond next to 6th
hole; another male at Hodge Lake

Hooded Merganser  1

Pied-billed Grebe  6     Adult plus 4 imm at Hodge Lake, which is where we
saw the 4 juveniles last month

Great Blue Heron  1     Flying -- first sighting on walk day

Red-tailed Hawk  2

Band-tailed Pigeon  4

Mourning Dove  18     A walk-day high

Anna's Hummingbird  3

Downy Woodpecker  2

Northern Flicker  2

Western Wood-Pewee  2

Steller's Jay  4

American Crow  3

Violet-green Swallow  8

Barn Swallow  95

Cliff Swallow  1

swallow sp.  4

Black-capped Chickadee  18

Chestnut-backed Chickadee  20

Red-breasted Nuthatch  16

Brown Creeper  1

Bewick's Wren  1

Golden-crowned Kinglet  1

American Robin  5     A walk-day low

European Starling  40

Cedar Waxwing  3

Orange-crowned Warbler  4

Common Yellowthroat  8

Wilson's Warbler  2

Spotted Towhee  5

Song Sparrow  2

White-crowned Sparrow  27

Dark-eyed Junco  12

Red-winged Blackbird  1

Brown-headed Cowbird  2

House Finch  7

Red Crossbill  15

Pine Siskin  30

American Goldfinch  6

 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19537825

 

May all your birds be identified,

 

Denis DeSilvis

Roy, WA

avnacrs4birds at outlook dot com

 

 
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Subject: Chelan Hawkfest
From: merdave AT homenetnw.net
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:44:08 -0700 (PDT)




Chelan Ridge Hawk Migration Festival2014

 Pateros, WA (City Park), Saturday, September 13, 2014; 8:00 am to 3:00 p.m.

Join the Methow Valley Ranger District, North Central Washington Audubon
Society, and Hawk Watch International this fall for the fifth annual
Chelan Ridge Hawk Migration Festival!  This family event combines free
activities in Pateros Memorial Park with trips to the Chelan Ridge site to
learn about and celebrate raptors as they journey to winter territories. 
The festival takes place in Pateros Memorial Park and will have vendors,
live raptors, a birding field trip, and projects for kids. The trip to and
from Chelan Ridge lasts 4 hours and includes seeing raptors as they are
banded and released. Pre-registration is required.

Just Added: Raptor ID Workshop with Jerry Liguori

Join Jerry Liguori from Hawk Watch International for a raptor ID workshop
in Pateros at 7PM on Friday, September 12th. . He has studied raptors
throughout North America researching raptor biology, life history, ID,
migration, and general behavior. Jerry is a premier raptor ID expert and
has authored 3 books: Hawks from Every Angle, Hawks at a Distance, and The
Crossley ID Guide: Raptors.

Jerry will also be available on Saturday up on the ridge for people taking
the shuttle.  He will discuss in-flight identification as birds migrate
down the ridge, and in-hand identification including sexing and aging.

More information and on-line registration for the shuttle,field trip, and
workshop is available at www.ncwaudubon.org.
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Subject: Ruff Photos
From: Tim Boyer <tboyer AT seanet.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:39:10 -0700
I posted three images of the Ruff on my blog at TimBoyerPhotography.com Here's 
a link: http://www.timboyerphotography.com/blog/ 


The bird was found south of the casino, and was fairly tolerant of most 
vehicles and beach walkers. It was feeding and preened before it was disturbed 
and moved south. I relocated it half an hour later north of the casino and was 
joined by other birders, Ken and Fanter Lane and then by Bruce LaBar. After 
extended views it flew north and I didn't relocate it. 



Tim Boyer
Renton, WA
tboyer AT seanet.com



 

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Subject: Ocean Shores
From: "Bruce LaBar" <blabar AT harbornet.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:03:06 -0700
After reading Fanter and Ken Lane’s report from the Oyhut game range in Ocean 
Shores yesterday, I decided to head there today as high tide was due around 
11:30 a.m. Other birders had the same idea as I met Bob Sundstrom with a group 
from Mercer Island and Michael Charest from Tacoma. Later, I birded with Jim 
Danzenbaker and Randy Hill. The shorebirds did not disappoint! We had the 
following with estimated numbers. 


Black-bellied Plover-9
American Golden-Plover-2, excellent views on the far pond. Adults losing there 
breeding plumage. 

Pacific Golden-Plover-2, in flight, calling, one juvenile gave us pretty good 
views. 

Semipalmated Plover-20
Spotted Sandpiper-1
Greater Yellowlegs-5
Lesser Yellowlegs-1, perhaps 2
Ruddy Turnstone-1, Michael saw earlier.
Semipalmated Sandpiper-3, excellent views with Western’s and Least's for 
comparison. 

Western Sandpiper-1800-2000
Least Sandpiper-35
Stilt Sandpiper-2, both juveniles.Together in first pond.
Short-billed Dowitcher-25
Red-necked Phalarope-1

Later in the afternoon, I checked Tweeters and saw that Tim Boyer had just 
found a juvenile Ruff at the beach in front of the Quinault casino. Drove there 
and found Tim, Fanter and Ken viewing the bird at very close range. Fanter took 
many photos. Excellent views by all. 


It is surely beginning to look like an outstanding shorebird season for late 
summer and fall! 


Bruce LaBar
Tacoma, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: some Skagit birds
From: Gary Bletsch <garybletsch AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:19:35 -0700
Dear Tweeters,

Today (21 August 2014) was a good birding day in Skagit County. I managed to 
find 14 species of shorebirds, plus lots of other species. Here are some 
highlights. 


Green Heron: 1 juvenile at Channel Drive.

Goldeneye sp: one female-type at Hayton Preserve. It looked to me like a 
Common, which is very unlikely. Then again, Barrow's isn't all that likely in 
saltwater in August, either.I took some monstrously bad photos. If I can 
reawaken my Flickr account, I will put the pictures there. 


Peregrine Falcons:they annoyed meat the West Ninety, at Channel Drive, and at 
the Game Range. That's because there were so many shorebirds to watch, but the 
falcons kept the shorebirds nervous all day. 


American Kestrel: one female at Jensen Access, not a place I have seen them 
often. 


Semipalmated Plover: 23 at the West Ninety.

Baird's Sandpiper: two at the West Ninety, three at Channel Drive.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: two at the West Ninety.

Red-necked Phalarope: eight at Channel Drive.

Black Turnstone: an out-of-habitat juvenilewas foraging aloneon the mudflats 
at the West Ninety, keeping away from a huge flock of peeps. 


Yours truly,

Gary Bletsch_______________________________________________
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Subject: Nisqually NWR, Aug 20, 2014
From: Eric Slagle <hannaslagle AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:11:28 -0700
Hi Tweeters,

Thirty six of is enjoyed another fun day at Nisqually. It was one of those days 
where the action was either really slow or really fast. Low tide was 0' 6" at 
8:53am and high tide of 12'2" at 4:37pm. The route for the group did not 
include the estuary boardwalk. Highlights are below, followed by Nathanael's 
eBird posting. 


There were a number of excellent sightings at the visitor center including 
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, WESTERN TANAGER, WARBLING VIREO AND GREEN HERON 
and a flyover of RED CROSSBILLS. The first part of the walk along the access 
road behind the parking lot and the riverside of the boardwalk loop, including 
the riparian overlook was pretty quiet. We did manage to pick up YELLOW 
WARBLER, SWAINSON'S THRUSH AND MacGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER. 


The action picked up a lot at the beginning of the estuary dike trail. 
Sightings here included YELLOW WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, WILLOW FLYCATCHER, 
DOWNY WOODPECKER, and a flock of BUSHTIT. The fresh water side of the dike 
trail continues to be almost a sure spot for SORA and VIRGINIA RAIL. We also 
had CINNAMON TEAL, BLUE-WINGED TEAL, WILSON'S SNIPE, PURPLE MARTIN, NORTHERN 
PINTAIL, HOODED MERGANSER, and NORTHERN SHOVELER. We got great looks at a 
MERLIN trying to tangle with a PEREGRINE as both flew above us. It was an 
excellent opportunity for size comparison. The walk back was mostly slow with 
no new birds seen. 


Species for the day:  64
Mammals:  two beaver at the visitor center pond.

Until next week when Phil and Shep return.

Eric Slagle
Olympia
> 
> Nisqually NWR, Thurston, US-WA
> Aug 20, 2014 7:05 AM - 12:37 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.4 > 64 species (+1 other taxa) > > Wood Duck 8 > Mallard 200 > Blue-winged Teal 1 > Cinnamon Teal 7 > Northern Shoveler 4 > Northern Pintail 25 > Hooded Merganser 4 > Pied-billed Grebe 6 > Great Blue Heron 10 > Green Heron 1 > Northern Harrier 2 > Bald Eagle 5 > Red-tailed Hawk 2 > Virginia Rail 3 > Sora 1 > American Coot 3 > Killdeer 1 > Greater Yellowlegs 3 > Least Sandpiper 3 > Western Sandpiper 17 > Wilson's Snipe 2 > Ring-billed Gull 15 > Glaucous-winged Gull 15 > Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 10 > Vaux's Swift 2 > Belted Kingfisher 3 > Downy Woodpecker 2 > Merlin 1 > Peregrine Falcon 1 > Western Wood-Pewee 3 > Willow Flycatcher 1 > Pacific-slope Flycatcher 1 > Warbling Vireo 2 > American/Northwestern Crow 75 > Common Raven 1 > Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1 > Purple Martin 2 > Violet-green Swallow 1 > Barn Swallow 150 > Cliff Swallow 1 > Black-capped Chickadee 10 > Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2 > Bushtit (Pacific) 21 > Brown Creeper 8 > Marsh Wren 3 > Bewick's Wren 1 > Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 > Swainson's Thrush 2 > American Robin 4 > European Starling 250 > Cedar Waxwing 20 > MacGillivray's Warbler 1 > Common Yellowthroat 9 > Yellow Warbler 3 > Black-throated Gray Warbler 1 > Wilson's Warbler 1 > Spotted Towhee (Pacific) 1 > Savannah Sparrow 10 > Song Sparrow 5 > White-crowned Sparrow 3 > Western Tanager 3 > Red-winged Blackbird 1 > Brown-headed Cowbird 2 > Red Crossbill 14 > American Goldfinch 9 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19534005 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)_______________________________________________ Tweeters mailing list Tweeters AT u.washington.edu http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
Subject: Green Heron
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:16:13 -0700
Standing on the boardwalk at Nisqually and just as we were walking by I said I 
wish we could see a Green Heron and there one was - between the branches...very 
well hidden but somehow it just showed itself to me. We started thinking it was 
another Bittern but when we got back to the Nature Shop, we checked Sibleys and 
decided it was a juvie Green Heron!! 


Caryn / headed back to Seattle (reluctantly!!)

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
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Subject: RE: Elegant terns in Oregon
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 14:15:12 -0700
Regarding Elegant Terns, in doing some prep for a trip to the coast
tomorrow I noticed that Charlie Wright reported Elegant Terns just north of
Tokeland on 8/18. Its the only report I've seen so far on Tweeters or eBird
thus far.

His checklists are linked below:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19508942
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19509122

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Elegant terns in Oregon
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:58:23 +0000 (UTC)
Tweeters, 

On this date last year, I filmed Elegant Terns at Grayland, WA. 
I just read an Oregon report of large numbers seen on the coast there for the 
past week. 


Let's hope these beauties venture a little further North again this year. If 
so, we may see them soon. 


Dan Reiff 
Mercer island _______________________________________________
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Subject: Fill help: Loosestrife photos
From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:52:41 -0700
Hey tweets, does anyone have photos from the late 1980s or early to mid 1990s 
showing Purple Loosestrife at its most prevalent stage at the Fill? I have a 
request from UWBG to assemble some photos showing how bad the loosestrife 
infestation was, and how effective the beetles are now in controlling it. UWBG 
wants to show the WSDOT mitigation people why spraying vast quantities of 
herbicide there is not necessary. Help! - 
Connie_______________________________________________ 

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Subject: Ruff
From: Tim <tboyer AT seanet.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:38:51 -0700
I am pretty sure I just saw a Ruff in a mixed flock of shorebirds also 
containing Blackbellied Plovers, Shortbilled Dowitchers and the usual peeps. At 
Ocean Shores just south of the casino on the outer beach. 


Tim Boyer
Renton
(206) 730-6925

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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2014-08-21
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor AT frontier.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:22:31 -0700
Tweets – it was an odd day at Marymoor. Clouds came in at sunrise, which kept 
it dark and cool all morning. There was a bit of a breeze too, which made 
finding the mostly-silent birds more difficult. We had a lot of misses, plus 
some odd surprises. But mostly it was fairly birdless. 


Highlights:

Common Merganser        Three at weir
RED-NECKED GREBE        I had one late from NE corner of lake
Green Heron                    Two juveniles at Rowing Club pond
Cooper’s Hawk                One near velodrome just before 6:30
WILSON’S SNIPE              1 at lake, earliest fall sighting ever
Band-tailed Pigeon          2-3 birds
Eurasian Collared-Dove  1 at fields 7-8-9
Barn Owl                         1-2 before 6 a.m.
Short-eared Owl?             95% sure, based on darkness, flight
Warbling Vireo                2, west edge of Dog Meadow
Purple Martin                  Baby looking out of gourd nest, adults overhead
Violet-green Swallow      Missed last 2 weeks; about 12-15 today
Bl.-thr. Gray Warbler      One, west edge of Dog Meadow
Wilson’s Warbler            West edge of Dog Meadow and at least 1 more
Western Tanager            Saw two, heard third

We did have large numbers (80+) of HOUSE FINCH, with a good group (40?) of 
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH (but no Lesser noted). 


Numbers for many species were way down. We only had about 3 GREAT BLUE HERONS, 
and none in the nesting trees. We had no more than 2-3 WESTERN WOOD-PEWEES, 
heard just 2 SWAINSON’S THRUSH, has probably only a dozen or so AMERICAN 
ROBINS, no large numbers of CEDAR WAXWINGS, and just 2 or so each of YELLOW 
WARBLERS, SPOTTED TOWHEES, SAVANNAH SPARROWS, and SONG SPARROWS. I think there 
was just one BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, and two BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS. 


Misses included Pied-billed Grebe, Vaux’s Swift, any woodpecker except 
Northern Flicker, Willow Flycatcher, Bushtit, Brown Creeper, and Orange-crowned 
Warbler. 


Still, we managed 55 species for this weird day.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com_______________________________________________
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Subject: Merlin and Crow Interaction and Chase
From: John Gatchet <jfgatchet AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:54:44 -0700
This morning crows were diving on a bird I could not see that was hidden in
a Douglas Fir.  As I was watching them swoop and dive suddenly a crow was
binging chased by a MERLIN.  The MERLIN went after several crows and then
perched in a Douglas Fir where I could see the beautiful adult female.

A crow came near the tree it was in and it once again gave chase and hit or
just skimmed the crows back.  The crow crashed into a tree, but quickly
regained composure and flew off.  The MERLIN basically chased the crows
away by going after at least three of them.  It was quite a show of speed,
maneuverability and attitude on the part of this female MERLIN.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: yard visit surprises
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 10:24:40 -0700
2 nights ago, at 10:30 p.m. a Barn Owl flew over and let out a distinctive 
shriek - must be one of the recently-fledged juveniles from Magnuson. 


Yesterday, midday, while involved in a cleaning project indoors, I happened to 
look out an open door to the big (very much alive) cherry tree and caught sight 
of a Pileated Woodpecker checking out the tree trunk(s) - a minute later, it 
was off down the street, calling from another tree or phone pole. That made the 
cleaning worthwhile ! 


And, I think, though I'm not positive, I heard a couple of "whits" of a 
Swainson's Thrush when I was out in the backyard yesterday - never saw the 
'whitter', though. 



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Yard bird update...and much non-bird rambling...
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 08:29:41 -0700
Hey Tweeters!
  Things have been hopping over here, but more along the mice thing, then
the birds.  The bird numbers have dropped, but we have some nice ones that
are constant.  Cedar Waxwings are pretty much out here all day long, and
Crossbills are several times a day.  Anna's are in abundance, as are the
non-migratory ones...
  Last week we started having two Coopers Hawks showing up every couple of
days.
I did meet the neighbors, and the mice are simply abundant around here,
even my golden retriever has been chasing, them.
  Haven't seen or heard the Barred, or Western Screech owls for a while.
The Turkey Vulture has excused himself and flown off to a more productive
area.
  I did have a neighbor kid come and welcome me to the neighborhood, while
staring with hope in his eyes, at the very overgrown acre of grass in the
front.  I think he was expecting one of the pretty young mothers that are
in the other three houses on this road.  I had been cleaning and cooking,
and looked pretty scary.  Mark said instead of a mom, he saw a
momster...(that was pretty funny, and very true!
  Hairy and Downy BOTH found my suet the same day, but the Pileateds are
nowhere in sight.
It seems they stick to the back five acres.
  No more elk, and no deer either, but the neighborhood pit bull is very
good at leaving his rather large signature on my grass without hesitation.

One thing I do love most, is getting to know all the Crossbill variations.
I've had a few calls and notes stump me, and I have to get out my
recordings and see what was going on, but chances are, I will just have to
learn the old fashioned way.
  Mourning doves have been here a couple of times, and leave with a great
deal of disappointment in me as a birder.  I'm only using sunflower and
suet, and they didn't appreciate the situation with all the field mice here.
  The starlings are not around now, and the house sparrow has not been much
either.
The neighbors moved their quarter horse down the the other pasture and put
their Palamino (SP?) in the pasture across the street.  He LOVES dogs, and
gets so excited when Isabelle is out, he runs back and forth on the
property, in an attempt to have a chase with her.  The other neighbors dog
is smaller and gets under the fence and plays with him all the time...

Well, have a wonderful weekend all of you!
Vicki Biltz
Buckley, WA 9821
vickibiltz AT gmail.com





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Subject: A Shorebird Moment
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:49:35 -0700
This evening I took a sunset walk out at Pt. Wilson lighthouse, Port Townsend. 
The water was a bit too wind-stirred to see seabirds very well, but right out 
at the point I had a wonderful shorebird moment at the very entrance to Puget 
Sound. 

 The beach from Pt. Wilson south is on Puget Sound. The beach west from Pt. 
Wilson is on the Straits of Juan de Fuca. While cartography is interesting and 
useful in human communications, I doubt the shorebirds were too aware of the 
concerns of map nerds. Too busy eating. A pretty nice spot to eat though. 

First I spotted some larger shorebirds up ahead, surprisingly close to a lone 
shore fisherman.They were Black Turnstones, which can be found during the 
winter in Port Townsend in pretty large numbers. These were the first I'd seen 
since spring. Seventeen in all, they were remarkably tame. While feeding away 
in the washed up wrack halfway up the beach they got within 8ft from me - with 
and without binoculars, the best views of this species I've ever had. 

Yup, the lighting was just right, and a few peeps were also in close with the 
Turnstones - about 3 Least Sandpipers, and about the same number of Westerns. 
One Western, struggling to nab a particularly recalcitrant amphipod (aka sand 
hopper) got super close. The best looks at any of these shorebirds I've ever 
had. Pretty cool. 

It was great to have such a good shorebird size comparison with these three 
species. The Turnstones were particularly beautiful - looked like they were 
feathered in various tones of dark chocolate - not really black, the legs an 
orange- brown, so according to Sibley they were probably immature birds. A 
Killdeer, calling from the nearby 'dunes' was shorebird number four on the 
scene. 

Well , shorebirds moved on just before the sun hit the horizon and I walked up 
over the beach logs to the very point, just inside the rock barrier, to check 
on the little 'colony' of California Broomrape I'd found blooming here back in 
early July. I was pleasantly surprised to find some of these strange purple 
parasitic plants still blooming. A very small cluster of weird flowers - the 
whole deal not much bigger than a golf ball. 

I've been waiting all summer for the flower of one mysterious dune species to 
bloom so I could Identify it - an interesting semi-woody perennial with ultra 
fine dissected leaves: Artemesia campestris it turns out. For busy, or lazy, 
naturalists plant id here has been made easier because the local chapter of the 
Washington Native Plant Society has created some fine plant lists (on their 
website) for Point Wilson dunes, and also the little Kah tai Prairie here in 
PT. I have made many new plant acquaintances in these unique habitats over the 
last seven months! 

Jeff Gibsonstill pokin' aroundPort Townsend Wa 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Vaux's Happening
From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters AT me.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 21:34:33 -0700
About a thousand swifts came into the Wagner roost site late tonight. 
http://wildearth.tv/cam/vauxs-swifts 


If there is anyone on the list who is really into amateur radio and scanners 
please send me an email. 


Larry Schwitters
Issaquah_______________________________________________
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Subject: September 5-6 WOS field trip
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 19:40:05 -0700
Tweeters,

Just a quick note to let you know that I'm leading a WOS field trip which
includes a Battle Ground Night Flight Night on September 5th followed by
birding at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge and other locations in Clark
County on September 6th.  Details are on the WOS website at
http://www.wos.org/fieldtrips.html

E-mail me if you are interested or need additional information.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Black Phoebe near Black River/Waterworks Garden 8/19/14
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 19:03:22 -0700
Photographer Mike Hamilton and a few others who make a weekly birding trip to 
the Black River area in Renton, saw a Black Phoebe near the upper part of the 
Waterworks Garden area across from Black River yesterday. Mike got some 
excellent photos and sent them out to the people on his list (he does a daily 
send), but Mike isn't a Tweet, so one of the other folks on the trip and list, 
was going to post about this on Tweeters List last night or this morning - I 
don't see a post yet, so I've been authorized by Mike, to go ahead and post the 
find and some of his photos some of you have a chance to go look for it soon. 


Click on this link for Mike's Black Phoebe photos:

https://flic.kr/s/aHsk1yBHh1

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Re: warm weather and late broods?
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 14:01:38 -0700
Christine, I have seen the same thing this year. Weve had more juvenile 
Spotted Towhees and Dark-eyed Juncos in the yard than ever before, with two 
different broods from the same parents present simultaneously (different stages 
of molt, some of them still fully in juvenile plumage). The yard seems to be 
alive with juncos and towhees. Also second broods of House Finches and Song 
Sparrows, again I presume from the same parents, as there arent all that many 
breeding right around here. It seems like a very good year for passerine 
breeding. 


Exactly like last year, three immature Black-headed Grosbeaks appeared at the 
feeders just a few days ago. They dont breed around here, at least the only 
singing I hear is the occasional male in spring, then theyre gone, but 
immatures appear every fall. However, only this year and last have I seen three 
that seem to be traveling together. Very interesting. 


But the two tailless Song Sparrows in our yard are adults, perhaps a 
consequence of a near miss by a cat. They have stayed tailless for several 
weeks now, not even starting to grow in new rectrices as far as I can see. 


Dennis Paulson
Seattle

On Aug 20, 2014, at 12:00 PM, tweeters-request AT mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:

> Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 13:01:59 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Christine Southwick 
> Subject: [Tweeters] warm weather and late broods?
> To: tweeters AT uw.edu
> Message-ID:
> 	
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
> 
> Sunday I saw in my yard a Song Sparrow with almost no tail. By last evening, 
the two center rects had grown longer--such a funny plumage stage. Two nice 
chocolate brown adults were close by. 

> I also have three (maybe four?) juvie Oregon Juncos--they are still 
striped--haven't started changing their body plumage yet, so are still quite 
young. 

> 
> I also have juvie Spotted Towhees of three different ages, judging from the 
differences of their body plumage--I just saw one (at least) that is still 
fully in its juvie striped suit. I believe that I have at least two breeding 
pairs, with one pair having a second brood. Some years I have had four pairs of 
juvies with two being earlier than the two later broods. 

> 
> I have several (5-7) Red-breasted Nuthatches(RBNU)--that appear off and on. I 
think that they go back into the woods when it is too hot. I have one RBNU that 
is so light on its chest and belly that it is almost white. I don't think I 
have ever seen one quite so light. 

> 
> And here I thought the babies were done. I know many of this year's 
chickaees, both Black-capped and Chestnut-backed have left, although I still 
have a healthy population. 

> 
> Oh, and I had a Black-headed Grosbeak (BHGR), probable juvie passing through 
about 6pm--about two weeks after that local family of BHGRs left. 

> 
> 
> Christine Southwick
> N Seattle/Shoreline
> clsouthwick AT q.com

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Subject: SAS Vashon field trip first of season birds
From: "Ed Swan" <edswan AT centurytel.net>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:23:12 -0700
The Seattle Audubon trip to Vashon Island totaled just under 50 species
today but we still saw a number of interesting birds including several first
of season (FOS) birds.

 

In Tramp Harbor, several groups of Horned Grebes (FOS) foraged somewhat
mixed together with Red-necked Grebes which returned a couple of weeks ago.
A number of grebes from both species still had red plumage, a bunch just
looked dirty and a few already looked clean black and white.  A couple of
Surf Scoters (FOS) dived off Ellisport in the northern part of Tramp Harbor
and others attacked the barnacles on the pilings.

 

At Fisher Pond, a number of Green-winged Teal (FOS) blended in almost
completely with the mud until turning just right to flash a bit of green on
their wing. Four juvenile Pied-billed Grebes peaked at us from amongst some
of the lily pads.

 

The shorebird front was disappointing with mostly just Killdeer, a Spotted
and peeps but as we made the ferry crossing, a Red-necked Phalarope nicely
dropped down on to a patch of floating weed directly in front of our course
for a good, quick, close look.  If you take either the Pt.
Defiance/Tahlequah ferry or Fauntleroy/Vashon ferry over the next couple of
weeks, watch for the floating weed patches, they attract from 1-100 or so
phalarope at this time of year.  We had some good alcid action from the
ferry as well with many Pigeon Guillemot, a couple of Rhinocerous Auklets
and a single fly by Common Murre.

 

Young raptors provided entertainment twice during the trip.  At Fern Cove,
an immature Sharp-shinned Hawk chased unsuccessfully after a number of birds
including kingfishers and crows and was mobbed in turn by them.  At Tramp
Harbor, a Peregrine Falcon disappeared pursuing a couple of ravens only to
return a few minutes later following an Osprey and being itself tailed by
upset Purple Martins.

 

Ed

 

Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

Check out the new seccond edition "The Birds of Vashon Island"              

www.theswancompany.com  

edswan AT centurytel.net  

206.463.7976

 
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Subject: Battle Ground Yard Birding and Night Flight
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 15:54:13 -0700
Tweeters and OBOL,

After spending a few days out of town, it was nice to get back and do some
birding in my Battle Ground, Clark County, WA yard yesterday - and - this
morning:

Yellow Warbler 2-2
Wilson's Warbler 1-3
Black-throated Gray Warbler 1-1
Orange-crowned Warbler 0-1
Common Yellowthroat 4-2
Warbling Vireo 2-1
Willow Flycatcher 1-2
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 1-1
Western Tanager 2-0
Black-headed Grosbeak 1-0
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1-0

At least ten Swainson's Thrushes flew over between 5-5:15 am on Tuesday
morning.  Several Wilson's Warblers flew over early this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
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Subject: Battle Ground Yard Birding and Night Flight
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 15:54:13 -0700
Tweeters and OBOL,

After spending a few days out of town, it was nice to get back and do some
birding in my Battle Ground, Clark County, WA yard yesterday - and - this
morning:

Yellow Warbler 2-2
Wilson's Warbler 1-3
Black-throated Gray Warbler 1-1
Orange-crowned Warbler 0-1
Common Yellowthroat 4-2
Warbling Vireo 2-1
Willow Flycatcher 1-2
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 1-1
Western Tanager 2-0
Black-headed Grosbeak 1-0
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1-0

At least ten Swainson's Thrushes flew over between 5-5:15 am on Tuesday
morning.  Several Wilson's Warblers flew over early this morning.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
-- 
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
Subject: Buff breasted sandpiper @ Ocean shores
From: FanterLane <fanterlane AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 15:24:16 -0700
Hi tweeters,
My dad and I just got back from walking the Oyhut wildlife area access from 
tonquin ave. and had some great birds. 

List:
Buff breasted sandpiper 1 far pond
Both golden plovers far pond
Stilt sandpiper 1 close pond
Baird's sandpiper 1 far pond
Greater white fronted geese 33 flying over parking lot and vocalizing 

We also had a semipalmated sandpiper at Hoquiam STP

Great day so far!
Good birding,
Fanter and Ken Lane
fanterlane AT gmail.com

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Subject: Bottle Beach/Midway Beach / Midway (Am. Bittern) / Caryn away from Wedgwood
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 AT seanet.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 13:32:00 -0700
Today we spent a wonderful time birding and learning about Ocean Shores with 
the most eloquent and gracious Dianna Moore. 


We started fashionably before high tide at the Oyhut marshes. Weather most 
cooperative - birds a little less so. But still had a couple of Greater 
Yellowlegs, peeps (probably Western Sandpipers). I really think I was so much 
in awe of Dianna that the birds took a backseat to her stories and lore. 


We visited Bill's Spit and Duck Lake which were more prolific in April. But the 
places alone are worth visiting for their separate vistas. 


Before we got to Ocean Shores we went to Westport and visited Johns River (no 
Yellowlegs this time...) Bottle Beach (where we met Blair Bernson along the 
trail telling us the birds would be back after the peregrine flyby. We went 
back on Monday (?) to Midway Beach where we spotted an Am. Bittern - the best. 


Still at Ocean Shores - birded the shore today seeing a Common Loon and many 
pelicans. Bill's Spit had an few Killdeer which were fun to watch and see the 
orangey coloration under the wings... 


Way too much to type on an iPhone...

Thanks a million again to Dianna Moore - what a joy to bird with her here in 
the place we saw the Snowys in 2012!! 


To be continued...

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Subject: White-headed Woodpeckers
From: Dave Hanscom <hanscom AT cs.utah.edu>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 11:00:12 -0600 (MDT)
Good morning, Tweeters.

I'm headed for Seattle for the next couple of weeks and would like to see 
a WHWO while I'm there.  According to eBird, they've been sighted in the 
Cle Elum area, which is a relatively short drive from the city.  I'm 
hoping to break away from family activites for a morning for some birding 
and wonder if someone on this list can give me some specific information 
about where to look.

Thank you very much.

Dave Hanscom
Park City, UT
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Subject: Rufous-less in Kalama
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 23:27:13 -0700
It seems the last Rufous Hummingbird has left our yard for the season. We
had at least 4 females (or sub-adult males) on Friday morning, August 16.
When we returned from Seattle the next day, there were no more visiting the
feeder. They have not been seen here since.

 

On the other hand, we have a lone BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK straggler still
hanging around the base of the seed feeder.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Geocaching Birders
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 23:29:12 -0700
Are there any birders on this list who are also Geocachers? If so, are you
interested in some local excursions? Please contact me off list.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
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Subject: Rufous-less in Kalama
From: "A & S Hill" <60stops2home AT kalama.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 23:27:13 -0700
It seems the last Rufous Hummingbird has left our yard for the season. We
had at least 4 females (or sub-adult males) on Friday morning, August 16.
When we returned from Seattle the next day, there were no more visiting the
feeder. They have not been seen here since.

 

On the other hand, we have a lone BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK straggler still
hanging around the base of the seed feeder.

 

Amy Hill

Kalama, Washington

628 feet up in Cowlitz County

60stops 2 home at kalama dot com

Artlessfun at yahoo dot com

 
Subject: shorebirds and others at Everett Marina
From: "Terrance and Gilala Dunning" <Madalama AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 18:20:00 -0700
There have been a few hundred least and western sandpipers working on the
north face of the marina parking lot, on the mudflats.  They are present
during incoming and outgoing tides.  They have been there for about a week
joining the usual ospreys, herons, gulls  and miscellaneous others usually
seen at this location.  The peeps have also attracted a peregrine who
managed to snatch one this a.m.  All in all, the past week has been very
busy on the mudflats.

Terry Dunning

Mountlake Terrace
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Subject: warm weather and late broods?
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth AT u.washington.edu>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 13:01:59 -0700 (PDT)
Sunday I saw in my yard a Song Sparrow with almost no tail. By last evening, 
the two center rects had grown longer--such a funny plumage stage. Two nice 
chocolate brown adults were close by. 

I also have three (maybe four?) juvie Oregon Juncos--they are still 
striped--haven't started changing their body plumage yet, so are still quite 
young. 


 I also have juvie Spotted Towhees of three different ages, judging from the 
differences of their body plumage--I just saw one (at least) that is still 
fully in its juvie striped suit. I believe that I have at least two breeding 
pairs, with one pair having a second brood. Some years I have had four pairs of 
juvies with two being earlier than the two later broods. 


I have several (5-7) Red-breasted Nuthatches(RBNU)--that appear off and on. I 
think that they go back into the woods when it is too hot. I have one RBNU that 
is so light on its chest and belly that it is almost white. I don't think I 
have ever seen one quite so light. 


And here I thought the babies were done. I know many of this year's chickaees, 
both Black-capped and Chestnut-backed have left, although I still have a 
healthy population. 


Oh, and I had a Black-headed Grosbeak (BHGR), probable juvie passing through 
about 6pm--about two weeks after that local family of BHGRs left. 



Christine Southwick
N Seattle/Shoreline
clsouthwick AT q.com

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Subject: re SAS Mt. Rainier trip
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 18:51:09 +0000
Wow - first tweeters post and what a mess! Please excuse all that irrelevant 
stuff!! 


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Subject: SAS Mt. Rainier Trip 8/17
From: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:57:49 +0000
On Sunday, Cara Borre and I led a group of 10 eager birders on a fairly 
rigorous, but rewarding hike up Mt. Fremont and First Burroughs Mountain above 
Sunrise in Mt Rainier NP. Most of us left the Ravenna P&R about 0640 and met up 
with Cara in Enumclaw about 0730. Arriving at the Sunrise parking area about 
0900; skies were clear and winds were calm. We set out through the picnic area, 
finding an abundance of Mountain Chickadees, Dark-eyed Juncos, Cassin's finches 
(mostly lacking any pink), and Chipping Sparrows. We had briefer looks at Cedar 
Waxwings, Red-Breasted Nuthatches, Yellow-rumped Warblers, and Western 
Tanagers, with a nice flyby from a Prairie Falcon. An immature Red-tailed Hawk 
also passed by and was later seen multiple times during the day. Thanks to Cara 
carrying her scope, we had great views of all the perched birds. 

Heading up the trail through the waning summer flowers (and leap-frogging a 
group from Tahoma Audubon!), we had our first Common Raven, Mountain Bluebirds, 
and our only Northern Flicker of the day. An immature Cooper's Hawk made a 
dramatic and close flyby, appearing quite large and leading some of us (me) to 
have visions of Goshawk. We also saw the first of many Pine Siskins for the 
day. At Frozen Lake we had marvelous views of the Prairie Falcon streaking over 
the lake and then being joined by a second bird. On the trail from the Lake up 
to Mt. Fremont, we met George Gerdts and Sarah Piden coming down with bad news 
on our target Ptarmigan (no show for them). But, the krumhollz along the trail 
had more Mountain Bluebirds, as well as Orange-crowned Warblers and Chipping 
Sparrows. In the valley below, we watched a close interaction between the 
immature Red-tailed Hawk and an American Kestrel. 

The summit of Mt. Fremont was a bird-free zone except for a lone raven, but the 
views and a flock or mountain goats made it all worthwhile. Disappointed (we 
had White-tailed Ptarmigan and Horned Lark there 2 weeks ago, and Sarah 
reported Gray-crowned Rosyfinches on Saturday), we headed back down, seeing the 
same birds as on the ascent except...we saw an unusual congregation of Mountain 
Bluebirds moving down the slope towards us while hovering (kiting?) about 10 - 
15 feet in the air before plunging to the ground to grab some juicy insect 
morsel. At times there were 3 to 5 birds hovering in a parallel line! 

Back at Frozen Lake, we had a unanimous vote to head down, by going up - First 
Burroughs, that is. Both Cara and I had seen American Pipets up that trail in 
the previous couple of weeks. Sure enough, only about 500 yds up the trail, we 
found them, quite close to the trail - lifers for a couple of folks in the 
group! Reaching the top of First Burroughs in a swirling (but not cold?!) fog, 
we quickly located a pair of Horned Larks. Taking a left at the trail junction 
(about 1500), we ran into a few birds near the first of the stunted white bark 
pines. An immature Horned Lark, more American Pipets, and a couple of pretty 
plain sparrows that seem to have been Brewer's (to be verified based on 
photos). 

Down near the stone masonry viewpoint over the snout of the Emmons Glacier and 
the origin of the White River, we encountered a very large mixed flock of Pine 
Siskins and Mountain Chickadees that included Cassin's Finches, RB Nuthatches 
and along with Townsend's Warblers and a quick fly by from a Rufous 
Hummingbird. The lovely hike down past Shadow Lake and back up to the parking 
lot yielded quite a few birds but no new species. Along with the goats, marmot, 
ground squirrels, chipmunks were common along the hike (along with one nice 
male deer (aka a buck) but, as usual, the diminutive pikas stole the scene. On 
the day we had just 24 species but enjoyed great looks at some pretty cool 
birds. 

Jon Houghton, Edmonds

Jon Houghton, Ph.D.
Principal; Senior Marine/Fishery Biologist
Jon.Houghton AT HartCrowser.com
[cid:image001.gif AT 01CF5E0F.E8E3FE50]
120 Third Avenue South, Suite 110
Edmonds, Washington 98020-8411
425.775.4682
425.329.1150 (direct)
206.601.0773 (cell)

Environmental - Geotechnical - Natural Resources
Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this message is intended 
only for the use of the addressee, and may be confidential and/or privileged. 
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Subject: RE: RE: Port Townsend Purple Martins
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:39:36 -0700
To clarify my nest box hole description - it's a low rectangular opening - more 
like a slot, not like the round hole I've seen in most martin nest 'boxes'. 

Jeff G

From: gibsondesign AT msn.com
To: lynnandstan AT earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:29:07 -0700
CC: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] RE: Port Townsend Purple Martins




 Stan, and Tweeters
It was a good morning for Purple Martins in Port Townsend today. On my early 
morning walk to Fort Worden I saw 15+ martins flying around the martin boxes 
(there are 4) out on the Marine Science Center pier.( These boxes were busy in 
May). That's the most Martins I've ever seen at once in Washington state. 

Feeling lucky, I also checked out the Martin boxes near the PT marina. There 
are 5 boxes there, at the boat entrance to the boat basin. If one goes a bit 
ENE from the marina, there is a little public beach access right next to the 
Aladdin Inn, and you can get good looks at the nest boxes. There were at least 
10 martins there - at one point every box had one or more martins on it. 

These martin boxes are sort of unique in my experience; a long rectangle shape, 
with a little "deck" on the hole end. The holes are also a horizontal shape, 
and situated very low - about level with the deck/perch. Have seen no Starlings 
or House Sparrows around any of these - luck, or the nest box design? I don't 
know. 

Anyway, always cool to see, or hear, a Martin.
Jeff Gibsonback inPort Townsend Wa

> From: lynnandstan AT earthlink.net
> Subject: Port Townsend Purple Martins
> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2014 18:55:44 -0700
> To: gibsondesign AT msn.com
> 
> Hi Jeff, 
> 
> I still read tweeters regularly but don't post much anymore.  
> 
> I'm curious to know if the purple martin nestboxes in town are still there, 
and if there are martins using them, next to the the marina , on upland poles 
behind a seafood company, it was called New Day Fisheries back in 2005. Not 
sure of my directions there, but pretty sure it would be immediately north of 
the marina. 

> 
> Maybe you could check it out sometime, I most likely won't be making it over 
that way this season. 

> 
> Thanks ,   
> 
> Stan Kostka
> Arlington
> 
> 					
 		 	   		  

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Subject: RE: Port Townsend Purple Martins
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:29:07 -0700
 Stan, and Tweeters
It was a good morning for Purple Martins in Port Townsend today. On my early 
morning walk to Fort Worden I saw 15+ martins flying around the martin boxes 
(there are 4) out on the Marine Science Center pier.( These boxes were busy in 
May). That's the most Martins I've ever seen at once in Washington state. 

Feeling lucky, I also checked out the Martin boxes near the PT marina. There 
are 5 boxes there, at the boat entrance to the boat basin. If one goes a bit 
ENE from the marina, there is a little public beach access right next to the 
Aladdin Inn, and you can get good looks at the nest boxes. There were at least 
10 martins there - at one point every box had one or more martins on it. 

These martin boxes are sort of unique in my experience; a long rectangle shape, 
with a little "deck" on the hole end. The holes are also a horizontal shape, 
and situated very low - about level with the deck/perch. Have seen no Starlings 
or House Sparrows around any of these - luck, or the nest box design? I don't 
know. 

Anyway, always cool to see, or hear, a Martin.
Jeff Gibsonback inPort Townsend Wa

> From: lynnandstan AT earthlink.net
> Subject: Port Townsend Purple Martins
> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2014 18:55:44 -0700
> To: gibsondesign AT msn.com
> 
> Hi Jeff, 
> 
> I still read tweeters regularly but don't post much anymore.  
> 
> I'm curious to know if the purple martin nestboxes in town are still there, 
and if there are martins using them, next to the the marina , on upland poles 
behind a seafood company, it was called New Day Fisheries back in 2005. Not 
sure of my directions there, but pretty sure it would be immediately north of 
the marina. 

> 
> Maybe you could check it out sometime, I most likely won't be making it over 
that way this season. 

> 
> Thanks ,   
> 
> Stan Kostka
> Arlington
> 
> 					
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Subject: Frenchman's bar park Clark County Washington
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:46:55 -0700
Just a heads up it was very slow today had only two migrating warblers a 
McGillivray s and a orange crown 


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Subject: Frenchman's bar park Clark County Washington
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:46:55 -0700
Just a heads up it was very slow today had only two migrating warblers a 
McGillivray s and a orange crown 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Re: Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:43:23 -0700
I've tried this morning and since about 7 to try and find the bird and have had 
no luck. I'll chalk this one up to the one that got away. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Bird was calling constantly until I attempted to enter the riparian area. That 
is when it stopped calling. I never got a look at it even though it could not 
have been more than 40 yards away calling from the top of the cottonwoods. The 
location is from the main parking area to the north take the trail that goes 
directly to the river from that parking lot and a small Trail leads to the 
right car in from there you are about 30 to 40 yards on the main trail from the 
site where the bird was calling 


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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:43:23 -0700
I've tried this morning and since about 7 to try and find the bird and have had 
no luck. I'll chalk this one up to the one that got away. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Bird was calling constantly until I attempted to enter the riparian area. That 
is when it stopped calling. I never got a look at it even though it could not 
have been more than 40 yards away calling from the top of the cottonwoods. The 
location is from the main parking area to the north take the trail that goes 
directly to the river from that parking lot and a small Trail leads to the 
right car in from there you are about 30 to 40 yards on the main trail from the 
site where the bird was calling 


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Subject: Edmonds marsh mystery sandpiper 8-18-14
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:05:35 -0700
I was at the #1 viewing platform of the Edmonds marsh Monday morning when a 
shorebird took off from the marsh and flew south past me. I initially did not 
bother taking photos as thought it was a killdeer. The bird was about the same 
size and shape and 

flew in the same manner as a killdeer. When it made some very 
un-killdeer cries, I snapped some rather poor, back-lit grab shots.

When I saw the long bill in my camera's viewing screen, I knew it was 
definitely not a killdeer. It was too 

large to have been one of the western or least sandpipers that have recently 
been hanging out at the marsh.

You can see my photos by scrolling down page 49 to post #484. Any guesses? 

Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014 - Page 49

 
       
Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014 - Page 49
At 62 pages, the original Edmonds wildlife thread was getting a bit cumbersome, 
so I am starting a new one for 2014. This will also help me in the year ahea... 

View on www.pnwphotos.com Preview by Yahoo  
 


Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 07:40:26 -0700
Bird was calling constantly until I attempted to enter the riparian area. That 
is when it stopped calling. I never got a look at it even though it could not 
have been more than 40 yards away calling from the top of the cottonwoods. The 
location is from the main parking area to the north take the trail that goes 
directly to the river from that parking lot and a small Trail leads to the 
right car in from there you are about 30 to 40 yards on the main trail from the 
site where the bird was calling 


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Subject: Possible eastern Phoebe at Frenchmans Bar Park Clark co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 07:40:26 -0700
Bird was calling constantly until I attempted to enter the riparian area. That 
is when it stopped calling. I never got a look at it even though it could not 
have been more than 40 yards away calling from the top of the cottonwoods. The 
location is from the main parking area to the north take the trail that goes 
directly to the river from that parking lot and a small Trail leads to the 
right car in from there you are about 30 to 40 yards on the main trail from the 
site where the bird was calling 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Paradise Ptarmigan
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 21:53:25 -0700
The intermittent rain at Paradise never amounted to anything more than an 
annoyance and the fog kept the glare down for 11 birders looking for high 
elevation birds on Friday, August 15. The birding started off well with Rufous 
Hummingbird and Orange-crowned Warbler in the flower beds behind the visitor 
center. The 6-mile hike on the Skyline Loop Trail meanders through alpine 
meadows, climbs above tree-line to talus slopes and returns in a steep descent 
to the parking area. During the day, we had 28 species of mostly expected birds 
(we missed the rosy finches seen only days earlier), but many of those got rave 
reviews. 


American Dipper - a pair were working both sides of the footbridge at Myrtle 
Falls; one of them kept walking over to the precipice yet continued to dip for 
food, leaving an enveloping wash of water 

 
https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/MtRainierNP#6049124444237958498 

	http://youtu.be/IFjMoTyueeQ
Sooty Grouse - a male bird gave good looks through the shrouding fog
 
https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/MtRainierNP#6049124502228012690 

	http://youtu.be/Xucvw3iFFRs
Sharp-shinned Hawk - one bird chased off a small group of Mountain Bluebird; 
another made a quick fly-by at about 6500 feet 

MacGillivrays Warbler - two non-adult birds in a small Doug Fir
Varied Thrush, American Pipit, and Red Crossbill (type 4) were heard only

The highlight of the day was the sighting of two male White-tailed Ptarmigan on 
a ledge above the trail. At first just sitting, they started moving around 
about the time we saw a person walking a few feet away, also on the ledge. When 
we realized that our trail did a switch-back up to that location, we went the 
extra few feet to amazing views of the two birds practically at our feet. Then, 
they walked towards us for even better looks! 

 
https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/MtRainierNP#6049124709664474578 

	http://youtu.be/DgowqU0jmL4

Oh, and the wildflowers were just about at their peak, making for a very 
rewarding day. 

Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19503023
Scott Ramos and Evan Houston
Seattle

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Subject: Slaty-backed Gull at Gog-le-hi-te Wetlands
From: mcharest AT wamail.net
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 19:49:02 -0700 (PDT)
I was doing my usual walk at Gog-le-hi-te wetlands in Tacoma this
afternoon and saw a presumed Slaty-backed Gull bathing in the North tidal
marsh. I took a couple of distant photos as it was closer to the Lincoln
Avenue side of the marsh. I ran around to the other side to get a better
look and the bird flew down river just as I was approaching. I was able to
take a couple more photos directly into the sun as it flew off down river.

I chased after the bird, checking the tidal lagoon farther down, the gull
bathing spot closer to 11th street, and all the buildings around the
bridge but was unable to relocate it.(the 11th street bridge is now closed
to cars and much better for scoping the rooftops as the bridge no longer
shakes with each passing vehicle)

I consulted with some better birders than myself who think it is indeed a
Slaty-backed and I would say most likely the same bird as before returned.

Also of interest for Pierce county were a Lesser Yellowlegs on the mud at
Sha-dax Wetlands in Fife today, a Solitary Sandpiper  with a couple of
Long-billed Dowitchers on the 16th, and a continuing Greater Yellowlegs at
nearby Levee Pond Park.

Photos of the Gull:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecharest/14941336866/in/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecharest/14964006632/in/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecharest/14941384936/in/photostream/

Let me know if your opinion differs.

Have a great day,

Michael Charest
Tacoma, Washington
mcharest AT wamail.net



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Subject: More Shorebirds at Warm Beach, Snohomish County
From: Marcus Roening <Marcus.D.Roening AT gsk.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 00:43:48 +0000
Hi Tweets,

Heather and I took the kayaks out on Sunday on the incoming tide to check the 
latest mix of shorebirds on the mouth of Hatt Slough of the Stillaguamish River 
in Port Susan. The Oso slide has definitely contributed a heavy sediment load 
to the estuary. 


The Black-bellied Plovers were still the dominant bird with 250+ flying around 
while being harassed by a very dark fronted Peregrine Falcon. Still about 20% 
of them with a fair amount of alternate plumage. 


8 Greater Yellowlegs, with 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS

180 Western Sandpipers that were all juveniles. And for anyone covering the 
Nature Conservancy property keep your eye open for a potential 'RED-NECKED 
STINT'. The bird had a very rufous crown, scapulars and tertials, a prominent 
white eye strip. From the eye down it was very peachy-buffy on the lower face 
and across the breast a seemed to have a bit of a darker feather along the 
bottom of the pectoral. I didn't detect any droop in the bill. At this point a 
very sharp looking Peregrine Falcon made its entrance, so I wasn't able to 
double-check the flanks and the degree of rufous on the tertials and coverts - 
a tad frustrating. We spent the next hour paddling around for the peep flocks, 
but no second looks. 


1 Baird's Sandpiper - juvenile

4 BLACK TURNSTONES - hanging loosely with the Black-bellied Plovers. I've only 
seen them in the midst of all this sand and mud one other time on the very same 
day, August 17, in 2002. 


17 Short-billed Dowitchers - All juveniles with their nice tiger stripe 
tertials. Amazing how close you can drift past these birds in a kayak. And a 
few tu-tu call notes is always helpful. 


6 Bonaparte's Gulls - no more Black heads, as in 2 weeks ago. All with the 
black spot behind the eye and doing a feeding behavior that reminded me of 
foxes hunting mice in the grass. The birds were in about 3 inches of water and 
would jump up and then stab down into something in the sand-mud mix. Perhaps 
some sort of marine annelid poking its head out. There were no little fish 
present. 


130 Caspian Terns - all adults

4 Semipalmated Plover, 1 Spotted Sandpiper, 4 Least Sandpiper (1 worn adult)

And 6 Turkey Vultures working over a dead Mallard, albeit not all at the same 
time. 


The nearest boat launch to access this area is on Marine View Drive as it 
crosses Hatt Slough (this is just south of Stanwood). 


Good Birding,

Marcus Roening
Tacoma WA
marcus.d.roening at GSK.com
C: 253-988-8313
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Subject: Frenchmans Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA and shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:20:10 -0700
Birds to note at Frenchman's Bar

Least flycatcher 1
Townsend's warbler 1
Wilson's warbler  4
Yellow warbler  4
Black-throated gray warbler  4
Band-tailed pigeon  2
Red-breasted nuthatch  2
Warbling vireo 3
Western tanager  10


Rest Lake, Ridgefield NWR

Lesser yellowlegs  27
Least sandpiper 130
Long-billed Dowitcher  13
Greater yellowlegs  4
Semipalmated sandpiper  1
Semipalmated plover 3

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Frenchmans Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA and shorebirds at Ridgefield NWR
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:20:10 -0700
Birds to note at Frenchman's Bar

Least flycatcher 1
Townsend's warbler 1
Wilson's warbler  4
Yellow warbler  4
Black-throated gray warbler  4
Band-tailed pigeon  2
Red-breasted nuthatch  2
Warbling vireo 3
Western tanager  10


Rest Lake, Ridgefield NWR

Lesser yellowlegs  27
Least sandpiper 130
Long-billed Dowitcher  13
Greater yellowlegs  4
Semipalmated sandpiper  1
Semipalmated plover 3

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA

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Subject: Re: Edmonds Marsh Merlin
From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:56:10 -0700
How appropriate Michael brought up the merlin, as I saw it again this morning 
(Monday, 8/18) chasing killdeer on the south side of the marsh. My photos 
were not very good, but it was still identifiable. A friend of mine saw it at 
the same time from the Pt. Edwards walkway. 



Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA


On Monday, August 18, 2014 2:45 PM, Mike McAuliffe  
wrote: 

 


Bill Anderson has reported several times about the Merlin which has been
hanging out at the marsh in Edmonds for the last few weeks. I have posted a
few pictures of the merlin on my website at:

http://mcmikephoto.com/2014/08/edmonds-marsh-merlin/

Have a great day!

Mike

Mike McAuliffe
Edmonds, WA
mcmike0605 AT gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/mcmikephoto



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Subject: Edmonds Marsh Merlin
From: "Mike McAuliffe" <mcmike0605 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:45:37 -0700
Bill Anderson has reported several times about the Merlin which has been
hanging out at the marsh in Edmonds for the last few weeks.  I have posted a
few pictures of the merlin on my website at:

http://mcmikephoto.com/2014/08/edmonds-marsh-merlin/

Have a great day!

Mike

Mike McAuliffe
Edmonds, WA
mcmike0605 AT gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/mcmikephoto



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Subject: Long-tailedJaeger from shore
From: Mark Oberle <oberle AT mindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 12:31:42 -0700
‎See below

Mark Oberle
Seattle, Washington 
Oberle at mindspring.com
  Original Message  
From: Dale Herter 
Sent: Monday, August 18, 2014 10:41 AM
To: Mark Oberle
Subject: LTJaeger

Watching a long-tailed jaeger harassing Bonapartes gulls off Miami Beach west 
of Seabeck WA right now. Unusual? You can post it on tweeters if so. 

Dale

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Subject: hot links to songbird videos
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:52:47 -0700
As the links Ray H. sent me for the videos don't appear to work on the Tweeters 
List, he's sent me these, which should: 



Swainson's Thrush Singing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2ib6ODJt9Q

Yellow-breasted Chat Singing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjCPV9_9fbw


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net
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Subject: RE: dippers and banding
From: Christine Southwick <clsouth AT u.washington.edu>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:52:25 -0700 (PDT)

I know that some people are not a fan of banding, and that some may think it is 
torturous for the birds. The fact remains that banding is, at this time, the 
best way to track/follow birds and compile data to prove to government 
officials and developers, that birds are using specific pieces of land, 
specific migration routes, and/or require specific habitat in order to survive. 

There are different bands used for landbirds, waterbirds, raptors, etc., and 
studies are being done to find the most suited for special species. 


Donnie Dipper's statement,
 " Most all observatories do not keep a record of injury or mortality, during 
the netting process. Even your own observatory does not keep any public record 
of such events. The Bird Banders Guide states not to let the public know if a 
bird has died or been injured. The Spottswood paper was accepted by the banding 
community because it made them look good, but it is an good example of 
selective data usage, nothing more. " is incorrect. 


Puget Sound Bird Observatory (PSBO) reports any and all injuries, no matter if 
pre-existing or a result of banding. 


All our banders have taken hands-on-courses, and work conscientiously to 
maintain, and/or improve, safe handling of all birds. Wild entities may often 
have cancers, chemical imbalances (or pesticide/herbicide poisoning) that are 
the cause deaths. The few birds that I have seen that have died (and I have 
been banding since 2003), were either old, had lice/pox/ or some other disease, 
or were starving (fat of zero). I have never seen a death that was caused by 
fright (we let all birds go immediately if there are any signs of stress--and 
our banders have all been taught to watch for signs of stress), or bad 
handling. I do know of some birds that have been killed while in the nets by 
opportunistic predators --I have heard of wind causing some injuries, before 
the nets could be closed. No one,least of all someone who is actively working 
with a bird, likes to see or know about a bird death. It makes us feel bad, and 
can lead to misunderstanding about the effectiveness and ben! 

 eficial aspects of banding.


All banding stations are required to submit scientific data from each bird that 
is caught in the net--that includes any injuries and if any deaths. All the 
information is sent annually to the Bird Banding Lab, as part of the USGS 
requirement. There is no public posting, because most banding stations have a 
minimum of volunteers (here at PSBO, all work full-time elsewhere), 

 and the data would require long explanations to make any sense to the 
public... 

(for example, a BCCH, AHY no CP, no BP, fat of 3--basically means that it is a 
Black-capped Chickadee,adult, not able to tell whether it is male or female 
(monomorphic birds can only be sexed during active breeding), and is actively 
feeding and healthy with a fat level of 3.] There is much more data taken for 
each bird, most of which seems immaterial to someone who does not actively 
study bird measurements. The collecting of this data takes about two minutes in 
the hands of an experienced bander. 


PSBO reports the very small number of birds that might show injuries, including 
those that the bird may have had before touching the net, and all, if any, that 
might die per season. 

That is part of our permit requirements. 

 And have no doubts about it--WE BAND THESE BIRDS TO HELP SAVE BIRDS IN 
GENERAL, AND SPECIFIC SPECIES IN PARTICULAR. And in order to band, before a 
permit is issued, we must have a valid, and approved by USGS, study to be 
issued a permit. 


We don't get paid for this work. It is usually hot and buggy, or cold and 
chilly, and about four hours outside, usually without bathroom facilities. We 
do this because we LOVE BIRDS. AND WE WANT THEM TO SURVIVE. Having data to 
prove where birds are is vitally important. It make it harder for developers to 
ignore. 


Pesticides, cats, window strikes, and tall structures cause thousand times more 
deaths per year then banding altogether has ever caused. People could focus on 
these dangers, as opposed to vilifying people who are working to protect and 
save birds in general, and some species in particular. 



Christine Southwick
Puget Sound Bird Observatory
clsouthwick AT q.com

On Sat, 16 Aug 2014, Donnie Dipper wrote:

> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 15:43:29 -0700
> From: Donnie Dipper 
> To: tweeters AT uw.edu
> Cc: clsouth AT u.washington.edu, ucd880 AT comcast.net
> Subject: RE: dippers and banding
>
> I want to respond the the statements made. My video did not make the 
statement that unbanded dippers would automatically live out a full lifespan. 
That is absurd. What 

> is does say is that only a handful are ever seen after the third year of 
banding. Every study on the American Dipper the mortality rates in the study 
was much higher 

> than the average for other birds. Dippers do not migrate the way other birds 
do and stay in the same watershed for their lifetime. Everything I have learned 
about the 

> dipper has come from close observation, thousands of hours of observation. 
There was no need to band them to understand their habitat needs, what the ate, 
how they 

> reacted to predators, territory boundaries, or sex. Banding just to hope to 
get that one bird that will out live the others in its species is another 
absurdity. We 

> already know what is the average lifespan of most all birds.
> In response to the other message: Again there is no importance to knowing the 
age of a banded dipper; it is just a human curiosity. Considering that so few 
survive, 

> and the fact I have proven that their is a danger with banding dippers, it 
would just amount to torturing these birds for the joy of it. There are not 
banded dippers 

> who live the normal lifespan, these has only been one, not a good percentage 
out of thousands that have been banded. To say that just because one bird has 
lived a 

> lucky life is not a testament to banding safety. The example of the 
Albatross, tells me that there does not need to be anymore Albatrosses banded 
because this one has 

> given all the answers needed. But, it also raises the question what happened 
to all the other Albatrosses that have been banded? Using one out of thousands 
to make a 

> point is not quality science.
> Since you opened discussion on the other aspects of banding I want to respond 
to them as well. 

>
> You have created a habitat in your backyard and if you have teamed with your 
neighbors, I do not understand any need to band birds there. Counting and 
observation 

> would tell you what you should already know. Banding does not help with an 
understanding of a bird's habitat needs, it is in fact another human 
interference with the 

> birds. Which can lead them to find another place to visit. Understanding 
habitat loss and effects of pollution is an observational understanding and 
that has nothing 

> to do with banding a bird.
>
> The Spottswood paper on the safety of mist netting, that you refer to is not 
a good or honest reflection of mist netting. She contacted only 22 banding 
stations, out 

> of the over 2000 stations in North America, and then only used some of the 
data from 13 of those 22 stations. Most all observatories do not keep a record 
of injury or 

> mortality, during the netting process. Even your own observatory does not 
keep any public record of such events. The Bird Banders Guide states not to 
let the public 

> know if a bird has died or been injured. The Spottswood paper was accepted by 
the banding community because it made them look good, but it is an good example 
of 

> selective data usage, nothing more.
>
> Thank you all for watching my video.
> http://youtu.be/nv1c7qZsh7g?list=PLUKk3XDNAVpXWl8UsH82d7HcSP3bgAtGD
>
> Donnie
> Port Angeles, WA
> dipper AT e-picturebookdesigners.com
>
>
> Much of we know, or need to know, about natural resources needs to be based 
on individuals with a known history. Unless you can track an individual, you 

> can't know the age. The radio tagging has shown migration routes that were 
totally unexpected. There is an ongoing discussion within fisheries and 
wildlife 

>       researchers as to the proper techniques to use.
> As to the Dippers, if (as seems to be claimed) the unbanded birds would all 
live out a full lifespan, which must be more than 9 years because that was 

> based on a band, the rivers would be full of them. Something is eating or 
killing the unbanded ones, too. 

>
> This is not to say that one should just "Ring and fling" to their heart's 
content. Marking should be used when it is the only way to obtain the desired 

>       information.
>
>
>
>       Hal Michael
>       Olympia WA
>       360-459-4005 (H)
>       360-791-7702 (C)
>       ucd880 AT comcast.net
>
>       ----- Original Message -----
>
>       Banding may not be the Best scientific study for American Dippers.
>       I don't personally know.
>
> Tt would be useful to find out the age of the banded dippers. If there are 
banded dippers who live the normal life span of dippers, then it would 

> appear that bands don't necessarily effect all dippers, even though to us it 
appears to make them ungainly. 

>
> As part of a census of wintering birds in backyard habitats, Puget Sound Bird 
Observatory(PSBO)actively banded in local backyards for five winters, 

>       specifically with
> the intention of finding what types of winter habitats they needed/used, and 
wintering site fidelity. PSBO used a USGS-approved colored-banding project to 

>       study these
>       birds even when it was raining
> (The welfare of birds is always the paramount guideline--more important than 
any scientific data, and banders follows the "Banders Code of Ethics")--I can 

>       send a copy
>       of these rules to all who are interested.
>
> Banding has been shown to be the safest way to study birds, with the least 
amount of trauma, and the least amount of side affects.--I can also send you a 

>       copy of the
> newest study in the US, "How Safe Is Mist Netting? First Large-Scale Study 
Into Bird Capture Technique Evaluates the Risks" . 

>
>
> Two of the birds banded in my yard lived at least 6 documented years --both 
males breeding--a Spotted Towhee, and an Oregon Junco. I have pictures of both 

>       birds over
> the years, and several pictures of the Oregon Junco bringing and feeding his 
young in the yard (never found the nests, but didn't really look too 

>       hard--didn't want to
> disturb ground nesters). Obviously, even though both these males were ground 
feeders and nesters, the bands didn't impede their movements, nor their 

>       ability to win
> mates and breed. Several of the Black-capped Chickadees(BCCH) have lived at 
three years, and two BCCH banded in Oct 2012 each raised broods this year. I 

>       had a pair of
> Chestnut-backed Chickadees(CBCH) that were yard residents, and probably 
nested in "my" alder snag, that had 183 documented visits to the feeders 

>       (motion-activated
> camera), before one of them disappeared (and presumed died) after an ice 
storm. The other CBCH was seen for another year. The Song Sparrows in my yard 

>       were not
> color-banded, so I can't be sure how many times a particular bird was seen, 
but I still have several (seen at the same time) Song Sparrows sporting 

>       bands--and we
>       haven't banded in my yard for two years...
>
> And Wisdom the Laysan Albatross, as the (presumed) World's oldest wild bird 
gave birth last year at the ripe old age of 63 - making her a mother for the 

>       35th time,
> was first banded in 1956, and has worn out three bands, and is still living. 
Banding obviously did not/has not affected her, and has allowed scientists to 

>       collect
>       useful data that can help other seabirds.
>
> That really is the reason for banding--to help protect birds by learning 
where birds live and travel, the habitats they use and need, and data to back 
up 

>       the
> assertions that areas not being "profitably used by humans" are needed to 
sustain birds, be they migrating or local. 

>
>       Christine Southwick
>       Puget Sound Bird Observatory
>       clsouthwick AT pugetsoundbirds.org
>
>
>

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Subject: 2 special songbirds in video - by Ray Hamlyn
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:00:12 -0700
These were a treat to start the day with, but I'll bet they'll appeal at 
anytime - Swainson's Thrush and Yellow-breasted Chat, taken a couple months 
ago. 


The vids are short, but very sweet - ENJOY !  


Swainson's Thrush Singing

Yellow-breasted Chat Singing


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net 

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Subject: P&R choices for birding trips
From: Qinglin Ma <qinglineric AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 09:47:30 -0700
Hi tweets,

I would like to report that the catalytic converter from my car got stolen
last Saturday at the Newport Hill's P*R in Bellevue. I parked there for the
Eastside Audubon Society trip to Mt. Rainier. According to police who came
this kind of crime is on the rise and happens quite often now. If you have
a SUV or Truck that has enough ground clearing, the thief will get under
neath the car and does it. They sell it to scrap metal for rare metals.
According to the Honda dealer today my CRV catalytic converter parts alone
costs $1700. The thief damaged the oxygen sensor and another sensor that
costs $500 each.

My suggestion for future birding trip meet up place would be where there
are security cameras. The newer P*R or covered P&R most likely will have
them.

Good luck with your vehicle and park where it is more secure.

By the way the trip to Mt. Rainier was great. Andy McCormick probably will
write a report soon.

Qinglin Ma
Kirkland, Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 09:38:51 -0700
I could not relocate the least flycatcher. I do not want discourage anyone from 
looking. 


Will post list later

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Chased for about two mins not stationary moving quickly.

 Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 09:38:51 -0700
I could not relocate the least flycatcher. I do not want discourage anyone from 
looking. 


Will post list later

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Bob  wrote:

Chased for about two mins not stationary moving quickly.

 Bob Flores

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Subject: Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 06:58:01 -0700
Chased for about two mins not stationary moving quickly.

 Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID_______________________________________________
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Subject: Least flycatcher Frenchman's Bar co park Clark Co WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 06:58:01 -0700
Chased for about two mins not stationary moving quickly.

 Bob Flores

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Neah Bay Pelagic Trip, Saturday, Aug 30
From: Boekelheide <bboek AT olympus.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 00:13:39 -0700
Hello, Tweeters,

We have scheduled a pelagic seabird trip out of Neah Bay on Saturday, August 
30, aboard the 62 Windsong, and we have room for more birders. Of course 
nothing is guaranteed, but our route will traverse offshore areas that have had 
an excellent variety of birds on other late-summer trips -- northwest from Neah 
Bay to Swiftsure Bank, then southwest over the continental shelf break and the 
Juan de Fuca Canyon, returning to Neah Bay in late afternoon. The Windsong is 
berthed at Makah Marina, the main marina at Neah Bay. Departure time will be 
8:30 am. The fee is $125, cash only, collected when boarding. We have 20 spaces 
available. The Windsong is similar to the Monte Carlo used for Westport Seabird 
trips. For reservations or further information contact Denny Van Horn 
[dennyvanhorn AT gmail.com] or Bob Boekelheide [360-808-0196] 


Weve taken this boat out this year and have been pleased with its performance, 
the skipper, and crew. The outing is of course weather dependent with 
cancellation at the skippers discretion. Like with any pelagic trip, we expect 
a variety of conditions -- wet, wind, waves, clouds and/or sun. 


Accommodations in the area include campgrounds at Hobuck Beach and Cape Motel, 
along with several motels, although space may be limited on Labor Day weekend. 
Neah Bay area this time of the year can be a birding candy store, not only for 
pelagic birds but vagrants as well. Its anticipated that this trip will fill 
quickly, so make your reservations asap. 


Denny Van Horn and Bob Boekelheide_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Sense of Scale
From: Jason Hernandez <jason.hernandez74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 19:22:17 -0700
When i go fish watching, there is usually a mask and snorkel involved -- not 
that I necessarily go swimming; sometimes, just lying belly-down on the gravel 
of a shallow stream, just deep enough to submerge my head in that position, can 
give me a fish's-eye view of the world. And in places like Square Lake, 
covered with water shield, I actually refer to it in my field notes as "the 
underwater forest," and describe the "canopy," "mid-level," and "understory." 
It really does look like a jungle! 



Bringing this back to birds: shifting scales like this can give you a whole new 
level of understanding of them. Imagine yourself the size of a Bewick's Wren, 
investigating tree cavities for a suitable nest site; what would you look for? 
And if a sudden rain catches you out foraging, imagine how much simpler it 
would be to find a dry spot at Bewick's Wren size than human size! Or how 
terrifyingly huge a Merlin would be! 


Jason Hernandez
Bremerton
jason.hernandez at yahoo dot com



Message: 12
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 09:42:04 -0700
From: Jeff Gibson 
Subject: [Tweeters] Sense of Scale
To: tweeters 
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

After sending my last post I had my morning coffee and remembered another 
boathouse sighting. 

One
 of my favorite things to do in nature is looking at tiny things, and 
also very large things. I guess I like looking at everything else in 
between too. Looking at small things can drawn one in to the Tiny World,
 where a tiny beetle looks huge compared to the even tinier mites on it.
 Once you get looking, you may see an even tinier mite nearby - mites 
come in different sizes you know.
I always admired that great 
documentary film "A Bugs Life" for it's sense of scale. OK, it was 
really an animated film, and ants usually are not lavender, or have only
 four legs - however, somebody on the production team had a fine sense 
of scale. There was a great scene in that film where the hero ant goes 
to town, when he is surrounded by various other arthropods, like giant 
millipedes and towering Daddy Long- legs, which in the real world, would
 be giant - compared to an ant anyway.
A great way to enter Tiny 
World is through close-focusing binoculars. Mine, at 8x magnification, 
focus down to five and a half feet. Thus I was able to see the blue 
eyes of a breeding male Stickleback more clearly from 6 ft away than I 
was without binocs from 2ft away, head hanging over the dock.
Sometimes
 being led down this primrose path into the smaller world, one gets a 
big surprise. As I was watching the Sticklebacks and Perch from 8 ft 
away thru my binocs, the world changed - the entire background of my 
little world view was changed into a rapidly moving field of big spots 
as a young Harbor Seal swam into my binocular view right under the 
Sticklebacks grotto! I just about fell off the swim-step of the boat. 
The seal disappeared as fast as it appeared. In this progression of 
scale, all I needed next was for a Gray Whale to swim right under the 
seal.
If you want to have fun developing a new sense of scale, you 
could do worse than fish watching with close-focusing binoculars, if you
 know what I mean. Of course birds vary considerable in scale too - it's
 all relative.
Jeff Gibson. just sayin', in Everett Wa_______________________________________________
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Subject: American Bittern feeding at Crescent Lake, Snohomish County
From: Hank <hank.heiberg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 19:18:19 -0700
> 
> Karen and I had the good fortune of watching an American Bittern for almost 
an hour today at Crescent Lake. 

> 
> Feeding videos:
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14765137937/
>  
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14765667860/
>  
> 
> At one point the bittern appeared to stumble into the water after which we 
watched it spread each wing, presumably drying them. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14951570002/
>  
> 
> We also watched it "shimmy", a movement we have seen Great Blue Herons make 
before striking a prey. 

> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14952733642/
> 
> 
> Finally here is a photo showing the bittern mirroring its environment.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/14763962388/ 

Hank Heiberg
Lake Joy
Carnation, Wa
hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom
>  _______________________________________________
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Subject: Tuck and Robin Lakes, Kititas Co. 8/11-14
From: amy schillinger <schillingera AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:01:53 -0700
My husband, brother, and I did a backpacking trip up to Tuck and Robin Lakes 
August 11th-14th. The weather was quite warm on our hike in. 

The trail begins at the Deception Pass trail 1376. The first 800 feet in 
elevation gain is gentle for 4.4 miles along Hyas lake. Mixed conifer with some 
riparian areas with low Alder along the lake. Highlights here were 
MacGillivray's Warblers, Common Loon, a Coopers Hawk, and two different 
Barrow's Goldeneyes with many young hanging out on logs in the lake. This would 
be a wonderful walk in the spring during migration. I will remember it. Only 
note is that without a high clearance vehicle one may have issues crossing 
Scatter Creek as it literally runs across the road year round. 

 
At the trail junction for 1376.1 takes you up 1100 feet in 2.00 miles to Tuck 
lake. To call this a trail is sort of a misnomer. It's more like a goat trail 
of rocks and roots that require climbing at certain points. Highlights here 
were Gray Jays swooping down and picking blueberries on the wing, an 
Olive-sided Flycatcher, more Brown Creepers than one could count. I stopped 
counting at 50! There were families everywhere on almost every tree. Many trees 
have peeling bark so it must be the perfect breeding ground for them. There 
were also many Townsends Warblers as well. 

 
Now for the worst part of the "trail". The last 1000 feet in elevation gain is 
only 1.7 miles up to Robin lakes. We thought the trail up to Tuck lake was bad! 
You absolutely must follow the cairns to find this "trail" as it literally 
crawls up to granite slabs. Then you just walk on the granite to get to the 
lakes. Absolutely stunning scenery! Our camp hosts the Mountain Goats were 
almost always near by except for Tuesday evening when a gnarly thunderstorm 
almost drowned us. Lighting and thunder directly overhead and we were fully 
exposed in the campsite. Scary evening with little sleep. At both upper and 
lower Robin lakes were American Pipits, Clarks' Nutcrackers, Cassin's Finches, 
and families of American Dippers. 

 
Side trips included a hike to the Granite Mt. Potholes. Many Cassin's Finches 
and Pine Siskins here as well as several Robins. On Wednesday we scrambled up 
to Granite Mt. (elv. 7100 ft). I was hoping for grouse and/or Ptarmigan. Saw 
neither. In fact, there was a total lack of birds at all on this scramble with 
the exception of a Raven or two. All one had to do was listen for a Marmot to 
whistle and sure enough, a Raven would pass through. 

 
On the controlled fall of a hike down we did have a couple of Dusky Grouse near 
Tuck Lake. Species count for the trip was 32. It probably would have been 
higher had I not been hiking with two non-birders and time was of the essence 
as one way for this trip was 8.5 miles. 

 
Cheers, 
Amy Powell
Renton, WA
schillingera AT Hotmail.com
 
 
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Subject: Tuck and Robin lakes 8/11-14
From: amy schillinger <schillingera AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:14:17 -0700
My husband, brother, and I did a backpacking trip up to Tuck and Robin Lakes 
August 11th-14th. The weather was quite warm on our hike in. 




The trail begins at the Deception Pass trail 1376. The first 800 feet in 
elevation gain is gentle for 4.4 miles along Hyas lake. Mixed conifer with some 
riparian areas with low Alder along the lake. Highlights here were 
MacGillivray's Warblers, Common Loon, a Coopers Hawk, and two different 
Barrow's Goldeneyes with many young hanging out on logs in the lake. This would 
be a wonderful walk in the spring during migration. I will remember it. Only 
note is that without a high clearance vehicle one may have issues crossing 
Scatter Creek as it literally runs across the road year round. 


At the trail junction for 1376.1 takes you up 1100 feet in 2.00 miles to Tuck 
lake. To call this a trail is sort of a misnomer. It's more like a goat trail 
of rocks and roots that require climbing at certain points. Highlights here 
were Gray Jays swooping down and picking blueberries on the wing, an 
Olive-sided Flycatcher, more Brown Creepers than one could count. I stopped 
counting at 50! There were families everywhere on almost every tree. Many trees 
have peeling bark so it must be the perfect breeding ground for them. There 
were also many Townsends Warblers as well. 


Now for the worst part of the "trail". The last 1000 feet in elevation gain is 
only 1.7 miles up to Robin lakes. We thought the trail up to Tuck lake was bad! 
You absolutely must follow the cairns to find this "trail" as it literally 
crawls up to granite slabs. Then you just walk on the granite to get to the 
lakes. Absolutely stunning scenery! Our camp hosts the Mountain Goats were 
almost always near by except for Tuesday evening when a gnarly thunderstorm 
almost drowned us. Lighting and thunder directly overhead and we were fully 
exposed in the campsite. Scary evening with little sleep. At both upper and 
lower Robin lakes were American Pipits, Clarks' Nutcrackers, Cassin's Finches, 
and families of American Dippers. 


Side trips included a hike to the Granite Mt. Potholes. Many Cassin's Finches 
and Pine Siskins here as well as several Robins. On Wednesday we scrambled up 
to Granite Mt. (elv. 7100 ft). I was hoping for grouse and/or Ptarmigan. Saw 
neither. In fact, there was a total lack of birds at all on this scramble with 
the exception of a Raven or two. All one had to do was listen for a Marmot to 
whistle and sure enough, a Raven would pass through. 


On the controlled fall of a hike down we did have a couple of Dusky Grouse near 
Tuck Lake. Species count for the trip was 32. It probably would have been 
higher had I not been hiking with two non-birders and time was of the essence 
as one way for this trip was 8.5 miles. 


Cheers, 
Amy Powell
Renton, WA
schillingera AT Hotmail.com 		 	   		  _______________________________________________
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