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Updated on Thursday, September 3 at 12:37 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Arabian Bustard,©BirdQuest

2 Sep Potholes Semi-pelagic TRIP-13 sept [Mike & MerryLynn ]
31 Aug Chestnut sided Warbler [Mike & MerryLynn ]
31 Aug Hawk Migration Festival September 11-13 ["Teri J Pieper" ]
24 Aug Red-tailed Hawk- Strange behavior [Keith Carlson ]
3 Aug Shorebirds, Biscuit Ridge saved [Mike & MerryLynn ]
27 Jul Ross's Goose-Hood Park [Mike & MerryLynn ]
20 Jul Re: [BirdYak] Gulls on Bumping Lake Sunday + Sunrise birds from Friday [Scott Downes ]
17 Jul County Yearlist Project mid-year update available at WA Birder [Matt Bartels ]
7 Jul LPO June ["Mike" ]
6 Jul 4th of July halfheated Big Day [Mike & MerryLynn ]
30 Jun Passing along a second-hand report of a possible Alder Flycatcher in Leavenworth [Chelan Co] [Matt Bartels ]
29 Jun Marbled Godwits, WWRdelta [Mike & MerryLynn ]
25 Jun FW: LPO BBS ["Mike" ]
17 Jun Re: Crested Caracara -- Yes ["Scott, Mike (mscott AT uidaho.edu)" ]
16 Jun Re Caracara [Doug Schonewald ]
16 Jun Re: Crested Caracara -- Yes [Nancy Williams ]
15 Jun Crested Caracara -- Yes [Rick Taylor ]
8 Jun Re: [Tweeters] Possible Washtucna Morning Warbler [Matt Bartels ]
8 Jun Re: 'Exotic' Species on State Lists [Doug Schonewald ]
7 Jun Re: 'Exotic' Species on State Lists [Doug Schonewald ]
4 Jun Yakima Dickcissel [Tom Mansfield ]
1 Jun Red Phalarope, gulls WWRdelta [Mike & MerryLynn ]
23 May White-faced Ibis continue in Walla Walla, Asotin [Matt Bartels ]
18 May County year list project update available on WA Birder [Matt Bartels ]
15 May Douglas County Ibis, Whimbrel [Tom Mansfield ]
10 May WA State Big Day Report - 9 May 2015 [long] [Matt Bartels ]
23 Apr Garfield County Mew Gull [Tom Mansfield ]
22 Apr Spring 2015 Klickitat County North American Migration Count.. May 9th...put it on your calendars and let me know if you will be able to participate... [Bob Hansen ]
20 Apr WOS Conference information available on website [amy schillinger ]
2 Apr Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Spring 2015 interim packet) [Matt Bartels ]
07 Mar Bats or owls? [Deborah ]
7 Mar Oak Creek Wildlife Area and vicinity ["Dave Hayden" ]
7 Mar Re: Jerdon's Babbler [Joshua Glant ]
7 Mar Jerdon's Babbler [Megan Lyden ]
7 Mar Issaquah Brambling []
7 Mar Short and Tweet Story, and Discovery Park Say's Phoebe question [Joshua Glant ]
07 Mar Re: Fill Update [Jane Hadley ]
7 Mar No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
7 Mar No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA [Bob ]
07 Mar Rufus hummingbird [cyberpoo ]
7 Mar Scrub jay in Wallingford [Katie Sauter Messick ]
7 Mar Cartwheels in The Sky | Union Bay Watch [Larry Hubbell ]
7 Mar Olympic Bird Fest [Boekelheide ]
7 Mar FOY Rufous Hummer [Dianna Moore ]
7 Mar TUVU [Dianna Moore ]
7 Mar Possible Rufous Hummingbird in Yard [Joshua Glant ]
7 Mar Brambling still in Issaquah [Denny Granstrand ]
7 Mar No Sage sparrow Steigerwald [Bob ]
7 Mar No Sage sparrow Steigerwald [Bob ]
7 Mar Say's Phoebe, Discovery Park, Seattle ["Rachel Lawson" ]
7 Mar Back on the Lone Prairie [Jeff Gibson ]
7 Mar a lovely video to start off your weekend right! [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Mar Ocean Shores Friday morning ["Randy Hill" ]
6 Mar Kalama GLAUCOUS GULL ... [Lyn Topinka ]
6 Mar Magnuson Park, 6 March 2015 [Scott Ramos ]
6 Mar Magnuson Park PGCH [Scott Ramos ]
06 Mar MV HWY Bald Eagle Pair [elynde ]
6 Mar Re: Yacolt Monk Parakeets? [Bob ]
6 Mar Sno-Valley, One Wk. Later - 3/5/15 [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar FW: Feather ID Help Please ["Eric Kowalczyk" ]
6 Mar Yacolt Monk Parakeets? ["Rachel Lawson" ]
6 Mar (Clark Co.) western bluebird [Luke Hanes ]
6 Mar Raven in Sammamish ["Ned McGarry" ]
6 Mar Ravens [David Hutchinson ]
6 Mar Feather ID Help Please [Lydia Gaebe Bishop ]
6 Mar hermit thrush and pine siskins [Jennifer DeSelle ]
6 Mar WDFW is on the case (injured eagle) [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar link to photos of injured Bald Eagle [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar injured Bald Eagle on Fir Is. [Barbara Deihl ]
6 Mar Community Values [Jeff Gibson ]
6 Mar Washington CSWA and other vagrant warbler photos [Joshua Glant ]
6 Mar Brambling still visible 3/5/15 []
5 Mar Re: Is this a whooping crane? (sorry, I got so excited I forgot to give a link!) [Michelle Maani ]
5 Mar Tufted Duck / Woodland Bottoms [Cowlitz co] []
5 Mar My Formative Years [Jeff Gibson ]
5 Mar Is this a whooping crane? [Michelle Maani ]

Subject: Potholes Semi-pelagic TRIP-13 sept
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 22:32:24 -0700
Hello All,

Yes it is time for the Potholes Semi-pelagic trip out on Potholes Res. 
We will leave at 6:30 am from Mardon Resort and will return by 1:30 pm. 
There are still several places open-let me know if you are interested 
and wish to go. This is a WOS field trip and as such is for WOS members. 
Sign up soon-It is a different type of migration this year-we have 
already seen both Sabines Gull and Parasitic Jaeger out on the Columbia 
River-who knows what will be on Potholes this trip out-come and find out!
Later Mike Denny
also at 509-529-0080

-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Chestnut sided Warbler
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 18:14:32 -0700
Hello All,

Went out to today to see what migration has brought to Walla Walla 
County. We started at Fishook Park and about 9:45 am MerryLynn located a 
fall plumeged Chestnut sided Warbler in the far northeast corner of the 
campground in two large maple trees. Took a number of photos -due to 
light did not come out good. This is the third record of this species in 
WW County. Wednesday looks like the next great opportunity to find 
migrants with a cold front moving in. Get out there and bird!!
Later Mike Denny

PS-The Ross's Goose is still at Hood Park.

-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Hawk Migration Festival September 11-13
From: "Teri J Pieper" <tjpieper AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:16:02 -0700
 

Please join the US Forest Services Methow Valley Ranger District, North
Central Washington Audubon Society (http://www.ncwaudubon.org/), HawkWatch
International, and the North Cascades Basecamp for the sixth annual Hawk
Migration Festival in Mazama!

 

As the wildfires have wreaked havoc throughout North Central Washington,
they have also burned in and around the Chelan Ridge HawkWatch site,
rendering it unusable for this years festival. This is a huge
disappointment for a project that has been in place since 1997. 

 

This year, HawkWatch will have a count station 400 yards south of the Slate
Peak parking area where visitors can come and help count hawks every day now
until at least September 13 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. Drive past the Harts
Pass campground one and one half miles to the parking area. This is about 45
minutes from Mazama.

 

The North Cascades Basecamp, an idyllic setting at the upper end of the
Methow Valley has graciously allowed us to use their place as headquarters
for Hawk Fest 2015. Due to the change of venue and the short time until the
festival, we have had to revise the schedule.

 

On Friday September 11th at 7 pm, Dave Oleyar from Hawk Watch International
(HWI) will offer a migration and raptor workshop at the North Cascades
Basecamp Classroom. Dave joined HWI as senior scientist in November 2013
after teaching upper level undergraduate courses in population ecology and
conservation biology at the University of Idaho for the previous three
years. He loves sharing his passion for ecology and conservation with others
whether it is in the classroom, at a public talk, or a walk in the field.
This workshop is free; snacks and coffee and tea will be provided.

 

On both the 12th and the 13th, there will be field trips to Slate Peak.
Starting at 8:45 am, carpools will leave from the Basecamp to go to Slate
Peak at 7,200 feet elevation. Local and trained raptor biologists will tell
us what it is like to live and breathe raptors. This will be an amazing
experience with environmental education and interpretation conducted by
on-site educators, including US Forest Service personnel and volunteers.
Dave Oleyar plans to participate both days. The North Cascades Basecamp has
offered to provide snack boxes ($7) or sack lunches ($10) for field trip
participants; please indicate if you want one of these when registering for
your field trip.

 

Jim Ullrich from Wild Birds Unlimited will be set up at the Basecamp with
optics and bird feeders for everyone to browse and try out.

 

We hope to bring HawkFest back to Pateros in 2016 so this may be your best
chance to experience raptors in the gorgeous setting of the North Cascades
on the border of the Pasayten Wilderness. 

 

As fires could create ongoing uncertainty about accessibility, we suggest
you check the NCW Audubon website http://www.ncwaudubon.org/

or facebook page prior to your departure for Hawkfest. 

 

To sign up for any of the activities or to learn more about the festival
please see www.ncwaudubon.org/. 

 

For more information about the HawkWatch International work at Chelan Ridge,
please see http://hawkwatch.org/migration/item/74-chelan-ridge-hawkwatch

 

The North Cascades Basecamp offers a European style lodge and cabin and is
located at 255 Lost River Road Mazama,  2  miles past the Mazama Store. To
find out more about the Base Camp please see www.northcascadesbasecamp.com

 

For alerts from the US Forest Service Methow Valley Ranger District please
see www.fs.usda.gov/detail/okawen/alerts-notices.

 

For information on other food and lodging opportunities near Winthrop and
Mazama, please see www.winthropwashington.com/

 

 

http://myeverydayphotos.wordpress.com/

 

 

 
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Subject: Red-tailed Hawk- Strange behavior
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 AT cableone.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 14:30:19 -0400
This Saturday morning, I observed an adult Red-tailed Hawk in some strange 
behavior I had not seen before. 

When first observed, I thought this bird was mantling it's prey. 
After watching awhile, it became apparent that it was tearing the bark off this 
old log.  Could not tell if it ever found a grub or not. 

Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, Thurston county, Washington,  USA 
  
https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/20849736055/in/dateposted-public/ 
  
https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/20663020049/in/dateposted-public/ 
  
Keith E. Carlson 
Lewiston, Idaho 

-- 
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Subject: Shorebirds, Biscuit Ridge saved
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2015 18:31:39 -0700
Hello all,
The Blue Creek fire is contained and thankfully Biscuit Ridge is still intact - 
still very dry and dusty up there. 

The river level was low enough for mudflats this morning so I checked the Walla 
Walla River delta, 2Rivers and Penninsula HMU's - lots of shorebirds. A 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER was county yearbird #237. Many Killdeer, Greater and Lesser 
Yellowlegs, Black-necked Stilts, Long-billed Dowitchers, Least, Western and one 
Solitary Sandpiper. Several Wilson's Snipe were in the cobble at "Ruff Spit" at 
2Rivers. On an exposed rock were 5 FORSTER'S TERNS - the best place in the 
county to see these birds. 


Over 30 Great Egrets out there today - nesting was successful. There were 150 
Western Grebes out in the milfoil - must be full of fish. 


Badger Island was white with Pelicans - they had a successful nesting season as 
well. 


Good birding, MerryLynn



*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

"If you haven't birded, you haven't lived"_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
Subject: Ross's Goose-Hood Park
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:38:57 -0700
Hello All,

This morning MerryLynn and I stopped by Hood Park to check out the 
purported summer Snow Goose. What we did find was the first summer 
record of an adult wild Ross's Goose in molt. I watched it drop a 
primary feather and make a short flight to the edge of the Snake River, 
so it is not injured. It is hanging out with 300+ Canada Geese and 
several mongrel farm geese. This the very first Ross's Goose summer 
record for Walla Walla County.
Good luck looking for it-it is small, but easy to locate. Very nice 
summer bird for southeastern Washington.
Later Mike Denny

-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED

_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu
https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Gulls on Bumping Lake Sunday + Sunrise birds from Friday
From: Scott Downes <downess AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 19:06:18 -0700
Michael,
Great sighting on the Bonaparte’s! I’m not aware of too many summer 
sightings in Yakima County and would guess they are less than annual in the 
summer months in the county. There seems to be a pattern in summer of 
California gulls using large Cascade lakes (reservoirs) in migration. I have 
seen them at Rimrock, Bumping, Kachess, Keechelus and Cle Elum, mostly in July. 
Bumping Lake is a good spot for both American three-toed woodpecker (in the 
more mature forest habitat) and black-backed woodpecker in the younger 
lodgepole pine stands to the southeast of the dam. 


Scott Downes
downess AT charter.net
Yakima WA

From: mailto:BirdYak-noreply AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 3:54 PM
To: Tweeters ; Inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu ; BirdYak 
Subject: [BirdYak] Gulls on Bumping Lake Sunday + Sunrise birds from Friday

  

I was doing a botany hike along the north edge of Bumping Lake yesterday, and 
was shocked to find 5 gulls out near the west end. 


One was an adult BONAPARTE’S GULL. Three more were very brown black 
wing-tipped juveniles, and I’m leaning towards CALIFORNIA GULL for them. A 
fourth gull was a very pale juvenile. I’m not sure what it was, but from the 
looks I got, it best matches a juvenile VEGA HERRING GULL. 


I’m sure about the Bonaparte’s; I’m decidedly not sure about the juvenile 
gulls :) I really wish I’d had my scope and a camera. 



Friday, I walked up to the Mt. Freemont Lookout from Sunrise. Birds of note 
included a BLACK SWIFT, an AMERICAN DIPPER at (un)Frozen Lake, which seems very 
early to have one so high, and a male WHITE-TAILED PTARMIGAN on the trail near 
the lookout. At Tipsoo Lake, an OSPREY flew over; again this seems early to 
have one so high. 


Saturday, I had 4-5 AMERICAN THREE-TOED WOODPECKERS while working my way along 
the road that follows the south shore of Bumping Lake; 2-3 were at a swamp, and 
2 were at the fen. Sunday morning, a BARRED OWL called near the Bumping Lake 
campground at some wee hour of the pre-dawn. 


All in all, it was a pretty good weekend of birding. And I must at that the 
old-growth forest at the northwest corner of Bumping Lake is phenomenal, and 
Bumping Falls, just a bit above the lake, are a real treasure. 


== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor AT frontier.com


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Subject: County Yearlist Project mid-year update available at WA Birder
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 05:24:20 -0700
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders

An updated version of the 2015 County Yearlist Project is up and available at 
Washington Birder. We've updated all 39 counties as of the mid-way point in the 
year. Thanks to everyone who has contributed by sending county compilers their 
sightings &/or posting on eBird. 


At the mid-year point, as summer gets into full wing, this is a decent time to 
compare totals with previous years. Overall, this year is shaping up pretty 
decently in comparison with last year, and is more similar to 2012 and 2013 sas 
far as total number of species reported. 26 counties have higher totals than 
they posted last year at this point, 22 have totals higher than 2013 as well. 


Here are a few comparisons with recent years:
Washington State: 369 +11 over 2014, equal to 2013, -1 from 2012
Western Washington 334 +14 over 2014, +9 over 2013, equal to 2012	
Eastern Washington 301 +2 over 2014, -7 from 2013, +2 over 2012


If you'd like to take a look at where things stand, the list and many other 
interesting files are at the Washington Birder website: 


http://www.wabirder.com/ 


A direct link to the 2014 county yearlist & the list of county compilers 
contact info: 

http://www.wabirder.com/county_yearlist.html



Thanks to all the compilers and all those pitching in to sketch a picture of 
another year's birds in WA. 



Matt Bartels 
Seattle, WA _______________________________________________
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Subject: LPO June
From: "Mike" <strix.nebulosa1987 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2015 19:48:40 -0700
 

I have gotten some positive comments in the past from my occasional weekly and 
monthly summaries. So I thought I would post a monthly checklist for the Little 
Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge again. So here we go, the staff 
collectively found the following 128 species somewhere of the refuge this past 
June. 


 

Mike

 

 

Canada Goose

Wood Duck

Mallard

Blue-winged Teal

Cinnamon Teal

Ring-necked Duck

Lesser Scaup

Bufflehead

Common Goldeneye

Hooded Merganser

Common Merganser

Ruddy Duck

California Quail

Ruffed Grouse

Dusky Grouse

Wild Turkey

Pied-billed Grebe

Double-creasted Cormorant

American Bittern

Great Blue Heron

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Northern Harrier

Cooper’s Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

American Kestrel

Virginia Rail

Sora

American Coot

Killdeer

Spotted Sandpiper

Wilson’s Snipe

Mourning Dove

Flammulated Owl

Western Screech-owl

Great Horned Owl

North Pygmy-owl

Barred Owl

Northern Saw-whet Owl

Common Nigthawk

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Calliope Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-naped Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

White-headed Woodpecker

Black-backed Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Olive-sided Flycatcher

Western Wood-pewee

Willow Flycatcher

Least Flycatcher

Hammond’s Flycatcher

Dusky Flycatcher

Pacific-slope Flycatcher

Say’s Phoebe

Eastern Kingbird

Cassin’s Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Gray Jay 

Steller’s Jay

Clark’s Nutcracker

Black-billed Magpie

Common raven

Tree Swallow

Violet-green Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Bank Swallow

Cliff Swallow

Barn Swallow

Mountain Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

Chestnut-backed Chickadee

Red-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Pygmy Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

House Wren

Pacific Wren

Marsh Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Western Bluebird

Mountain Bluebird

Townsend’s Solitaire

Veery

Swainson’s Thrush

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Varied Thrush

Gray Catbird

European Starling

Cedar Waxwing

Northern Waterthrush

Orange-crowned Warbler

Nashville Warbler

McGillivray’s Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Yellow Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Townsend’s Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Spotted Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Lincoln’s Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Western Tanager

Black-headed Grosbeak

Lazuli Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird

Western Meadowlark

Yellow-headed Blackbird

Brewer’s Blackbird

Brown-headed Blackbird

Bullock’s Oriole

Cassin’s Finch

House Finch

Red Crossbill

Pine Siskin

American Goldfinch

 

 
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Subject: 4th of July halfheated Big Day
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2015 10:33:37 -0700
Hello all,
Mike and I did our annual Big Day in Walla Walla county on the 4th - because of 
the heat we took a siesta from 2 - 7 pm - but still ended with 131 species for 
the day - the last a Horned Lark at 10:15 pm in the road coming down Lewis 
Peak. 


We started at 4 am and drove up Biscuit Ridge - many birds including Dusky 
Grouse but NO Cassin's Finch, Pine Siskin or Crossbill. Out to the WWRdelta 
where we found Franklin's Gull and Marbled Godwit along with the usual 
shorebirds. 


In the evening there was a Pectoral Sandpiper on Mill Creek behink Kmart in WW 
and up Mill Creek were Cedar Waxwings EVERYWHERE. 


Worst misses include Bewick's Wren, Downy or Hairy Woodpecker and Kingfisher.

This morning I walked Rook's Park and found our first Red-eyed Vireo of the 
year - it was singing a quarter mile east of the park - you take the trail up 
over the hill above the dam - past the second bench. 


The family of Pileated Woodpeckers nested again above the first parking spots 
at the park - 3 young were begging this morning - always fun to watch. 

Lesser Goldfinches were everywhere at the park - 1 pair on the weeds at the 
entrance. 


Good birding, ML
*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

"If you haven't birded, you haven't lived"_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
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Subject: Passing along a second-hand report of a possible Alder Flycatcher in Leavenworth [Chelan Co]
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:51:52 -0700
Hi all -
Passing along a non-reviewed ['pending'] eBird report of a possible Alder 
Flycatcher found by a birder not on Tweeters -- he wasn't able to get 
recordings, but there's definitely a possibility the bird is still around and 
might be refindable and fully documented by another birder. If you are headed 
to Leavenworth anytime soon, it is definitely worth a visit [and a report 
positive or negative] -- there are currently 4 accepted records of Alder 
Flycatcher for the state, though part of the low number is likely the 
difficulty of the id, w/o good documentation. 


Here's hoping someone has some luck. The report follows:

Species: Alder Flycatcher

Count: 1
Observation date: Jun 19, 2015
Location: Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery, Chelan, US-WA
Submission ID: S24059013
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24059013

Identical to Willow Flycatcher with dark face almost undiscernible eye-ring and 
good sized bill with lighter lower mandible with darker tip. It's call was 
distantly different than the "fits-bew" of a the Willow FC. This bird repeated 
a raspy "ree-bee" song similar in tonal quality to Willow but very different. A 
two part but closely connected "ree-bee" song with second note ("bee") higher 
in pitch than first. Dead on with recordings of Alder Flycatcher. Bird was 
located on the nature trail adjacent to the fish hatchery 100 yards or so in 
where the trail hooks around to the left. Mostly calling between forays for 
flying insects from mid level pine branches within a small area. Observed at 
close range 15-30' for 5+ min. with 10x Swarovski's. Bird was calling when I 
left. 


 
Best,

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA
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Subject: Marbled Godwits, WWRdelta
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:52:56 -0700
Hello all,
I headed out to the millet pond this morning with a quick stop at the delta 
even though there is no mud. Out wading around between the gulls and pelicans 
were 11 Marbled Godwits - a rest stop on their way to the coast. 


The millet pond is drying up fast - one deeper pool was full of pelicans, 
egrets and herons eating tadpoles and salamander larvae. There were a few 
shorebirds but it will be dry too soon especially as we are going to be in the 
100's for the next 10 days - it was 81 and windy with sprinkles this morning at 
6 am. 


Tyson ponds - the large one was clear full with no mud and the marsh to the 
east is dried up - so sad as all the phalaropes, stilts and avocets didn't 
bring off any young this year - didn't even see any young teal this year - all 
their marshes dried up too soon. There are many young Red-wing and 
Yellow-headed Blackbirds - didn't seem to affect them. 


Stay cool, MerryLynn


*******************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the beautiful Walla Walla Valley

"If you haven't birded, you haven't lived"_______________________________________________
Inland-nw-birders mailing list
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Subject: FW: LPO BBS
From: "Mike" <strix.nebulosa1987 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:13:04 -0700
 

For those who may interested I completed the Little Pend Oreille BBS earlier 
this week. I had the following 80 species. Pretty much the usual birds. A 
couple of notable species though. The first Mountain Bluebird since I have been 
doing the count. We do have a pair in one of the boxes near headquarters that 
has generally been the domain of westerns. Also, the first Eurasian 
Collared-dove for the route. It may be the first but it was not unexpected. 
Like everywhere else in the country they are on the increase around here. Since 
the last few points are off the refuge in farm land I am not surprised one 
finally showed up for count day. 


 

  

Canada Goose

Mallard

Ring-necked Duck

Ruffed Grouse

Dusky Grouse

California Quail

Wild Turkey

American Coot

Killdeer

Spotted Sandpiper

Mourning Dove

Rock Pigeon

Eurasian Collared-dove

Common Nighthawk

Calliope Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Red-naped Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

White-headed Woodpecker

Red-shafted Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Western Wood-pewee

Willow Flycatcher

Hammond’s Flycatcher

Dusky Flycatcher

Pacific-slope Flycatcher

Cassin’s Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Common Raven

Black-billed Magpie

Tree Swallow

Violet-green Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Cliff Swallow

Barn Swallow

Mountain Chickadee

Chestnut-backed Chickadee

Red-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Pygmy Nuthatch

House Wren

Pacific Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Western Bluebird

Mountain Bluebird

Townsend’s Solitaire

Veery

Swainson’s Thrush

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

European Starling

Northern Waterthrush

Orange-crowned Warbler

Macgillivray’s Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Audubon’s Warbler

Townsend’s Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Spotted Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Oregon Junco

Western Tanager

Black-headed Grosbeak

Red-winged Blackbird

Yellow-headed Blackbird

Western Meadowlark

Brewer’s Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Cassin’s Finch

House Finch

Red Crossbill

Pine Siskin

 

 

 

 

 
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Subject: Re: Crested Caracara -- Yes
From: "Scott, Mike (mscott AT uidaho.edu)" <mscott@uidaho.edu>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 22:17:44 +0000
Regarding fleshy" protusion" probably indicative of a full crop.


MIke Scott

________________________________
From: Nancy Williams 
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 11:36 AM
To: taylorrl AT outlook.com; tweeters AT u.washington.edu; Mailman - 
inland-nw-birders AT uidaho.edu 

Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Crested Caracara -- Yes

That fleshy protrusion is it's crop.


-----Original Message-----
From: Rick Taylor 
To: 'tweeters' ; 'Inland NW Birders' 
 

Sent: Mon, Jun 15, 2015 10:38 pm
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Crested Caracara -- Yes

Tweeters, Inlanders,

Tina and I blasted up to Skykomish after work this evening. There were several 
other birders looking for the bird and it was quickly located roosting on a 
tree branch. See the digiscope photo https://www.flickr.com/photos/2birders/ . 
Note the "thing" on its breast - any idea what this is? 


Rick

Rick Taylor
Everett

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Subject: Re Caracara
From: Doug Schonewald <dschone8 AT donobi.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 16:29:15 -0700
It might be interesting to note in the discussion of vagrancy that not only
are there patterns of vagrancy, but this bird likely arrived in the midst of
a strong push of warm weather from the south. It would be interesting to
note if the other occurrences also coincided with strong southerly wind
patterns.



Cheers

 

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA

 
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Subject: Re: Crested Caracara -- Yes
From: Nancy Williams <oriole2023 AT aol.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 14:36:16 -0400
That fleshy protrusion is it's crop.
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Rick Taylor 
To: 'tweeters' ; 'Inland NW Birders' 
 

Sent: Mon, Jun 15, 2015 10:38 pm
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Crested Caracara -- Yes


 
  
Tweeters, Inlanders,
  
 
  
Tina and I blasted up to Skykomish after work this evening. There were several 
other birders looking for the bird and it was quickly located roosting on a 
tree branch. See the digiscope photo https://www.flickr.com/photos/2birders/ . 
Note the “thing” on its breast – any idea what this is? 

  
 
  
Rick
  
 
  
Rick Taylor
  
Everett
 


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Subject: Crested Caracara -- Yes
From: Rick Taylor <taylorrl AT outlook.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 22:38:18 -0700
Tweeters, Inlanders,

 

Tina and I blasted up to Skykomish after work this evening.   There were
several other birders looking for the bird and it was quickly located
roosting on a tree branch.  See the digiscope photo
https://www.flickr.com/photos/2birders/ .    Note the "thing" on its breast
- any idea what this is?

 

Rick

 

Rick Taylor

Everett
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Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Possible Washtucna Morning Warbler
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 19:31:30 -0700
Hi all -
To add to what Scott mentioned -
There's still some question about this bird -- it would be great if anyone in 
Washtucna were able to get a look at it. 

I was there on Sunday, and the bird was singing away much of the time - 
frustratingly, it never once showed itself to me in 2 hours of trying to get a 
look. 

The song sounds pretty decent for Mourning Warbler, but MacGillivray's can sing 
things very akin to Mourning Warbler, and the chip notes [heard by others] may 
well have been more lke Mac than Mourning. 

Without getting photos or great visual descriptions, this one is likely to 
remain a mystery. 


The problem is, that bird is buried in a thicket and doesn't seem to have much 
reason to rise to the surface. Playback only seemed to quiet the bird, if it 
provoked any response at all. The thicket is right where Brad described it - 
NNE of the park near the corner of Cooper and Clearwater. 


If anyone wants to hear the recordings I made Sunday, send an email and I'll 
share the dropbox folder link w/ you. 


If you are in the area and want a challenge - go get a photo! We've only got 
two Mourning Warbler records for the state so far.... 


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA


On Jun 8, 2015, at 3:34 AM, Scott R a y wrote:

> The recording of this bird made over the weekend sounds a lot like a Mourning 
Warbler. It would be worth confirming. 

> 
> Scott Ray
> Stanley, ND
> 
> <
> <
> Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2015 08:52:58 -0700
> Subject: [Tweeters] Continuing Washtucna Mystery Warbler
> Hello All,
> 
> I received word from my birder friend Bob that the "mystery" warbler
> was still singing in the same bush yesterday behind the green
> residential house in Washtucna. The warbler still has not came out of
> it's sight impenetrable "brush fortress." I have recording of the
> singing (very close to the video recorder actually) as well from when
> I was there Friday.
> 
> Good Birding,
> 
> Kevin Black
> Vancouver, WA
> 
> Scott Ray
> Stanley, ND
> Pecked out on my phone
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Subject: Re: 'Exotic' Species on State Lists
From: Doug Schonewald <dschone8 AT donobi.net>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 16:43:12 -0700
Thanks to Justin for pointing out my grievous error in the species nominations 
for Sagebrush and Bell’s Sparrows. Too old and not as good a memory as I 
should have. Regardless, if you had seen them both during breeding season you 
now reliably have two species for the price of one. Splitting can be boon for 
listers. You will of course have to eliminate Sage Sparrow from your lists. 


Cheers

 

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA.

 

 

From: Justin Wilde [mailto:jwwilde AT outlook.com] 
Sent: Monday, June 8, 2015 10:50 AM
To: Doug Schonewald
Subject: RE: [inland-NW-birders] 'Exotic' Species on State Lists

 

I am trying not to be "that guy" but i guess there is no way around it. The 
sparrow split was not to Sage and Sagebrush Sparrow but rather Sage Sparrow no 
longer exists and we have Sagebrush and Bell's sparrow. Bell's is the species 
located out of California. You would not be able to have a list check without 
have ever seen that subspecies in that endemic area of Cali. There is still a 
lot of material out there that uses Sage Sparrow in its works but that common 
name no longer exists, and the latin names are different as well. 


so there is the end of my "that guy" post that had nothing to do with your swan 
post haha, happy birding. 


 

 

 

Justin



-------- Original message --------
From: Doug Schonewald  > 
Date: 06/07/2015 17:23 (GMT-08:00) 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu   
Cc: Inland-Nw-Birders  > 

Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] 'Exotic' Species on State Lists 

Mostly my thoughts pertain specifically to comments on Mute Swans by Wayne and 
Matt, both of who I respect deeply. 


I keep my personal lists according to the ABA, both state lists and my NA list. 
However, remember that lists are personal and nothing keeps anyone from keeping 
complete lists of birds seen whether they are exotic or not. The ABA list will 
remain in flux and change regularly. Not too many years ago we had one species 
known as Sage Sparrow. Now we have two known as Sage Sparrow and Sagebrush 
Sparrow. If you kept a complete list of sightings you would have been able to 
add a species to your list without making a trip to California. 


Changes in bird populations are dynamic and ever-changing. I can remember not 
so long ago when everyone in the state chased after the rare and elusive 
vagrant known as the Eurasian Collared-Dove. In a few short years they went 
from a rare vagrant to a complete nuisance, breeding in every niche in the 
state. There is also a movement at this time to eradicate (or at least 
dramatically reduce) Caspian Terns and DC Cormorants from the avian biomass in 
the Columbia Basin. Does this mean that since there is a concerted and official 
effort to remove these populations that people should not count those species 
if seen in the area and attempted eradication? Of course not. 


That is not to say that the Mute Swan is going to do the same as the Eurasian 
Collared-Dove, but it is likely that they will become established and a viable 
bird on the state list. Recently I saw a photo of a Mute Swan with what 
appeared to be a Trumpeter Swan paired on a wetland near Quincy, WA. The Mute 
Swan was not likely transported there by human means. Rather, it likely arrived 
the same way the Trumpeter Swan arrived. Does that mean it is a vagrant? From 
what population did it come from? No one can reliably answer any of those 
questions for a sighting in the Columbia Basin far away from any known 
populations in the rest of the state. At the same time the Mute Swans that are 
being seen in the Puget Trough came from somewhere. If the sightings are 
increasing then it is reasonable to assume they are either breeding locally or 
the population is being supplemented by an established population in the 
Vancouver/Victoria area. Regardless if they are escapees from the aviculture 
industry or influx from Canada they should be recorded and noted. Whether you 
put them on your list, or not, is entirely up to you. 


Cheers

 

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA

 

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com  
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Subject: Re: 'Exotic' Species on State Lists
From: Doug Schonewald <dschone8 AT donobi.net>
Date: Sun, 7 Jun 2015 17:23:06 -0700
Mostly my thoughts pertain specifically to comments on Mute Swans by Wayne
and Matt, both of who I respect deeply.

I keep my personal lists according to the ABA, both state lists and my NA
list. However, remember that lists are personal and nothing keeps anyone
from keeping complete lists of birds seen whether they are exotic or not.
The ABA list will remain in flux and change regularly. Not too many years
ago we had one species known as Sage Sparrow. Now we have two known as Sage
Sparrow and Sagebrush Sparrow. If you kept a complete list of sightings you
would have been able to add a species to your list without making a trip to
California.

Changes in bird populations are dynamic and ever-changing. I can remember
not so long ago when everyone in the state chased after the rare and elusive
vagrant known as the Eurasian Collared-Dove. In a few short years they went
from a rare vagrant to a complete nuisance, breeding in every niche in the
state. There is also a movement at this time to eradicate (or at least
dramatically reduce) Caspian Terns and DC Cormorants from the avian biomass
in the Columbia Basin. Does this mean that since there is a concerted and
official effort to remove these populations that people should not count
those species if seen in the area and attempted eradication? Of course not.



That is not to say that the Mute Swan is going to do the same as the
Eurasian Collared-Dove, but it is likely that they will become established
and a viable bird on the state list. Recently I saw a photo of a Mute Swan
with what appeared to be a Trumpeter Swan paired on a wetland near Quincy,
WA. The Mute Swan was not likely transported there by human means. Rather,
it  likely arrived the same way the Trumpeter Swan arrived. Does that mean
it is a vagrant? From what population did it come from? No one can reliably
answer any of those questions for a sighting in the Columbia Basin far away
from any known populations in the rest of the state. At the same time the
Mute Swans that are being seen in the Puget Trough came from somewhere. If
the sightings are increasing then it is reasonable to assume they are either
breeding locally or the population is being supplemented by an established
population in the Vancouver/Victoria area. Regardless if they are escapees
from the aviculture industry or influx from Canada they should be recorded
and noted.  Whether you put them on your list, or not, is entirely up to
you.

Cheers

 

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA

 
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Subject: Yakima Dickcissel
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 4 Jun 2015 13:54:28 -0400
As of the time of this post the Hardy Canyon DICK continues on territory making 
short flights and sitting up calling. The bird is along the road leading from 
the second Hardy Canyon posted access as you drive north from Selah on N. Wenas 
road. For the uninitiated city slicker like me, you have to OPEN THE 2 GATES in 
order to drive in. Thanks for finding it Richard! 


Tom Mansfield headed to Pend Oreille

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Subject: Red Phalarope, gulls WWRdelta
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2015 19:55:00 -0700
Hello all from MerryLynn,
After the stormy weather last night I wondered what might be at the 
delta since the water level was low enough for mud so I was out there 
early this morning and was not disappointed! A breeding plumage RED 
PHALAROPE was swimming out around the pelicans - 43 FRANKLIN'S and 3 
BONAPARTE'S GULLS were picking around in the mud along with Avocets, 
Stilts and a couple Blue-winged Teal. Out by itself was an adult WESTERN 
GULL - this species shows up every summer here.

Only 5 Caspian Terns left - these birds will become rare here since they 
won't let them nest anywhere in Eastern WA. No Forster's Terns anywhere 
today.

I checked 2Rivers and Penninsula HMU - lots of birds - nothing rare. 137 
Western Grebes seems high for June. Not sure if they are non-breeders or 
what.

Good birding, ML

-- 
MIKE & MERRYLYNN DENNY
BIRDING THE BEAUTIFUL WALLA WALLA VALLEY
IF YOU HAVEN'T GONE BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED

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Subject: White-faced Ibis continue in Walla Walla, Asotin
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 19:08:05 -0700
I started the weekend with a search for some of the recently reported 
White-faced Ibis [WFIB]-- 

This morning at ~7:00, 15 WFIB were at the Millet Pond in Walla Walla County -- 
they mostly stayed well hidden in the rushes, but did fly up once to give a 
good chance to count them. 

I tried in vain to turn up WFIB in Columbia or Garfield County where they have 
yet to be recorded. Best birds in a run along the Snake River were in Garfield, 
on the island a couple miles west of the Lower Granite Dam where an American 
Avocet & a Blue-winged Teal were keeping the Am.White Pelicans company . 


In Asotin County, the mouth of the Alpowa river didn't have any WFIB, but 
several pelicans were joined by 6 American Avocets. 

And then, at Swallows Park in the swimming area, a White-faced Ibis was hanging 
out with 4 Blue-winged Teal. 


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA
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Subject: County year list project update available on WA Birder
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 05:13:50 -0700
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders -

An updated version of the 2015 County Yearlist Project is up and available at 
Washington Birder. We've received updates from all but four of the 39 counties 
as of the end of April. Thanks to everyone who has contributed by sending 
county compilers their sightings &/or posting on ebird. 


An end-of-April cut off for produces a lot of variability in the lists -- there 
is so much that is coming in right around the first of May that the precise 
totals for each county are pretty insignificant -- one week earlier or later 
could make the difference for a dozen or more species , easily. 

Nevertheless, here's a bit of year-on-year comparing!

As of the end of April 2015 2014, 329 species had been tallied -- that's well 
above last year's total of 318, but not as high as two years ago. Western WA, 
at 288 species was ten above last year's 278, and Eastern WA's 259 is right on 
last year's pace. 


Though I haven't looked at the specifics, perhaps the higher totals are a 
reflection of a slightly earlier spring migration bringing birds in just inside 
the cut-off, rather than any overall sign of a year with more diversity of 
birds. We'll see in a couple months when the reporting mark comes during a 
quieter time. 


25 of the 39 counties have higher totals reported this year than they did at 
this point last year. 

Yakima county, with 221 species reported, is well ahead of the other counties, 
with Clallam, King, & Grays Harbor next in line and the only other counties to 
have crossed the 200 mark by the end of april. 


If you'd like to take a look at where things stand, the list and many other 
interesting files are at the Washington Birder website: 


http://www.wabirder.com/ 


A direct link to the 2015 county yearlist & the list of county compilers 
contact info: 

http://www.wabirder.com/county_yearlist.html



Thanks to all the compilers and all those pitching in to sketch a picture of 
another year's birds in WA. 



Matt Bartels 
Seattle, WA 
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Subject: Douglas County Ibis, Whimbrel
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 22:20:37 -0400
Inspired by Meredith Spencer's reports the past couple of days and the influx 
of Ibis sightings on the east side, I headed over to Douglas County today to 
check some vernal spots on the Waterville Plateau. While the mud at the places 
I checked is disappearing on the edges, there were still plenty of good birds 
today. The large wet area at the top of Bridgeport Hill and Road 18 wasn't 
quite as exciting for me as for Meredith but still there were Avocets, Wilson's 
Phalaropes, Baird's and Least sandpipers. A vernal patch on the "Highway to 
Mansfield" at mile post 16 had Greater Yellowlegs, a half dozen Long-billed 
Dows, both Red-necked and Wilson's phalaropes, and a lone Pectoral Sandpiper. 
The big "lake" behind the St. Andrews Grange had nothing but Avocets but the 
ponds and wet area on St. Andrews Road at Road N had 1 White-faced Ibis and at 
least 3 Whimbrel poking in and out of view. Fairly difficult scope views but 
identifiable and distant photos taken. There was much of the same (less the 
Ibis and Whimbrels) at a very large vernal pond just off Highway 2 and L Road 
NE, southwest of St. Andrew. This is a large pond with great edges that may 
take some time to dry up and may offer some good birds in the days to come. 


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Subject: WA State Big Day Report - 9 May 2015 [long]
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 10 May 2015 11:28:02 -0700
Tweets -
Yesterday, May 9 2015, Michael Hobbs, Sharon Cormier-Aagaard and I held our 
fourth State Big Day. Our goal was to see as many species as possible in a 24 
hour period and we zoomed all over the place trying our luck. We had a great 
time, found some new places and surprise birds, and missed some 'shoulda' 
birds. Weather was great, hot but not oppressively, with mostly low winds and 
no rain. 


Our total for the day was 168 species - 7 fewer than our 2012 best of 175, and 
somehow exactly tied with last year for our second highest result. 


Here's the run-down:

Night:
We began in Ellensburg at 11:30 , picked up coffee and were in place at 
midnight when the day began. First bird, just after midnight, was a Great 
Horned Owl on Umptanum Rd near a recent nest [our first of 3 Great Horned Owls 
on the night]. Next up, we hit Durr Rd [Kittitas County] where as in previous 
years we enjoyed hearing Sage Thrasher & Brewers Sparrow singing in the dark. 
Wenas Campground was next, where an open gate allowed us to drive quite a ways 
in and almost right up to where Flammulated Owl were hooting away loudly in the 
pines. A new stop along Malloy Rd. outside of Wenas CG brought us a Western 
Screech-Owl - nice! Along Audubon Rd., we found our only Common Poorwill of the 
night, one that grave us great looks before flying off to the roadside. At the 
entrance to Hardy Canyon we barely were out of the car before we heard a 
Yellow-breasted Chat singing away. After failing to find Burrowing Owl in the 
dark at Sheep Company Rd., we headed to Yakima, where on Valle 

 y Mall Blvd. we found our 'traditional' Barn Owl. Our last stop in darkness 
was at Toppenish NWR, at the 3/4 miles ponds on US-97 where we heard things 
like American Bittern, Black-necked Stilt, Virginia Rail, Wilson's Snipe and 
more. 


With 21 species before dawn, we headed off to daylight birding.

Dawn:
Our previous starting point has been Tule Rd. off US 97 and BIA 148 nearby - 
recently, the Yakama Nation has clarified that those unsigned spots are 
actually off-limits - so we had to restructure our first stops to try to make 
up for some great birding. 

This year, we gave the east end of Tule Rd a try - the east end is public , and 
it proved productive though different than the previous spots. As light grew, 
we were greeted by Long-billed Curlew's eerie calls as they flew in. Lark 
Sparrow are also very common on that end of the route [a new bird for our Big 
Day history]. We picked up things like Western Kingbird, Says Phoebe, Northern 
Harrier, Rock Wren, Bullock's Oriole, Gambelliis White-crowned Sparrow, and a 
flock of Cedar Waxwings [our only Cedar Waxwings of the day]. Missed birds, 
present the day before, were Horned Lark & Loggerhead Shrike - next time! 


Tule Rd. east was good, but it left us behind schedule for much of the day -- 
just too much fun to try a new place -- as a result, we spent a lot of the day 
trying to make up minutes by going a bit fast at our 'regular' stops. 


Morning:
Toppenish NWR was next - poking around we picked up a number of good birds, 
though not as many as in previous years at this location -- best birds 
included: A Short-eared Owl on Old Goldendale Rd. perhaps carrying food to a 
nest site?, Blue-winged Teal [at the 3/4 mile spot], Cinnamon Teal [several 
spots], & Sagebrush Sparrow [along Pumphouse Rd.]. 


Next up, we began the westward run, moving through Yakima [Double-crested 
Cormorant, White-throated & Vaux's Swift] and then uphill towards White Pass 
along SR 12. Lewis's Woodpecker, Black-headed Grosbeak & Western Tanager were 
cooperative at Oak Creek & the Oak Creek Headquarters. Just before Bear Canyon, 
a quick stop produced a Common Merganser on the water and a male Black-throated 
Gray Warbler in the trees. At Bear Canyon, we added Canyon Wren, Nashville 
Warbler, Spotted Towhee, Chipping Sparrow & Mountain Chickadee. Flycatchers 
weren't cooperating though, and a zoom-by hummingbird was almost certainly a 
Calliope, but we really didn't get a chance to confirm and Calliope was a miss 
for the day. We wanted to spend more time up Bethel Ridge this year, but still 
had to scoot pretty fast -- Woodpeckers were a target , and Downy Woodpecker, 
Red-naped Sapsucker & Williamson's Sapsucker all cooperated, along with a 
hybrid Red-naped x Red-breasted Sapsucker. Hammond's & Dusky Fl 

 ycatchers were vocalizing, Cassin's Vireo, Western Bluebird, Townsend's 
Solitaire & Hermit Thrush all put in a show, along with a couple singing 
Lincoln's Sparrow. For the first time on our big day, we had a booming Sooty 
Grouse as well. At Tieton Marsh, Ring-necked Duck & Lesser Scaup were added to 
our day list, and over at Clear Lake we found Barrow's Goldeneye, American 
Wigeon and [in the trees] Yellow Warbler [finally]. As we got back toward SR 
12, Sharon spotted a soaring accipiter - we stopped & looked, and got nice 
looks at an immature Northern Goshawk, a highlight bird of the day. Our final 
eastern WA stop was at Leech Lake, where Slate-colored Fox Sparrows were 
singing along with Wilson's Warblers [and Pugetensis White-crowned Sparrows].. 


We crossed White Pass at about 1:30 w/ 116 species tallied [a bit below our 
intended rate, and a little later than ideal, but still mighty nice for a 1/2 
day] 


Afternoon:
Across the pass into Lewis County, we made a few stops to pick up westside 
birds before hurrying to the coast - Gray Jay & Chestnut-backed Chickadee were 
along FR 45, Rufous Hummingbird at the Packwood Gas Station as usual, Pac-slope 
Flycatcher, Pacific Wren & Varied Thrush along FR 25 our of Randle. We snagged 
Western Scrub-Jay in Mossyrock as we pushed west on SR 12 then SR 6 to Rainbow 
Falls SP. Outside the park, Purple Finch & Evening Grosbeaks were nice 
additions At Rainbow Falls State Park, Hermit Warbler came right in to our 
iPod, and we followed up with Swainson's Thrush & Brown Creeper relatively 
quickly, before failing to dig out some of our missing woodpeckers. We were 
able to make quick roadside stops for Bushtit, Red-breasted Sapsucker, our 
first Black-capped Chickadees of the day and American Dipper [Fork Creek 
Hatchery] before we hit Raymond and Willapa Bay for our last leg of the trip, 
saltwater birding. 


Evening: 
By around 6:00, we were out along Willapa Bay, hoping for a last surge of birds 
before light disappeared. 

The tide was way in, higher than we expected, but after making a few less 
successful stops, we started picking up birds -- Caspian Tern, Common & 
Red-throated Loon, Brant and a couple more ducks were first. Then finally more 
shorebirds, with Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs, Dunlin, Semipalmated Plover, 
Whimbrel and Western Sandpiper. Behind us , a long-awaited Hairy Woodpecker 
finally showed itself. Tokeland Marina wasn't all that birdy [only added 
Green-winged Teal!], but Graveyard Spit in Tokeland came through, with 
Black-bellied Plover, Red Knot, Short-billed Dowitcher, Marbled Godwit, 
Bonaparte's & Mew Gull. On the way out of Tokeland, we ticked Anna's 
Hummingbird finally [we'd spent too long checking earlier feeders in the day 
and woulda/coulda/shoulda just waited to see it here]. Before heading to 
Westport, we stopped at North Cove and were greeted by a nice flock of Surf 
Scoters that included at least two Black Scoters. On the rocks, Pelagic 
Cormorant were joined with Bla 

 ck Turnstone & Ruddy Turnstone. 

At the Westport Jetty, we finally crossed paths with the other Big Day team we 
knew was out today - no time to talk, as we were all rushing for last birds, 
but I look forward to hearing how their day went. The water from the jetty 
didn't turn up as much as we'd hoped [compared with last year], but we did 
quickly find Brown Pelican, Sanderling, Rhino Auklet & Pigeon Guillemot as well 
as Brandt's Cormorant. At the Coast Guard Station, the 'old' stop is gated but 
we could still do some scoping from the edge and as we looked out on a spit we 
were very surprised to find 5 American White Pelicans sitting in the dusk! 


Our last bird of the night was back towards Aberdeen, along Newskah Rd. where 
[after playing leap-frog with the other big day team] we were happy to call in 
a pair of Barred Owls - our 6th Owl species of the day. 


All told a great day of birding - less tiring than previous years. 

It is always easy to construct a list of the birds we didn't find -- so much 
more seems possible in retrospect, but there's no way to really get them 
all.... Notable misses for the day included: White-winged Scoter, Hooded 
Merganser, Cooper's Hawk, Least Sandpiper [...], Ring-billed & California Gull, 
Calliope Hummingbird, Black-backed, 3-Toed or Pileated Woodpecker, Peregrine 
Falcon or Merlin, Western Wood-Pewee, Loggerhead Shrike, Horned Lark, 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Orange-crowned Warbler, MacGillivray's Warbler, Vesper 
Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow and Red Crossbill. 


Here's our full species list, with first locations noted included.

1. Brant - Willapa Bay 1st, Pacific County
2. Canada Goose - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
3. Wood Duck - Toppenish Fort Road Ponds, Yakima County
4. Gadwall - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds b, Yakima County
5. American Wigeon - Clear Lake, Yakima County
6. Mallard - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds b, Yakima County
7. Blue-winged Teal - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds b, Yakima County
8. Cinnamon Teal - Toppenish Old Goldendale Rd., Yakima County
9. Northern Shoveler - Toppenish Old Goldendale Rd., Yakima County
10. Northern Pintail - Willapa Bay 1st, Pacific County
11. Green-winged Teal - Tokeland Marina, Pacific County
12. Ring-necked Duck - Tieton Marsh, Yakima County
13. Lesser Scaup - Tieton Marsh, Yakima County
14. Surf Scoter - North Cove, Pacific County
15. Black Scoter - North Cove, Pacific County
16. Bufflehead - Toppenish Old Goldendale Rd., Yakima County
17. Barrow's Goldeneye - Clear Lake, Yakima County
18. Common Merganser - US 12 roadside, Yakima County
19. Red-breasted Merganser - Willapa Bay 1st, Pacific County
20. California Quail - Tule Rd., Yakima County
21. Ring-necked Pheasant - Tule Rd. - Plank Rd pond a, Yakima County
22. Sooty Grouse - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
23. Red-throated Loon - Willapa Bay 4th, Pacific County
24. Common Loon - Willapa Bay 2nd, Pacific County
25. Pied-billed Grebe - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
26. Brandt's Cormorant - Westport Jetty, Grays Harbor County
27. Double-crested Cormorant - Yakima SR 12, Yakima County
28. Pelagic Cormorant - North Cove, Pacific County
29. American White Pelican - Westport Coast Guard Station, Grays Harbor County
30. Brown Pelican - Westport Jetty, Grays Harbor County
31. American Bittern - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
32. Great Blue Heron - Tule Rd. - Plank Rd pond b, Yakima County
33. Turkey Vulture - SR 12 Oak Creek HQ, Yakima County
34. Osprey - Toppenish -SR 22, Yakima County
35. Bald Eagle - Yakima SR 12, Yakima County
36. Northern Harrier - Tule Rd., Yakima County
37. Northern Goshawk - Yakima Clear Lake area, Yakima County
38. Red-tailed Hawk - Tule Rd., Yakima County
39. Virginia Rail - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
40. Sora - Toppenish Lateral C, Yakima County
41. American Coot - Toppenish Old Goldendale Rd., Yakima County
42. Black-necked Stilt - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
43. Black-bellied Plover - Tokeland Graveyard Spit, Pacific County
44. Semipalmated Plover - Willapa Bay 4th, Pacific County
45. Killdeer - Yakima Costco/Valley Mall, Yakima County
46. Spotted Sandpiper - Toppenish -SR 22, Yakima County
47. Greater Yellowlegs - Willapa Bay 3rd, Pacific County
48. Lesser Yellowlegs - Willapa Bay 3rd, Pacific County
49. Whimbrel - Willapa Bay 4th, Pacific County
50. Long-billed Curlew - Tule Rd., Yakima County
51. Marbled Godwit - Tokeland Graveyard Spit, Pacific County
52. Ruddy Turnstone - North Cove, Pacific County
53. Black Turnstone - North Cove, Pacific County
54. Red Knot - Tokeland Graveyard Spit, Pacific County
55. Sanderling - Westport Jetty, Grays Harbor County
56. Dunlin - Willapa Bay 4th, Pacific County
57. Western Sandpiper - Willapa Bay 4th, Pacific County
58. Short-billed Dowitcher - Tokeland Graveyard Spit, Pacific County
59. Wilson's Snipe - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
60. Pigeon Guillemot - Westport Jetty, Grays Harbor County
61. Rhinoceros Auklet - Westport Jetty, Grays Harbor County
62. Bonaparte's Gull - Tokeland Graveyard Spit, Pacific County
63. Mew Gull - Tokeland Graveyard Spit, Pacific County
64. Western Gull - Willapa Bay 1st, Pacific County
65. Glaucous-winged Gull - Willapa Bay 1st, Pacific County
66. Caspian Tern - Willapa Bay 1st, Pacific County
67. Rock Pigeon - Tule Rd., Yakima County
68. Band-tailed Pigeon - Lewis FR 25, Lewis County
69. Eurasian Collared-Dove - Tule Rd., Yakima County
70. Mourning Dove - Tule Rd. - Plank Rd pond a, Yakima County
71. Barn Owl - Yakima Costco/Valley Mall, Yakima County
72. Flammulated Owl - Wenas Campground, Yakima County
73. Western Screech-Owl - Malloy Rd., Yakima County
74. Great Horned Owl - Umptanum Rd., Kittitas County
75. Barred Owl - Newskah Rd., Grays Harbor County
76. Short-eared Owl - Toppenish Old Goldendale Rd., Yakima County
77. Common Poorwill - Audubon Rd., Yakima County
78. Vaux's Swift - SR 12 east of Yakima, Yakima County
79. White-throated Swift - SR 12 east of Yakima, Yakima County
80. Anna's Hummingbird - Tokeland, Pacific County
81. Rufous Hummingbird - Packwood Gas Station, Lewis County
82. Belted Kingfisher - Tieton Marsh, Yakima County
83. Lewis's Woodpecker - SR 410 Naches, Yakima County
84. Williamson's Sapsucker - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
85. Red-naped Sapsucker - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
86. Red-breasted Sapsucker - Pacific Co SR 12 old house, Pacific County
87. Downy Woodpecker - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
88. Hairy Woodpecker - Willapa Bay 3rd, Pacific County
89. Northern Flicker - SR 12 Oak Creek, Yakima County
90. American Kestrel - Toppenish Fort Road Ponds, Yakima County
91. Hammond's Flycatcher - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
92. Dusky Flycatcher - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
93. Pacific-slope Flycatcher - Lewis FR 25, Lewis County
94. Say's Phoebe - Tule Rd., Yakima County
95. Western Kingbird - Tule Rd., Yakima County
96. Cassin's Vireo - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
97. Warbling Vireo - Toppenish Lateral C, Yakima County
98. Gray Jay - Lewis SR 12 FR 45, Lewis County
99. Steller's Jay - SR 12 Oak Creek HQ, Yakima County
100. Western Scrub-Jay - Lewis SR 12 Mossyrock, Lewis County
101. Black-billed Magpie - Tule Rd., Yakima County
102. American Crow - Toppenish Lateral A, Yakima County
103. Common Raven - Tule Rd., Yakima County
104. Tree Swallow - Yakima Costco/Valley Mall, Yakima County
105. Violet-green Swallow - SR 12 east of Yakima, Yakima County
106. N. Rough-winged Swallow - Tule Rd. - Plank Rd pond b, Yakima County
107. Bank Swallow - Toppenish Pumphouse Rd., Yakima County
108. Cliff Swallow - Tule Rd., Yakima County
109. Barn Swallow - Toppenish -SR 22, Yakima County
110. Black-capped Chickadee - Pacific Co SR 12 old house, Pacific County
111. Mountain Chickadee - Bear Creek Canyon, Yakima County
112. Chestnut-backed Chickadee - Lewis SR 12 FR 45, Lewis County
113. Bushtit - Lewis SR 12 Pe Ell area, Lewis County
114. Red-breasted Nuthatch - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
115. Brown Creeper - Rainbow Falls SP, Lewis County
116. Rock Wren - Tule Rd., Yakima County
117. Canyon Wren - Bear Creek Canyon, Yakima County
118. House Wren - Toppenish Lateral C, Yakima County
119. Pacific Wren - Lewis FR 25, Lewis County
120. Marsh Wren - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds b, Yakima County
121. Bewick's Wren - Toppenish Lateral C, Yakima County
122. American Dipper - Pacific Co. Fork Creek Hatchery, Pacific County
123. Golden-crowned Kinglet - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
124. Western Bluebird - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
125. Townsend's Solitaire - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
126. Swainson's Thrush - Rainbow Falls SP, Lewis County
127. Hermit Thrush - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
128. American Robin - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
129. Varied Thrush - Lewis FR 25, Lewis County
130. Sage Thrasher - Durr Rd., Kittitas County
131. European Starling - Tule Rd., Yakima County
132. Cedar Waxwing - Tule Rd., Yakima County
133. Nashville Warbler - Bear Creek Canyon, Yakima County
134. Common Yellowthroat - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
135. Yellow Warbler - Clear Lake, Yakima County
136. Yellow-rumped Warbler - Toppenish Lateral C, Yakima County
137. Black-throated Gray Warbler - US 12 roadside, Yakima County
138. Townsend's Warbler - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
139. Hermit Warbler - Rainbow Falls SP, Lewis County
140. Wilson's Warbler - Yakima White Pass Leech Lake, Yakima County
141. Yellow-breasted Chat - Hardy Canyon, Yakima County
142. Spotted Towhee - Bear Creek Canyon, Yakima County
143. Chipping Sparrow - Bear Creek Canyon, Yakima County
144. Brewer's Sparrow - Durr Rd., Kittitas County
145. Lark Sparrow - Tule Rd., Yakima County
146. Sagebrush Sparrow - Toppenish Pumphouse Rd., Yakima County
147. Savannah Sparrow - Toppenish Old Goldendale Rd., Yakima County
148. Fox Sparrow - Yakima White Pass Leech Lake, Yakima County
149. Song Sparrow - Tule Rd. - Plank Rd pond a, Yakima County
150. Lincoln's Sparrow - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
151. White-crowned Sparrow - Tule Rd., Yakima County
152. Dark-eyed Junco - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
153. Western Tanager - SR 12 Oak Creek HQ, Yakima County
154. Black-headed Grosbeak - SR 12 Oak Creek, Yakima County
155. Lazuli Bunting - Tule Rd., Yakima County
156. Red-winged Blackbird - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
157. Western Meadowlark - Tule Rd., Yakima County
158. Yellow-headed Blackbird - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
159. Brewer's Blackbird - Tule Rd., Yakima County
160. Brown-headed Cowbird - Toppenish 3/4 mile ponds a, Yakima County
161. Bullock's Oriole - Tule Rd., Yakima County
162. House Finch - Tule Rd., Yakima County
163. Purple Finch - outside Rainbow Falls SP, Lewis County
164. Cassin's Finch - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
165. Pine Siskin - Bethel Ridge, Yakima County
166. American Goldfinch - Tule Rd., Yakima County
167. Evening Grosbeak - outside Rainbow Falls SP, Lewis County
168. House Sparrow - Tule Rd. - Plank Rd pond b, Yakima County


Good May Birding!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA
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Subject: Garfield County Mew Gull
From: Tom Mansfield <birds AT t-mansfield.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:52:54 -0400
As of the time of this post the County First Record MEGU found Tuesday by Russ 
Koppendrayer continues on the gravel bar 2 miles west of Lower Granite Dam at 
Almota. Photos. 


Tom Mansfield passing through

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Spring 2015 Klickitat County North American Migration Count.. May 9th...put it on your calendars and let me know if you will be able to participate...
From: Bob Hansen <bobhansen AT gorge.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:42:02 -0700
Folks,

Who is ready for a countywide Spring migration bird count? Well it is a BIG 
event in Klickitat County, where we have been doing it since 1997. Yes, nearly 
20 years. 


We set aside the second Saturday in May for this memory creating event. It is a 
grand way to experience our colorful Spring migrants, citizen science and 
collaborative birding. 


Randy Robinson has done a masterful of tabulating the results of all 16 prior 
years, including last year's. Click on 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/SpringNAMC.htm 
 to see how we did 
compared to the average year. Here are last year's ( Spring 2014) results.... 
http://birdingwashington.info/Klickitat/Spring2014.htm 
 Once again, thanks 
Randy and all of last Spring's participants... 


Please let me know as soon as possible if you will be able to participate this 
Spring. May 9th is only 17 days away... 


Happy Birding, 
Bob

"ask not what your eco system can do for you,
"ask what you can do for your eco system." OWS graffiti






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Subject: WOS Conference information available on website
From: amy schillinger <schillingera AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:29:38 -0700
Hi tweeters and Inland NW birders,
 
The 2015 Ocean Shores WOS Conference information is now available on the 
http://wos.org/2015conference.html website. 

 
Here you will find information regarding registration, schedule of events, 
field trip and workshop lists, and lodging information. 

 
This years conference, taking place between August 20-24, will be fantastic 
with larger field trip groups and several workshops available. There will also 
be a Friday night social and Stump the Experts Quiz night with Dennis Paulson 
as well as a Saturday evening banquet followed by a presentation on Westport 
Seabirds by Bill Tweit. 

 
Workshops will be offered by Michael Donahue, Peter Wimberger and Gary Shugart, 
Dennis Paulson, Scott Mills, Michelle Landis, and Jim Dazenbaker on Friday, 
Saturday, and Sunday. 

 
It is recommended that you sign up for or renew your WOS membership (required 
to attend the conference) prior to attempting to register on June 1st. You may 
do this on the website at any time by visiting the membership page at 
http://wos.org/join.html. 

 
Please note that if you received the WOS membership newsletter that there have 
been several updates to field trip and workshop information. 

 
Online registration begins at 12:00pm NOON on Monday, June 1st, 2015. 
 
Hope to see you all there!
 
Amy Powell
VP, WOS
schillingera AT Hotmail.com 
 
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Subject: Washington Bird Records Committee recent decisions (Spring 2015 interim packet)
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2015 15:42:47 -0700
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders - 

The Washington Bird Records Committee [WBRC] has completed its review of its 
Spring 2015 interim packet. 


The WBRC normally meets annually in October, but often also circulates an 
interim packet half way between meetings. This allows the committee to 
process a number of reports where it is relatively easy to reach consensus 
without discussion. Because the committee does not meet in person to discuss 
these reports, a greater level of voting consensus is required to accept or 
not accept a report. Many reports will be carried over until the October 
meeting for final deliberations. 


30 received 7 yes votes, and are thus passed w/o need for further discussion.
 8 received 4 or more 'no' votes, and are thus not accepted.
15 reports were deferred for more consideration at the Fall meeting. 

 
3 new species are added to the state list:
Spotted Redshank
Broad-billed Hummingbird
Lucy's Warbler

This brings the official Washington State Checklist to 510 species.

ACCEPTED RECORDS:

BRBO-2014-2, Brown Booby - 143nm w of Pt. Brown, Grays Harbor County, 17 August 
2014 Michael Force [w,p] (7-0-0). 


SNEG-2014-1, Snowy Egret - Ridgefield NWR, Clark County, 10/13 - 12/3/2014, 
Randy Hill [w,p], Doug Schurman [w,p] (7-0-0). 


LBHE-2014-1, Little Blue Heron - Fir Island, Skagit County, 14 September 2014, 
Doug Schurman [w, p], Michael Hobbs [w,p], Jeff Mills [w, p] (7-0-0). 


LBHE-2014-2, Little Blue Heron - Spokane, Spokane County, 17 November 2014, 
Wendy Klaue [w], Carrie Lowe [w,p] (7-0-0). 


CAEG-2014-1, Cattle Egret - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 10/30 - 11/11/ 14, Doug 
Schurman [p], Randy Hill [w, p], Michael Charest [p], Len & Dian Jellicoe [p] 
(7-0-0). 


CAEG-2014-2, Cattle Egret - Bay Center, Pacific County, 8 November 2014, Tom 
Mansfield [p], MaryFrances Mathis [w] (7-0-0). 


CAEG-2014-3, Cattle Egret - Satsop, Grays Harbor County, 11/9-11/14, Carol 
Riddell [p], Matt Bartels [w] (7-0-0). 


MOPL-2014-1, Mountain Plover - Ocean Shores, Grays Harbor County, 11/8-15/14, 
Michael Charest [p] (7-0-0). 


SPRE-2014-1, Spotted Redshank - Hayton Preserve, Fir Island, Skagit County, 
11/27 - 12/1/2014, Ginger Rebstock [w], Jeff Bryant [w] (7-0-0). WA State First 
Record. 


TBMU-2015-1, Thick-billed Murre - Ediz Hook, Port Angeles, Clallam County, 
1/3-20/2015, Bob Boekelheide[w], Ryan Merrill [w,p] (7-0-0). 


BHGU-2014-2, Black-headed Gull - South Bend, Pacific County, 10/28 - 11/5/2014, 
Bob Flores [w, p], Jim Danzenbaker [w,p] (7-0-0). 


LIGU-2014-1, Little Gull - Jensen Access, Skagit County, 24 October 2014, Evan 
Houston [w, p], Ryan Merrill [w, p] (7-0-0). 


HERG-2014-1, "Vega" Herring Gull - Waatch River Mouth, Clallam County, 26 
October 2014, Steve Mlodinow [w,p], Ryan Merrill [p] (7-0-0). 


BBLH-2014-1, Broad-billed Hummingbird - Carson, Skamania County, 10/25-26/14, 
Matt Schroeder [p, w], Matt Bartels [w] (7-0-0). WA State First Record. 


EHOB-2014-1, Eurasian Hobby - Waatch River Valley, Clallam County, 10/26/14 - 
11/1/14, Steve Mlodinow [w,p], Doug Schurman [p], Scott Ramos [p], Fanter Lane 
[p], Chris Rurik [p], Ryan Merrill [p], Charlie Wright [p] (7-0-0). 


BGGN-2014-1, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 11/7-10/14, Brad 
Waggoner [w, p], Michael Charest [p], Alan Richards [w] (7-0-0). (Subspecies ID 
decision deferred to Fall meeting) 


NOWH-2014-1, Northern Wheatear - Pt. Robinson, Vashon Island, King County, 
10/18-21/14, Doug Schurman [p], Chris Rurik [p], Martha Taylor [w,p], Grace & 
Ollie Oliver [p], Evan Houston [p], Ed Swan [p], George Pagos [p], Gregg 
Thompson [p], Tom Mansfield [p] (7-0-0). 


OVEN-2014-4, Ovenbird - Anacortes, Skagit County, 11 September 2014, Ryan 
Schain [w] (7-0-0). 


BAWW-2011-4, Black-and-White Warbler - Seattle, King County, 9 May 2011, Nathan 
Keen [w] (7-0-0). 


BAWW-2014-4, Black-and-White Warbler - Washtucna, Adams County, 9/11-13/14, 
Keith Brady [w], Randy Hill [w,p], Matt Bartels[w], Tom Mansfield [p], (7-0-0). 


BAWW-2014-5, Black-and-White Warbler - Spokane, Riverside Park, Spokane County, 
31 December 2014, Patrick McKann [w] (7-0-0). (later resightings not reviewed 
yet) 


LUWA-2014-1, Lucy's Warbler - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 11/6-7/14, Brad 
Waggoner [w] (7-0-0). WA State First Record. 


CSWA-2014-1, Chestnut-sided Warbler - Konnowac Pass, Yakima County, 
9/15-17/2014, Ellen & Andy Stepniewski [p], Debie Brown[w], Karen Zook [p], Tom 
Mansfield [p], Keith Brady [w] (7-0-0). 


OROR-2014-1, Orchard Oriole - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 26 Oct 2014 - at least 
15 Feb 2015, Steve Mlodinow [w,p], Doug Schurman [p], Scott Ramos [p], Fanter 
Lane [p], Ryan Merrill [w, p], Alan Richards [w] (7-0-0). 


HOOR-2014-1, Hooded Oriole - Hoquiam, Grays Harbor County, 11/8-10/14, Arnie 
Martin [p], Tom Mansfield [p], Lynn & John Ogren [p,w] (7-0-0). 


BRAM-2014-1, Brambling - Neah Bay, Clallam County, 10/30 - 11/7/14, Tom 
Mansfield [p], Doug Schurman [p], Scott Ramos [p], Fanter Lane [p], Randy Hill 
[p, w], George Pagos [p], Len & Dian Jellicoe [p] (7-0-0). 


BRAM-2014-2, Brambling - Port Hadlock, Jefferson County, 11/5-9/14, Paula 
Vanderheul [w], David Gluckman [p], Randy Hill [p, w] (7-0-0). 


BRAM-2015-1, Brambling - Issaquah, King County, 4 February 2015 to present, 
Frances & Dan Pope [w, p], Grace & Ollie Oliver [p], Evan Houston [p], Tom 
Mansfield [p], Michael Hobbs [w], Matt Bartels [w], Brian Bell [p] (7-0-0). 


PUFI-2012-1, "Eastern" Purple Finch - Bradley Lake, Pierce County, 20 November 
2012, Charlie Wright [w, a] (7-0-0). 


PUFI-2014-1, "Eastern" Purple Finch - Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, 15 
December 2014, Brad Waggoner [w,p] (7-0-0). 



REPORTS NOT ACCEPTED:

ARLO-2014-3, Arctic Loon - Reach Island, Mason County, 27 December 2014 
(0-7-0). 


ARLO-2015-1, Arctic Loon - Larrabee SP, Whatcom County, 1/9-23/2015 (0-7-0).

ARLO-2015-2, Arctic Loon - Luhr Beach, Thurston County, 1/15-16/2015, (0-7-0).

ARLO-2015-3, Arctic Loon - Tramp Harbor, Vashon Island, Kng County, 17 January 
2015, (0-7-0). 


LEBI-2014-1, Least Bittern - Centralia Steam Plant, Lewis County, 5 September 
2014 (0-6-1). 


SEWR-2014-1, Sedge Wren - Ocean Shores, Grays Harbor County, 19 November 2014 
(0-7-0). 


CARW-2014-1, Carolina Wren - Seattle, King County, 15 March 2014 (0-7-0).

CONW-2009-1, Connecticut Warbler - Sammamish, King County, 13 September 2009 
(1-5-1). 


The results and an updated state checklist will eventually be posted on the 
wos.org website. 


The committee continues to depend on submissions from the community, and I'd 
urge you to submit reports for rarities on the review list when you observe 
them. A form for submitting reports can be found at: 
http://wos.org/observation_exported/observation.php 


I welcome any questions about the status of past decisions or any new report 
submissions, 


Matt Bartels 
Secretary, WBRC 
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Subject: Bats or owls?
From: Deborah <dlrymnd AT aol.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 22:25:33 -0800
Hi, 
Just want to make sure I'm getting this correctly.  Are bats out and about at 
10pm and not owls? Over by the  Laurelhurst playfield.  All  I saw was the 
shadow on the street under the light.  I heard nothing. And it was gone moving 
west. 


Debbie 

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Subject: Oak Creek Wildlife Area and vicinity
From: "Dave Hayden" <dtvhm AT nwrain.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:04:12 -0800
Sherry and I ventured to the east side, targeting mainly the Oak Creek Wildlife 
Area. We had a warm sunny day and very little wind. Our first stop was at Swift 
Rock (mp 182.5 on Hwy 12). We spent about 30 minutes scanning the Basalt cliffs 
and area. We had; 

LEWIS’S WOODPECKER – 4
BLACK-BILLED MAGPIE – 1
CANYON WREN – 1
RED-TAILED HAWK – 1
GOLDEN EAGLE – 1
We continued on to the headquarters of the Oak Creek Wildlife Area. The Elk 
feeding area had no Elk. Not surprising, the snow levels are way too high, so 
they don’t need to be fed at this time. However, they still could come down 
in the late evening or first thing in the morning. Not many birds here, only; 

AMERICAN KESTREL – 1
LEWIS’S WOODPECKER – 2
Our last stop in the Oak Creek Wildlife Area was over at Cleman Mountain, where 
the Big Horn Sheep feeding area is located. We spent about 2 hours here. We had 
between 125 to 150 Big Horn Sheep scattered across the slopes. We had some from 
quite close to way up at the top of the ridges. Birds we saw here; 

RED-TAILED HAWK – 1
GOLDEN EAGLE – 1
PRAIRIE FALCON – 1
Before heading home, we drove up Bethel Ridge Road. We didn’t find any 
woodpeckers, but we did get; 

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH  - 2
MOUNTAIN CHICKADEE – 1
PYGMY OWL – 1   (great scope views)

Dave Hayden
dtvhm AT nwrain.com
Centralia, WA_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Jerdon's Babbler
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 20:00:04 -0800
Interesting!

Although I find it strange that it's all over the news now, considering
that this all happened at the end of last May. Did it take that long to
process the report and write up a formal scientific essay before being able
to publicize the discovery?

Also, I think that the species as a whole has been considered extant, it's
just the nominate Myanmar subspecies that has been considered extinct.
There are eBird reports from India as recent as 2010. Sort of like the
unfortunate Dusky Seaside Sparrow! I think that calling it an extinct
"species" makes the headline more compelling.

Anyways, thanks for sharing!

Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com

On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 7:09 PM, Megan Lyden  wrote:

> Hi Tweets,
>
>
>
> species of babbler thought extinct rediscovered in Myanmar:
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/6/tiny-bird-long-thought-to-be-extinct-rediscovered-in-myanmar.html 

>
>
>
> Megan Lyden
>
> Bellevue, WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
>_______________________________________________
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Subject: Jerdon's Babbler
From: Megan Lyden <meganlyden AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:09:23 -0800
Hi Tweets,

 

species of babbler thought extinct rediscovered in Myanmar:

 

 

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/6/tiny-bird-long-thought-to-be-
extinct-rediscovered-in-myanmar.html

 

Megan Lyden

Bellevue, WA
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Subject: Issaquah Brambling
From: MEYER2J AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:45:56 -0500
Hi Tweets:
 
Several of us birders saw the Issaquah Brambling this Saturday morning at  
about 10:40 AM.  It came in to feed on what appeared to be bread and  
perhaps seed that the homeowner had spread on the deck railing. Lots of other 

bird species in the area including Varied Thrush, Red-breasted Nuthatch,  Pine 
Siskin, Bushtit, Black-capped and Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Purple Finch,  
Steller's Jay and the ever present junco. 
 
While rambling through Snoqualmie Valley before driving to Issaquah, we  
found a Northern Shrike along 100th, just past the red barn, and a single Tree 
 Swallow on the wire over Sikes Lake.  A Red-breasted Sapsucker was 
drumming  on a utility pole next to the Chinook Bend parking lot.  
 
Joyce Meyer
Mike West
Redmond, WA
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Subject: Short and Tweet Story, and Discovery Park Say's Phoebe question
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:39:47 -0800
Hello Tweets,

In reflecting on our early spring, I thought I would share this very short
story about one of our nature-loving presidents:

"One winter morning the President electrified his nervous Cabinet by
bursting into a meeting with, 'Gentlemen, do you know what has happened
this morning?'
They waited with bated breath as he announced,
'Just now I saw a Chestnut-sided Warbler and this is only February.' "
-- Corine Roosevelt Robinson
 (on her brother
Theodore Roosevelt)
(1861-1933) poet, lecturer, orator


Source: http://www.nabci-us.org/quotes.htm . That site has some other
conservation quote treasures as well.


Also, has anyone seen the Discovery Park Say's Phoebe since this morning?
If so, where was it, and how much was it moving around? I am going to look
for it tomorrow, and I would like as much info as I can get! I'd also
welcome information about the Ravens seen there.


Thanks and have a nice rest of this sunny Saturday (oh, and Good Birding),
Joshua Glant


Mercer Island, WA


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Subject: Re: Fill Update
From: Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 14:40:32 -0800
Jeff Gibson asked for someone to provide "a brief synopsis" of the WOS 
monthly meeting Monday night (March 2). The program was a presentation 
by Seattle Audubon folks about how WSDOT (Washington State Department of 
Transportation) and other government agencies plan to "mitigate" 
wetlands damage from the construction of a new SR-520 bridge across Lake 
Washington.  The current plans call for mitigations in about 15 
locations around the state, including the Montlake Fill. The 
presentation Monday night concerned the plans for Montlake Fill, also 
known as the Union Bay Natural Area.

The impression I had from the presentation was that Seattle Audubon 
believes the mitigations at the Fill will have very negative effects for 
birders and for birds, especially shorebirds.  It appears that when 
WSDOT does wetland mitigation, its main aim is to avoid being sued. It 
implements a standard formula with little concern for local conditions 
or for whether the mitigations will actually succeed at anything. The 
mitigations are very salmon-centric, even though there will be no salmon 
benefit at the Fill.

The major mitigations planned for the Fill involves "buffering" (that 
is, surrounding) ponds with vegetation intended to shade the ponds and 
to keep people out. They will also create a shallow pond and a swampy 
area, but neither is expected to provide valuable habitat. So Seattle 
Audubon's conclusion is that the mitigations will do nothing for 
shorebirds, and will keep birders away from ponds. It also will likely 
also significantly decrease breeding habitat for Savannah Sparrows.  In 
the end, Seattle Audubon thought that the mitigations would result in 
more mallards and "backyard birds" at the Fill, no shorebirds, and fewer 
to none of the less common birds that show up there now. They believe 
the mitigations clearly violate the management plan for the Fill. They 
said that the botanical society, which manages the Union Bay Natural 
Area, also is unhappy about the plan.

Seattle Audubon said it had offered a number of alternative suggestions 
for mitigation at the Fill, but the agencies were not receptive.

More information from Seattle Audubon is at: http://goo.gl/Lv4rIE

Jane Hadley
WOS Board Member_______________________________________________
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Subject: No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:42:55 -0800
Hi All

Randy Hill and I looked for the w. Bluebirds reported by Luke Haines and 
dipped. We did however had a singing pygmy owl just north of the rd 1100 
entrance at 11:30 am. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: No Western Bluebirds located on Rd 1100 Larch Mt, Clark Co., WA
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:42:55 -0800
Hi All

Randy Hill and I looked for the w. Bluebirds reported by Luke Haines and 
dipped. We did however had a singing pygmy owl just north of the rd 1100 
entrance at 11:30 am. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
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Subject: Rufus hummingbird
From: cyberpoo <cyberpoo AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2015 13:27:21 -0800
Saw our first Rufus, a female, this morning at our feeder in North Edmonds.


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Subject: Scrub jay in Wallingford
From: Katie Sauter Messick <kfsauter AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:09:22 -0800
Hi Tweets,

I had a scrub jay on the corner of 36th and Densmore in Wallingford this 
morning. 


Katie Messick
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Subject: Cartwheels in The Sky | Union Bay Watch
From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:14:06 -0800
Tweeters,

Once on Hood Canal, far in the distance, I saw bald eagles cartwheeling out of 
the sky and into the water. I never expected to see a cartwheeling courtship 
display near Union Bay. Perhaps the fact that Union Bay is in the city helped 
to lower my expectations or may be it was the fact that we have mature eagle 
pairs nesting on both sides of the bay. In any case, this week's post proves 
that I was wrong. On Tuesday, I watched eagles cartwheeling through the sky 
above Montlake Cut, just four or five blocks from my home. I hope you enjoy the 
photos! 


http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2015/03/cartwheels-in-sky.html

Have a great day on Union Baywhere nature cartwheels through the sky!

Larry Hubbell
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Subject: Olympic Bird Fest
From: Boekelheide <bboek AT olympus.net>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 12:06:50 -0800
Hello, Tweeters,

The Olympic BirdFest is coming up April 8 - 14, and you’re all invited. 
Details and registration are on-line at www.olympicbirdfest.org 
 


Here are some trips that Tweeters folks might be particularly interested in:

1. Once again this year, we have a pre-festival two-day birding trip to Neah 
Bay on April 8-9. It includes a pelagic trip out of Neah Bay and birding 
excursions around the best spots on the Makah Reservation. As you likely know, 
Neah Bay is an amazing birding spot, where anything is possible. Considering 
the distance to Neah Bay, the package includes two nights lodging (April 7 & 
8), two breakfasts and lunches, and a special dinner for our group. Website for 
the Neah Bay trip: http://www.olympicbirdfest.org/neah-bay-birding/ 
 


2. The main festival occurs Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Apr 10 - 12. We have 
several field trips to some of the best birding spots on the north Olympic 
Peninsula, including half-day and full day trips. There is also a nature 
photography class and a bird drawing class for artsy folks. On Friday evening, 
Apr 10, we have a special presentation of live raptors by the Northwest Raptor 
Center, and on Saturday, Apr 11, two trips to a Waterfowl Breeding Sanctuary, 
where you can see close-up views of ducks in spectacular breeding plumage, 
including eiders and Smew. The festival banquet occurs Saturday evening, Apr 
11, at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s fantastic Red Cedar Room overlooking 
Sequim Bay. On Sunday there is a cruise around Protection Island. Sorry, the 
owl prowls are filled up. 


3. Sunday through Tuesday, Apr 12 - 14, is a three-day cruise through and 
around the San Juan Islands on Glacier Spirit, a very comfortable boat run by 
Puget Sound Express. We stay two nights at Roche Harbor Resort on San Juan 
Island, with full days on the boat exploring the area and looking for wildlife, 
including a lunch stop at Sucia Island and return trip through Deception Pass. 
For more info: 

http://www.olympicbirdfest.org/san-juan-cruise/ 
 and 
http://www.pugetsoundexpress.com/whale-watching-and-wildlife-tours/audubon/ 
 


Best thing yet, all proceeds from the festival support education programs at 
the Dungeness River Audubon Center, a very worthwhile cause! 


Hope to see you,
Bob Boekelheide
Dungeness
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Subject: FOY Rufous Hummer
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:30:20 -0800
Hey Tweets...again....first of year, a female Rufous Hummingbird at one of
my three feeders on Wednesday, March 4th...sorry I'm late in posting.

Dianna Moore
Ocean Shores_______________________________________________
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Subject: TUVU
From: Dianna Moore <dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:24:38 -0800
Hey Tweets...From Cyndie Sundstrom yesterday...Friday the 6th, at 1:23pm, 3
turkey vultures over Hwy 8 in McCleary.

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Subject: Possible Rufous Hummingbird in Yard
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:11:12 -0800
Hello Tweets,

Yesterday afternoon, a female/immature hummingbird visited our feeder. I 
grabbed my binoculars to take a closer look. It zoomed over to our blooming 
peonies, and I saw a green back. Then, I thought I saw orangey sides, and at 
that moment the hummer zipped away. Female Rufous? A RUHU would be a new 
yardbird. 


30 minutes later, I heard a sound quite similar to a Rufous Hummingbird's wing 
trill at Ellis Pond. Now I'm keeping my eyes and ears open! 


Also, I have seen at least 2 Hutton's Vireos and a dozen Townsend's Warblers at 
the corner of 45th and 90th just north of Ellis Pond. The vireos were hawking 
gnats from the clouds of them that always seem to cling to the top of conifers 
- surely the secret to how so many small songbirds like Yellow-rumped Warblers, 
kinglets and Hutton's Vireos are able to subsist in the Puget Sound winter. 


The Cedar River mouth has a lot of gnat-covered conifers, as does the Lid Park 
on the Island; I have seen Yellow-rumps (Butterbutts) at both places, and the 
Palm Warbler at the Cedar River mouth. Maybe the hops vines on the bus-stop 
fence in the U District had lots of bugs hiding in it last year? 


Good birding, Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com


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Subject: Brambling still in Issaquah
From: Denny Granstrand <dgranstrand AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 11:11:24 -0800
Hi Tweeters,

Friday the Brambling was seen in the large cedar tree near the north end of
the house at 625 Mt. Fury Circle SW, Issaquah, at 10:00 and 1:00.

After a short stay in the cedar at 10:00, it flew into the flowering bushes
across the street.

It was on the deck railing before going into the cedar tree at 1:00. It
disappeared into the tree after posing for a few minutes.

A couple of photos of the Brambling are in the new photos folder on my
website.

Denny Granstrand

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *
Denny Granstrand
Yakima, WA
dgranstrand AT gmail.com
Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:

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Subject: No Sage sparrow Steigerwald
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:34:23 -0800
Randy Hill and I both of this morning looking for the sage sparrows at 
Steigerwald no luck several people here 


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Subject: No Sage sparrow Steigerwald
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:34:23 -0800
Randy Hill and I both of this morning looking for the sage sparrows at 
Steigerwald no luck several people here 


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Subject: Say's Phoebe, Discovery Park, Seattle
From: "Rachel Lawson" <rwlawson AT q.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 09:11:49 -0800
Today, on the monthly Discovery Park bird census, Dan Harville and I found a
Say's Phoebe flycatching from the fence around the lighthouse.  Phoebes are
seen down there from time to time, but this is the first time we have had
one for the official count.  We heard from other census participants that
there are now three Common Ravens in the park.  It really seems like spring
is here.Dan and I saw a pair of Bushtits building the beginning of a nest.

 

Rachel Lawson

Seattle

rwlawson AT q.com

 
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Subject: Back on the Lone Prairie
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 06:24:33 -0800





Last April I posted about the Kah Tai Prairie here in Port Townsend, which I 
"discovered" by snooping on the Washington Native Plant Society's Olympic 
Chapter website. It's alway nice having help in discovering things. 


Anyhoo, I went there yesterday seeking Grass Widows. Now, grass widows are not 
women who have lost spouse's due to lawn mowing accidents, or maybe to lethal 
pot growing competition. No, Grass Widows is a plant . That common name is 
interesting, so I did a few minutes of deep research on the internet as to it's 
origin, and came up with vague info. 

The plant is presently known to botanist's as Olsynium douglasii. I first knew 
it as Sisyrinchium douglasii, but since then, busy botanist's have changed the 
name. That's progress! Due to helpful signage at the prairie, I knew this plant 
was gonna be here, but I missed it last year - it's an early bloomer found in 
open grassy "bald's" in rain shadowy areas around these parts. 

A short plant in the Iris family , it is unique (isn't everybody) with its 
showy six-petaled flowers. It's one of those colors that words just can't quite 
fence in. Botany books call it 'reddish purple', which would make it violet on 
a artists color chart, but it don't look violet to me. Technically, it's bright 
and real purdy, as we say on the prairie. You could see a bunch of em' at Kah 
Tai now if you wanna. A few early blooming Lomatiums were the only other 
prairie bloomers I noted- bright yellow. 

As I noted last year, Kah Tai Prairie is a humble affair - a remnant bit of a 
historically larger habitat here, nurtured by Native Plant Society folks. Truth 
is, it looks, defined by a low slung white plastic chain fence, like an unmowed 
old military cemetery plot, without the white crosses - surrounded by the Port 
Townsend Golf Course in which its located. About the size of a couple of city 
home lots. Looks like a failure of golf course maintenance . 

Humble, but really interesting for a naturalist - the soon to pass Grass Widows 
will be followed by a sequence of other native prairie flowers. As for birds, 
my species count for last year was 2 - Savannah Sparrow and California Quail. 

As to Grass Widows, if you can't make it to Port Townsend, keep your eyes 
peeled and to the ground in open balds in places like Deception Pass or 
Washington Park in Anacortes. The flower is a real beauty. Now's the time. 



Jeff Gibsonon the rangePort Townsend Wa



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Subject: a lovely video to start off your weekend right!
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:14:06 +0100
hello everyone,

I have been watching this lovely video of a starling murmuration for a
couple days now. It was filmed a month ago in Utrect, Netherlands, and
captures a spectacular show -- likely one of the last we'll see until
November this year:

http://gu.com/p/46bqb/stw

tschüss!

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
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Subject: Ocean Shores Friday morning
From: "Randy Hill" <re_hill AT q.com>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 00:47:08 -0800
Was at Point Brown Jetty this morning before 9am.  Found 2 dozen Black
Turnstones but only 2 each Rock Sandpiper and Surfbird during a very low
tide.  A single Black-legged Kittiwake at the very end of the jetty.  Most
interesting find was a second winter Glaucous Gull among the flock using the
jetty and adjacent sandy beach.

 

Randy Hill

Ridgefield
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Subject: Kalama GLAUCOUS GULL ...
From: Lyn Topinka <pointers AT pacifier.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:34:19 -0800
hi all ... Gene and I went to Kalama today to see if gulls were there snacking 
on the smelt ... our stops were the end of Sportsmans Road, mouth of the 
Kalama, and the Port of Kalama ... and yes, there were gulls ... HUNDREDS of 
gulls ... er, THOUSANDS of gulls !!!!!!!!!!!!!! ... our highlight was one 
GLAUCOUS GULL on a log boom at the Port ... smelt fishing is apparently still 
good ... 


lots of sea lions too ...


later,
Lyn



Lyn Topinka
Vancouver, Wa.
www.NorthwestJourney.com
www.NorthwestBirding.com
www.ColumbiaRiverImages.com
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Subject: Magnuson Park, 6 March 2015
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:01:35 -0800
Our string of fabulous weather continues. And the birds certainly seem 
enthused, so much singing going on today it was hard to isolate single birds. 
Some nesting and nest prepping, and more—try to explain to a 3-year old 
(grandson) what the geese were doing was the day’s challenge. Arrived too 
late to evaluate the Barn Owl situation, though there may have been some 
hissing coming from the nest boxes. 


Cackling Goose - 1 Taverner’s with the goose flock at NOAA; we rarely see 
these at Magnuson 

Eurasian Wigeon - a male continues with the large flock of AMWI
Ring-necked Duck - a pair continues at the Sail Lagoon
Common Goldeneye - >40, the flock seems to be growing
Red-breasted Merganser - 3, way out in the lake
California Quail - 1 calling from the wetlands
Ring-necked Pheasant - 3 females; are these new releases or carry-over from 
last year? 

Red-necked Grebe - 3 in breeding plumage
Cooper’s Hawk - adult male and immature female, appear to be a couple, 
Promontory Point 

Dunlin - 2 were on the swim beach; first of year
Herring Gull - adult on the swim platform, juvenile in the sports fields with 
huge flock of Mew Gull 

Belted Kingfisher - a pair seem to be checking out Kingfisher Basin; after the 
bluff was ‘cleaned’ of overhanging ‘weeds', their nest hole of last year 
is quite exposed 

Violet-green Swallow - small flock over Promontory Point; first of year
Mystery Bird - in post to follow

For the day, 62 species.
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22199537 
 

Scott Ramos
Seattle_______________________________________________
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Subject: Magnuson Park PGCH
From: Scott Ramos <lsr AT ramoslink.info>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 21:01:25 -0800
During my walk today, I ran across a new species for the park, in fact, one 
that I have not seen documented locally: the Pacific Golden Chickadee (Poecile 
aureus). Related to the more common Black-capped Chickadee, this variant is 
known to take on a Spring plumage of color not unlike an Orange-crowned 
Warbler: 



https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/PacificGoldenChickadee#6123350486861570226 
 


From summer through winter the PGCH is indistinguishable from its more common 
variant. As the two forms overlap considerably in range, intergrades are 
expected: 



https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/PacificGoldenChickadee#6123350330238135538 
 


This particular group was spotted in the willows near Frog Pond and may persist 
for a few more days of catkin development. 


https://picasaweb.google.com/104613265151815506340/PacificGoldenChickadee# 
 


Scott Ramos
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Subject: MV HWY Bald Eagle Pair
From: elynde <elynde AT cox.net>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 20:49:41 -0800
Hello,

Was wondering if anyone else keeps an eye on the bald eagle pair just west of 
SE 140th Pl on WA-169.  


I thought they were nesting up, but I haven't seen either of them the last two 
days during my commutes.  


If so, please email me offline. 

Lynde Eller
Renton, WA
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Subject: Re: Yacolt Monk Parakeets?
From: Bob <rflores_2 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:51:43 -0800
Yes they are still around but come and go. You just have to be lucky to be at 
the right place at the right time. 


Bob Flores
Ridgefield, Wa

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 6, 2015, at 16:31, Rachel Lawson  wrote:
> 
> A friend of mine is wondering if there still are any Monk Parakeets nesting 
in Yacolt. I found photos of them online from as recently as 2011. Does anyone 
know if they are still there? If they are, is it possible to go look at them? 

>  
> Rachel Lawson
> Seattle
> rwlawson AT q.com
>  
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Sno-Valley, One Wk. Later - 3/5/15
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:19:46 -0800
No Pygmy Owl did I find this time, but other birds and sights, made the trip 
worthwhile. See what I saw (and heard) in these photos: 


https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5xMSVX


Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: FW: Feather ID Help Please
From: "Eric Kowalczyk" <cassidix2005 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:29:29 -0800
 The black and white contour feathers certainly look like the head feathers of 
a male Lady Amherst's Pheasant, Chrysolophus amherstiae. 


 

    Eric Kowalczyk

    Seattle,WA

 

 

From: tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
[mailto:tweeters-bounces AT mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Lydia Gaebe 
Bishop 

Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 3:06 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Feather ID Help Please

 

Hello Tweeters!

 

I found a big pile of feathers on my property just east of Snohomish near Three 
Lakes Road. 


 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021920178 
 
&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 


 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021960179 
 
&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 


 

What bird did they come from?

 

Thank you

 
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Subject: Yacolt Monk Parakeets?
From: "Rachel Lawson" <rwlawson AT q.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:30:01 -0800
A friend of mine is wondering if there still are any Monk Parakeets nesting
in Yacolt.  I found photos of them online from as recently as 2011.  Does
anyone know if they are still there?  If they are, is it possible to go look
at them?

 

Rachel Lawson

Seattle

rwlawson AT q.com

 
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Subject: (Clark Co.) western bluebird
From: Luke Hanes <lukeandharmony1997 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:20:35 -0800
I jog/hiked 11 miles worth of the Tarbell Trail this morning
Saw what I believe to be two Western Bluebirds
This one is obvious:
http://flic.kr/p/qy3RnU

But what about this one?
http://flic.kr/p/rbJ1Lc
http://flic.kr/p/qyfSyB



-- 
Luke Hanes
Vancouver, WA (Felida)
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Subject: Raven in Sammamish
From: "Ned McGarry" <ned_mcgarry AT wavecable.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:50:24 -0800
In a neighborhood conifer being mobbed by about 10 unhappy but highly organized 
crows. Relentless swooping. Looked like a circus act. 


Last seen flying west toward the downslope to the north end of Lake Sammamish.

________________________

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Subject: Ravens
From: David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:15:13 -0800
This morning, over the centrally located Capehart site, in Discovery Park, two 
Ravens were calling, staying close and doing a few aerial tricks. This does not 
quite make a breeding pair, but there may be an empty niche for corvids 
involved. While there are many American Crows around the park in winter, in the 
breeding season, they are much less numerous, according to recent records. They 
mainly appear to nest and feed in the surrounding Magnolia neighborhood, where 
there are plentiful nesting trees and widespread feeding sources. 

David HutchinsonFlora & Fauna Books3213 West Wheeler St, #6Seattle, WA 
98199206-282-0093 
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Subject: Feather ID Help Please
From: Lydia Gaebe Bishop <lydiagaebe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:06:09 -0800
Hello Tweeters!

I found a big pile of feathers on my property just east of Snohomish near
Three Lakes Road.


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021920178&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 



https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206359021960179&set=a.4709149572473.191669.1406355649&type=1&theater 


What bird did they come from?

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Subject: hermit thrush and pine siskins
From: Jennifer DeSelle <jendeselle AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:49:29 +0000 (UTC)
While walking around Capitol Lake this morning I spotted and was able to 
observe a Hermit Thrush foraging in the grass near the lake-- the first I have 
seen in W. WA in ages.  (When I lived in CA they were a common winter bird.) 
  

Also, after 2 months of occupation (and high birdseed bills) it appears my pine 
siskin "superflock" has begun to disperse.  Now I'm seeing occasional pairs 
visit the feeder.  I wonder if they're gearing up for nesting? 

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Subject: WDFW is on the case (injured eagle)
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:03:03 -0800
In talking with both Greg Meis and Belinda Rotton, of WDFW, about the injured 
Bald Eagle, I was told that, due to it having enough strength to keep clear of 
human captors, they are not able at this time to capture it. Biologist Paul 
DeBruyn will continue to monitor the bird and, should it become too weak, from 
inability to forage, he will try again to capture it and take it to a rehab 
facility (likely Sarvey) to check on its condition. If the bird stays strong, 
it will not be taken to a facility and will hopefully, continue with its 
nesting. Belinda was unsure whether or not there are yet eggs in the nest... 


They will call and let me know how this turns out, and I will pass the report 
on to you Tweets :-) 


Thanks to Michelle and Sammy for your help on this today and to Debra for the 
alert and photos. 



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl AT comcast.net


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Subject: link to photos of injured Bald Eagle
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 11:14:00 -0800
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5wtzjN
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Subject: injured Bald Eagle on Fir Is.
From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 10:58:29 -0800
This was sent to me early this morning - I tried to call Debra, but could only 
leave a message. If anyone wants to see the photos (3), please write to me - 
later I will post them on my Flickr album. I've contacted WDFW through Chris 
Anderson, but one of you may have another contact or a contact # for the dept. 
and can make a call. As I just rec'd this message and cannot get in touch with 
Debra, I don't know the status of the bird as of daylight today. 


Any help will be appreciated by all, especially the eagle...

The message:

Hi Barb,
My name is Debra Hoskins and I have followed your postings on Tweeters...I am 
pretty new to tweeters and registered a couple of months ago but have never 
posted. Rather than trying to figure out how to go about posting at this late 
hour, I am sending you what I wanted to post. 

 
To all my birding friends and eagle lovers, please be on alert and help keep 
track of this injured eagle. I believe it is one of the pair that has the nest 
at FIR ISLAND RESERVE which is 3.2 miles from the Conway exit driving towards 
LaConner. This eagle was in a short tree directly across from the entrance into 
the reserve. I was there for about 2 hours and saw one of the eagles come and 
go from the nesting tree. It wasn't until I was leaving that I noticed this one 
across the street. I have a sick feeling this is the female that is injured 
because its larger than the other one. My heart sank when I got home tonight 
and downloaded these pictures. When looking through my viewfinder I thought 
this was about a 4 year old eagle who still had some brown on its head. After 
zooming in and cropping the images I can clearly see the terrible injuries! I 
would have called Sarvey Wildlife Care Center in Arlington if I had realized it 
then. I live in Stanwood so its a close drive and I will go back to carefully 
scout the area before I head to Winthrop for the weekend. If she is still in 
the same tree or on the ground I will call Sarvey. 

Blessings, Debra Hoskins..425-876-5881



Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
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Subject: Community Values
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 09:35:45 -0800


It was a number of decades ago, when I first heard (or read, in the context of 
Timber Politics here in the wonderful Pacific Northwest), our great Old-Growth 
forest's referred to as "decadent, over mature timber". I remember being 
appalled that people could even think that way about a forest - and still am. 

Why would anybody say something so rude and disrespectful? Well, it's just 
about the money, honey. 

 I imagine the old-growth as a wise old Grandmother. Oh sure, she's old as 
dirt, but still sharp as a tack. And the forest stories she has to tell - and 
will- to anybody who listens! But see, ol' Granny is sitting on a goldmine - 
she's rich. Unfortunately , the family has one branch ( raised primarily on 
video games and ORV's), who don't care about Grannies boring old forest 
anymore, and need to come up with some cash money for their lifestyle. Now. 

Trouble is, Granny's still alive. So the questionable family branch sent a 
representative over to her house to parley - I just happened to be there, 
having a beer with Granny , when we heard the knock. 

There stood ol' Uncle Ernie on the doorstep. "Well Granny" he started into it, 
"the family has been talking and we figured you, being so old and all, that 
you've had a pretty good run of it, so it's time you dropped dead and gave us 
our inheritance. Plus, there been some rumors around town about your decadent 
behavior and....". That's when Granny closed the door on Uncle Ernie's face. 
"Lets you and me get away from Mister Entitled Turd out there, and I'll tell 
you some forest stories. Would you get me another beer ? I could use one after 
hearing all that BS!" she said. 

I handed Granny a cold beer, and sat down next to her on the couch.
"Thanks, honey. You're a good boy, always out in the woods feeling ferns and 
watching the birds! " she told me. I was just starting to get a little 
misty-eyed, when Granny burst out laughing, almost blowing beer out her nose. 

" I can't believe that poor excuse of a relative out there - what a hoser!". 
Granny laughed and laughed. "Some people just don't get it , and maybe never 
will" she continued. " That 'decadent' thing - that punk out there has no idea 
what the hell he's talking about! Trouble is, he's afraid of the forest now - 
spent too much time playing with himself on his x- box or whatever." 

" Some folks don't understand the community I've lived in my whole life. They 
seem to think it's like a retirement home, when really there's room for the 
old, the young, and the in between, because the community is always changing. 
See, geezers like me will fall over someday, providing opportunities for new 
growth in the future- we got the same chance when we were young. All ages 
living together! Oh sure, sometimes it takes a long time for things to change, 
but if you have no patience, you should find another community to live in" 
Granny continued. 

"Like ol' Ernie out there, he might like it in one of those factory monoculture 
'forests' like the neo tree-nazi's put together with their cloned uber-firs. 
More like cornfields than forest's, if you ask me. More like a tree version of 
the Stepford Wives, if you know what I mean. 

Seems like nature folks could do one of those' Bio Blitz' inventories in those 
monoculture patches, in about 15 minutes. A Bio Burp they could call it. In my 
neck of the woods, it would take quite awhile - lifetime maybe." Granny was 
starting to wind down. " I'll split a beer with you, if you want" she asked. " 
Need to wet my whistle." 

After a sip of beer, Granny got a little gleam in her eye. "Decadent!" she 
snorted. " Truth is, the forest if full of 'decadence' - rot, gambling 
(windstorms, fire, disease, are chances we play with) , not to mention half the 
forms of kinky sex ever invented. Thats nature. That reminds me, did I ever 
tell you about that fling I had with Fred Cedar about 500 years ago? He was a 
real stud at the time , and one day we........" 

Jeff Gibsonlistening to the trees inPort Townsend Wa
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Subject: Washington CSWA and other vagrant warbler photos
From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 07:34:41 -0800
Hello Tweets,

I have long been fascinated by bird vagrancy in Eastern Washington. It's 
exciting to read of an Eastern warbler discovered in a grove of trees in the 
middle of the plains, like at the Gingko Petrified Forest near Vantage or 
Bassett Park in Washtucna. 


I was wondering if anyone had photos of the following species in WA:

Chestnut-sided Warbler - I am especially interested in the photo supposedly 
taken on June 6th, 2007 of two males together in Ritzville by "B. Lyle". 


Magnolia Warbler - I have seen photos of birds at Gingko Petrified Forest and 
at Harrington Cemetery, but not from Washtucna or other places. 


Black-throated Blue Warbler - I have seen photos of the one on Mercer Island in 
the winter of 1994-1995, and of a female in Yakima in October 2005, but no 
others. 


Blackpoll Warbler - I have only found one video of one in Ephrata, and no 
photos. 


Black-and-white Warblers - one of my favorites. The more, the merrier!

Canada Warbler - I can't find any photos of the 1st state record at McNary NWR 
in September 2010! 


Finally, the Bay-breasted Warbler - I have only seen one photo of the male near 
Olympia in June 2006. 


Thank you for sharing and good birding,

Joshua Glant

Mercer Island, WA

Josh.n.glant AT gmail.com


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Subject: Brambling still visible 3/5/15
From: ctrogon AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 06:25:43 +0000 (UTC)
HI Tweets, 
The brambling was seen by at least 5 people today between 11am and high noon. 
I was told it had been in the exact same place the last 4 days, across the 
street from the residence and down in the flowered shrubbery. It has now 
'discovered' the camellias even farther down the slope, so check there as well. 
~poppe 


----- Original Message -----

From: tweeters-request AT mailman1.u.washington.edu 
To: tweeters AT u.washington.edu 
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2015 12:00:10 PM 
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 127, Issue 5 

Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to 
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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific 
than "Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..." 

Today's Topics: 

1. Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know the 
local Mallards (Joshua Glant) 
2. Re: Osprey nest near Montesano (Jason Hernandez (Larry Eickstaedt) 
3. RE: Bald Eagles preying on Heron colonies (falcophile AT comcast.net) 
4. Re: Steller's Jay making unusual calls, and getting to know 
the local Mallards (Bob Sundstrom) 
5. Okanogan Birding and Updated Photos (Khanh Tran) 
6. Ol' Rusty Returns (Jeff Gibson) 
7. FW: Natural Area and Greenbelt Focus Group Invitation - Will 
you join us? (Mark Ahlness) 
8. Re: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA (Wilson Cady) 
9. Fill Update? (Jeff Gibson) 
10. Birding at Juanita Bay Park (Mick) 
11. RFI Advice on learning non-native bird songs/calls 
(Richard Anderson) 
12. Pygmy Nuthatches to Turkeys - A Fun Day in Kittitas County 
(Blair Bernson) 
13. Ravens (Diann MacRae) 
14. Nisqually Wednesday Walk 3/4/2015 (Shep Thorp) 
15. RE: Pigeon gullimot Columbia River, Clark Co., WA (Rob Conway) 
16. Unusual Steller's Jay - Redtails courting (Rob Conway) 
17. RBA: Portland, OR 3-5-15 (Harry Nehls) 
18. Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning (Bob) 
19. Re: Frenchmans Bar Columbia River this morning (Bob) 

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Subject: Re: Is this a whooping crane? (sorry, I got so excited I forgot to give a link!)
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:35:15 -0800
Thank you to the people who wrote me. Michael Hobbs suggested that the 
different crane is a different subspecies of Sandhill crane. Obviously I have 
never seen a whooping crane. I have to curb my enthusiasm! :) 

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Subject: Tufted Duck / Woodland Bottoms [Cowlitz co]
From: slugranch85 AT wwest.net
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:00:14 -0800
Hello All,

I observed the Tufted Duck at Woodland Bottoms area, Cowlitz county, 
today, 3/5/2015, between 12:20 and 12:50 PM.  Thanks to Bill Tweit and
others for earlier reports.

Alan

Alan Richards / Naselle WA 98638

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Subject: My Formative Years
From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:10:01 -0800
I've long been a bit amused by that notion of "your formative years", which, in 
typical usage, seems to imply that there is a certain window (seemingly narrow) 
in which the rest of your life has now successfuly been implanted, and you just 
do your remaining time - kind of like a prison term. Really? 

Well, while carrying plenty of past-time personal baggage, I still find myself 
being impressed, or formed if you will, by life, by nature. It just happened 
again a few minutes ago, and I've been around almost 60 years. 

It's been an unusual night here; my elderly children ( aka parents) both went 
to bed early, leaving me alone in the dark. And that was a good thing, because 
I got to see a moonrise a bit brighter than any I remember. 

We live in such an atmospheric place here in wet side Washington. Depending on 
the cloud conditions, the mountains appear to shrink, or grow. They move 
closer, or further away, or so it seems - just tricks performed by Mother 
Nature's lighting department - clouds change perspective of the scene. 

Clouds can also focus the light of the Sun and Moon in various tricksy ways, 
and tonights moonrise sure was visual proof of that. The moon came up sort of 
orangish, through the low clouds, and something in the atmosphere brightened 
the light effect of the moon's reflection on the waters of Port Townsend - it 
seemed bright as a sunrise almost. It was really remarkable. 

Hey, maybe I'm just getting contact dementia from my parents, and I can't 
remember moonrises real good anymore, but even so, I don't feel my formative 
years are quite over yet. Hey maybe I'll learn something new tomorrow - like 
the ID of a funny little plant I found on the Point Wilson dunes today - a new 
acquaintance. 

Jeff Gibsonslow learner, inPort Townsend Wa

 
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Subject: Is this a whooping crane?
From: Michelle Maani <lamoustique AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:33:55 -0800
I have a shot of several Sandhill cranes taken near Frenchman's Bar park in 
Vancouver, WA(actually near the turnoff a little further down the road, where 
there are some houseboats on the left and a turnoff on the right). Anyhow, I'm 
looking at this shot and I see the red on the forehead of the middle crane is a 
bit different. Is it a whooping crane? 


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