Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Virginia Birding

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Monday, March 2 at 10:05 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Northern Carmine Bee-eaters,©BirdQuest

2 Mar 75+ Black vultures at roost, Yorktown [Elisabeth Wilkins ]
2 Mar Mixed flock of larks, pipits and lapland longspurs ["Bulmer, Anthony" ]
1 Mar Brown Creepers and Suet Feeders [Allen Hart ]
01 Mar Smith's Longspur, Silver Lake [Phillip Kenny ]
01 Mar No. Va. Bird club meeting March 4 ["Joanna Bellows Taylor" ]
1 Mar Possible blue-morph Ross's X Snow Goose at Fort Monroe [Frank Fogarty ]
1 Mar Northern Loudoun County Owls and Finches [Gerco ]
1 Mar Pine Siskin in Warren County 3/1/2015 [Fred Bogar ]
1 Mar Fwd: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Mar 1, 2015 [Rich Rieger via va-bird ]
01 Mar Let the Rusty Blackbird Migration Blitz officially begin! [Robert Ake ]
1 Mar [va-bird] Back yard finch explosion in Springfield [Scott Priebe ]
01 Mar Smith's here [Phil Kenny ]
1 Mar Smith's Longspur and other Saturday birds [Rowe, Richard A, ĒDickĒ ]
28 Feb Common Raven in North Arlington [Karen Fairweather ]
28 Feb CBBT Field Trip - Hampton Roads Wildlife Enthusiasts [Frank Fogarty ]
28 Feb Dyke Marsh walk/Sunday/March 1 [Rich Rieger via va-bird ]
28 Feb Fwd: Crow story ["Patricia Scanlon M. " ]
28 Feb Highland County & beyond today -- Rough-legged Hawk, Am Tree Sparrows, etc [Gabriel Mapel via va-bird ]
28 Feb 2/28/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR, Sandbridge (White Ibis) [Rob Bielawski ]
28 Feb Re: Rusty Blackbird, Rough-legged Hawk Fauquier Co ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
28 Feb Photos - Western Tanager, Chesapeake [Karen Kearney via va-bird ]
28 Feb Rusty Blackbird, Rough-legged Hawk Fauquier Co [Frederick Atwood via va-bird ]
28 Feb Golden Eagle... Briery Branch Rd ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
28 Feb Smith's Longspur still present, Weyers Cave [Elisa Enders ]
28 Feb Smith's Longspur yes Sat morning [Gabriel Mapel via va-bird ]
27 Feb 2 White-winged scoters were still at Dyke Marsh Friday morning [Pam and Ben via va-bird ]
28 Feb Re: Trip to Bay Bridge-Tunnel (2/26/2015) Photos [Les Brooks ]
28 Feb Augusta & Rockingham 2/27--Waterfowl, Smith's Longspurs, Snow Bunting [Gabriel Mapel via va-bird ]
27 Feb Re: 2/27/15 - Virginia Beach - CBBT Island #1 (Common Goldeneye, Redhead, Both Loons) [Rob Bielawski ]
27 Feb ducks at CBBT 26 Feb 2015 [David Matson ]
27 Feb Rectortown Road [Greg Slader via va-bird ]
27 Feb 2/27/15 - Virginia Beach - CBBT Island #1 (Common Goldeneye, Redhead, Both Loons) [Rob Bielawski ]
27 Feb Re: longspur and photographers, again []
27 Feb Short-eared Owls on Rectortown and Crenshaw Roads, Fauquier County [Linda Millington ]
27 Feb "Oregon" Junco at College Creek, James City County [Brian and Deborah Taber via va-bird ]
27 Feb Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
27 Feb Eurasian Widgeons [Jayne Munoz ]
27 Feb longspur and photographers, again ["C. Michael Stinson" ]
27 Feb Smith's Longspur(s), one or two? ["Marshall Faintich" ]
27 Feb Blue Ridge Center Bird Walk, Loudoun Co, Feb. 28 ["Joe Coleman" ]
27 Feb Waterfowl on the Rivanna [David White ]
27 Feb Re: Smith's Longspur yesterday, 2/26 [David White ]
27 Feb Common goldeneye/rockingham co [Appleaday via va-bird ]
27 Feb Re: Mockingbirds [vineeta anand ]
27 Feb Thursday in ornithology ["Robyn A. Puffenbarger" ]
27 Feb Smith's Longspur yesterday, 2/26 [Diane L via va-bird ]
27 Feb Any bird walks on Saturday? [Farid Javidan ]
27 Feb Smith's Longspurs--IMPORTANT PARKING MESSAGE [Gabriel Mapel via va-bird ]
27 Feb Smith's Longspur [Gabriel Mapel via va-bird ]
26 Feb Mockingbirds ["Patricia Scanlon M. " ]
26 Feb Rectortown SEOW and RLHA [Mark Moran ]
26 Feb Green-winged Teal & Three Mergansers Species at Sandy River Reservoir, Prince Edward County [Evan Spears ]
26 Feb Great Falls Park -- from va side, below dam (2/26) [Stuart via va-bird ]
26 Feb Re: [va-richmond-general] Question about Mockingbird [vineeta anand ]
26 Feb Re: [va-richmond-general] Question about Mockingbird [Maggie via va-bird ]
26 Feb Re: Road Trip? [vineeta anand ]
26 Feb Road Trip? [Rich Rieger via va-bird ]
26 Feb Peregrine Falcon (I'm pretty sure) at Lake of the Woods, Orange County [Suzanne Stewart ]
26 Feb eBird -- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave) -- Feb 26, 2015 [Fredatwood via va-bird ]
26 Feb Re: longspurs and photographers [Sarah Anderson via va-bird ]
26 Feb longspurs and photographers [Herbert Larner via va-bird ]
26 Feb Frozen Lake of the Woods and grebes [Suzanne Stewart ]
26 Feb The Good and the Bad - quest for the Longspurs [Brenda Tekin ]
26 Feb Re: longspurs and photographers [Sarah Anderson via va-bird ]
26 Feb Bryan Park Walk postponed to March 8 [Susan Ridd ]
26 Feb RAS Pocahontas SP February 28 field trip CANCELLED [Wendy Ealding ]
26 Feb Re: Smith's Longspur and Photographers ["Marshall Faintich" ]
26 Feb Re: Trip to Bay Bridge-Tunnel, Eastern Shore NWR and Oyster [Les Brooks ]
26 Feb Re: longspurs and photographers [Larry Kline via va-bird ]
26 Feb Re: longspurs and photographers [Wendy Ealding ]
26 Feb Smith's Longspur; Yes [Ellison Orcutt ]
26 Feb Trip to Bay Bridge and Tunnel and Lower Eastern Shore [Les Brooks ]
26 Feb Scoter and Scaup increase at CBBT [Ned Brinkley ]
26 Feb Re: longspurs and photographers [SANDY ]
26 Feb longspurs and photographers ["C. Michael Stinson" ]
25 Feb Waking up at 4:30am for a before school excursion [Andrew Rapp ]

Subject: 75+ Black vultures at roost, Yorktown
From: Elisabeth Wilkins <ilike2hike AT ymail.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 14:34:22 +0000 (UTC)
This morning there were more than 75 Black vultures at their winter roost 
directly behind Grafton Bethel Elementary School, 410 Lakeside Drive, Yorktown. 
 They have been roosting there for years, perching on trees, roof, fence, and 
basketball goals, but this is the highest number of individuals I have counted 
at this location; double the usual count.  -Elisabeth Carrozza Wilkins  

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Mixed flock of larks, pipits and lapland longspurs
From: "Bulmer, Anthony" <Anthony.Bulmer AT fairfaxcounty.gov>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:06:12 +0000
I have been watching a mixed flock of horned larks, pipits and Lapland 
longspurs right in the field in front of my house in Nokesville. It is so cool 
to watch their behavior vs our sparrows. Makes you feel like you are in the 
arctic circle with no trees. They will all of sudden get spooked and take off 
only to land 50 feet away from where they were feeding after doing a couple of 
impressive loops to lose their enemy. Usually a passing car. :) 



Tony Bulmer
Naturalist/Historian Senior Intepreter
Ellanor C. Lawrence Park
703-631-0013

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Brown Creepers and Suet Feeders
From: Allen Hart <hartal AT techsolvers.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 23:49:34 -0500
I wanted to provide the promised summary of replies I received to my
question about other people observing Brown Creepers feeding from their
suet feeders.

I received replies from 15 people, and of those 12 had observed Brown
Creepers feeding at their suet feeders.  Replies came from the following
places: Charlottesville, Alexandria, Crozet, Richmond, Lisette, Arlington,
Jeffersonton, Chesterfield, Staunton, and Rockingham County.

It seems that Brown Creepers definitely like suet.  The reported
observations ranged from experiences like mine where they seldom see
Creepers at their feeders but have seen one feeding from their suet cage,
to one observer who sees them often and has seen as many as five at one
time!  Another observer noted that they usually have Brown Creepers visit
their suet cages each year, but they thought they were visiting more often
this year and were present longer.

Thanks to all of you who responded (and thanks for the kind comments about
my photo)

Good birding to all of you.

--allen hart
--Herndon, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur, Silver Lake
From: Phillip Kenny <philkenny AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 21:57:01 -0500
I made the trek down to Weyerís Cave to see the Smithís Longspur at Shenandoah 
Valley Regional Airport and I was not disappointed! I then drove over to Silver 
Lake to see the swans and ducks. There were a couple of Red-breased Mergansers, 
and one duck that stumped me. Maybe it is a hybrid of some sort, or maybe a 
juvenile Blue-winged Teal? Any thoughts would be appreciated. 

Here is the link to a photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/95123562 AT N07/
Thanks,
Phil 
Phillip Kenny
1731 Killarney Court
Vienna VA 22182-2133
703-255-5423
philkenny AT verizon.net


*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: No. Va. Bird club meeting March 4
From: "Joanna Bellows Taylor" <jandrtaylor AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 16:28:46 -0500
The Northern Virginia Bird Club will hold its rescheduled  meeting this
Wednesday, Mar. 4.  Our speaker will be  Bob Munford who will give us a talk
"The Exquisite Birds of Ecuador" which will include 150 of his fantastic
pictures taken during 16 trips to Ecuador.  Bob's work has appeared in many
publications including  National Wildlife Magazine, Birding, Birder's Worl
and Howard Youth's book, A Field Guide to the Natural World inWashington,
DC.  He has also authored Spring Comes to Washington.  His recently
published book, The Exquisite Birds of Ecuador will be on sale at the
meeting.

 

The meeting will be held at St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 4000 LORCOM Lane,
Arlington 22207.  Directions can be found in the Siskin at our website:
www.nvabc.org.  Early bird refreshments start at 7:30.  Any contributions of
food or drink will be most gratefully received.  It looks as though we may
not have any serious problems with the weather this time.  

 

 

Joanna Taylor

VA Programs 

Northern Virginia Bird Club

Arlington, VA

 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Possible blue-morph Ross's X Snow Goose at Fort Monroe
From: Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 15:53:34 -0500
Hi all,

Ernie Miller and Adam Bollinger found and photographed an intriguing small
blue goose at Fort Monroe on Feb 10th. I was unable to relocate it the
following morning and on many subsequent trips to the Fort, so I assumed it
was a one-day wonder. Ernie refound what appears to be the same bird
yesterday morning and Jason Strickland and I were able to see it early in
the afternoon. Seeing the bird in person, a number of things looked off for
a Lesser Snow Goose and my hunch was that it was a hybrid. Some exceptional
midwest and mountain west birders have had the same thoughts upon viewing
my mediocre photos of the bird.

A few of my notes from the field:

-Size: The bird felt quite small compared to the CANG it was with and
seemed to be more in the range of Ross's than Snow size
-Bill: The bill seemed to have a very slight grin patch and a bit of dark
coloration at the base. Length and size compared to the head seemed in
range for Lesser Snow (seemed too large for a pure Ross's).
-Head/neck pattern: the bird has quite a bit of dark on the nape and
blotchy dark markings extending across most of the crown. The amount of
dark there seemed too extensive for a Snow, but I don't have a lot of
experience with the range of variation in Lesser Snow.
-Wings: One of the first things I noticed in the field, besides the
diminutive size, was that the wing coverts appeared both brighter and more
extensively white than I am used to on Blue Snow Geese. I don't think the
photos convey the brightness there very well, as it was challenging light
conditions for photograph, but those feathers seemed as bright at the vent
area and face. Again, I'm not well-versed in the range of variation in that
feature for Lesser Snow.

I have limited internet bandwidth right now, so I've only been able to
upload two photos to Flickr:

https://flic.kr/p/qtLouR
https://flic.kr/p/r96LzT

The bird has been associating with a group of about 20 CANG near the
ballfields at Fort Monroe and was present again this morning. To reach the
ball fields from the entrance, continue straight past the marina, where the
road does a 90 degree turn at the hotel, and continue on the main road
until you see the ballfields on your left. Parking is pretty limited with
all the snow and ice, so you may need to park down the road and walk.

Sorry for the delayed word on this bird. I've had my hands full with moving
this weekend and just had time to review my photos and realize that the
bird had not been mentioned here or on FB.

Good birds,

Frank Fogarty
Hampton
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Northern Loudoun County Owls and Finches
From: Gerco <drgerco AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:04:32 -0500
Saturday late afternoon 6-8 Northern Harriers were very active along 
Spinks Ferry Rd just south of Lucketts in Northern Loudoun County. Along 
Limestone School Rd I did find 2 Short-eared Owls. One of them perched 
on a utility post before flying off. Unlike previous weeks when the 
birds were close to the road, the owls were now further away and it was 
hard to spot them.

Sunday morning I saw 3-4 Pine Siskins and 2 Purple Finches at my feeder. 
At one point there were at least 24 White-throated Sparrows and a dozen 
plus Dark-eyed Junco foraging around the feeders as well. It is a lot of 
fun to watch soo many birds close together.

Gerco
Leesburg, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Pine Siskin in Warren County 3/1/2015
From: Fred Bogar <fbogar AT wildblue.net>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 11:57:35 -0500
Both male and female Pine Siskin were observed at 1130 today, 3/1/2015, at
our feeders.  Our feeders are located in the suburbs of glorious, greater,
downtown Limeton, Virginia.  Limeton is located about 6.65 miles south of
Front Royal, Virginia, on US Route 340, the Stonewall Jackson Highway.

Also seen this morning in the snow from 0900 until now, about 1130, were
all the usual suspects which included:

Mourning Dove - 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2
Downy Woodpecker - 2
Northern Flicker - 1
Pileated Woodpecker - 1
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Blue Jay - 4
American Crow - 2
Carolina Chickadee - 2
Tufted Titmouse - 1
White-breasted Nuthatch - 1
Carolina Wren - 1
Northern Mockingbird - 1
European Starling - 4
Eastern Towhee - 1
Song Sparrow - 2
White-throated Sparrow - 4
Dark-eyed Junco - 6
Northern Cardinal - 3
House Finch - 2
American Goldfinch - 15


Note that all these counts were determined using the rule that all the
birds of a species must be seen at the same time to be counted.  There were
probably many more birds present but not simultaneously.

A House Wren was observed at 0930 at the Visitor's Contact Station of
the Shenandoah River State Park on 2/24/2015.

Red-shouldered Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, and American Kestrel have been
observed near Limeton, VA, on US Route 340 this past week.  In fact, these
birds are endemic to the area.

Frederic D. Bogar
Bentonville, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Mar 1, 2015
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 11:41:53 -0500
So thanks to the hardy 6 that came out to the abbreviated Dyke Marsh Sunday 
walk today. I hope all made it home safe and sound. A thin coating of ice on my 
scope was a sign that perhaps we should not try to fool mother nature. March 1 
is traditionally when we expect to see our first Osprey... I think they are 
still sipping on umbrella drinks somewhere to our south. 


Large numbers of waterfowl are still present off the picnic area and marina - 
less concentrated now that there is more open water. Lots of Canvasbacks, lots 
of Lesser Scaup, some Ring Necked Ducks, some Buffleheads. No Scoters seen 
today. We did get a pretty nice look at a RedTailed Hawk that perched in the 
marina long enough to get the scope on it. Small mixed flock passed quickly 
overhead - we found WB Nuts, Yellow-rumped Warblers, one Downy WP and a 
Golden-Crowned Kinglet. 


Here's hoping the weather next Sunday is more conducive to being out. Maybe the 
Osprey will start showing up... sure could use a few signs of spring. Be 
careful out there today. 


Rich Rieger
Alexandria

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: March 1, 2015 11:28:20 AM EST
> To: zelig88 AT aol.com
> Subject: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Mar 1, 2015
> 
> Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Fairfax, US-VA
> Mar 1, 2015 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     an ice coated morning for the Sunday Dyke Marsh walk
> 24 species
> 
> Canada Goose  750
> Tundra Swan  5
> Mallard  6
> Canvasback  600     maybe more - large numbers present for over a week now.
> Ring-necked Duck  12
> Lesser Scaup  600
> Bufflehead  12
> Common Merganser  30
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> Ring-billed Gull  X
> Herring Gull  1
> Great Black-backed Gull  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Brown Creeper  1
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
> American Robin  40
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
> Song Sparrow  2
> White-throated Sparrow  6
> Northern Cardinal  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22122681 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Let the Rusty Blackbird Migration Blitz officially begin!
From: Robert Ake <rake AT cox.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 09:03:07 -0500
Okay blitzers and wannabe blitzers,
     It's officially open, the first day of this year's Rusty Blackbird 
Migration Blitz.  For those who have participated before, just enter 
your data as you did before, using the "Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration 
Blitz" site under "Other" choices listed under "Observation Type" using 
the ebird data entry portal http://ebird.org/ebird/submit. If you'd like 
a little tutoring, here's a video that should remind you of how it's done:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETRXujTSsZQ
This year there's a request for returning blitzers to re-visit those 
sites where you had Rusties last year to see if they have returned, 
giving some measure of site fidelity and intensity of usage.
     For those of you for whom this season will be your first 
participation in the blitz, there's a separate video for you on data 
entry into ebird:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjqOLXyJLro&feature=youtu.be
Take a look; if you have any questions, please let me know.  The main 
objective is to record the data on ebird.  And don't forget - negative 
data is important, too.  If you're out and about in Rusty Blackbird 
habitat, you should submit your birdlist whether you run into Rusties or 
not.
     The official dates for gathering data in our state are the days of 
March, but I think it's important to keep gathering data until June.  
Last year Rusties were still moving through Virginia in April.  So keep 
it up as long as you care to.  Last year the effort expended by Virginia 
participants was one of the highest in the country.
     To learn more about the Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz, 
visit our website at http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/.

Best blitzing,

Bob Ake
State Coordinator
Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz




*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: [va-bird] Back yard finch explosion in Springfield
From: Scott Priebe <falco57 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:01:35 +0000
The weather appears to be influencing our local finches to congregate at 
feeders this morning. So far high counts of 30 Goldfinches, 7 Pine Siskins and 
4 House Finches (uncommon in our yard since mycoplasma epidemic). Other unusual 
feeder visitors, a pair of Bluebirds eating peanut chips or hulled sunflower 
from a tube feeder. 



Scott Priebe

Springfield






Sent from Windows Mail
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's here
From: Phil Kenny <philkenny AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Mar 2015 07:44:22 -0500
Just saw it at the usual spot

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur and other Saturday birds
From: Rowe, Richard A, ĒDickĒ <RoweRA AT vmi.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 03:36:13 +0000
All Ė like many other birders, I headed up to Shenandoah Valley Airport to look 
for Longspurs this morning. When I arrived a little before 8am there were two 
other birders from PA looking for the SMLO. After about 20 minutes, the SMLO 
and a few Horned Larks showed up. Unfortunately, the Lapland Longspurs werenít 
to be seen. As others have noted the SMLO is quite tame. At one point, the bird 
was flushed by cars twice and very fortunately after flushing the second time, 
it landed almost right in front of Russ Taylor and I. I was able to get some 
nice photos of the SMLO. After spending about 1.5 hrs at the airport, I headed 
off to Silver Lake outside of Dayton to look for the Trumpeter Swan and Mute 
Swans that has been there for many weeks. The swan was present along with 
Gabriel Mapel and members of the Junior Birding Club that he established 
(Gabriel et al. had been at the airport earlier as well). It was great to see 
the young members of his group getting excited over seeing all of the ducks 
there Ė many were life-listers for them. Gabriel was doing a great job of 
teaching them about birds. Also at Silver Lake there was a flock of about 20 of 
American Pipits that were actively feeding along the road and the edge of the 
pond. 


Iíve up-loaded photos of the SMLO (with one out of focus in flight shot that 
shows the diagnostic field marks), Horned Larks, Trumpeter Swan, Mute Swan (at 
Silver Lake), and the pipits to my Flickr site. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/vmibiology/

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology Dept

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Common Raven in North Arlington
From: Karen Fairweather <twofairs AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 22:19:54 -0500
While standing at the intersection of Lee Hwy and N Glebe Rd this afternoon, 
Cliff Fairweather spotted and heard a Common Raven being pursued by 2 American 
crows. They were last seen headed west on Lee Hwy flying about 25 feet above 
the ground. 


Karen Fairweather
Arlington VA

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: CBBT Field Trip - Hampton Roads Wildlife Enthusiasts
From: Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 22:15:43 -0500
Hi all,

I led a group of 13 hardy souls out into the brisk weather this morning for
Hampton Roads Wildlife Enthusiasts' field trip to the CBBT. Overall, the
volume of birds was quite low, with probably the fewest gulls I've ever
seen out there, but a number of great birds made up for the lack of
quantity with quality.

Highlights included:

8 Harlequin Duck together on Island #3
>20 Great Cormorant for the trip
Immature Iceland Gull at Island #2
5 Red-necked Grebe for the trip
12(!) Common Eider, with groups seen at all three islands
A lone American Oystercatcher

Good birds,

Frank Fogarty
Hampton
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Dyke Marsh walk/Sunday/March 1
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:53:44 -0500
Is up in the air?
Third time's the charm?

Having been cancelled the last two Sundays due to weather, I'm not quite ready 
to write this one off... sometimes they don't get it right... so think on these 
things... 


Weather advisory now has snow starting in Alexandria between 7a - 9a. I can 
walk over - others not so blessed should use their best judgement. Recent 
reports of Scoters (WW and Surf) leaves me hoping there will be time to scan 
the bay off the picnic area. Sometimes, activity will pick up w. weather moving 
in... 


So - if you'd rather stay home, drink coffee and read the Sunday paper, it's OK 
by me... I'll miss you, but will look forward to seeing you again in the near 
future... 


Rich Rieger
Alexandria

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Fwd: Crow story
From: "Patricia Scanlon M. " <pescanlon AT cox.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 19:01:03 -0500

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Patricia  Scanlon 
> Date: February 28, 2015, 6:57:15 PM EST
> To: Va-Bird 
> Subject: Crow story
> 
> All,
> 
> Susan Hubbard of Virginia, sushubbard AT gmail.com, asked me to post this 
wonderful story about her grandmother's gold necklace. We had been emailing 
back and forth about the story on BBC world news on line magazine about the 
little girl and her crows (a must read even for non birders). 

> 
> 
>>> I have a pretty unbelievable crow story. My grandmother In her 80s or 90s 
was living In suburban Richmond in the 50's. She always wore a gold chain 
around her neck with a cross and diamond ring on it. My uncle was out walking 
in the neighbor hood and noticed something shining way up in a tree...... He 
studied it and soon realized it was grandmother's chain!! Probably dropped 
there by a crow. 

>>> 
>>> It was rescued some how. No one had noticed it missing. That is a pretty 
good story, isn't it!! 

>>> 
>>> Susan Hubbard
> Sent from my iPad
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Highland County & beyond today -- Rough-legged Hawk, Am Tree Sparrows, etc
From: Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 23:24:44 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,Today I led a field trip for the Blue Ridge Young Birders Club and we 
had 4 young birders with us.  Amazing to think that a couple years ago 4 was 
our largest attendance ever and now this was the lowest turnout for a trip in 
quite some time.  

We started off and got to show everyone the Smith's Longspur at Shenandoah 
Valley Regional Airport here in Augusta County.  Today the dark bird was there 
and gave great views for our entire group and the other 10 or so people there. 
 We were there from 8:05am for 45 minutes and about 10 other birders were 
there while we were there.  Everyone was parking in the parking lot and seemed 
to do a good job staying in the allowed areas so THANK YOU and I hope that 
trend continued through the entire day.  Just a friendly reminder for anyone 
pursuing these birds to please park in the parking lot and walk back and keep 
all scopes/tripods off the roadway and on the shoulders.  It was very nice to 
see several familiar faces that I haven't seen in quite some time while 
watching the Longspur this morning. 

From here we headed over to Rockingham to show the young birders all the 
waterfowl on Silver Lake highlighted by the Trumpeter Swan.  Overall the 
waterfowl tally at Silver Lake was similar to that of yesterday and no new 
additions.  An entire group of 30 American Pipits was present today compared 
to only 5 yesterday.  From Silver Lake we shot down to Bridgewater where along 
the North River at the Hwy 42 bridge we were able to show the young birders all 
the continuing waterfowl--1 Pintail (very accommodating!), 1 Greater Scaup, 1 
Goldeneye, 2 Hooded, 4 Common, & 1 Red-breasted Mergansers (the Commons were 
WAY up river towards Wildwood Park, like yesterday), and 2 Pied-billed Grebes. 
  

After starting off with a bang here in Aug./Rock. we headed over to Highland 
County with hopes of Golden Eagles, Rough-legged Hawks, and American Tree 
Sparrows.  On our way over Bullpasture Mtn on Hwy 250 which is the last 
mountain before McDowell when coming from the east we spotted 2 Buteos soaring 
off to the left with one noticeably larger and longer-winged, and 
proportionally smaller-headed.  Once it separated from the Red-tail, the sun 
lit it up nicely to show off all the field marks of a Rough-legged.  The way 
the road was in that spot it was even safe to pull off to get the bird in 
binoculars which was quite nice.  Down in McDowell the feeders had 3 
Black-capped Chickadees, 3 Purple Finches, and 7 Pine Siskins plus the usual 
suspects.   

Once we arrived in the Blue Grass Valley we did the Wimer Mtn Rd-Hardscrabble 
Rd-Heavner Ln circuit.   Unfortunately we missed Golden Eagle and the resident 
Screech-Owl but we had a few nice birds like a Killdeer, Hairy & Pileated 
Woodpeckers, a Kestrel, 2 Ravens, 2 Horned Larks, and an Am Tree Sparrow along 
Hardscrabble Rd just above Heavner Ln.  The snow-covered ground lit up by the 
sun was absolutely gorgeous in the picturesque Blue Grass Valley!  From this 
circuit we went down south of New Hampden to Snyder Lane.  The feeders at the 
intersection with Blue Grass Valley Road didn't hold anything out of the 
ordinary other than a very few Siskins but further up the road we discovered a 
set of feeders on the left hand side of the road which was packed with Siskins 
(55+) and there were 2 Am Tree Sparrows feeding under the feeders giving 
extraordinary looks.   

We ended our excursion by traveling south from Hightown on Rte 640 to check the 
Bald Eagle nest and surrounding area.  There was no activity on the Eagle nest 
and no Goldens in the area.   

Despite having dipped Golden Eagle we had a great day with 52 species total and 
most everyone in the group got many life birds.  Good Birding to all!Gabriel 
MapelNew Hope, VA 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: 2/28/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR, Sandbridge (White Ibis)
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:42:36 -0500
Folks,

*Quick Notes*
Back Bay NWR - 7:55 - 9:45 AM - Bay is open water, plenty of waterfowl out.
Sandbridge Beach - 10:05 AM - FOY Cedar Waxwings
Sandbridge Road - 10:15 AM - Juvenile White Ibis in roadside ditch near
Baybreeze Farms
Kings Grant Landing - 12:45 PM - FOY Fox Sparrow in my front yard!

*Outing Photographs*
*http://www.rbnature.com/galleries/we-20150301
*

*Full Information*
The sun was shining right off the bat this morning, and with temperatures
in the high 20s I headed out about 7:15 AM towards Back Bay NWR. I was
expecting the bay to be fully frozen over like last weekend, but apparently
the howling northerly winds have caused so much motion on the water that it
was unable to freeze up, even in the sub-freezing temperatures we've had
overnight and yesterday. Also because of the strong northerly winds, much
of the water has been pushed southward and the water levels are very low.
Waterfowl were taking advantage of the lack of ice fortunately, and about
25-30 Tundra Swans were visible from the parking area and surrounding
boardwalks. Among the swans, one could pick out Canada Geese, and many
species of ducks (Scaup, Northern Pintails, Redheads, American Wigeons,
Gadwalls, American Black Ducks, Mallards, and Green-winged Teal). I
initially walked the Bayside Trail and realized quickly that I wasn't going
to be sneaking up on any birds today with the crunchy snow still around.
Fortunately on the gravel Bay Trail, the snow was more melted, and just
around in the shadiest of spots. At the west end of the trail I saw a set
of King Rail tracks in the snow, which was very neat as I've never seen
that before, and about 90 minutes later on my second trip down the trail I
did find the Rail, for a split second before it dashed under the boardwalk
and out of sight. Back on the first outing down the trail, a Great Blue
Heron, a Northern Harrier, and an American Bittern were all seen out near
the pond, though the crunching of the snow sent them off before I ever got
close.

Walking around the Loop Road proved the best section of the park, since all
the snow had melted on the gravel roadways. Unfortunately, there wasn't a
whole lot to see along the way, though there were plenty of Yellow-rumped
Warblers and Sparrows (White-throated, Song, Savannah, Swamp, and one
Field) picking out seeds or grit in the cleaned off shoulders. I took the
southern access trail down to the beach, then walked northward and back to
the parking area. The surf zone was quite wide today, so nothing was in
close, and no shorebirds were out. Just a few Ring-billed and Great
Black-backed Gulls in the air. There was a group of about a dozen Common
Loons out of camera range though, but no ducks were visible with the strong
winds crashing up the surf. With the snow situation inland, I'd wanted to
walk the beach, but the catch 22 today was heading south, the sun was right
in your eyes, and heading north, the wind was, so not exactly ideal
conditions for observing and documenting wildlife. After arriving back at
the parking area, I did one quick jaunt out the Bay Trail (seeing the King
Rail this time), and running into Jim Marcum, who made mention of just how
tough the snowfall had been on the smaller trees along the trail, causing
many branches to break off, and in a few spots blocking the trail, though
I'm sure the staff will have them cleaned up pretty quickly.

I left the park about 9:45 AM and drove back north on Sandbridge Road.
While driving I caught eye of a flock of birds and thought I'd seen the
tail of a Cedar Waxwing as it passed over, so I pulled a couple u-turns,
and meandered through the gridded streets, finally finding where they
landed. There was about 20 Cedar Waxwings, and some Brown-headed Cowbirds,
American Robins, and European Starlings all sipping water off the roadway
and dining in the nearby front yard. I snapped a couple of shots from the
vehicle as the Waxwings were a FOY species for me and then kept going.
After passing westward over the bridge at Hells Point Creek, I saw a
juvenile White Ibis in the ditch on the north side of the road right where
the RV Park entrance is. I'm surprised eBird still classifies these as
'rarities', they're quite regular around the tributaries that feed Back Bay
in the winter time. It was kind enough to pose for some shots from my car
as I sat in the turn lane for the RV park though, a beautiful bird.

After I'd arrived back home, thinking the birding was all done for the day,
I was excited to find out that the ibis was the 100th species I'd seen in
Virginia Beach this month, but, it wasn't quite over yet. While heading out
the door to go catch a matinee, a couple of Yellow-rumped Warblers and
Dark-eyed Juncos were flitting about in my very tiny front yard, and
another bird flew in. Thinking it was something I hadn't yet seen this year
I ran back upstairs, grabbed my binoculars and went back down to find that
it was a Fox Sparrow, another FOY bird. Fortunately it stayed long enough
for me to again run back upstairs, grab my camera this time, and head out
the door. I know a lot of folks see this birds regularly in winter around
here, but without having feeders anywhere near my home, this was quite a
surprise for me, and is actually only the second Fox I've seen &
photographed in my life. It was a great way to end the month of February,
looking forward to a great March!

Rob Bielawski
Virginia Beach, VA
www.rbnature.com
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Rusty Blackbird, Rough-legged Hawk Fauquier Co
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:58:28 -0500
Marc and I picked the Rough legged Hawk on Rector town Red at 330 pm as it was 
harassed by a male short eared owl. 

Kurt Gaskill

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Frederick Atwood via va-bird  wrote:

>This morning I birded a couple areas near Broad Run,  as well as Harrison Rd 
(The Plains) and Rectortown Rd, beyond Rectortown.  I found 57 species 
including the light phase rough-legged hawk at the short-eared owl fields 
across Rectortown Rd from Edgecliff farm.  This area (3 road miles) also had 5 
red-tails, a male harrier, 2 red-shouldered hawks, and 2 kestrels, as well as a 
killdeer, a brown creeper, some cedar waxwings and white-crowned sparrows, and 
a river otter, which was crossing the mostly frozen creek near the bridge. The 
6 Rusty Blackbirds were in a mixed flock of blackbirds and crows that were 
eating in a cornfield along Harrison Rd near The Plains.  This road also had a 
lot of savannah sparrows (29) and 5 meadowlarks but no longspurs or larks. The 
lakes in this area were frozen and snow-covered. Near Broad Run, Trapp Branch 
Rd had a fox sparrow and 4 towhees. A nearby private-property lake had two 
pockets of open water that were packed with waterfowl including something like 
3600 Canada Geese (mostly sleeping with beaks tucked into their backs on the 
ice), 190 Mallards, 4 gadwall, 2 pintail, 2 black duck, 1 wood duck, 102 
american wigeon, 3 buffleheads, 2 ring-necked ducks, 1 drake common goldeneye, 
1 ruddy duck, and 1 coot. A red-headed woodpecker was also here. The owner of 
the lake said the pintails were the most unusual birds for this lake. 

>I believe the Rusty Blackbird blitz starts tomorrow.
>All the bestFred AtwoodOakton, Fairfax Co.
>*** You are subscribed to va-bird as kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Photos - Western Tanager, Chesapeake
From: Karen Kearney via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:26:09 +0000 (UTC)
 This afternoon as I was filling my bird feeders yet again, I found a female 
Western Tanager eating the grape jelly that I keep out for my wintering 
Baltimore Orioles. As I watched from inside the house, I saw her return several 
times in between the Starling invasions, eating from both jelly feeders. I only 
have one window that doesn't have a screen, so I ran outside and quickly pruned 
the branches that were between the window and the feeder, waited for a few 
minutes for her return, then got a few distant photos. Delightful! Photos are 
at 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdingva/16649010996/https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdingva/16487383718/in/photostream/https://www.flickr.com/photos/birdingva/16052636834/in/photostream/ 

Karen KearneyChesapeake
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Rusty Blackbird, Rough-legged Hawk Fauquier Co
From: Frederick Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:21:37 +0000 (UTC)
This morning I birded a couple areas near Broad Run,  as well as Harrison Rd 
(The Plains) and Rectortown Rd, beyond Rectortown.  I found 57 species 
including the light phase rough-legged hawk at the short-eared owl fields 
across Rectortown Rd from Edgecliff farm.  This area (3 road miles) also had 5 
red-tails, a male harrier, 2 red-shouldered hawks, and 2 kestrels, as well as a 
killdeer, a brown creeper, some cedar waxwings and white-crowned sparrows, and 
a river otter, which was crossing the mostly frozen creek near the bridge. The 
6 Rusty Blackbirds were in a mixed flock of blackbirds and crows that were 
eating in a cornfield along Harrison Rd near The Plains.  This road also had a 
lot of savannah sparrows (29) and 5 meadowlarks but no longspurs or larks. The 
lakes in this area were frozen and snow-covered. Near Broad Run, Trapp Branch 
Rd had a fox sparrow and 4 towhees. A nearby private-property lake had two 
pockets of open water that were packed with waterfowl including something like 
3600 Canada Geese (mostly sleeping with beaks tucked into their backs on the 
ice), 190 Mallards, 4 gadwall, 2 pintail, 2 black duck, 1 wood duck, 102 
american wigeon, 3 buffleheads, 2 ring-necked ducks, 1 drake common goldeneye, 
1 ruddy duck, and 1 coot. A red-headed woodpecker was also here. The owner of 
the lake said the pintails were the most unusual birds for this lake. 

I believe the Rusty Blackbird blitz starts tomorrow.
All the bestFred AtwoodOakton, Fairfax Co.
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Golden Eagle... Briery Branch Rd
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:43:59 -0500
After the Smiths Marc Ribaudo and I went to Dayton Silver Lake for the 
Trumpeter Swan. Then we drove west on Briery Branch Rd (257) into the mtns. 
Above the dam we picked up our first Black capped Chickadees. Another few miles 
produced an adult Golden Eagle and nearby were Red breasted Nuthatch and YB 
Sapsucker. 

Kurt Gaskill

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Elisa Enders  wrote:

>The Smith's was still being seen a few minutes ago, in the usual spot, on the 
Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport entrance road. I didn't seen any Lapland's. 

>
>Elisa Flanders
> 		 	   		  
>*** You are subscribed to va-bird as kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur still present, Weyers Cave
From: Elisa Enders <elisaenders AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:18:36 -0500
The Smith's was still being seen a few minutes ago, in the usual spot, on the 
Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport entrance road. I didn't seen any Lapland's. 


Elisa Flanders
 		 	   		  
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur yes Sat morning
From: Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 08:35:37 -0500
Here now regular location
Gabriel Mapel and orgels

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: 2 White-winged scoters were still at Dyke Marsh Friday morning
From: Pam and Ben via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 23:42:57 -0500
Along with about 500 canvasbacks, and a similar number of scoters.

 

Ben Jesup

Alexandria

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Trip to Bay Bridge-Tunnel (2/26/2015) Photos
From: Les Brooks <ubrooks AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 03:55:15 +0000 (UTC)
Hello everyone!
Well, (I dislike starting a sentence with well. But warranted in this case)  I 
am very glad that I was not still shooting film on this day!  Had I been using 
camera film, a bunch of it would be laying at my feet right now.  As it turns 
out, I just changed a few ones and zero's on a memory card and sent them to 
never, never land.  Because of the snow and ice between the guard rail and 
fence at the Bay Bridge-Tunnel, I got lazy.  I crossed over once and then 
tried shooting through the fence openings by focusing on the other side.  Now 
I know this does not normally work well because the fence provides all sorts of 
shadows and effects.  But the laws of physics can sometimes be 
broken........sure......Right!   Long story short........not a lot of 
keepers....and that's life!  Hopefully the birds will remain and I can visit 
another day. 

Here are a couple of links If you care to have a look:       

Northern Gannet 

http://natures-finest-photography.com/gallery/sea-birds/northern-gannet-over-the-bay-nfp-s/ 

Non Breeding Ruddy Turnstone 
http://natures-finest-photography.com/gallery/shore-birds/a-turnstone-nfp-s/ 



Have a safe and enjoyable weekend!
Les BrooksGlen Allenhttp://www.natures-finest-photography.com/


*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Augusta & Rockingham 2/27--Waterfowl, Smith's Longspurs, Snow Bunting
From: Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 01:59:18 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,Allen Larner and I spent the day birding throughout Augusta & Rockingham 
Counties and we had a great day ending with a total of 66 species--50 in 
Augusta and 38 in Rockingham.   

We spent the morning scouting throughout Augusta County before meeting up with 
the Northern Virginia Bird Club led by Elton Morel and took them up into 
Rockingham after not finding all that much in Augusta this morning.   

It was wonderful to get to bird with the Northern Virginia Bird Club group, 
they are on their way for their annual winter Highland County weekend and are a 
wonderful group of people and skilled group of birders. 

Allen and I started off this morning at the Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport 
and had both the Smith's Longspurs.  We were watching a Smith's in good 
lighting and noticed that the bird was very pale like the one individual that 
has been reported.  It then flew off and 5-10 minutes later a Smith's landed 
in a similar area in the same lighting and was noticeably much darker and 
buffier, the other individual.  While we were watching the dark bird feed I 
heard the flight call of a Smith's, presumably the other bird flying by.   

From here we headed through Bell's Lane and Swoope, over to Middlebrook, to 
Fishersville at the Quarry, down through Sangers Lane before meeting up with 
the Northern Virginia group.  With them we went back to the airport and found 
the dark Longspur, then went to Silver Lake, Wildwood Park, and the North River 
in Bridgewater with them.  One notable sighting at Silver Lake was a single 
Painted Turtle sitting on the ice in 30 degree weather! 

Also, just a friendly reminder to all pursuing the Smith's Longspurs to please 
park somewhere in the Airport Parking Lot at the end of the access road that 
the Smith's Longspurs are frequenting and not along the shoulders of the road. 
 You can then walk back to view the Longspurs but please walk along the 
shoulders and view from the shoulders.  And all tripods/scopes/cameras need to 
be on the shoulder of the road and not on the pavement.  These are reasonable 
requests from Airport Security!Also when you turn left off of Rte 771 onto that 
access road, you will see another road going off to your left.  It may look 
tempting to walk up but PLEASE DO NOT.  There is an easy-to-miss sign at the 
entrance to that road stating that it is Airport Property and a No Trespassing 
area.  Please only walk along/view from the main access road. 

A list of our highlight species broken down by county is below.
Thanks to Allen as well as the Northern Virginia group for a most enjoyable 
day.Gabriel MapelNew Hope, VA 

Augusta highlights:Canada Goose 180 -- A low count and no Cacklings or 
White-fronteds among themGadwall 26 -- Bells Lane and QuarryCanvasback 5 -- 
QuarryRedhead 15 -- Bells Lane and QuarryRing-necked Duck 1 -- Bells 
LaneGreater Scaup 1 -- Bells LaneHooded Merganser 3 -- Bells LaneRuddy Duck 4 
-- Bells Lane and QuarryNorthern Harrier 1 -- SHD AirportSharp-shinned Hawk 1 
-- Sangers LaneCooper's Hawk 1 -- Sangers LaneBald Eagle 2 -- Sitting on nest 
(presumably on eggs) in SwoopeRed-shouldered Hawk 1 -- Long Meadow 
RoadRed-tailed Hawk 7 -- ThroughoutAmerican Coot 18 -- QuarryRed-headed 
Woodpecker 1 -- Shemariah Road in the Middlebrook AreaAmerican Kestrel 10 -- 
Throughout.  We had a male/female pair by the new nest box at the entrance to 
Smith's in Swoope.Horned Lark 244 -- ThroughoutAmerican Pipit 6 -- Rockfish 
Road and Long Meadow RoadSmith's Longspur 2 -- SHD AirportSnow Bunting 1 -- 
Glebe School Rd (south end of Swoope Area) between Trimble's Mill Rd and Shuey 
Rd.  This bird was a flyover and kept on going but fortunately we both had a 
good look and heard it as it flew over.Savannah Sparrow 6 -- ThroughoutSong 
Sparrow 22 -- ThroughoutWhite-throated Sparrow 161 -- ThroughoutWhite-crowned 
Sparrow 90 -- ThroughoutDark-eyed Junco 98 -- ThroughoutEastern Meadowlark 13 
-- ThroughoutCommon Grackle 51 -- Swoope AreaBrown-headed Cowbird 60 -- 
Throughout 

Rockingham highlights: Canada Goose 10 -- Silver LakeMute Swan 2 -- Silver 
LakeTrumpeter Swan 1 -- Silver LakeGadwall 98 -- Silver LakeAmerican Wigeon 4 
-- Silver LakeMallard 40 -- ThroughoutNorthern Pintail 2 males -- Hwy 42 bridge 
in BridgewaterCanvasback 20 -- Silver LakeRedhead 26 -- Silver LakeGreater 
Scaup 1 -- Hwy 42 bridge in BridgewaterLesser Scaup 1 -- Silver LakeBufflehead 
1 -- Silver LakeCommon Goldeneye 1 female -- Hwy 42 bridge in BridgewaterCommon 
Merganser 4 (1 male, 3 females) -- Along the North River in Bridgewater between 
the 42 Bridge and Wildwood Park.  The best place to view them though it is in 
a residential neighborhood and there is no good place to park is along Bank St 
before you get to Wildwood Park.   You can also view them looking WAY upriver 
from the 42 bridge.Red-breasted Merganser 4 -- 3 at Silver Lake and 1 at 
the Hwy 42 bridge in BridgewaterPied-billed Grebe 2 -- Hwy 42 bridge in 
BridgewaterAmerican Coot 8 -- Silver Lake and Hwy 42 bridge in 
BridgewaterKilldeer 1 -- Silver LakeEastern Screech-Owl 1 -- Wildwood 
ParkBelted Kingfisher 1 -- Hwy 42 bridge in BridgewaterGolden-crowned Kinglet 
2 -- Hwy 42 bridge in BridgewaterAmerican Pipit 5 -- Silver Lake 


*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: 2/27/15 - Virginia Beach - CBBT Island #1 (Common Goldeneye, Redhead, Both Loons)
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:31:09 -0500
My apologies, the link to photos is
http://www.rbnature.com/galleries/we-20150301

Rob

On Feb 27, 2015 6:55 PM, "Rob Bielawski"  wrote:
>
> Folks,
>
> Quick Notes
> CBBT Island #1 - 3:25 - 4:35 PM - 3 Redheads, 3 Common Goldeneyes,
Red-throated & Common Loons, Horned Grebes
>
> Outing Photographs
> http://www.rbnature.com/galleries/we-20150301
>
> Full Information
> Coming off a day stuck indoors yesterday due to the 5-6" of snow we
received in my neighborhood in Virginia Beach, I was more excited than
usual for my Friday evening outing. After leaving work, I arrived at the
first island of the CBBT about 3:25 PM, and parked at the southeastern
corner of the island as usual. From the parking spot, I could see 3 female
Common Goldeneyes to the south, with a group of Ruddy Ducks and
Red-breasted Mergansers. After having seen my first goldeneye in Virginia
Beach this January, then a group of two here last week, seeing 3 seemed to
continue on the pattern tonight. Walking up around the island was a bit
tough since the snow is still sitting over the walkway, and thanks to the
warmer weather during the daytime, it has gotten a bit mushy. But, it's
easier to get around than it was last week with the snow/ice combination.
Amazingly we've probably received close to a foot of snow this year, the
most I've seen since having moved to the region in late 2005.
>
> At the northern point of the island, a very large group of at least 100
Scaup was present. Two Redheads (1 female, 1 male) were sitting amongst the
group, and several Buffleheads were also. The wind, coming out of the
north/northwest was pushing up quite a swell, and the raft of ducks were
riding up and down almost hypnotically. Further out in the channel,
Long-tailed Ducks and many Surf Scoters were diving in the rough waves. I
ended up walking out to the end of the pier just to keep the blood flowing
to my hands..holding the camera and binoculars just sucks all the heat
right of them. From the end of the pier, I saw 2 Red-throated Loons flyby
quite far out, and also a Common Loon bobbing up and down in the waves. I
could not locate any Red-necked Grebes through my binoculars, which has
been my prime target the last couple of times I've been up to the island.
I'm still trying to spot my very first one.
>
> Heading back around the island, mostly the same birds were still present,
since it'd been only about a half hour or so since I'd walked past the
first time. A few Horned Grebes were sitting on the peaceful eastern side
of the island, and I had flybys of Ring-billed, Herring, and Great
Black-backed Gulls. Though, hardly any gulls were actually on the ground.
One single shorebird was seen tonight, a Ruddy Turnstone that flew past and
then landed on the parking area of the island. Earlier in the day it looked
as though the snow might be on the way out, but after being on the island
for over an hour, the temperature drop was noticeable, so it isn't going to
disappear over night at least. I'm looking forward to seeing what gets
spotted this weekend around the region, all the freshwater ponds and lakes
are pretty well frozen, which means Back Bay surely is as well.
>
> Rob Bielawski
> Virginia Beach, VA
> www.rbnature.com
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: ducks at CBBT 26 Feb 2015
From: David Matson <wrenpt AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:14:01 -0500
All,

Driving south yesterday afternoon across the CBBT, one saw 100s of scoters
on the Bay-side of the bridge-tunnel. North of Island 4 was one duck with a
large duck with a large splash of white on the side: male Eider??

David
-- 
David Matson
Suffolk and Onancock, Virginia
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Rectortown Road
From: Greg Slader via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:09:52 -0500
Greetings - this evening the Short -Eared Owls did not disappoint. I was able 
to see 4 owls with 2 flying quite close making for a great view. The 
Rough-Legged Hawk was also present which is a lifer so that was great. Down the 
road 2 large Harriers were spotted in the trees making this a great stop. 


Quick note for birders going over there - please don't forget that Rectortown 
Road is a rural back road and walk on the side of the road with caution. The 
locals are not always doing the speed limit and I would hate to see someone 
injured while doing something they love. 


Greg Slader 
Warrenton - Fauquier 
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: 2/27/15 - Virginia Beach - CBBT Island #1 (Common Goldeneye, Redhead, Both Loons)
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:55:36 -0500
Folks,

*Quick Notes*
CBBT Island #1 - 3:25 - 4:35 PM - 3 Redheads, 3 Common Goldeneyes,
Red-throated & Common Loons, Horned Grebes

*Outing Photographs*
*http://www.rbnature.com/galleries/we-201503
01*

*Full Information*
Coming off a day stuck indoors yesterday due to the 5-6" of snow we
received in my neighborhood in Virginia Beach, I was more excited than
usual for my Friday evening outing. After leaving work, I arrived at the
first island of the CBBT about 3:25 PM, and parked at the southeastern
corner of the island as usual. From the parking spot, I could see 3 female
Common Goldeneyes to the south, with a group of Ruddy Ducks and
Red-breasted Mergansers. After having seen my first goldeneye in Virginia
Beach this January, then a group of two here last week, seeing 3 seemed to
continue on the pattern tonight. Walking up around the island was a bit
tough since the snow is still sitting over the walkway, and thanks to the
warmer weather during the daytime, it has gotten a bit mushy. But, it's
easier to get around than it was last week with the snow/ice combination.
Amazingly we've probably received close to a foot of snow this year, the
most I've seen since having moved to the region in late 2005.

At the northern point of the island, a very large group of at least 100
Scaup was present. Two Redheads (1 female, 1 male) were sitting amongst the
group, and several Buffleheads were also. The wind, coming out of the
north/northwest was pushing up quite a swell, and the raft of ducks were
riding up and down almost hypnotically. Further out in the channel,
Long-tailed Ducks and many Surf Scoters were diving in the rough waves. I
ended up walking out to the end of the pier just to keep the blood flowing
to my hands..holding the camera and binoculars just sucks all the heat
right of them. From the end of the pier, I saw 2 Red-throated Loons flyby
quite far out, and also a Common Loon bobbing up and down in the waves. I
could not locate any Red-necked Grebes through my binoculars, which has
been my prime target the last couple of times I've been up to the island.
I'm still trying to spot my very first one.

Heading back around the island, mostly the same birds were still present,
since it'd been only about a half hour or so since I'd walked past the
first time. A few Horned Grebes were sitting on the peaceful eastern side
of the island, and I had flybys of Ring-billed, Herring, and Great
Black-backed Gulls. Though, hardly any gulls were actually on the ground.
One single shorebird was seen tonight, a Ruddy Turnstone that flew past and
then landed on the parking area of the island. Earlier in the day it looked
as though the snow might be on the way out, but after being on the island
for over an hour, the temperature drop was noticeable, so it isn't going to
disappear over night at least. I'm looking forward to seeing what gets
spotted this weekend around the region, all the freshwater ponds and lakes
are pretty well frozen, which means Back Bay surely is as well.

Rob Bielawski
Virginia Beach, VA
www.rbnature.com
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: longspur and photographers, again
From: altomomatic AT verizon.net
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 23:20:53 +0000
Did anyone there approach the photographer and tell him to stop what he was 
doing? Would have been a reasonable request given such moronic behavior. I am 
so with you on this! 


Tom Stock
Silver Spring MD

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: "C. Michael Stinson" 
Sender: "va-bird" 
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:17:31 
To: Virginia Birds (va-bird AT listserve.com)
Subject: [Va-bird] longspur and photographers, again

Birders -

I'm just home from seeing the Smith's Longspur in Augusta County. Many
people were able to see it along the entrance road to the airport this
morning. While watching it, many of us commented on how approachable this
bird is. Those who have chased these birds in their typical winter habitat
know that this species can be very hard to see well; the views we had this
morning were superb. It was also remarkably tolerant of passing vehicles,
on several occasions freezing and letting them drive past without flying
away.

Unfortunately, within 15 minutes of my arrival I watched through my scope
as the longspur nervously watched the approach of a photographer who kept
walking closer, and closer, and closer... until he flushed the bird. This
was exactly the sort of behavior I wrote about yesterday and hoped not to
see. I don't understand why the individual with the longest camera lens
felt compelled to get closer to the bird than everyone else. (I was able to
get passable pictures through my scope using a pocket camera before it was
flushed.)

Longspurs often won't flush until they are closely approached. But it's
possible that this bird is very approachable because it's starving. Much of
the surrounding area is snow-covered. Someone has placed some seed on the
roadside and the longspur was busily eating when it was flushed. It later
returned to the same site. If it had not been flushed, it might have eaten
more and spent less energy flying away and then returning.

It's quite likely that this bird, like many vagrants, will not survive its
trip to Virginia, far outside its normal range. But many birders today
would say that we should not be behaving in a way that will decrease its
chances of survival, low though they may be. With the weekend coming, I
imagine even more birders will try to see the longspur. I hope that
whatever collective behavior emerges as they look for the bird will take
the bird's welfare into consideration.

I should note that many people responded to me privately yesterday after my
first post, and all the responses were positive. These responses included
birders I have met and birders I have not, some who had seen the longspur
as well as some who had not. And some individuals who wrote are
accomplished bird photographers; I especially appreciate their comments.

But a few people wrote to tell me that they had also experienced the sort
of behavior I was complaining about. I hope that the many birders and
photographers who do not want to see birds, especially rarities, threatened
by other birders or photographers will speak up when they see this sort of
thing occurring.

Mike Stinson

-- 
C. Michael Stinson
Dillwyn, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as altomomatic AT verizon.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Short-eared Owls on Rectortown and Crenshaw Roads, Fauquier County
From: Linda Millington <millington.linda AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:52:37 -0500
Birders,

While I was walking along Rectortown Road at about 4:35 PM this afternoon,
a Short-eared Owl flew out of the hedge row and landed on a telephone pole
right in front of me. Photos can be found at the link below. Another
photographer said that he had been on Crenshaw Road, and had seen at least
four Short-eared Owls in the hedge-rows and on tree tops there.


Short-eared Owl 1

I am going to miss these guys when they leave our area!

Linda Millington
Upperville VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: "Oregon" Junco at College Creek, James City County
From: Brian and Deborah Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:29:50 -0500
There's a rather poor photo, in low light, through the windshield, from late 
this afternoon, of an "Oregon" Junco on the Blog at Coastal VA Wildlife 
Observatory, but it does show the distinctive features. 


Brian Taber
CVWO
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:08:23 -0500

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Cackling Goose (Richardson's) (1 Fairfax)
Canada Goose (parvipes) (1 Albemarle)
Trumpeter Swan (11 Rockingham)
Surf Scoter (1 Fairfax)
White-winged Scoter (6 Fairfax)
Rough-legged Hawk (2 Fauquier)
Merlin (Taiga) (1 Fairfax)
Peregrine Falcon (North American) (1 Northampton)
Peregrine Falcon (1 Augusta, 1 Orange)
Smith's Longspur (22 Augusta)
Western Tanager (1 James City)
Painted Bunting (1 Chesapeake)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert. The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View this alert on the web 
at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Cackling Goose (Richardson's) (Branta hutchinsii) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 14:10 by Sherman Suter
- Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7695,-77.0494&ll=38.7695,-77.0494 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085154
- Comments: "considerably smaller than CaGo, with shorter neck; stubby bill; 
grayish back; 

on ice with 36 CaGo 100 m E of picnic ground shore (opposite N restroom) at 
1650; 1 (or more?) has been in the area much of the winter;" 


Canada Goose (parvipes) (Branta canadensis) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 11:15 by Andrew Rapp
- Keswick Club, Albemarle, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.0123711,-78.361231&ll=38.0123711,-78.361231 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22080078
- Comments: "Continuing bird, small size, long bill, dark sides, small 
yellowish patch on face 

" 


Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 17:40 by William Benish
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085176
- Comments: "Straightish bill line - no yellow- no orange- dipping to feed and 
often coming up with light green stringy vegetation- occasionally paddling 
lightly to stay under water tipped. Fairly close- 20 yards approximately while 
I was in the car and I did not get out" 


Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:55 by Kent Davis
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086349
- Comments: "Continuing bird at known location hanging out with two Mute Swans. 
Seen well by all in party." 


Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:55 by Mike Smith
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086356
- Comments: "Continuing bird at known location hanging out with two Mute Swans. 
Seen well by all in party." 


Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 14:30 by Robert Ake
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087146
- Comments: "Continuing rarity"

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 14:20 by John Shea
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22082838
- Comments: "continuing"

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 12:11 by Frederick Atwood
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22080080
- Comments: "Continuing bird."

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 09:15 by Ellison Orcutt
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22078182
- Comments: "Continuing"

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 by Andrew Baldelli
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087774
- Comments: "on Silver Lake with Mute Swans and other waterfowl"

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 25, 2015 12:00 by Bill Williams
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22077528
- Comments: "continuing; with/near 2 Mute Swans; a Tundra Swan was near-by for 
bill size and base-of-bill-to-eye comparison; Trumpeter Swan bill 
proportionately larger than Tundra Swan's bill; base of the bill to the eye was 
straight for Trumpeter; base of bill for Tundra was angled upward just above 
the gape then straight towards the eye; photographed" 


Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) 
- Reported Feb 23, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087219

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) 
- Reported Feb 22, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087218

Surf Scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 14:10 by Sherman Suter
- Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7695,-77.0494&ll=38.7695,-77.0494 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085154
- Comments: "scoter, black with sloping forehead, white patches on forehead and 
nape; white around black spot at sides of base of bill; triangular orange bill; 

actively diving among scaup & Canv 300 to 400 m E of S end of marina;"

White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:55 by Sherman Suter
- Bell Haven PG to Stone Bridge, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7846902,-77.0539856&ll=38.7846902,-77.0539856 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086336
- Comments: "resting on water among scaup to S of Jones Point; dark black duck 
with white of secondaries showing as streak toward rear of flanks; likely one 
of the males continuing since 23 Feb;" 


White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:30 by Ron Clabbers
- Belle Haven--Picnic Area, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7798,-77.0524&ll=38.7798,-77.0524 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086235
- Comments: "Another birder pointed it out to me. It was about 50 yards 
offshore. I saw it through my spotting scope. Other birders had seen it this 
year according to the ABA birdingonthenet site. I also saw one last year about 
10 miles north on the Potomac River." 


White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:20 by Michael Mayer
- Belle Haven--Picnic Area, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7798,-77.0524&ll=38.7798,-77.0524 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085619
- Comments: "male: large black duck with white wing patch, white comma around 
eye, pink bill with black feathering extending out from steep forehead; orange 
legs stuck out of water when preening; photo available" 


White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (2)
- Reported Feb 27, 2015 07:10 by Ben Jesup
- Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7695,-77.0494&ll=38.7695,-77.0494 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22089529

White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:15 by Gaylan Meyer
- Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7695,-77.0494&ll=38.7695,-77.0494 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086501
- Comments: "Continuing Bird. Scope View. Clearly saw a dark duck with a white 
stripe on it's side. Also observed the white under the eye." 


White-winged Scoter (Melanitta fusca) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:15 by Jan Meyer
- Dyke Marsh - CMN02, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7695,-77.0494&ll=38.7695,-77.0494 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22084215
- Comments: "Continuing Bird. Scope View. Clearly saw a dark duck with a white 
stripe on it's side. Also observed the white under the eye." 


Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 12:39 by Todd Day
- Edgecliff Farm, Fauquier, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.924852,-77.865653&ll=38.924852,-77.865653 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22080999
- Comments: "Continuing light-morph bird."

Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus) (1)
- Reported Feb 25, 2015 17:05 by BJ Little
- Rectortown--Short-eared Owl fields , Fauquier, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.9270987,-77.8563309&ll=38.9270987,-77.8563309 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22079495
- Comments: "Light morph bird. Happily, this bird flew close along beside the 
car for about 6 seconds, with the light bouncing up off the snow cover clearly 
revealing all the diagnostic markings on the bird's underside: big black carpal 
patches, dark wide low bellyband, and dark terminal band on light tail. Its 
head was light. Possibly same bird as reported earlier in the month. 

Interestingly, the SEOWs dive-bombed the perched Red-tails but not the 
Rough-leg." 


Merlin (Taiga) (Falco columbarius) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:55 by Sherman Suter
- Bell Haven PG to Stone Bridge, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7846902,-77.0539856&ll=38.7846902,-77.0539856 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086336
- Comments: "falcon with gray upperparts, streaked breast, flanks, belly; 
barred tail; slight supercilium; 

perched at S edge of crown of tree with former eagle nest on E side golf course 
(with ad BaEa perched just above the former nest); species has been repeatedly 
reported from the area since late fall;" 


Peregrine Falcon (North American) (Falco peregrinus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 09:00 by stephen grimes
- Bay Creek, Northampton, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.2563953,-76.0074949&ll=37.2563953,-76.0074949 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22078180
- Comments: "Well seen low and at close range strafing feeder. Large falcon, 
sleek pointed wings, dark head and back, tail not as dark." 


Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 12:00 by Suzanne Stewart
- Lake of the Woods, Section one, Orange, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.3415847,-77.7553618&ll=38.3415847,-77.7553618 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22080643
- Comments: "The slate gray back caught my attention, dark face mask which 
extends toward the neck, black tipped beak, salt and pepper breast, bands on 
dark tail, about half the size of a bald eagle. It was preening in an oak tree 
usually used by a pair of bald eagles looking down on a frozen lake. 

https://flic.kr/p/r6aZh5  
There are three photos, but I think you have to arrow to the left for the other 
two." 


Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 10:32 by Frederick Atwood
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22079483
- Comments: "Caught a modo on the wing and started plucking it as it flew. Saw 
her again plucking and eating the five perched on a tree along road to 
airport." 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) 
- Reported Feb 24, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Shen. Valley Reg. Airport, Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.265714,-78.8987446&ll=38.265714,-78.8987446 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087217

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:35 by Diane Lepkowski
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22089321
- Comments: "Continuing, along airport access road. Photographed. Will add link 
to photos & video later." 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:00 by David Shoch
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085799
- Comments: "Continuing Photo & Video Sharing by SmugMug Photo & Video Sharing by SmugMug" 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:00 by Kent Davis
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086246
- Comments: "Continuing bird, seen well through 10x at 10 to 30 feet, just like 
yesterday when I saw them. White outer tail feathers etc. Photographed by 
Andrew Clem." 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:00 by Mike Smith
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086260
- Comments: "Continuing bird, seen well through 10x at 10 to 30 feet, just like 
yesterday when I saw them. White outer tail feathers etc. Photographed by 
Andrew Clem." 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 15:20 by David Boltz
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087460
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Photo forthcoming (next week sometime)."

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:55 by Daniel Mapel
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22082049
- Comments: "Mega rarity (first state record) continuing.  Photographed."

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:55 by Gabriel Mapel
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22082011
- Comments: "Mega rarity (first state record) continuing.  Photographed."

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:40 by Robert Ake
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087121
- Comments: "Continuing rarity"

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:04 by Joe Turner
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22086721
- Comments: "continuing; sparrow-like bird, larger than nearby SAVSs, smaller 
than HOLAs, distinctive auricular patch, fine streaking on upper breast, 
otherwise plain belly, striped back with two prominent larger white stripes, 
white outer tail feathers 

Smith's Longspur" 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 13:04 by Leslie Starr
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22081944
- Comments: "continuing; sparrow-like bird, larger than nearby SAVSs, smaller 
than HOLAs, distinctive auricular patch, fine streaking on upper breast, 
otherwise plain belly, striped back with two prominent larger white stripes, 
white outer tail feathers 

Smith's Longspur" 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (2)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 12:00 by teri holland
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22089038
- Comments: "Seen well and heard along entrance road. Overall Buffy with 
prominent eyeing. Light triangle marking on cheek. White on tail edges." 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 10:32 by Frederick Atwood
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22079483
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Buffier individual."

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) 
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 09:21 by William Benish
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087024
- Comments: "I was persuaded through prior review of Brenda Tekin's analysis 
that I too encountered both a buffier and a paler individual partly based on 
slightly disjointed location. Unfortunately I did not see both at the exact 
same time though it may have been possible since they were only 100-150 yards 
apart. I only had binoculars- no scope- facial pattern somewhat plain- overall 
more streaked than a Snow Bunting,but very plump like a Snow Bunting. I saw 
some prominent white in the the outer tail feathers, but never confirmed 'two' 
white. I saw the paler bird fly once at about 30 yards but couldn't see well 
enough. I did not see any prominent white in flight- in the tail, that was 
without the binoculars." 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 08:45 by Carson Lambert
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22081059
- Comments: "Continuing, well documented

[url=https://flic.kr/p/rkrfWL][img]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8635/16628860696_735a6635ae.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/rkrfWL]Smith's 
Longspur Digiscoped[/url] by 
[url=https://www.flickr.com/people/119606407 AT N06/]Grebe Guy[/url], on 
Flickr" 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 08:45 by Carson Lambert
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22081128
- Comments: "Continuing, well documented. I have photos."

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 08:45 by Carson Lambert
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22081077
- Comments: "continuing, well documented

[url=https://flic.kr/p/rkrfWL][img]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8635/16628860696_735a6635ae.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/rkrfWL]Smith's 
Longspur Digiscoped[/url] by 
[url=https://www.flickr.com/people/119606407 AT N06/]Grebe Guy[/url], on 
Flickr" 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 08:00 by Ellison Orcutt
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22084976
- Comments: "Continuing; photos to add"

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 01:25 by David Clark
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22080817
- Comments: "Continuing. Photographed"

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 by Andrew Baldelli
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22087879
- Comments: "bird continues seen by many , many photos taken"

Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 25, 2015 10:15 by Bill Williams
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22077922
- Comments: "well documented with photographs; numerous observers this day and 
the previous day; foraging with or near a Horned Lark, and Eastern Savannah 
Sparrow and a Song Sparrow; very pale, very conical pink/gray bill with hint of 
darker gray on the tip of the upper mandible; distinct pale tan/white eye ring; 
pale brown auriculars and malar stripe; pale gray; median crown stripe pale tan 
with dark stippling; thin, brown lateral crown stripe; throat pale tan/white; 
faint brown streaking on the upper breast; faint rufous brown on the upper 
flanks; belly to undertail pale gray/white; mantle had lateral white and brown 
streaks; lesser coverts brown with white tips, greater coverts brown,with tan 
edges and white tips; in flight, white bar on the lesser coverts was evident as 
were the two white outer rectrices" 


Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) (2)
- Reported Feb 25, 2015 08:33 by BJ Little
- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave), Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.261064,-78.905611&ll=38.261064,-78.905611 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22079006
- Comments: "Multiple observers. Distinguished from accompanying Song Sparrows 
mainly, for me, by very light patch in ear coverts and white feathers on sides 
of tail." 


Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 10:00 by Bill Williams
- Settlers' Mill, James City, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.2417402,-76.7577624&ll=37.2417402,-76.7577624 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22081301
- Comments: "a male; present since at least 10 Nov 2014; seldom seen when 
grackle/blackbird species flocks are in the neighborhood" 


Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) (3)
- Reported Feb 26, 2015 16:30 by Bob Mislan
- Home - Great Bridge, Chesapeake, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.6999054,-76.2303391&ll=36.6999054,-76.2303391 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22084848

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Virginia Rare 
Bird Alert 


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
http://ebird.org/ebird/alerts
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Eurasian Widgeons
From: Jayne Munoz <jayne.munoz AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:53:41 -0500
Today I saw a pair of Eurasian widgeons (male and female) in the western
branch of the Lynnhaven River.

Jayne D. Munoz
3751 Little Neck Point
Virginia Beach, VA 23452



*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: longspur and photographers, again
From: "C. Michael Stinson" <myrmecocichla AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:17:31 -0500
Birders -

I'm just home from seeing the Smith's Longspur in Augusta County. Many
people were able to see it along the entrance road to the airport this
morning. While watching it, many of us commented on how approachable this
bird is. Those who have chased these birds in their typical winter habitat
know that this species can be very hard to see well; the views we had this
morning were superb. It was also remarkably tolerant of passing vehicles,
on several occasions freezing and letting them drive past without flying
away.

Unfortunately, within 15 minutes of my arrival I watched through my scope
as the longspur nervously watched the approach of a photographer who kept
walking closer, and closer, and closer... until he flushed the bird. This
was exactly the sort of behavior I wrote about yesterday and hoped not to
see. I don't understand why the individual with the longest camera lens
felt compelled to get closer to the bird than everyone else. (I was able to
get passable pictures through my scope using a pocket camera before it was
flushed.)

Longspurs often won't flush until they are closely approached. But it's
possible that this bird is very approachable because it's starving. Much of
the surrounding area is snow-covered. Someone has placed some seed on the
roadside and the longspur was busily eating when it was flushed. It later
returned to the same site. If it had not been flushed, it might have eaten
more and spent less energy flying away and then returning.

It's quite likely that this bird, like many vagrants, will not survive its
trip to Virginia, far outside its normal range. But many birders today
would say that we should not be behaving in a way that will decrease its
chances of survival, low though they may be. With the weekend coming, I
imagine even more birders will try to see the longspur. I hope that
whatever collective behavior emerges as they look for the bird will take
the bird's welfare into consideration.

I should note that many people responded to me privately yesterday after my
first post, and all the responses were positive. These responses included
birders I have met and birders I have not, some who had seen the longspur
as well as some who had not. And some individuals who wrote are
accomplished bird photographers; I especially appreciate their comments.

But a few people wrote to tell me that they had also experienced the sort
of behavior I was complaining about. I hope that the many birders and
photographers who do not want to see birds, especially rarities, threatened
by other birders or photographers will speak up when they see this sort of
thing occurring.

Mike Stinson

-- 
C. Michael Stinson
Dillwyn, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur(s), one or two?
From: "Marshall Faintich" <mfaintich AT theworddoctor.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:14:06 -0500
Here's a link to my report and a large selection of my photos of the Smith's
Longspur(s). From my photos, I cannot determine of there were two of them or
only one:

 

http://www.symbolicmessengers.com/Blog2015/2015_Smith's_Longspurs.htm

 

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

 

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

Marshall Faintich, Ph.D.

 

mfaintich AT theworddoctor.com

 

mfaintich AT cyberwind.net

 

www.symbolicmessengers.com  

 

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

 

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Blue Ridge Center Bird Walk, Loudoun Co, Feb. 28
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:40:42 -0500
Everyone is welcome at the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy's free monthly bird
walk at the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship (BRCES), in the
northwestern corner of Loudoun County near Harpers Ferry at 8 am on Sat.,
Feb. 28. This walk will be led by Del Sargent & Mary Ann Good.

The main entrance to BRCES is on the west side of Harper's Ferry Rd, Rte
671, about a 1/4 mile north of the Neersville Fire Station and about 5.5
miles north of the intersection of Rte 9 & Rte 671 and about 2 miles south
of the intersection of Rte 340 & Rte 671.

We hold the walk regardless of the weather unless it is dangerous but don't
expect a lot of participants if the weather is lousy. Pls be prepared as
tomorrow morning should be pretty cold & the trails will probably be icy in
places; this will prob. result in a relatively short walk.

Information on the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship can be
found at www.blueridgecenter.org/.   Information on the Loudoun Wildlife
Conservancy's many free programs and field trips can be found at
www.loudounwildlife.org.

Joe Coleman
540-454-3361 or joecoleman AT rstarmail.com

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Waterfowl on the Rivanna
From: David White <dizoo AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 11:36:22 -0500
This morning walking the banks of the Rivanna River (Riverview Park) as it 
flows through Charlottesville I was privileged to find, in addition to the 
"usual" Mallards and Canada Geese, 4 Canvasbacks (3 male, 1 female), 2 female 
Hooded Mergansers, 1 male Greater Scaup and a first-year male Common Goldeneye. 
The river, with the exception of very modest amounts of shelf ice, was totally 
open. 


David I. White Jr. | 505 Park Plaza, Charlottesville VA | H: 434-296-4272 | C: 
434-466-3636 | dizoo AT comcast.net 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur yesterday, 2/26
From: David White <dizoo AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 11:29:44 -0500
Corn on the shoulder makes a bird bolder
Along comes a car and the bird meets the tar 

David I. White Jr. | 505 Park Plaza, Charlottesville VA | H: 434-296-4272 | C: 
434-466-3636 | dizoo AT comcast.net 


> On Feb 27, 2015, at 9:53 AM, Diane L via va-bird  
wrote: 

> 
> Here's a link to video (and photos) taken late yesterday. (Camera was 
tripod-mounted this time, so it's steadier than the earlier videos.) This bird 
may be a different individual than the one photographed two days earlier. 

> 
> http://smu.gs/1FElLZ1
> 
> You'll notice someone has scattered seed/corn on the road's shoulder. In the 
video, it appears the corn may have provided more exercise than energy! 

> 
> Kudos to the Airport staff and security; they've been great and REALLY 
accommodating! They expressed hope they'd have time to plow an overflow parking 
area that's fairly close to where the birds have been foraging. 

> 
> Diane Lepkowski
> Harrisonburg
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as dizoo AT comcast.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Common goldeneye/rockingham co
From: Appleaday via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:38:25 -0500
Our merry band of birders found a female Common Goldeneye on the North River - 
south end of Bridgewater. Viewed from small park just off 42 on north side of 
River 


Rich Rieger Sherman Suter Gerry Hawkins Ed Eder

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Mockingbirds
From: vineeta anand <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:32:21 -0500
That's very interesting that the mockingbirds only harass black birds. I'll
have to pay attention next time. They're very smart birds so I'm not
surprised they're actively seeking you out when they're hungry and watching
you. Very cool!

Vineeta in Alexandria

"We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts, With our
own thoughts we make the world." Gautama Buddha

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 11:51 PM, Patricia Scanlon M. 
wrote:

> The only birds my mockingbirds harass are black, black as in color.
> Starlings, grackles, crows, red wings. I suspect the reason is two fold.
> Grackles and crows kill the nestlings. Starlings devour all the food. My
> mockingbirds keep company with all the other birds in harmony until
> nesting. Then, like all birds they don't tolerate intruders.
>
> Since my yard is now under siege by "black" birds eating everything and
> covering the feeders, my mockingbird finds me wherever I am in the house
> and flaps and dances on the windowsill  to get my attention. Of course , I
> go the door where it's waiting for me and give it some special peanut
> butter suet. When the black birds leave it doesn't look for me. So its not
> just looking for a treat. It's smart enough to actively seek me out when
> it's hungry. What I can't get over is that this bird is watching me as much
> as I'm watching it! How cool is that!
>
> Pat Scanlon
> Norfolk
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as vineetaa AT gmail.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Thursday in ornithology
From: "Robyn A. Puffenbarger" <rpuffenb AT bridgewater.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:01:38 +0000
Hello-

My ornithology class headed out Thursday AM to find the Trumpeter Swan still at 
Silver Lake. We also saw a flock of American Pipits flying around. We found 
three male Red-breasted Mergansers. I caught a glimpse of a large falcon 
swooping over the lake at the ducks. It did not manage to catch anything and I 
wondered if this could be a Peregrine Falcon? It was too large to be a Kestrel 
and not shaped correctly for an accipiter. I was not sure if the falcon was 
trying to catch a duck while it was on the water or if the strafing was to 
startle the ducks into flight so it could get a meal in flight. 


We did make it to the airport and thanks to Richmond birders who scoped the 
Smith's Longspur for us. Thanks to Gabriel for the instructions on parking from 
the airport. This is a super find. We also had great views of many Savannah 
Sparrows. 


I hope next week the class can find the pintails and Lapland Longspurs that 
have eluded us so far. 


Cheers - Robyn P.
Biology, Bridgewater College

Sent from my iPad
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur yesterday, 2/26
From: Diane L via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:53:33 +0000 (UTC)
Here's a link to video (and photos) taken late yesterday. (Camera was 
tripod-mounted this time, so it's steadier than the earlier videos.) This bird 
may be a different individual than the one photographed two days earlier. 

 
http://smu.gs/1FElLZ1

You'll notice someone has scattered seed/corn on the road's shoulder. In the 
video, it appears the corn may have provided more exercise than energy! 


Kudos to the Airport staff and security; they've been great and REALLY 
accommodating! They expressed hope they'd have time to plow an overflow parking 
area that's fairly close to where the birds have been foraging. 


Diane Lepkowski
Harrisonburg
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Any bird walks on Saturday?
From: Farid Javidan <fjavidan82 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:51:50 -0500
Hello all,

Are there any bird walks scheduled for tomorrow, Saturday, in the NOVA
area? I would love to get out there for a bit.

Thanks -
Farid Javidan
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspurs--IMPORTANT PARKING MESSAGE
From: Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 08:25:33 -0500
We just finished talking with Airport Security. There have been complaints of 
people blocking the roadway but we can still view here as long as we park in 
the airport parking lot and walk back to the Longspur spot. This is a very 
short walk and it is important to respect security's wishes or we could be 
booted out of here altogether. We are allowed to park anywhere in the parking 
lot. Also please do not have any tripods/scopes in the road, only on the 
shoulders. Thank you for respecting these very reasonable requests. 


Also both Smith's Longspurs have put on appearances in the last 30 minutes.  

Good Birding,
Gabriel Mapel

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur
From: Gabriel Mapel via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 08:05:10 -0500
1 (the pale) Smith's Longspur present now at the regular spot on the SHD 
Airport entry road. 

Gabriel Mapel and others

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Mockingbirds
From: "Patricia Scanlon M. " <pescanlon AT cox.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 23:51:35 -0500
The only birds my mockingbirds harass are black, black as in color. Starlings, 
grackles, crows, red wings. I suspect the reason is two fold. Grackles and 
crows kill the nestlings. Starlings devour all the food. My mockingbirds keep 
company with all the other birds in harmony until nesting. Then, like all birds 
they don't tolerate intruders. 


Since my yard is now under siege by "black" birds eating everything and 
covering the feeders, my mockingbird finds me wherever I am in the house and 
flaps and dances on the windowsill to get my attention. Of course , I go the 
door where it's waiting for me and give it some special peanut butter suet. 
When the black birds leave it doesn't look for me. So its not just looking for 
a treat. It's smart enough to actively seek me out when it's hungry. What I 
can't get over is that this bird is watching me as much as I'm watching it! How 
cool is that! 


Pat Scanlon
Norfolk



Sent from my iPad
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Rectortown SEOW and RLHA
From: Mark Moran <moran4 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 20:25:20 -0500
A handful of Short-eared Owls put on a show at Rectortown tonight,
including perching on roadside telephone poles and the harassment of a
Rough-legged Hawk in the field to the East of the road.  Also present was a
Northern Harrier and a Common Raven.  All were lifers for my 6 and 8
year-olds which, along with the Smith's Longspur at the Shenandoah airport
and an hour in Grand Caverns at Grottoes made for a great snow day.

Mark Moran
Alexandria, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Green-winged Teal & Three Mergansers Species at Sandy River Reservoir, Prince Edward County
From: Evan Spears <e3spears AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 19:53:13 -0500
Still plenty of waterfowl diversity at Sandy River Reservoir this
afternoon. Highlights were a flyover calling pair of adult BALD EAGLES, a
flock GREEN-WINGED TEAL, one male REDHEAD, and all three mergansers: two
HOODED, five COMMON, and five RED-BREASTED. This is the first time I have
seen all three species in one location at the same time in central Virginia.

I also checked the Farmville Regional Airport in Cumberland County for
anything unusual but only turned up the usual suspects as well as a
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK and a couple FOX SPARROWS. (I did NOT find any of the
White-crowned Sparrows along the fence line adjacent to the golf course
driving range.)

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/65924095 AT N06/

Sandy River Reservoir: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085186
Farmville Airport: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22085281

Evan Spears
Farmville, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Great Falls Park -- from va side, below dam (2/26)
From: Stuart via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 19:46:34 -0500
 
Hi all:?? What little open water there was below the dam included
?
A raft of about 30 redheads swirling around in the icy water.
?
One mute swan with attitude.? (see previous story re: muskrat? & swan.
?
5 male common mergansers.
?
25 or so buffleheads.
?
1 ring-necked duck
?
An oddly placed bluebird -- on the middle of the ice covered Potomac.
?
On terra-firma: a nice view of an? active Pileated woodpecker.
?
?
Good birding, all.
?
Naturalist-at-large,
Stuart Kent Merrell
?
?
?

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: [va-richmond-general] Question about Mockingbird
From: vineeta anand <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:04:26 -0500
Mockingbirds are very aggressive, Maggie, and will chase away all the other
birds. I had one in the huge snow storm of 2010 took over the suet feeder
for a whole week and wouldn't let any other birds near it.
Vineeta in Alexandria

"We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts, With our
own thoughts we make the world." Gautama Buddha

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 4:39 PM, Maggie via va-bird 
wrote:

> I have a mockingbird at my feeders.  I put up a suet feeder and a peanut
> butter feeder  a little distance from my other feeders and the mocker
> spends its time guarding those feeders and leaves the others alone.  It
> nearly had a nervous breakdown when some crows came to the suet feeder.  It
> was really comical.  This has worked for me for years.
>
> Margaret O’Bryan
>
> On Feb 26, 2015, at 3:57 PM, Suzanne Ruch Jenkins 
> wrote:
>
> > I rarely see a Mockingbird in my yard and never at my feeders, but one
> showed up at my feeders a few days ago and is taking over. Spends most of
> its time on top of feeder pole intimidating other birds and aggressively
> chasing Red Bellied Woodpecker from feeder and closest tree. Any advice?
> >
> > Thanks
> > Suzanne Jenkins
> > You are subscribed to VA-Richmond-General. To unsubscribe, send email to
> > va-richmond-general-request AT freelists.org with 'unsubscribe' in the
> Subject field. To adjust other settings (vacation, digest, etc.) please
> visit, http://www.freelists.org/list/va-richmond-general.
> >
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as vineetaa AT gmail.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: [va-richmond-general] Question about Mockingbird
From: Maggie via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 16:39:55 -0500
I have a mockingbird at my feeders. I put up a suet feeder and a peanut butter 
feeder a little distance from my other feeders and the mocker spends its time 
guarding those feeders and leaves the others alone. It nearly had a nervous 
breakdown when some crows came to the suet feeder. It was really comical. This 
has worked for me for years. 


Margaret OíBryan

On Feb 26, 2015, at 3:57 PM, Suzanne Ruch Jenkins  
wrote: 


> I rarely see a Mockingbird in my yard and never at my feeders, but one showed 
up at my feeders a few days ago and is taking over. Spends most of its time on 
top of feeder pole intimidating other birds and aggressively chasing Red 
Bellied Woodpecker from feeder and closest tree. Any advice? 

> 
> Thanks
> Suzanne Jenkins 
> You are subscribed to VA-Richmond-General. To unsubscribe, send email to
> va-richmond-general-request AT freelists.org with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject 
field. To adjust other settings (vacation, digest, etc.) please visit, 
http://www.freelists.org/list/va-richmond-general. 

> 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Road Trip?
From: vineeta anand <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:37:19 -0500
Rich, you must have read my mind. Alas, I can't go tomorrow, but would love
to go early next week if anyone else is going in the hopes of seeing the
Longspurs at the Shenandoah Valley airport.
Vineeta in Alexandria

"We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts, With our
own thoughts we make the world." Gautama Buddha

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 2:06 PM, Rich Rieger via va-bird <
va-bird AT listserve.com> wrote:

> I'm heading west and south in the a.m. in hopes of seeing the Longspur(s)
> at the Shenandoah Valley airport. If anyone in NoVa or points west is
> interested in riding along, please contact me offline. I have room for one
> or two more. Will also swing by Silver Lake near Dayton to try for
> Trumpeter Swan. Some other "possibles" along the way if time allows.
>
> Rich Rieger
> Alexandria
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as vineetaa AT gmail.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Road Trip?
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:06:23 -0500
I'm heading west and south in the a.m. in hopes of seeing the Longspur(s) at 
the Shenandoah Valley airport. If anyone in NoVa or points west is interested 
in riding along, please contact me offline. I have room for one or two more. 
Will also swing by Silver Lake near Dayton to try for Trumpeter Swan. Some 
other "possibles" along the way if time allows. 


Rich Rieger
Alexandria
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Peregrine Falcon (I'm pretty sure) at Lake of the Woods, Orange County
From: Suzanne Stewart <suzinotsue AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:40:18 -0500
An unusually gray raptor was preening in an oak tree usually used by bald
eagles and an occasional osprey or red-shouldered hawk. It is about half
the size of an eagle.  The dark mask is very prominent, once it turned
sideways. The photos are far away, but I did my best in cropping them
closer.

https://flic.kr/p/r6aZh5

You may have to go to the left to see all three photos.  I can never figure
out how Flickr can mix up the order on a link grab!  (If you get photos of
my granddaughter :) ,go to Albums/Birding at Lake of the Woods)

Suzanne Stewart
Lake of the Woods
Wilderness, Orange County
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: eBird -- Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave) -- Feb 26, 2015
From: Fredatwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:47:00 -0500
fredatwood
Feb 26, 2015
Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport (Weyers Cave)
Traveling
3.3 miles
63 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments:  
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
3 Black Vulture
6 Turkey Vulture
2 Cooper's Hawk -- Ad imm
2 Red-tailed Hawk
3 American Kestrel
1 Peregrine Falcon -- Caught a modo on the wing and started plucking it as it 
flew. Saw her again plucking and eating the dove perched on a tree along road 
to airport. 

130 Mourning Dove -- One of which was caught by a peregrine. 
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
11 Blue Jay
6 American Crow
27 Horned Lark
2 Carolina Chickadee
3 Tufted Titmouse
4 Carolina Wren
4 Northern Mockingbird
40 European Starling
1 Smith's Longspur -- Continuing bird. Buffier individual. 
16 Savannah Sparrow
33 Song Sparrow
23 White-throated Sparrow
42 White-crowned Sparrow -- Careful count. 
30 Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)
16 Northern Cardinal
2 Red-winged Blackbird
22 Eastern Meadowlark
8 House Finch
8 House Sparrow
20 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)




Sent from my iPhone*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: longspurs and photographers
From: Sarah Anderson via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:12:19 -0500
 
Sorry if what I wrote was confusing. I was trying to make the point that 
despite what those birders at Chincoteague "knew" - or thought they knew - the 
signs are there year round. I should have added that the signs don't say 
anything about limiting access at certain times of the year. 


 
But I didn't want to go down the road of bashing those folks; that was the 
opposite of what I was trying to get across in my post. My point was that bad 
behavior is not limited to photographers and we shouldn't make generalizations 
about any group of people. And, that as a community of people who care about 
birds we should be fostering good relationships and trying to correct bad 
behavior in an effective way when we see it. 


 

Sarah B. Anderson
Cabin John, MD
www.sarahanderson.net

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Herbert Larner via va-bird 
To: va-bird 
Cc: shenvalbirds 
Sent: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 11:02 am
Subject: [Va-bird] longspurs and photographers


Hello all

Sarah your note on the signs that are to close an area for birds to
breed . This goes for all seasons . The sign states the area is closed & no one
is to cross it . I asked a Ranger at Chicoteague at the beginning of the year .
He had asked someone to step back behind the sign when I was in the area . I
asked him if it goes for all seasons & he stated yes . 

As for the Longspur's
all keep in mind that when you go down the lane to the Air Port  please do not
block the roads . Find a place to get off the road far enough to allow cars to
pass SAFELY .  Also lets keep ourselfs safe  by getting out of the road when
cars are coming into  or going out of the Air Port .  If this is not followed ,
the Air Port security can come out & shut it down . 

Good birding & photo
taking to all .

Allen
Larner
Staunton








--------------------------------------------
On
Thu, 2/26/15, Sarah Anderson via va-bird  wrote:


Subject: Re: [Va-bird] longspurs and photographers
 To: va-bird AT listserve.com

Date: Thursday, February 26, 2015, 10:04 AM
 
 Whenever this topic comes
 up
I feel obligated - as a birder AND a photographer - to
 point out that bad
behavior is not limited to rude
 photographers.  There are plenty of
responsible bird
 photographers and irresponsible birders. 
 
 In fact, last
fall, when I was
 at Chincoteague, I was in the area near the parking lot for

the beach, watching and hoping to photograph the birds that
 were in the bay
there.  I was staying behind (on the
 correct side of) the signs telling people
to stay out of the
 dunes.  A group of 8-10 birders, as part of an organized

trip, walked right past the signs in order to get closer to
 the birds.  I did
not follow.  I took some photos of the
 bad behavior, complete with the easily
visible signs in the
 foreground but I did not post them as I am not into
public
 shaming unless the behavior is desperately egregious. 
 Also, I talked
to someone later in the day about it - one of
 the trip leaders, I think, and
was told that the signs are
 most important in the spring/summer when the
plovers are
 nesting.  Still, the signs are there year-round, and these
 folks
were not setting a good example for everyone else who
 was there be they
birders, photographers or the general
 public.  
 
 Anyway, my point
 is,
let's try to foster good behavior whenever we can,
 by setting good examples
for each other and by addressing
 situations as they occur in a polite and
friendly way. 
 "Hey did you know" is a good way to begin some
 conversations
- some people are truly clueless about how
 their behavior affects the critters
they are watching.  And
 please let's not lump *any* group of people under
one
 label of "bad".  That kind of thinking
 doesn't go in a good direction no
matter what the
 context.
 
  
 
  Thanks and respectfully
 yours,
 
 

Sarah B. Anderson
 Cabin John,
 MD
 www.sarahanderson.net
 
  
 
  
 

-----Original Message-----
 From: Larry Kline via va-bird

 To: va-bird 
 Sent: Thu, Feb
26, 2015 8:45 am
 Subject: Re: [Va-bird] longspurs and
 photographers
 
 

This reminds me of when I drove 200 miles one
 way to observe a Northern 
 

Lapwing several years ago.  I waited across
 the road from the observation 


 point until the church services let out not
 knowing that many observers
were 
 
 already viewing the bird on the opposite side
 of the church. 
Shortly  before
 
 I went to the observation point a very rude
 photographer
walked down into 
 
 the pasture and spooked the bird.  I waited
 there for
several hours but the 
 
 Lapwing never returned and the species is still

absent from my life list, 
 
 sheesh.
  
 Larry
 Kline
  

Fredericksburg, VA
 
  
  
 In a
 message dated
 2/26/2015 7:20:30 A.M.
Eastern
 Standard Time,  
 SANFAY AT VERIZON.NET
 writes:
 
 Michael:  An
important message: well
 said!!!   Thanks.
 
 Sandy
 Holton
 Falls Church,
VA
 
 
 On 2/26/2015 1:55  AM, C.
 Michael Stinson
 wrote:
 >
 Fellow
birders -
 >
 >
 It's  great to have photos when a rare species
 shows up.
As a records
 > 
 committee member and eBird reviewer I know how
 helpful
good images are  
 when
 > reports of these
 rarities are submitted. They

are beautiful
 to  look at as
 > well. In the case of
 the longspur (or
longspurs)
 in Augusta 
 County,
 > photographs also provided the
 means for
the bird's 
 discovery.
 >
 > Now that we have
 images adequate for the
longspur's 
 identification, it
 > seems
 reasonable to mention behavior that
I believe  has
 become more 
 common
 > in recent years. Several times in
the
 past  decade I've
 seen photographers
 > harass rare birds and irritate
their 
 fellow birders by
 trying to get more
 > photos long after a bird has
been 
 adequately documented.
 To mention just
 > one example, in 2009 I
watched  a Roseate
 Spoonbill pursued
 by a
 >
 photographer, first in a
vehicle and  then on foot, until
 it left an
 area
 > where
 it had been
trying to eat.  This bird had already been
 photographed
 > numerous
 times.
Ironically (or  not), this also occurred in
 Augusta 
 County.
 >
 > I hope
similar 
 behavior does not occur as people
 continue
 to look for
 >
Smith's  Longspurs in
 Augusta County. But if it does, I
 hope it
 will be

>  immediately pointed out by
 other birders. Like other
 problems such
 as

>  trespassing and habitat
 destruction, this is the sort of
 situation 

where
 > one or a few individuals who are
 intent on getting yet more 

images when
 > hundreds have already been obtained can
 give all birders a 
bad
 
 reputation.
 > It can also
 make other birders angry.
 >
 >  A bird
like a
 spoonbill
 or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of  
 range;
 >
it's
 reasonable to expect that it's stressed by
 its travels  here and its

> efforts
 to survive in a strange environment. Exactly
 how  much, it's hard

 to
 > tell,
 but birders and
 photographers have been asked  numerous
times to
 > respect a
 bird's
 attempts to survive during our  efforts to see
them. The
 > American
 Birding
 Association's Code of Ethics  states that
"(t)o
 avoid
 > stressing birds
 or exposing them to danger" we  should

"exercise restraint
 > and caution
 during
 observation,  photography,
sound
 recording, or 
 filming."
 > No exception is
 made for 
 rare birds.
Unfortunately the behavior of some
 > photographers does
 not 
 seem to model
restraint at all, and at times this
 > tendency seems to 
 manifest itself
most seriously when the rarest
 birds
 >  appear.
 >
 > I realize
 that
owning a
 camera or being a birder does  not mean one is a
 > member of the

ABA or the
 Virginia Society of  Ornithology, which has 
 adopted
 > a Code
of
 Ethics that contains a  statement essentially
 identical to the 
 one

>
 from the
 ABA cited above.  Some people may
 feel no obligation to
follow
 > these
 ethical
 guidelines.  And I realize that not
 every birder
cares what
 > other
 birders
 think; to  put it bluntly, some
 people will
do what they 
 want,
 > no matter
 what.  But I
 also think a lot of
birders, including many of us 
 who
 > will be 
 looking for longspurs in the
coming days, do
 care, and I hope we
 > will  be
 willing to point out
inappropriate behavior if
 it becomes a 
 problem
 > 
 where
 the Augusta
County longspurs are
 concerned.
 >
 > Mike 
 Stinson
 >
 >
 
 *** You

are
 subscribed to va-bird as  larrynta AT aol.com.
 If you wish to 

unsubscribe, or
 modify your preferences  please visit
 

http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
  ***
 
 *** You
are
 subscribed to va-bird as sarahb3 AT aol.com. If
 you wish to unsubscribe, or
modify
 your preferences please
 visit

http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
 ***
 
  
 *** You
are subscribed to va-bird as birdergonewild AT yahoo.com.
 If you wish to
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences
 please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
 ***
 
*** You are
subscribed to va-bird as sarahb3 AT aol.com. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify
your preferences please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

 
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: longspurs and photographers
From: Herbert Larner via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:01:34 -0800
Hello all

Sarah your note on the signs that are to close an area for birds to breed . 
This goes for all seasons . The sign states the area is closed & no one is to 
cross it . I asked a Ranger at Chicoteague at the beginning of the year . He 
had asked someone to step back behind the sign when I was in the area . I asked 
him if it goes for all seasons & he stated yes . 


As for the Longspur's all keep in mind that when you go down the lane to the 
Air Port please do not block the roads . Find a place to get off the road far 
enough to allow cars to pass SAFELY . Also lets keep ourselfs safe by getting 
out of the road when cars are coming into or going out of the Air Port . If 
this is not followed , the Air Port security can come out & shut it down . 


Good birding & photo taking to all .

Allen Larner
Staunton








--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 2/26/15, Sarah Anderson via va-bird  wrote:

 Subject: Re: [Va-bird] longspurs and photographers
 To: va-bird AT listserve.com
 Date: Thursday, February 26, 2015, 10:04 AM
 
 Whenever this topic comes
 up I feel obligated - as a birder AND a photographer - to
 point out that bad behavior is not limited to rude
 photographers.† There are plenty of responsible bird
 photographers and irresponsible birders. 
 
 In fact, last fall, when I was
 at Chincoteague, I was in the area near the parking lot for
 the beach, watching and hoping to photograph the birds that
 were in the bay there.† I was staying behind (on the
 correct side of) the signs telling people to stay out of the
 dunes.† A group of 8-10 birders, as part of an organized
 trip, walked right past the signs in order to get closer to
 the birds.† I did not follow.† I took some photos of the
 bad behavior, complete with the easily visible signs in the
 foreground but I did not post them as I am not into public
 shaming unless the behavior is desperately egregious.†
 Also, I talked to someone later in the day about it - one of
 the trip leaders, I think, and was told that the signs are
 most important in the spring/summer when the plovers are
 nesting.† Still, the signs are there year-round, and these
 folks were not setting a good example for everyone else who
 was there be they birders, photographers or the general
 public.† 
 
 Anyway, my point
 is, let's try to foster good behavior whenever we can,
 by setting good examples for each other and by addressing
 situations as they occur in a polite and friendly way.†
 "Hey did you know" is a good way to begin some
 conversations - some people are truly clueless about how
 their behavior affects the critters they are watching.† And
 please let's not lump *any* group of people under one
 label of "bad".† That kind of thinking
 doesn't go in a good direction no matter what the
 context.
 
  
 
  Thanks and respectfully
 yours,
 
 
 Sarah B. Anderson
 Cabin John,
 MD
 www.sarahanderson.net
 
  
 
  
 
 -----Original Message-----
 From: Larry Kline via va-bird 
 To: va-bird 
 Sent: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 8:45 am
 Subject: Re: [Va-bird] longspurs and
 photographers
 
 
 This reminds me of when I drove 200 miles one
 way to observe a Northern 
 
 Lapwing several years ago.† I waited across
 the road from the observation 
 
 point until the church services let out not
 knowing that many observers were 
 
 already viewing the bird on the opposite side
 of the church.† Shortly† before
 
 I went to the observation point a very rude
 photographer walked down into 
 
 the pasture and spooked the bird.† I waited
 there for several hours but the 
 
 Lapwing never returned and the species is still
 absent from my life list, 
 
 sheesh.
  
 Larry
 Kline
  
 Fredericksburg, VA
 
  
  
 In a
 message dated
 2/26/2015 7:20:30 A.M. Eastern
 Standard Time,† 
 SANFAY AT VERIZON.NET
 writes:
 
 Michael:† An important message: well
 said!!!†††Thanks.
 
 Sandy
 Holton
 Falls Church, VA
 
 
 On 2/26/2015 1:55† AM, C.
 Michael Stinson
 wrote:
 >
 Fellow birders -
 >
 >
 It's† great to have photos when a rare species
 shows up. As a records
 >†
 committee member and eBird reviewer I know how
 helpful good images are† 
 when
 > reports of these
 rarities are submitted. They
 are beautiful
 to† look at as
 > well. In the case of
 the longspur (or longspurs)
 in Augusta†
 County,
 > photographs also provided the
 means for the bird's 
 discovery.
 >
 > Now that we have
 images adequate for the longspur's 
 identification, it
 > seems
 reasonable to mention behavior that I believe† has
 become more 
 common
 > in recent years. Several times in the
 past† decade I've
 seen photographers
 > harass rare birds and irritate their†
 fellow birders by
 trying to get more
 > photos long after a bird has been†
 adequately documented.
 To mention just
 > one example, in 2009 I watched† a Roseate
 Spoonbill pursued
 by a
 >
 photographer, first in a vehicle and† then on foot, until
 it left an
 area
 > where
 it had been trying to eat.† This bird had already been
 photographed
 > numerous
 times. Ironically (or† not), this also occurred in
 Augusta 
 County.
 >
 > I hope similar†
 behavior does not occur as people
 continue
 to look for
 > Smith's† Longspurs in
 Augusta County. But if it does, I
 hope it
 will be
 >† immediately pointed out by
 other birders. Like other
 problems such
 as
 >† trespassing and habitat
 destruction, this is the sort of
 situation†
 where
 > one or a few individuals who are
 intent on getting yet more 
 images when
 > hundreds have already been obtained can
 give all birders a† bad
 
 reputation.
 > It can also
 make other birders angry.
 >
 >† A bird like a
 spoonbill
 or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of† 
 range;
 > it's
 reasonable to expect that it's stressed by
 its travels† here and its
 > efforts
 to survive in a strange environment. Exactly
 how† much, it's hard 
 to
 > tell,
 but birders and
 photographers have been asked† numerous times to
 > respect a
 bird's
 attempts to survive during our† efforts to see them. The
 > American
 Birding
 Association's Code of Ethics† states that "(t)o
 avoid
 > stressing birds
 or exposing them to danger" we† should
 "exercise restraint
 > and caution
 during
 observation,† photography, sound
 recording, or 
 filming."
 > No exception is
 made for†
 rare birds. Unfortunately the behavior of some
 > photographers does
 not†
 seem to model restraint at all, and at times this
 > tendency seems to 
 manifest itself most seriously when the rarest
 birds
 >† appear.
 >
 > I realize
 that owning a
 camera or being a birder does† not mean one is a
 > member of the
 ABA or the
 Virginia Society of† Ornithology, which has 
 adopted
 > a Code of
 Ethics that contains a† statement essentially
 identical to the 
 one
 >
 from the
 ABA cited above.† Some people may
 feel no obligation to follow
 > these
 ethical
 guidelines.† And I realize that not
 every birder cares what
 > other
 birders
 think; to† put it bluntly, some
 people will do what they 
 want,
 > no matter
 what.† But I
 also think a lot of birders, including many of us 
 who
 > will be 
 looking for longspurs in the coming days, do
 care, and I hope we
 > will† be
 willing to point out inappropriate behavior if
 it becomes a 
 problem
 >†
 where
 the Augusta County longspurs are
 concerned.
 >
 > Mike†
 Stinson
 >
 >
 
 *** You
 are
 subscribed to va-bird as† larrynta AT aol.com.
 If you wish to 
 unsubscribe, or
 modify your preferences† please visit
 
 http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
  ***
 
 *** You are
 subscribed to va-bird as sarahb3 AT aol.com. If
 you wish to unsubscribe, or modify
 your preferences please
 visit
 http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
 ***
 
  
 *** You are subscribed to va-bird as birdergonewild AT yahoo.com.
 If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences
 please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird
 ***
 
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Frozen Lake of the Woods and grebes
From: Suzanne Stewart <suzinotsue AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:22:38 -0500
Our lake has been frozen for at least two weeks now, which rarely happens. 
Other than a strip near the dam filled with Canadian Geese, one open spot 
remains in which eight Pied- billed Grebes have congregated this whole time 
right under the watchful eye of a Bald Eagle. 


The hole opened up a bit more this weekend and a large flock of Buffleheads 
pushed them to the periphery. Four Canvasbacks arrived only to be pushed out 
quickly by the Buffleheads. 


This morning, an eagle was feeding on the snow covered ice, and the Grebes have 
scattered. 


Suzanne Stewart
Lake of the Woods
Wilderness, Orange County

Sent from my iPad
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: The Good and the Bad - quest for the Longspurs
From: Brenda Tekin <brenda AT birdsofvirginia.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:12:13 -0500
I am a birder and amateur photographer. It was because of birds that I took up 
the camera. 


There are those individuals only interested in seeing a bird long enough to add 
to their "list." That's fine and I have no problem with that. Then there are 
those who want more than to just list the bird. I am one of those individuals 
who wants to observe and learn. Photographs help to capture that. I keep notes 
and photographs that I share and are occasionally used to document uncommon or 
rare finds like the Smith's Longspur for county and state record committees 
(that also include areas outside Virginia). 


Then there are those individuals who will do what it takes to get that one 
close-up look or image, whether it be a lister and/or photographer. 


Case in point. During my two trips to the Longspur location folks have been 
using good judgment and flow of traffic has not been impeded. A big thanks to 
you! However, prior to my arrival yesterday others observed one individual who 
not only blocked the road near the entrance to the airport parking lot but they 
parked their vehicle in such a way that it blocked both lanes of traffic 
forcing traffic in both directions to go around as the individual stood next to 
the vehicle to take photos. Someone took a picture and shared with me and the 
vehicle indeed was angled across the center of the road and the individual had 
what appeared to be a large camera on a tripod that was pointing toward the 
left shoulder as you headed in to the airport. All it takes is one action like 
this that could ban future access. 


On the good note, a young couple from the corner farm walked over to see what 
all the fuss was about and we happily shared and I was able to show them 
pictures of the Smith's and brightly plumaged Lapland. The young man told his 
wife they needed to go check out the birds around their house. A short while 
later they returned with a BIG carafe of hot coffee and cups. Augusta County 
hospitality at its best! 


Brenda
Brenda Tekin
Stuart's Draft, VA

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: longspurs and photographers
From: Sarah Anderson via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:04:00 -0500
Whenever this topic comes up I feel obligated - as a birder AND a photographer 
- to point out that bad behavior is not limited to rude photographers. There 
are plenty of responsible bird photographers and irresponsible birders. 


In fact, last fall, when I was at Chincoteague, I was in the area near the 
parking lot for the beach, watching and hoping to photograph the birds that 
were in the bay there. I was staying behind (on the correct side of) the signs 
telling people to stay out of the dunes. A group of 8-10 birders, as part of an 
organized trip, walked right past the signs in order to get closer to the 
birds. I did not follow. I took some photos of the bad behavior, complete with 
the easily visible signs in the foreground but I did not post them as I am not 
into public shaming unless the behavior is desperately egregious. Also, I 
talked to someone later in the day about it - one of the trip leaders, I think, 
and was told that the signs are most important in the spring/summer when the 
plovers are nesting. Still, the signs are there year-round, and these folks 
were not setting a good example for everyone else who was there be they 
birders, photographers or the general public. 


Anyway, my point is, let's try to foster good behavior whenever we can, by 
setting good examples for each other and by addressing situations as they occur 
in a polite and friendly way. "Hey did you know" is a good way to begin some 
conversations - some people are truly clueless about how their behavior affects 
the critters they are watching. And please let's not lump *any* group of people 
under one label of "bad". That kind of thinking doesn't go in a good direction 
no matter what the context. 


 

 Thanks and respectfully yours,


Sarah B. Anderson
Cabin John, MD
www.sarahanderson.net

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Larry Kline via va-bird 
To: va-bird 
Sent: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 8:45 am
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] longspurs and photographers


This reminds me of when I drove 200 miles one way to observe a Northern 

Lapwing several years ago.  I waited across the road from the observation 

point until the church services let out not knowing that many observers were 

already viewing the bird on the opposite side of the church.  Shortly  before

I went to the observation point a very rude photographer walked down into 

the pasture and spooked the bird.  I waited there for several hours but the 

Lapwing never returned and the species is still absent from my life list, 

sheesh.
 
Larry Kline
 
Fredericksburg, VA 
 
 
In a message dated
2/26/2015 7:20:30 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
SANFAY AT VERIZON.NET
writes:

Michael:  An important message: well said!!!   Thanks.

Sandy
Holton
Falls Church, VA


On 2/26/2015 1:55  AM, C. Michael Stinson
wrote:
> Fellow birders -
>
> It's  great to have photos when a rare species
shows up. As a records
>  committee member and eBird reviewer I know how
helpful good images are  
when
> reports of these rarities are submitted. They
are beautiful to  look at as
> well. In the case of the longspur (or longspurs)
in Augusta  County,
> photographs also provided the means for the bird's 
discovery.
>
> Now that we have images adequate for the longspur's 
identification, it
> seems reasonable to mention behavior that I believe  has
become more 
common
> in recent years. Several times in the past  decade I've
seen photographers
> harass rare birds and irritate their  fellow birders by
trying to get more
> photos long after a bird has been  adequately documented.
To mention just
> one example, in 2009 I watched  a Roseate Spoonbill pursued
by a
> photographer, first in a vehicle and  then on foot, until it left an
area
> where it had been trying to eat.  This bird had already been
photographed
> numerous times. Ironically (or  not), this also occurred in
Augusta 
County.
>
> I hope similar  behavior does not occur as people
continue to look for
> Smith's  Longspurs in Augusta County. But if it does, I
hope it will be
>  immediately pointed out by other birders. Like other
problems such as
>  trespassing and habitat destruction, this is the sort of
situation  where
> one or a few individuals who are intent on getting yet more 
images when
> hundreds have already been obtained can give all birders a  bad

reputation.
> It can also make other birders angry.
>
>  A bird like a
spoonbill or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of  
range;
> it's
reasonable to expect that it's stressed by its travels  here and its
> efforts
to survive in a strange environment. Exactly how  much, it's hard 
to
> tell,
but birders and photographers have been asked  numerous times to
> respect a
bird's attempts to survive during our  efforts to see them. The
> American
Birding Association's Code of Ethics  states that "(t)o avoid
> stressing birds
or exposing them to danger" we  should "exercise restraint
> and caution during
observation,  photography, sound recording, or 
filming."
> No exception is
made for  rare birds. Unfortunately the behavior of some
> photographers does
not  seem to model restraint at all, and at times this
> tendency seems to 
manifest itself most seriously when the rarest birds
>  appear.
>
> I realize
that owning a camera or being a birder does  not mean one is a
> member of the
ABA or the Virginia Society of  Ornithology, which has 
adopted
> a Code of
Ethics that contains a  statement essentially identical to the 
one
> from the
ABA cited above.  Some people may feel no obligation to follow
> these ethical
guidelines.  And I realize that not every birder cares what
> other birders
think; to  put it bluntly, some people will do what they 
want,
> no matter
what.  But I also think a lot of birders, including many of us 
who
> will be 
looking for longspurs in the coming days, do care, and I hope we
> will  be
willing to point out inappropriate behavior if it becomes a 
problem
>  where
the Augusta County longspurs are concerned.
>
> Mike  Stinson
>
>

*** You
are subscribed to va-bird as  larrynta AT aol.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or
modify your preferences  please visit

http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird  ***

*** You are
subscribed to va-bird as sarahb3 AT aol.com. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify
your preferences please visit
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***

 
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Bryan Park Walk postponed to March 8
From: Susan Ridd <susaneridd AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 09:52:10 -0500
Because of the snow we will postpone the March 1 walk to March 8th.  Thanks
for your understanding.

Sue Ridd
804.270.5365
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: RAS Pocahontas SP February 28 field trip CANCELLED
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 09:29:08 -0500
  With the snow and the very low temperatures forecast for Saturday
morning, the Richmond Audubon field trip to Pocahontas State Park is
CANCELLED.  There are no plans to reschedule.  The next scheduled RAS field
trip to Pocahontas SP will be on April 11



-- 
Wendy Ealding
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Smith's Longspur and Photographers
From: "Marshall Faintich" <mfaintich AT theworddoctor.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 09:17:09 -0500
The recent posting about photographers disturbing the Smith's Longspur(s) at
the Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport may have been directed towards me, as
I posted that I had taken about 800 photos of it yesterday afternoon. I
would like to add some information that might clarify the situation. First,
and most importantly, I agree 100% with not disturbing birds, and try my
best not to do so. If it appears that any bird might be disturbed by my
photography, I back away.

 

The Smith's Longspur(s) seemed not to care if any birder came no closer than
about 30 feet away. In fact, the bird only seemed agitated when a car would
drive by as it was foraging on the road shoulder. In addition, I was using a
400mm lens so I kept a reasonable distance away, and my camera can take up
to 15 frames per second, so a short burst of the camera could take as many
as 30 to 40 shots in a couple of seconds.

 

I was in the process of updating my VARCOM submission, and when I learned of
a probable second Smith's Longspur there, I wanted to capture a wide range
of angles in different lighting angles, because lighting effects can make a
dramatic change in a bird's appearance, and I thought it prudent to get
definitive evidence of more than Smith's Longspur.

 

Walt Childs and I were there for less than an hour, and I didn't see any
birder who was disturbing the Longspur(s). 

 

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

 

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

Marshall Faintich, Ph.D.

 

mfaintich AT theworddoctor.com

 

mfaintich AT cyberwind.net

 

www.symbolicmessengers.com  

 

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

 

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: Trip to Bay Bridge-Tunnel, Eastern Shore NWR and Oyster
From: Les Brooks <ubrooks AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:15:15 +0000 (UTC)
Hello Everyone!

Sorry (I think my email system messed up my first post.)
About this time (6:15 A.M.) yesterday morning I was almost to the Bay Bridge 
and Tunnel waiting on the Sun.  I was surprised at the amount of snow still 
covering I-64 and other roads in Virginia Beach.  After topping off the fuel 
and securing breakfast at the local mega fuel stop on Route 13, I ventured onto 
the bridge-tunnel.  The Sun made for a beautiful day and even took care of 
some snow on the roads too.  But, always a but, it wrecked havoc with some of 
my photo taking.  For some strange reason I could not get the birds to move to 
the Bay side.  In these cases I normally chill out and just use the Mark 1 
eyeball.  Beautiful day!  I also visited Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Oyster. 


If I, hopefully, have any images from this trip, I will post another email.

I saw the following:

White-Winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Surf Scoter
Brant
Bufflehead
Red-Breasted Merganser
Hooded Merganser (Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Oyster)
Ruddy Duck
Redhead Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Green Winged Teal (Eastern Shore of VA NWR)
Gadwall (Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Oyster)
Ruddy Turnstone (Bay Bridge-Tunnel)
Red-Necked Grebe 6 (Bay Bridge-Tunnel)
Horned Grebe (Bay Bridge-Tunnel & Eastern Shore of VA NWR)
Brown Pelican 1 (Bay Bridge-Tunnel)
Double-Crested Cormorant
Northern Gannet (Bay Bridge-Tunnel)
Great Blue Heron (Eastern Shore of VA NWR)
Red-Tailed Hawk (Eastern Shore of VA NWR)
Gulls

Very few songbirds except along roadways Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Route 600 
(Eastern Shore 


Stay safe and warm!
Les BrooksGlen Allenhttp://www.natures-finest-photography.com
 




*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Re: longspurs and photographers
From: Larry Kline via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:44:28 -0500
This reminds me of when I drove 200 miles one way to observe a Northern  
Lapwing several years ago.  I waited across the road from the observation  
point until the church services let out not knowing that many observers were  
already viewing the bird on the opposite side of the church.  Shortly  before 
I went to the observation point a very rude photographer walked down into  
the pasture and spooked the bird.  I waited there for several hours but the  
Lapwing never returned and the species is still absent from my life list,  
sheesh.
 
Larry Kline
 
Fredericksburg, VA 
 
 
In a message dated 2/26/2015 7:20:30 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
SANFAY AT VERIZON.NET writes:

Michael:  An important message: well said!!!   Thanks.

Sandy Holton
Falls Church, VA


On 2/26/2015 1:55  AM, C. Michael Stinson wrote:
> Fellow birders -
>
> It's  great to have photos when a rare species shows up. As a records
>  committee member and eBird reviewer I know how helpful good images are  
when
> reports of these rarities are submitted. They are beautiful to  look at as
> well. In the case of the longspur (or longspurs) in Augusta  County,
> photographs also provided the means for the bird's  discovery.
>
> Now that we have images adequate for the longspur's  identification, it
> seems reasonable to mention behavior that I believe  has become more 
common
> in recent years. Several times in the past  decade I've seen photographers
> harass rare birds and irritate their  fellow birders by trying to get more
> photos long after a bird has been  adequately documented. To mention just
> one example, in 2009 I watched  a Roseate Spoonbill pursued by a
> photographer, first in a vehicle and  then on foot, until it left an area
> where it had been trying to eat.  This bird had already been photographed
> numerous times. Ironically (or  not), this also occurred in Augusta 
County.
>
> I hope similar  behavior does not occur as people continue to look for
> Smith's  Longspurs in Augusta County. But if it does, I hope it will be
>  immediately pointed out by other birders. Like other problems such as
>  trespassing and habitat destruction, this is the sort of situation  where
> one or a few individuals who are intent on getting yet more  images when
> hundreds have already been obtained can give all birders a  bad 
reputation.
> It can also make other birders angry.
>
>  A bird like a spoonbill or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of  
range;
> it's reasonable to expect that it's stressed by its travels  here and its
> efforts to survive in a strange environment. Exactly how  much, it's hard 
to
> tell, but birders and photographers have been asked  numerous times to
> respect a bird's attempts to survive during our  efforts to see them. The
> American Birding Association's Code of Ethics  states that "(t)o avoid
> stressing birds or exposing them to danger" we  should "exercise restraint
> and caution during observation,  photography, sound recording, or 
filming."
> No exception is made for  rare birds. Unfortunately the behavior of some
> photographers does not  seem to model restraint at all, and at times this
> tendency seems to  manifest itself most seriously when the rarest birds
>  appear.
>
> I realize that owning a camera or being a birder does  not mean one is a
> member of the ABA or the Virginia Society of  Ornithology, which has 
adopted
> a Code of Ethics that contains a  statement essentially identical to the 
one
> from the ABA cited above.  Some people may feel no obligation to follow
> these ethical guidelines.  And I realize that not every birder cares what
> other birders think; to  put it bluntly, some people will do what they 
want,
> no matter what.  But I also think a lot of birders, including many of us 
who
> will be  looking for longspurs in the coming days, do care, and I hope we
> will  be willing to point out inappropriate behavior if it becomes a 
problem
>  where the Augusta County longspurs are concerned.
>
> Mike  Stinson
>
>

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as  larrynta AT aol.com. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences  please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird  ***

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: longspurs and photographers
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:35:22 -0500
Thanks for a very timely and appropriate message, Mike

Wendy Ealding
Secretary, Virginia Avian Records Committee

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 1:55 AM, C. Michael Stinson  wrote:

> Fellow birders -
>
> It's great to have photos when a rare species shows up. As a records
> committee member and eBird reviewer I know how helpful good images are when
> reports of these rarities are submitted. They are beautiful to look at as
> well. In the case of the longspur (or longspurs) in Augusta County,
> photographs also provided the means for the bird's discovery.
>
> Now that we have images adequate for the longspur's identification, it
> seems reasonable to mention behavior that I believe has become more common
> in recent years. Several times in the past decade I've seen photographers
> harass rare birds and irritate their fellow birders by trying to get more
> photos long after a bird has been adequately documented. To mention just
> one example, in 2009 I watched a Roseate Spoonbill pursued by a
> photographer, first in a vehicle and then on foot, until it left an area
> where it had been trying to eat. This bird had already been photographed
> numerous times. Ironically (or not), this also occurred in Augusta County.
>
> I hope similar behavior does not occur as people continue to look for
> Smith's Longspurs in Augusta County. But if it does, I hope it will be
> immediately pointed out by other birders. Like other problems such as
> trespassing and habitat destruction, this is the sort of situation where
> one or a few individuals who are intent on getting yet more images when
> hundreds have already been obtained can give all birders a bad reputation.
> It can also make other birders angry.
>
> A bird like a spoonbill or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of range;
> it's reasonable to expect that it's stressed by its travels here and its
> efforts to survive in a strange environment. Exactly how much, it's hard to
> tell, but birders and photographers have been asked numerous times to
> respect a bird's attempts to survive during our efforts to see them. The
> American Birding Association's Code of Ethics states that "(t)o avoid
> stressing birds or exposing them to danger" we should "exercise restraint
> and caution during observation, photography, sound recording, or filming."
> No exception is made for rare birds. Unfortunately the behavior of some
> photographers does not seem to model restraint at all, and at times this
> tendency seems to manifest itself most seriously when the rarest birds
> appear.
>
> I realize that owning a camera or being a birder does not mean one is a
> member of the ABA or the Virginia Society of Ornithology, which has adopted
> a Code of Ethics that contains a statement essentially identical to the one
> from the ABA cited above. Some people may feel no obligation to follow
> these ethical guidelines. And I realize that not every birder cares what
> other birders think; to put it bluntly, some people will do what they want,
> no matter what. But I also think a lot of birders, including many of us who
> will be looking for longspurs in the coming days, do care, and I hope we
> will be willing to point out inappropriate behavior if it becomes a problem
> where the Augusta County longspurs are concerned.
>
> Mike Stinson
>
>
> --
> C. Michael Stinson
> Dillwyn, VA
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as wendy.ealding AT gmail.com. If you wish
> to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>



-- 
Wendy Ealding
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Smith's Longspur; Yes
From: Ellison Orcutt <mr.ellyo AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:25:10 -0500
Looking at 1 bird right now just before the airport parking lot.  

Ellison 

Sent from my iPhone
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Trip to Bay Bridge and Tunnel and Lower Eastern Shore
From: Les Brooks <ubrooks AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:36:47 +0000 (UTC)
Hello Everyone!

About this time (6:15 A.M.) yesterday morning I was almost to the Bay Bridge 
and Tunnel waiting on the Sun.  I was surprised at the amount of snow still 
covering I-64 and other roads in Virginia Beach.  After topping off the fuel 
and securing breakfast at the local mega fuel stop on Route 13, I ventured onto 
the bridge-tunnel.  The Sun made for a beautiful day and even took care of 
some snow on the roads too.  But, always a but, it wrecked havoc with some of 
my photo taking.  For some strange reason I could not get the birds to move to 
the Bay side.  In these cases I normally chill out and just use the Mark 1 
eyeball.  Beautiful day!  I also visited Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Oyster. 

 If I, hopefully, have any images from this trip, I will post another email.
I saw the following:
White-Winged ScoterBlack ScoterSurf ScoterBrant
BuffleheadRed-Breasted MerganserHooded Merganser (Eastern Shore of VA NWR and 
Oyster) 

Ruddy DuckRedhead DuckGreater ScaupLesser ScaupGreen Winged Teal (Eastern Shore 
of VA NWR)Gadwall (Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Oyster)Ruddy Turnstone (Bay 
Bridge-Tunnel)Red-Necked Grebe 6 (Bay Bridge-Tunnel)Horned Grebe (Bay 
Bridge-Tunnel & Eastern Shore of VA NWR)Brown Pelican 1 (Bay Bridge-Tunnel) 

Double-Crested CormorantNorthern Gannet (Bay Bridge-Tunnel)
Great Blue Heron (Eastern Shore of VA NWR)
Red-Tailed Hawk (Eastern Shore of VA NWR)Gulls

Very few songbirds except along roadways Eastern Shore of VA NWR and Route 600 
(Eastern Shore). 


Be safe and stay warm!
Les BrooksGlen AllenNatures Finest Photography
|   |
|   |   |   |   |   |
| Natures Finest PhotographyNature's finest photography with emphasis on images 
of wild birds. | 

|  |
| View on www.natures-finest-photography.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |




*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 
Subject: Scoter and Scaup increase at CBBT
From: Ned Brinkley <23cahow AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 07:33:01 -0500
Yesterday afternoon during calm weather I counted nearly 10,000 scoters (mostly 
Surf) and almost 500 scaup along the CBBT. This represents a sharp increase 
over recent weeks' totals, though a far cry from record numbers here. One 
Red-necked Grebe still on the Bay side of Island One. 


Ned Brinkley
Cape Charles VA

CBBT - CES01, Northampton, US-VA

Brant  1
Redhead  10
Greater Scaup  32
Lesser Scaup  48
Greater/Lesser Scaup  310
Surf Scoter  5900     
White-winged Scoter  1
Black Scoter  50
Surf/Black Scoter  3300     
Long-tailed Duck  31
Bufflehead  121
Common Goldeneye  1
Red-breasted Merganser  45
Ruddy Duck  39
Red-throated Loon  2
Common Loon  1
Horned Grebe  1
Red-necked Grebe  1
Northern Gannet  5
Double-crested Cormorant  45
Great Cormorant  1
Ruddy Turnstone  7
Purple Sandpiper  2
Ring-billed Gull  12
Herring Gull  10
Great Black-backed Gull  3
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  11

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22072001 



*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Re: longspurs and photographers
From: SANDY <SANFAY AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 07:19:51 -0500
Michael:  An important message: well said!!!  Thanks.

Sandy Holton
Falls Church, VA


On 2/26/2015 1:55 AM, C. Michael Stinson wrote:
> Fellow birders -
>
> It's great to have photos when a rare species shows up. As a records
> committee member and eBird reviewer I know how helpful good images are when
> reports of these rarities are submitted. They are beautiful to look at as
> well. In the case of the longspur (or longspurs) in Augusta County,
> photographs also provided the means for the bird's discovery.
>
> Now that we have images adequate for the longspur's identification, it
> seems reasonable to mention behavior that I believe has become more common
> in recent years. Several times in the past decade I've seen photographers
> harass rare birds and irritate their fellow birders by trying to get more
> photos long after a bird has been adequately documented. To mention just
> one example, in 2009 I watched a Roseate Spoonbill pursued by a
> photographer, first in a vehicle and then on foot, until it left an area
> where it had been trying to eat. This bird had already been photographed
> numerous times. Ironically (or not), this also occurred in Augusta County.
>
> I hope similar behavior does not occur as people continue to look for
> Smith's Longspurs in Augusta County. But if it does, I hope it will be
> immediately pointed out by other birders. Like other problems such as
> trespassing and habitat destruction, this is the sort of situation where
> one or a few individuals who are intent on getting yet more images when
> hundreds have already been obtained can give all birders a bad reputation.
> It can also make other birders angry.
>
> A bird like a spoonbill or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of range;
> it's reasonable to expect that it's stressed by its travels here and its
> efforts to survive in a strange environment. Exactly how much, it's hard to
> tell, but birders and photographers have been asked numerous times to
> respect a bird's attempts to survive during our efforts to see them. The
> American Birding Association's Code of Ethics states that "(t)o avoid
> stressing birds or exposing them to danger" we should "exercise restraint
> and caution during observation, photography, sound recording, or filming."
> No exception is made for rare birds. Unfortunately the behavior of some
> photographers does not seem to model restraint at all, and at times this
> tendency seems to manifest itself most seriously when the rarest birds
> appear.
>
> I realize that owning a camera or being a birder does not mean one is a
> member of the ABA or the Virginia Society of Ornithology, which has adopted
> a Code of Ethics that contains a statement essentially identical to the one
> from the ABA cited above. Some people may feel no obligation to follow
> these ethical guidelines. And I realize that not every birder cares what
> other birders think; to put it bluntly, some people will do what they want,
> no matter what. But I also think a lot of birders, including many of us who
> will be looking for longspurs in the coming days, do care, and I hope we
> will be willing to point out inappropriate behavior if it becomes a problem
> where the Augusta County longspurs are concerned.
>
> Mike Stinson
>
>

*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: longspurs and photographers
From: "C. Michael Stinson" <myrmecocichla AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 01:55:53 -0500
Fellow birders -

It's great to have photos when a rare species shows up. As a records
committee member and eBird reviewer I know how helpful good images are when
reports of these rarities are submitted. They are beautiful to look at as
well. In the case of the longspur (or longspurs) in Augusta County,
photographs also provided the means for the bird's discovery.

Now that we have images adequate for the longspur's identification, it
seems reasonable to mention behavior that I believe has become more common
in recent years. Several times in the past decade I've seen photographers
harass rare birds and irritate their fellow birders by trying to get more
photos long after a bird has been adequately documented. To mention just
one example, in 2009 I watched a Roseate Spoonbill pursued by a
photographer, first in a vehicle and then on foot, until it left an area
where it had been trying to eat. This bird had already been photographed
numerous times. Ironically (or not), this also occurred in Augusta County.

I hope similar behavior does not occur as people continue to look for
Smith's Longspurs in Augusta County. But if it does, I hope it will be
immediately pointed out by other birders. Like other problems such as
trespassing and habitat destruction, this is the sort of situation where
one or a few individuals who are intent on getting yet more images when
hundreds have already been obtained can give all birders a bad reputation.
It can also make other birders angry.

A bird like a spoonbill or a Smith's Longspur in Virginia is out of range;
it's reasonable to expect that it's stressed by its travels here and its
efforts to survive in a strange environment. Exactly how much, it's hard to
tell, but birders and photographers have been asked numerous times to
respect a bird's attempts to survive during our efforts to see them. The
American Birding Association's Code of Ethics states that "(t)o avoid
stressing birds or exposing them to danger" we should "exercise restraint
and caution during observation, photography, sound recording, or filming."
No exception is made for rare birds. Unfortunately the behavior of some
photographers does not seem to model restraint at all, and at times this
tendency seems to manifest itself most seriously when the rarest birds
appear.

I realize that owning a camera or being a birder does not mean one is a
member of the ABA or the Virginia Society of Ornithology, which has adopted
a Code of Ethics that contains a statement essentially identical to the one
from the ABA cited above. Some people may feel no obligation to follow
these ethical guidelines. And I realize that not every birder cares what
other birders think; to put it bluntly, some people will do what they want,
no matter what. But I also think a lot of birders, including many of us who
will be looking for longspurs in the coming days, do care, and I hope we
will be willing to point out inappropriate behavior if it becomes a problem
where the Augusta County longspurs are concerned.

Mike Stinson


-- 
C. Michael Stinson
Dillwyn, VA
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 

Subject: Waking up at 4:30am for a before school excursion
From: Andrew Rapp <lax3birder AT live.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 22:30:35 -0500
Hey everyone,
This morning after finally getting my dad to agree we headed off to Weyers Cave 
Airport. We arrived right before sunrise at 6:30am. As we went slowly along the 
road we had Larks, Savannah and Song Sparrows and finally we came upon the 
Smith's Longspur! It was fun early this morning as blackbird and cowbird flocks 
streamed over the orangish sky and we watched the Longspur by ourselves in 
peace. Then Gabriel arrived, and we pointed him to the Longspur. A flock of 
larks came in with a Lapland Longspur the only one I saw. Soon more birders 
arrived all happily adding this rarity to their lists. But for me I had to rush 
to school so I wouldn't get a demerit. Driving through Waynesboro a Merlin flew 
over which was a welcome addition to the day list. I almost have my license (2 
weeks left) so watch out birding world! 

Good Birding,
Andrew Rapp
 		 	   		  
*** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***