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Updated on Friday, May 29 at 08:42 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Rufous-bellied Seedsnipe,©BirdQuest

29 May 5/29/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR - 2 Black-necked Stilts [Rob Bielawski ]
29 May Birding in southern Texas ["Marshall Faintich" ]
29 May Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
28 May Hummingbird [Jeff Blalock ]
28 May Mississippi Kite [Jeff Blalock ]
28 May Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
28 May Remove from list [rebecca morrow ]
27 May Meadowood: Dickcissel, Blue Grosbeak, Meadowlark, possible Summer Tanager [Donald Sweig ]
27 May Fairfax Co. Ravens [Rich Rieger via va-bird ]
27 May Great Dismal Swamp - Railroad Ditch - May 27, 2015 [Robert Ake ]
27 May Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Huntley Meadows - nesting activity ["Larry Cartwright" ]
27 May Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
27 May Dickcissel, Summer Tanager Meadowood, Gunston Rd. [Rich Rieger via va-bird ]
27 May Voice: Greater Washington Area, May 26 ["Joe Coleman" ]
27 May Rachael Carson [Harry Glasgow via va-bird ]
27 May VSO Breeding Bird Foray, Franklin County, 6-14 June [Clyde Kessler ]
26 May Chincoteague NWR -- A black bellied plover gets the worm [Bill Hohenstein ]
26 May White Ibis and Grasshopper Sparrow at Kiptopeke [Alyssa Freeman ]
26 May Meadowood Dickcissel - YES (Fairfax Co.) [Claire Kluskens ]
26 May May 24, 2015 Chincoteague Shorebird/Gull Survey [Joelle Buffa ]
26 May Bald Eagle association with cattle grazing??? [Eric Harrold via va-bird ]
26 May Meadowood Dickcissel - YES [Donald Sweig ]
26 May Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
26 May Online Birding Resources ["R. Bruce Richardson" ]
26 May Old Courthouse Spring Branch, Tysons Corner, Ffx co. [Russell W Taylor ]
26 May Dickcissel at Meadowoods Recreational Area (Fairfax County) ["Ron Vogel" ]
26 May Ruth Beck Tribute [Brian and Deborah Taber via va-bird ]
25 May Northern Virginia Bird Club walk Wednesday, May 27 - A request for help ["Larry Cartwright" ]
25 May Chincoteaguw NWR - GADWALL, Black-bellied Plover [Alyssa Freeman ]
25 May Re: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk ["Walter L. Barrows" ]
25 May Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk [Harry Glasgow via va-bird ]
25 May 5/25/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR - 4 Red Knots [Rob Bielawski ]
25 May Dickcissel - Meadowood Recreation Area, Lorton []
25 May Birding Around Concord and Questions about Piliated WP [pepherup--- via va-bird ]
25 May Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
24 May Willow Flycatcher, Markham Rd, Pittsylvania Co. [Mary Foster ]
24 May Willow Flycatcher, Markham Rd., Pittsylvania Co. [Mary Foster ]
24 May Willow Flycatcher, Markham Rd., Pittsylvania Co. [Mary Foster ]
24 May Saxis WMA [Alyssa Freeman ]
24 May Blue-winged Warblers, Broad-winged Hawk, Chats and more, Blue Ridge Center Lo Co ["Joe Coleman" ]
24 May Fwd: eBird Report - G.R. Thompson WMA - MFR02, May 24, 2015 [Phillip Kenny ]
24 May Common Nighthawks, Badger Rd (Augusta Co., today) [Diane L via va-bird ]
24 May Dyke Marsh, Alexandria ["Marc Ribaudo" ]
24 May Mississippi Kite - Dismal Swamp Canal Trail - Chesapeake VA [Tracy Tate ]
24 May Great Falls Walk [Marshall Rawson via va-bird ]
24 May 2 Mississippi Kites in Burke, VA [janet anderson via va-bird ]
24 May Killdeer distraction display [Stephen Johnson ]
24 May Willow Flycatcher at Occoquan bay NWR [Candice Lowther ]
23 May Eastern shore birds - Black Scoters, White Ibises, Summer Tanager, Chuck-Will's-Widows, more [Alyssa Freeman ]
23 May Huntley Meadows, FRFX Co, 23 May 2015 ["Kurt Gaskill" ]
24 May Thompson WMA- scads of Redstarts [Scott Priebe ]
23 May 5/22/15 & 5/23/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR & False Cape SP [Rob Bielawski ]
23 May Highland (the usual Black-billed Cuckoos, GW Warblers, Mourning Warbler, and two Alders) (5/23) [Andrew Rapp ]
24 May Highland County Report, 5/23 (4 Alder Flycatchers) [Diane L via va-bird ]
23 May Fwd: Black-necked Stilts at Hog Island [Wendy Ealding ]
23 May Black-necked Stilts at Hog Island [Wendy Ealding ]
23 May Re: Whimbrel duke marsh [Gerry Hawkins ]
23 May Mississippi Kite - Lake Accotink Park, Springfield []
23 May Re: Whimbrel duke marsh ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
23 May Whimbrel duke marsh [Robnoblestar via va-bird ]
23 May Red Headed Woodpecker []
23 May Blackpoll warbler and hummingbirds [mb b ]
23 May Prairie Warbler ["Otis G. Sowell, Jr." ]
22 May Chalet Woods Park (Centreville, Fairfax County) 22 May [Stephen Johnson ]
22 May [va-bird] Leesylvania SP & Julie Metz Wetlands [Scott Priebe ]
22 May Dutch Gap (Chesterfield County) this morning 5/22/15, COMMON GALLINULE [Wendy Ealding ]
22 May Hummingbirds ..... [Craig Zalk ]
22 May Radcliffe Appomattox River Conservation Area 5/22 [Adam D'Onofrio ]
22 May Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert ["kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" ]
22 May Theodore Roosevelt Island, DC; May 22 [Scott Baron ]
22 May White-crowned sparrow [Marc Ribaudo ]
22 May Common Gallinule at Dutch Gap, Chesterfield County [Wendy Ealding ]
21 May Willow Flycatcher at Dyke Marsh [Edward Eder ]
21 May Red-Tail Hawk breeding report [Stephen Johnson ]
21 May Re: hummingbirds no va [Scott Priebe ]
21 May Hummingbirds []

Subject: 5/29/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR - 2 Black-necked Stilts
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 21:39:47 -0400
Folks,

*Highlights*
Back Bay NWR - 3:40 to 7:05 PM - 2 Black-necked Stilts seen on C-Storage
Pool (the pond connected to the pumphouse along the West Dike Trail, County
Lifer), Yellow-breasted Chats, Orchard Orioles, No Eastern Kingbirds today,
adult Bald Eagle, 11 Glossy Ibis (7 in flight, 4 on the B-Pool viewable
from West Dike), 1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo, several Great Crested Flycatchers,
1 Prothonotary Warbler, American Coot still hanging out on the B-Storage
Pool near entrance to maritime forest. One rather large Eastern Cottonmouth
seen, and a Raccoon nearby also, very active wildlife evening at the park.

*Outing Photographs (Photos not yet posted, aside from 1 of the Stilts)*
*http://www.rbnature.com/galleries/we-20150531/
*

*Full Details*

From the moment I arrived this afternoon at Back Bay NWR, it just felt like
it was going to be a good outing. On the entry road, I spotted some Eastern
Towhees, Northern Cardinals, Northern Mockingbirds, and several Ospreys.
Just after parking and stepping out of the vehicle, a Prairie Warbler was
calling from a tree just east of the parking lot, offering good looks and a
couple identifying photographs. Though they're common in the park, it was
nice for one to show up right in view here, instead of having to hunt them
down in the scrubland like usual. I quickly walked along the visitor
contact station and worked my way towards the small pond, then down the
boardwalks to the Bay Trail. Perched in the grove of trees nearby was a
Northern Cardinal and Red-winged Blackbird, both calling loudly. I'd hoped
to see a warbler or two along the Bay Trail, but as I walked it westward,
nothing whatsoever flushed, so I turned around at the pond, heading back
towards the Loop Road. I stopped for a moment at the cypress grove at the
eastern end of the trail, but nothing was moving around here and it appears
that this spot, a hot spot just a week or two ago, has now finally cooled
off. Coming into the park, I had it in my mind that perhaps if I walked the
beachfront, that maybe I'd pick up some shorebirds I hadn't yet seen,
hoping for a possible Whimbrel or Black Tern. I took the Seaside Trail
boardwalk down to the beach, seeing a Great Egret on the E-Pool next to the
parking lot, and another Northern Cardinal along the boardwalk itself. On
the beach, the wind was really driving into shore, blowing sand inland. The
crashing waves have carved out the beach considerably, and it was a bit
difficult to walk on given how moist it was just beneath the surface. While
attempting to walk along the water's edge, a wave rolled over my feet, and
I thought to myself just how terrible a Sanderling I would make. Speaking
of which, Sanderlings and Semipalmated Sandpipers were both present, though
they were the only shorebirds seen between the Seaside and Dune Trails.
Only a pair of gulls passed overhead, otherwise, birds here were
nonexistent. So, I abandoned my plans to walked the beach towards False
Cape, and instead walked up the Dune Trail back onto the Loop Road.


Along the boardwalk just prior to reaching the Loop Road, a Yellow-breasted
Chat and a Blue Grosbeak were seen up on the power wires. This was only the
second chat I've ever seen, having just added this species to my life list
a couple weeks ago after finding one in False Cape State Park to the south.
Excited, I snapped some shots, but was in a poor spot given the light
streaming in from the west. I tried to work around the bird, but it dropped
down into a thicket unfortunately. The Blue Grosbeak though, in a surprise
move, flew right at me, landing in a shrub nearby, and though shaded a bit,
I was able to get a nice photo showing off its blue plumage! I walked the
eastern side of the Loop Road around to where the West Dike Trail begins
and then continued onward. With the sunlight facing me from the west, I
spent most of my time focused on the impoundments to the east side of the
trail. Walking along the C-Pool, I picked up a Yellow-billed Cuckoo gliding
over the ditch and into the nearby forest canopy. Nearby, a Barn Swallow
was snapping water off the ditch's surface, and several Great Egrets were
visible, standing tall out in the marshes. As I approached the 'island' of
trees along the southwest corner of the pool, I noted a pair of
Brown-headed Cowbirds again in the same spot as seen on Monday, but also
noted a lack of Eastern Kingbirds at the park, of which I didn't see a
single one for the first time in a while. Near here, I spotted a large
Red-bellied Watersnake that swiftly moved off the shoulder into the ditch,
and a few minutes later also saw a Northern Watersnake swimming along the
water surface down the ditch. Clearly, the reptiles are out enjoying the
start of summer weather. The Black Scoter I had seen last Friday was
nowhere to be found today again, so it is clearly gone from the area at
this point. Walking up near the C-Storage Pool it was obvious that much of
the water had recently been drained from this usually
deeper-than-the-others pond. This pool is now mostly mudflats, giving a
great amount of habitat back to the shorebirds. And today, they were taking
advantage already. As I arrived at the northwest corner of the pool, I
could see birds walking around, and as soon as I got the binoculars up, I
about jumped for joy, seeing two black & white birds with long legs & neck,
clearly Black-necked Stilts! These are the 2nd and 3rd stilts I've ever
seen in Virginia, and the first ones ever in Virginia Beach. I snapped lots
of long range photographs, then scanned the rest of the pool. Canada Geese,
14 Mallards, and a few Greater Yellowlegs were out walking the flats as
well. Several peeps were also visible, but too far out for me to
confidently identify.


Walking along the B-Storage Pool, the same American Coot that has been
sighted each outing over the last couple of weeks was again in the same
area of the main pond mudflats. A pair of Greater Yellowlegs, also seen
every outing recently, were in their spots again. And, this time I saw a
male Orchard Oriole flush from the trees on the west side of the trail.
Entering the maritime forest, an Indigo Bunting was singing loudly from a
perch that it seems to use often, and a Mourning Dove flushed from the A/B
cross dike, in sight just beyond the gate. A pair of Red-headed Woodpeckers
was seen flying over the roadway, disappearing quickly into the forest, and
several Great Crested Flycatchers were also observed making their raucous
Wheeep calls, then landing on open perches. No cuckoos were seen in the
forest this outing, and it wasn't until I had reached the south exit of the
forest, turned around, and walked halfway back before I heard my first
Prothonotary Warbler. I've been hearing at least 2 of these each pass
through the forest over the last couple of weeks. Exiting the north end of
the forest, I stopped to chat with Kyle, one of the park staff that had
driven past. As soon as he had taken off, I noticed that in addition to the
coot and yellowlegs, an Eastern Cottonmouth had taken up residence on the
mudflat in the center of the B-Storage Pool. This snake was laying out of
the water, with its head raised high up, moving slowly around the mudflat,
very close to both bird species. It was very interesting to observe the
three animals in such close proximity to one another. I was a bit curious
if the Cottonmouth was capable of taking prey as large as a Greater
Yellowlegs, or even the Coot, but it appears it didn't want anything to do
with either, because if it had, there was nothing to stop it. Several
times, the birds moved within just a few feet of the large snake, before
the snake finally decided to cruise off along the water surface back to the
shoreline marshes. While observing this in the middle of the pool, a
Raccoon also appeared on the far shoreline, walking along it, meandering in
and out of the reeds and offering up some photographs.


Continuing north along the B-Storage Pool, I found a female Red-breasted
Merganser at the northern end, the first I've seen out here in a few
outings, though not a rare sighting by any means. From the West Dike, I
could see 4 Glossy Ibis walking around out on the B-Pool's marshes, the
first I'd seen on the day. I passed the pumphouse, and scanned the
C-Storage Pool, finding both Black-necked Stilts still out on the exposed
mudflats. I had figured they would probably move on but they were there for
at least an hour and a half between my two passes of the pool. This second
time, they were in quite a bit closer and I was able to get some better,
although still not stellar, photographs to be able to prove the IDs. After
watching them for a few minutes, I continued north to the C-Pool. From far
off, I could see a large bird to the north flying out over the marshes.
Noting that all the egrets on the marsh took to flight, and seeing many
crows or blackbirds chasing the bird in the air, I figured it was either an
Osprey or an eagle. It turned out to be an adult Bald Eagle, making several
passes over the marshes, then landing up in the tall trees along the dike
trail to halt the attacks by a ravenous Red-winged Blackbird. I walked up
towards the tree as quiet as I could, hoping to be able to view it on its
perch, but a biker rode past me, and caused it to flush from the tree. It
made a couple of sweeps and I took a few photographs as its wings tilted
its body into good light, capture one nice shot with it very close to the
Moon as a backdrop before it flew off to the west! The rest of the way up
the West Dike was dominated by Red-winged Blackbirds, with a couple
cardinals and a Great Crested Flycatcher seen where the trail banks to the
northeast on the final straightaway. I then walked the Loop Road's west
side up to where the fishing 'pier' splits the D-Pool, following the song
of a Prairie Warbler to the eastern side of the Loop Road for a viewing
opportunity. It was amazing how the strong wind today was carrying the
sounds of birds. This warbler sounded as if it was 20 feet away, but it was
more like 500 feet away. I saw another pair of Yellow-breasted Chats, and a
single one nearby also, bringing my count for the day to 4, the most I've
ever seen in a day, by a factor of 4. Several Purple Martins were seen on
the wire across the E-Pool near the visitor center, and a Great Blue Heron
& Great Egret were stalking fish in the shallows. I walked the Bay Trail to
the boardwalk, and around the small pond back to the parking area, not
noting anything new in terms of birds, though seeing 3 of the rodents I've
seen a lot of recently (still not certain on what they are). I headed out
from the park at 7:05 PM, feeling very fortunate to have added the stilts
to my county list, and having seen so much wildlife on just a beautiful
evening. Now for the rest of the weekend!


*In-Depth Weekly Outing Details & Photographs:*

*http://www.rbnature.com/blog-index/ *


*Index of all of my eBird Reports (publicly viewable):*

*http://www.rbnature.com/lists/ebird-reports/
*


Rob Bielawski

Virginia Beach, VA
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Subject: Birding in southern Texas
From: "Marshall Faintich" <mfaintich AT theworddoctor.com>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 16:53:13 -0400
Walt Childs and I birded in southern Texas for 3-1/2 days last week. We
ended up with 118 avian species, including 27 life birds for me. Highlights
were many, including Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher,
Altamira Oriole, Common Pauraque, Gray Hawk, Olive Sparrow, Aplomado Falcon,
and White-tailed Hawk. A complete trip report with lots of photos is on my
web site:

 

 
http://www.symbolicmessengers.com/Blog2015/Texas.htm

 

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

 

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

Marshall Faintich, Ph.D.

 

mfaintich AT theworddoctor.com

 

mfaintich AT cyberwind.net

 

www.symbolicmessengers.com  

 

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

 

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015 13:32:51 -0400

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Common Merganser (1 Fluvanna)
Solitary Sandpiper (1 Augusta)
American Woodcock (1 Richmond City)
Red-necked Phalarope (1 Portsmouth)
Savannah Sparrow (1 Highland)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert.The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View or unsubscribe to this 
alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 17:00 by Tom Johnson
- Hardware River Wildlife Management Area - PJR07, Fluvanna, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.7406,-78.4074&ll=37.7406,-78.4074 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23683020
- Comments: "female flyby"

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) (1)
- Reported May 28, 2015 13:50 by John Shea
- McCormick's Mills, Augusta, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.9310735,-79.2130029&ll=37.9310735,-79.2130029 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23681388
- Comments: "Seen closely. Medium-sized sandpiper, dark brown back with white 
spotting, dark streaking down the throat, a whitish eye ring, and greenish 
legs." 


American Woodcock (Scolopax minor) (1)
- Reported May 26, 2015 12:00 by James Shelton
- James River Park--The Wetlands, Richmond City, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.5466699,-77.5098753&ll=37.5466699,-77.5098753 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23669681
- Comments: "Heard Aggressive Cackles near edge of pond and meadow. I knew that 
I recognized that sound but could not remember what it was. I was listening to 
the Aggressive Cackle recorded sound today and remembered that was what I 
heard. It was different from the Bank Swallows by being much more intense and 
having reverberation. I had an "Ah-ha" moment when I heard it today (The 
following Thursday." 


Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) (2)
- Reported May 28, 2015 05:30 by Bill Williams
- Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9065,-76.37&ll=36.9065,-76.37 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23679393
- Comments: "small phalarope; very thin tipped, black bill; black face and 
crown; white throat; bright deep orange red neck, front and back; gray upper 
breast and lower hind neck; white belly and undertail; back/wing coverts dark 
gray brown with 2 golden lateral stripes; feeding among Semipalmated 
Sandpipers; observed at less than 100 meters through spotting scopes; 
photographed" 


Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) (4)
- Reported May 28, 2015 17:00 by Tom Johnson
- Blue Grass Valley, Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.445778,-79.614166&ll=38.445778,-79.614166 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23681526
- Comments: "Singing from grassy fields; scoped"

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Virginia Rare 
Bird Alert 


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
http://ebird.org/ebird/alerts
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Subject: Hummingbird
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder AT gcronline.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 16:53:22 -0400
Greetings to all

After weeks of no hummingbirds I had my first female for the year just before I 
left the house this AM. In face I was in the car and about to back out when I 
saw her 


May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
jcbabirder AT gcronline.com

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Subject: Mississippi Kite
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder AT gcronline.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 15:25:50 -0400
Greeting all

This morning I went to Runt Powell farm in Halifax Co to see if I could see a 
Mississippi Kite in the area were I have seen them since 1998 


After almost an hour of looking I spotted one. Another year added to the record 
of seeing them here, I only missed the year 2000. 


Good Birding Always

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
jcbabirder AT gcronline.com

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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 11:03:58 -0400

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Swan (1 Accomack)
American Wigeon (1 Accomack)
Hooded Merganser (1 Richmond City)
White-faced Ibis (1 Accomack)
Mississippi Kite (3 Virginia Beach)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1 Tazewell)
Long-billed Dowitcher (1 Northampton)
Sandwich Tern (1 Northampton)
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (1 Accomack)
Loggerhead Shrike (1 Bedford)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert.The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View or unsubscribe to this 
alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus) (1)
- Reported May 23, 2015 11:05 by Clark Olsen
- Chincoteague NWR--Tom's Cove, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.8795,-75.3639&ll=37.8795,-75.3639 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23671669
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Appeared injured."

American Wigeon (Anas americana) (3)
- Reported May 23, 2015 11:05 by Clark Olsen
- Chincoteague NWR--Tom's Cove, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.8795,-75.3639&ll=37.8795,-75.3639 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23671669
- Comments: "Two males and one female"

Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 07:45 by Ben Griffon
- Bryan Park, Richmond City, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.594345,-77.4712497&ll=37.594345,-77.4712497 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23659728
- Comments: "Female seen near small bridge over young's pond"

White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 19:15 by Gary Smith
- Chincoteague NWR--Wildlife Loop, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.9004587,-75.3431654&ll=37.9004587,-75.3431654 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23668956
- Comments: "White marking around the reddish face including behind the eyes 
clearly visible with bins; scope view verified. Feeding voraciously with a 
flock of 30 GLIB. Previously reported from the CNWR." 


Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)
- Reported May 23, 2015 15:15 by Clark Olsen
- 4604 Curtiss Drive, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.8961649,-76.1276793&ll=36.8961649,-76.1276793 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23671694
- Comments: "Continuing bird"

Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 18:20 by Marie Mullins
- Furnish Yard, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.863836,-76.1009207&ll=36.863836,-76.1009207 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23667713
- Comments: "Bird making its daily evening tour of the Kings Grant 
neighborhood." 


Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 18:20 by Ron Furnish
- Furnish Yard, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.863836,-76.1009207&ll=36.863836,-76.1009207 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23667705
- Comments: "Bird making its daily evening tour of the Kings Grant 
neighborhood." 


Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 10:00 by Clancey Deel
- Burke's Garden - MMH04, Tazewell, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.1001,-81.3434&ll=37.1001,-81.3434 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23665789
- Comments: "From eBird 
Photos_2015" 


Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus) (1)
- Reported May 23, 2015 08:20 by Clark Olsen
- Cheriton Landfill, Northampton, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.2987049,-75.9245396&ll=37.2987049,-75.9245396 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23671244
- Comments: "Keek/week call, extremely long bill on fresh water"

Sandwich Tern (Thalasseus sandvicensis) (3)
- Reported May 27, 2015 07:45 by Clark Olsen
- Oyster, Northampton, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.2865,-75.9218&ll=37.2865,-75.9218 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23671108
- Comments: "Flew by close for positive ID"

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) (2)
- Reported May 27, 2015 11:11 by Michael Aurelia
- Chincoteague NWR--Lighthouse, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.9109,-75.3562&ll=37.9109,-75.3562 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23673527
- Comments: "Saw & heard calls"

Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) (1)
- Reported May 27, 2015 09:00 by Jim Elder
- Kelso Mill Rd, Bedford, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.3907545,-79.6020734&ll=37.3907545,-79.6020734 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23661018
- Comments: "Got great look in binocs and scope. This bird was seen here during 
a count on May 6, and was seen during the same count last year" 


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Subject: Remove from list
From: rebecca morrow <rebeccalmorrow AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 09:46:46 -0500
i no longer live in VA and would like to be removed from the list. Thank
you.

Rebecca morrow
Rebeccalmorrow AT gmail.com


-- 
Rebecca Morrow
Independent Beauty Consultant
805-200-8279
www.marykay.com/rmorrow83
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Subject: Meadowood: Dickcissel, Blue Grosbeak, Meadowlark, possible Summer Tanager
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 15:02:29 -0400
I arrived at Meadowood about 8 o'clock this morning, took the counter-clockwise 
trail where I found the Dickcissel yesterday, didn't find anything and so I 
started down the counter-clockwise trail and ran into David Boltz, Sherman 
Suter and Rich Reiger, who were kind enough to tell me that they had just seen 
the Dickcissel down the hill in the direction I was going, on the other side of 
the field from where I saw it yesterday. I headed on down the trail and was 
soon joined by my friend Seth, who had also come looking for the bird. 

  
 We soon found the Dickcissel, down by the bluebird boxes. It was energetically 
calling and flying around. We had excellent looks and photographed the bird 
sitting on a variety of approaches low to the ground. Further down the trail we 
saw a female Blue grosbeak, at least two male Blue Grosbeaks and got some OK 
photographs of that bird as well. We had some stunning views of male Indigo 
Buntings, sitting on low preaches out in the bright sunshine. Down at the 
corner where the trail separates by the old horse barn, I had an added treat 
when a Yellow-breasted Chat flew in to eat cherries on the cherry tree about 30 
feet away, and then flew and perched nicely in the tree right above me. Super 
photo op !! 

 We had more nice looks at the Dickcissel on the way back up the trail. Overall 
the bird probably perched and sang for us for at least 30 minutes or more. 
There may well have been two Dickcissels. 

 In the tall forest trees on the far side of the field, maybe 150 yards away, I 
heard several Scarlet Tanagers and what I think was a Summer Tanger singing. 
There have been Summer Tanagers found at this location in past years. 

  All in all a very nice morning. 
    Donald Sweig
     Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Fairfax Co. Ravens
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 14:31:10 -0400
After finding Dickcissels at Meadowood, but no Meadowlarks or Bobolinks, Dave, 
Sherman and I motored up to the Equestrian Center in Lorton - near the old 
prison. 


No Meadowlarks, but we did find a KESTREL, REDSHOULDER HAWK and a RAVEN to put 
on the short list. 


Heading home, we pulled into a parking lot off Telegraph Rd. just south of 
Davison Airport to listen for Grasshopper Sparrow and/or Meadowlark which have 
been tallied there before. No luck on grassland birds, but we did score another 
RAVEN, being harassed by a Mockingbird on the west side of Telegraph Road. 


Rich Rieger
Alexandria
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Subject: Great Dismal Swamp - Railroad Ditch - May 27, 2015
From: Robert Ake <rake AT cox.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 13:43:36 -0400
     This was my last swamp walk for this year and it was a good one.  I 
really didn't have very high expectations when I set out alone along 
Railroad Ditch at 7:00am.  But after the gate opened I was joined by 
Jayne Munoz and friend in their car.  We had a good time jumping in and 
out of the car as we motored along.  We seemed to be always hearing a 
Prothonotary Warbler or a Common Yellowthroat or an Indigo Bunting or a 
Carolina Wren.  Blue Grosbeaks' songs carry a long way and seemed to be 
always within earshot.  We did hear three Swainson's Warblers and one on 
West Ditch about half way down was close enough I thought we could have 
seen it....but we didn't.  The most unlikely miss of the morning was 
Red-eyed Vireo; none were heard or seen.
     The real highlight for me was the beautiful male Black-throated 
Green Warbler that came down to the road to grab a bug and allowed us 
fantastic looks.  This is my first in the swamp in the last five years.  
As some of you may know this bird is part of a population of this 
species that breeds in the Dismal Swamp and further south along the 
coast and is a distinct subspecies  commonly referred to as Wayne's 
Warbler.  There is a large gap between these breeders and those in the 
Appalachians in the western part of the state.
     Thanks to all the birders that showed up during spring 2015 to walk 
with me.  Those walks as always are one of the highlights for me every year.

Bob Ake
Norfolk

     The complete birdlist follows.

Dismal Swamp NWR Railroad Ditch, Suffolk, US-VA
May 27, 2015 6:44 AM - 11:52 AM
Protocol: Traveling
8.0 mile(s) - 2 by foot and 6 by car

45 species

Wood Duck  1
Great Blue Heron  2
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  18 - mostly over the burn area, but six were feeding on 
an otter carcass on West Ditch
Osprey  1 - at Lake Drummond near nest
Killdeer  4 - Interior Ditch road
Mourning Dove  4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  8 - many calls, but no see ums
Chimney Swift  2 - at Lake Drummond
Red-headed Woodpecker  5 - Three locations: Visitor Center, Underground 
Railroad, burn area
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  3
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2
Pileated Woodpecker  3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Acadian Flycatcher  4
Great Crested Flycatcher  6
Eastern Kingbird  2 - at burn area
White-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  3
Purple Martin  1 - at Lake Drummond
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  14
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Wood Thrush  1 - only the whip whip whip call heard
Gray Catbird  2
European Starling  3 - burn area
Ovenbird  2 - near the Visitor's Center
Prothonotary Warbler  13
Swainson's Warbler  3 - one was quite close on West Ditch
Common Yellowthroat  18
Hooded Warbler  2
American Redstart  5
Pine Warbler  5
Prairie Warbler  3 - at the corner marsh and the burn area
Black-throated Green Warbler  1 - on the road grabbing bugs on West 
Ditch just north of Interior Ditch
Eastern Towhee  5
Northern Cardinal  4
Blue Grosbeak  4
Indigo Bunting  13 - very vocal
Red-winged Blackbird  3 - at Lake Drummond
Common Grackle  18 - mostly near Lake Drummond
Orchard Oriole  1 - at Lake Drummond
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Subject: Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Huntley Meadows - nesting activity
From: "Larry Cartwright" <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 13:35:34 -0400
About a dozen people joined Bryan (Pete) Peters and me for the
NVBC-sponsored walk at Huntley Meadows today. By the sound (or lack thereof)
in the woodland, migration is rapidly winding down.  Didn't even hear a
single Blackpoll!  The breeders were well represented though, especially
Red-eyed Vireos, Acadian Flycatchers, and Common Yellowthroats, all very
vocal.  Wood Ducks were everywhere in the central wetlands it seemed and
several Green Herons put on a nice show for the crowd. We watched three
nestlings in the Red-shouldered Hawk nest along the path to the central
wetland and saw a hen Merganser with 8 young.  Most of us got great views of
a singing Blue Grosbeak near the observation tower.  A very nice, if rather
a slow day,  and the company was delightful!

 

Huntley Meadows Park - CMN04, Fairfax, US-VA May 27, 2015 8:20 AM - 11:00 AM

Protocol: Traveling

2.0 mile(s)

Comments:     
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 46 species Canada Goose 25 Wood Duck 18 Mallard 5 Hooded Merganser 9 one hen and 8 precocial young Wild Turkey 1 Great Blue Heron 2 Green Heron 4 Osprey 2 Red-shouldered Hawk 5 Mourning Dove 3 Chimney Swift 3 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 4 Downy Woodpecker 4 Hairy Woodpecker 1 Pileated Woodpecker 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee 4 Acadian Flycatcher 13 Great Crested Flycatcher 4 Eastern Kingbird 1 Red-eyed Vireo 7 Blue Jay 1 American Crow 1 Tree Swallow 6 Barn Swallow 1 Carolina Chickadee 12 Tufted Titmouse 8 Carolina Wren 3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 6 Eastern Bluebird 3 Wood Thrush 1 American Robin 12 Gray Catbird 1 Ovenbird 2 Prothonotary Warbler 1 Common Yellowthroat 6 Eastern Towhee 2 Scarlet Tanager 3 Northern Cardinal 12 Blue Grosbeak 1 Indigo Bunting 2 Red-winged Blackbird 30 Common Grackle (Purple) 10 Brown-headed Cowbird 2 American Goldfinch 7 House Sparrow 2 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23660986 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) Larry Cartwright prowarbler AT verizon.net *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 13:18:01 -0400

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Purple Finch (1 Fairfax)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert.The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View or unsubscribe to this 
alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus) (1)
- Reported May 26, 2015 16:30 by Robin Huff
- AA Reston -- My Patch, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.943131,-77.349801&ll=38.943131,-77.349801 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23651343
- Comments: "Close view at feeder, as usual -- House Finches also seen today. 
Nary a sign of a Purple Finch female, however." 


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Subject: Dickcissel, Summer Tanager Meadowood, Gunston Rd.
From: Rich Rieger via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 12:06:46 -0400
Dave Boltz, Sherman Suter and I got great looks at a singing Male Dickcissel at 
Meadowood Recreation Area this morning. Bird was off the Mustang trail, about 
180 degrees from the parking lot. There are two bluebird boxes close together 
and we saw the Dickcissel in trees and low shrubs in that area. It also flew 
back to the treeline SW of the trail. 


Another bird was singing in low shrubs, pretty much in the center of the trail 
loop, providing long scope views. That bird flew toward the parking area, as 
the second bird started singing near the nest boxes. We arrived early, about 
6:40a, but the bird(s) did not singing until a little after 8a. 


A Blue Grosbeak was seen perched on those same bluebird boxes.

Heading back toward Rt. 1, we turned into the driveway where the horse stable 
are. Dave and Sherman heard a Summer Tanager calling from the woods on the 
right side as we were headed into the stables. It got quiet as soon as we 
parked the car.... 


Rich Rieger
Alexandria
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Subject: Voice: Greater Washington Area, May 26
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 09:53:08 -0400
FYI  - this report is for sightings from May 19 through May 25 and was
compiled by Joe Coleman.

Joe Coleman

 

Hotline:           Voice of the Naturalist

Date:              05/26/2015

Coverage:          MD/DC/VA central and southern DE/WV panhandle

Reports, comments, questions:  voice AT anshome.org  

Compiler:          Joe Coleman

Sponsor:           Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic

States (independent of NAS)

Transcriber:       

 

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100; Audubon Advocate
$200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940
Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is
http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.

 

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, May 19 and was
completed on Tuesday, May 26 at 9:30 a.m. 

 

The top birds this week were a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* in MD and a WHITE-WINGED
DOVE in DE.

 

Other birds of interest this week included EGYPTIAN GOOSE, TRUMPETER SWAN,
ducks, NORTHERN BOBWHITE, ANHINGA, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, MISSISSIPPI KITE,
COMMON GALLINULE, SANDHILL CRANE, BLACK-NECKED STILT, shorebirds,
flycatchers including OLIVE-SIDED, ALDER and YELLOW-BELLIED, WESTERN
KINGBIRD, LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, warblers including
GOLDEN-WINGED, SWAINSON'S, and MOURNING, sparrows, DICKCISSEL, RUSTY
BLACKBIRD, and PINE SISKIN. 

 

TOP BIRDS

 

The NEOTROPIC CORMORANT* near Violette's Lock, Montgomery Co MD, continued
to be seen there throughout the week with the most recent sighting from May
25.

 

A WHITE-WINGED DOVE was found May 23 at Slaughter Beach, DE; it was heard on
the 24th from Yerkes Rd at Slaughter Beach.

 

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

 

The EGYPTIAN GOOSE of unknown provenance was seen again in Baltimore, MD,
with a report of it at Patterson Park on the 19th.

 

Ducks and swans continue to linger in the area /beyond their normal late
dates. The TRUMPETER SWAN continues in the vicinity of the Black Hill
Regional Park, Montgomery Co., MD with a sighting on May 23 at the nearby
Lake Churchill.

 

A REDHEAD was seen May 20 at Tydings Marina, Harford Co, MD. A SURF SCOTER
was seen throughout the week at Violette's Lock, Montgomery Co MD. Forty-two
BLACK SCOTERS were seen May 20 at North Beach, Virginia Beach, VA. A female
BLACK SCOTER was seen May 22 at Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach, VA. Two
LONG-TAILED DUCKS were seen May 23 at Point Lookout SP, St. Mary's Co, MD.

 

NORTHERN BOBWHITES turned up at a variety of widely scattered locations this
past week. 

 

An ANHINGA was reported on May 21 back at the same location they were at on
Blackwater Rd, Chesapeake, VA last year. An ANHINGA was seen and
photographed on a farm in Fluvanna Co, VA on the 22nd and 23rd.

 

AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were seen May 23 and 24 at Fowler Beach, Sussex Co,
DE.

 

MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen in a number of locations throughout the week
including one in Norfolk, VA on the 19th; two the same day flying over the
Fort Smallwood Park hawk watch, Anne Arundel Co, MD; and Perryman Park,
Harford Co, MD on the 24th. Two MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen May 21 in a tree
close to the road at Gaines and Jackson Streets in Burke, Fairfax Co, VA.
One was seen May 23 flying over Lake Accotink Park, Fairfax Co, VA.
MISSISSIPPI KITES were also seen along Whiton Crossing Rd, Worcester Co, MD
on the 23rd, 24th, & 25th. A MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen the 24th flying over
Rte 40, W. Patrick St, Frederick, MD. A MISSISSIPPI KITE was flying along
Rte 40 behind Perryman Park, Harford Co, MD, at the Gray's Run crossing on
the 24th. Also on the 24th, a MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen soaring high towards
Lake Drummond (Great Dismal Swamp NWR, Suffolk, VA) just south of Balyhack
Rd. A MISSISSIPPI KITE flew over Rockwood Beach (near Fort Smallwood) on the
25th.

 

A COMMON GALLINULE was seen May 22 at the Dutch Gap Conservation Area,
Chesterfield Co, VA.

 

Two SANDHILL CRANES were found May 21 in a flooded field in the 3122-3190
block of Rte 146 in Harford Co, MD. A SANDHILL CRANE was seen May 25 heading
southwest from Fort Smallwood Park.

 

Two BLACK-NECKED STILTS were found May 23 at Hog Island, Surry Co, VA.

 

SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were seen at the Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens, NE
DC, from the 19th through the 22nd. A SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and a DUNLIN
were seen May 23 at the Rowe Rd farm pond just east of the intersection of
Rowe and Intyre Rds, Washington Co, MD; the DUNLIN and three SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS were there on the 24th. Thirty-two SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS were seen
May 20 at Belvoir Pond, Fauquier Co, VA; two were seen there on the 25th.
Two PIPING PLOVERS were spotted April 11 at Fort Monroe, Hampton, VA. 

 

As many as 9 WHIMBRELS were found on the 23rd, first at Dyke Marsh and then
later on the mudflats at Hunting Creek, Fairfax Co, VA. This past week RED
KNOTS turned up in relatively small numbers on ocean beaches from Virginia
Beach to Delaware. A couple of RED-NECKED PHALAROPES were found May 17 & 18
at the Pickering Beach side of Little Creek Wildlife, Kent, DE.

 

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHERS turned up at a number of locations including Hughes
Hollow, Montgomery Co, MD on the 20th; Violette's Lock, Montgomery Co, MD,
on the 22nd & 23rd; at Cromwell Valley Park, Baltimore Co, MD on the 21st &
the 23rd; on the 23rd along the WB&A Trail - Old Pond Dr, Prince George's
Co, MD; on the 23rd at Fort Washington NP, Prince George's Co, MD.

 

ALDER FLYCATCHERS were also seen in a number of locations including Cromwell
Valley Park on the 21st & 23rd; Governor Bridge NA, Prince George's Co, MD,
on the 22nd; at Meadowpark Park, Howard Co, MD on the 23rd  and also, the
same day, at the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area, Howard Co, MD. ALDER
FLYCATCHERS were seen and heard at a variety of locations in Highland Co, VA
this past week including three at Beaver Ponds in on the 23rd.

 

A YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER turned up in a private yard on the 22nd in
Harford Co, MD. Both a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER and a PHILADELPHIA VIREO
were reported May 23 in the same tree north of Blairs Valley Lake,
Washington Co, MD.

 

A WESTERN KINGBIRD was reported from the Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE Allee
House area on the 24th.

 

A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was seen throughout the week at Burwells Bay Rd at
Purvis Rd, Isle of Wight, VA. 

 

A PHILADELPHIA VIREO was seen May 24 at the northwest corner of the lake at
Wheaton RP, Montgomery Co, MD.

GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS were seen May 23 at their regular spot on Wimer
Mountain Rd, Highland Co, VA. 

 

MOURINING WARBLERS turned up at a number of locations this past week. Some
of the sightings included one in a yard in western Loudoun Co on May 19, one
on May 20 along the Flag Ponds Parkway powerline, Calvert Co, MD, and
another May 21 in the Rock Creek Park (NW DC) maintenance yard. One was also
seen at Governor Bridge NA, Prince George's Co, MD, on the 22nd. Another was
seen May 23 near Paddy Knob, Highland Co, VA. One was also seen on the 23rd
at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA. A MOURNING WARBLER was also seen on
the regular weekly bird walk at Great Falls National Historical Park,
Fairfax Co, VA, on May 24.

 

Two VESPER SPARROWS were seen May 23 along the road in Laurel Forks,
Highland Co, VA. Another was singing the same day on Smith Rd, Jefferson Co,
WV.A LINCOLN'S SPARROW was seen May 20 in Rock Creek Park, NW DC. Two were
seen the 21st in the maintenance yard at Rock Creek Park. A LINCOLN'S
SPARROW was also seen the 22nd at Mount Pleasant Farm, Howard Co (MD)
Conservancy. And one was seen the 22nd at Theodore Roosevelt Island, NW DC.
A couple of WHITE-THROATED and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS continued to turn up
at feeders in the area.

 

A singing DICKCISSEL was seen the 25th at the Mustang Trailhead, Meadowood
Recreation Area, Gunston and Harley Rds, Lorton. A DICKCISSEL was also
located the 25th at the corner of Brookfield Rd and Parkgate Dr, near
Nokesville, Prince William Co, VA.

 

Other lingering winter birds included a single RUSTY BLACKBIRD on the 20th
at Piscataway Park, Prince George's Co, MD and two PINE SISKINS in Howard
Co, MD from the 20th through the 21st as well as in a few other locations. 

 

***

 

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers via the ABA Internet links, and on eBird records.

 

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, anshome.org/shop) is an excellent
source for guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.

 

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org
 .

Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as
the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.

 

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

 

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Subject: Rachael Carson
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 11:44:17 +0000 (UTC)
  Today, May 27, marks the 108th anniversary of the birth ofRachael Carson.  
Carson is one of ourmost cherished conservation heroes for several reasons:  
she bravely withstood the unrelentingpersecution from the commercial chemical 
industry (that continues to this day, morethan 50 years after her death) 
because of her crusade to rid the world ofagricultural poisons such as DDT; 
 shewas an author of exceptional eloquence, whose descriptions of the natural 
worldinspired thousands to take up the cause of a contamination-free earth; 
 and who was a gentle, soft spoken scientistwho quietly fought the big, public 
fights as well as her own personal battlesover health and friendships with 
great strength, courage and dignity.  Rachael Carson is one of those 
extraordinarypeople who single-handedly has visibly made our world a healthier 
place tolive. Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows 

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Subject: VSO Breeding Bird Foray, Franklin County, 6-14 June
From: Clyde Kessler <mrbrock.o.lee AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 06:45:38 -0400
Greetings,

The Breeding Bird Foray is in Franklin County this year, 6 to 14 June.

Here is a link to website with more info...

https://sites.google.com/site/vso2015foray/


As of now there is pretty good coverage the first few days of the Foray. We
could use more folks birding the last half of the foray time.

If you would like more info, please feel free to contact me at

ckessler AT vt.edu

or at my work phone: 540-231-9261.


Good birding everyone,

Clyde Kessler
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Subject: Chincoteague NWR -- A black bellied plover gets the worm
From: Bill Hohenstein <elliety AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 22:56:52 -0400
Shorebirds continue to be plentiful on Chincoteague NWR and the surrounding 
marshes and flats. Shorebirds included large numbers of Semipalmated Sandpipers 
(probably 50% of all of the shorebirds present); Dunlin, Ruddy turnstones, 
Dowitchers (I only heard short-billed); Willets -- atlantic and one holdout 
Western; Black Bellied Plovers; Least Sandpipers; Both Yellowlegs -- mostly 
Greater; Oystercatchers; Semipalmated Plovers; Piping Plovers; Spotted 
Sandpipers; Black Necked Stilts on the main causeway and two on the flats of 
the wildlife loop; Whimbrel -- in the marshes of Tom's Cove; Marbled Godwit -- 
9 on the flats of Tom's Cove; and Sanderlings on the beaches and behind Tom's 
Cove. Two of the rarer sandpipers also made an appearance -- a couple of White 
Rumped Sandpipers came close in for id on the South side of the wildlife loop; 
and 4 Stilt Sandpipers were identifiable out on the flats of the loop. I missed 
out on Red Knots -- but they should be coming through on the 

 beaches.
Other birds of note -- lots of Glossy Ibis and a few White Ibis. Chats are 
breeding by the beach at D-Dike, along with Prairie Warblers and Field 
Sparrows. A lone gull billed tern was mixed in with the Skimmers and Forster's 
at Queens landing. Horned Larks in the sand behind the south parking lot. Black 
Crowned Night Heron along Beach Drive. A lone Tundra Swan remains on Swan's 
Cove (of course)-- could be injured? 

All and all ... great birding.  
Check out the photos on my flickr page.... there is a set of the "Early Black 
Bellied Plover catching the Worm" (and then not knowing what to do with it!). I 
couldn't believe it when I was shooting it. 

Bill
https://www.flickr.com/photos/73831614 AT N00/sets/72157651185036314
https://www.flickr.com/photos/73831614 AT N00/sets/72157653502439572



 		 	   		  
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Subject: White Ibis and Grasshopper Sparrow at Kiptopeke
From: Alyssa Freeman <tsiporah.shani AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 22:40:21 -0400
While driving home from Chincoteague today, I stopped off for an hour or so
at Kiptokepe State Park. On the road that leads into the park, I saw a
White Ibis in someone's yard, then had a Grasshopper Sparrow hop onto a
sign and start singing. While walking on the Wood Warbler Boardwalk, I
heard a Scarlet Tanager singing.

Alyssa Freeman,
Richmond, VA
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Subject: Meadowood Dickcissel - YES (Fairfax Co.)
From: Claire Kluskens <ckluskens AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 21:14:51 -0400
Thanks David and Ron  
I likewise went there today, but around noon, and eventually heard the 
Dickcissel singing from the grass at very close range in the same area. I also 
thought I heard a second one, briefly, a little further off, but still in the 
same area. Neither obliged to sing in plain view, however. Came up empty on 
Bobolinks. 


Claire Kluskens
Fairfax Co.


On May 26, 2015, at 12:15 PM, Donald Sweig  wrote:

> At about 10:20 this morning I had good looks at, and got a number of clear, 
definitive photographs of an energetically singing male Dickcissel at the 
Meadowood recreation area in Fairfax county. 

> This is surely the same bird that David Ledwith found and reported yesterday. 
THANK YOU DAVID! I found the bird along the Mustang Trail out of the parking 
lot off of Harley Road. I took the trail closest to Gunston Road and found the 
bird out about 100 yards, it was first singing in the grass and then it flew up 
to the top of the large cedar tree on the ridge and sang for about 10 minutes. 
I had excellent looks and got excellent photographs. The bird was still singing 
from the same perch when I left. 

>   Donald Sweig
>     Falls Church, Va
> 

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Subject: May 24, 2015 Chincoteague Shorebird/Gull Survey
From: Joelle Buffa <clyde_joelle AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 23:01:20 +0000 (UTC)
Below are the results of our weekly shorebird/gull survey conducted at 
Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday May 24, 2015. All water areas 
(impoundments and beach areas) were covered in a 9.5 hour survey. All 
individuals are counted for the target species; other birds seen or heard on 
the survey are followed by a dash. It was another wonderful spring migration 
shorebird survey at the Refuge. The Refuge's impoundments continue to provide 
excellent habitat for all shorebirds from those needing shallow water or 
mudflats to those needing deeper water depths. 

We counted 18,272 individual shorebirds  which is a notch down from last 
week's 28,161. We saw 19 species of shorebirds which is also lower than last 
week. It appears that we are on the downward slope of shorebird migration. 
However, we still see many (hundreds or thousands?) of shorebirds using 
portions of the impoundments that are so far from our route that we can't even 
determine if they are peeps or larger species such as Yellowlegs, Willets or 
Dowitchers. How many birds are actually using the Refuge? We may never know 
exactly but it certainly more than we see on our survey which follows a very 
strict route and protocol so the data is comparable to past surveys. 

We also noticed that some species which were dominant in the past few weeks are 
now at much lower numbers such as Dunlin (last week: 9,694 and this week: 
2,889) and others that have not moved on since last  week such as 
Semi-palmated Sandpiper (8,000  this week and 9,314 last week). This seems to 
reflect the well known peaks in bird migration with some species peaking 
earlier than others. 

 If you and/or the Refuge visitors are looking to see shorebirds, we continue 
to recommend the Wildlife Loop with Pond B-South having over 9,000 individual 
shorebirds to be studied and admired. 

For us, the best bird of the survey was not even a shorebird. We saw a Sooty 
Shearwater not far from the shoreline of Wild Beach about half-way between the 
parking lots and the MD State Line. Though this is a fairly common pelagic 
seabird worldwide, it usually requires a boat trip far offshore. However, even 
more exciting is that the bird knows how to read, since it showed up in 
Chincoteague just when "Birds of Virginia" says it should: " Small numbers are 
seen from shore, particularly during strong easterly winds in late spring." 
(Wind was from the east the day before the survey).Clyde Morris & Joelle Buffa 


| Canada Goose | -- |
| American Black Duck | -- |
| Mallard | -- |
| Black Scoter | -- |
| Red-breasted Merganser | -- |
| Wild Turkey | -- |
| Common Loon | 5 |
| Sooty Shearwater | 1 |
| Double-crested Cormorant | 183 |
| Brown Pelican | 24 |
| Great Blue Heron | -- |
| Great Egret | -- |
| Snowy Egret | -- |
| Little Blue Heron | -- |
| Tricolored Heron | -- |
| Cattle Egret | -- |
| Green Heron | -- |
| White Ibis | -- |
| Glossy Ibis | -- |
| Black Vulture | -- |
| Turkey Vulture | -- |
| Osprey | -- |
| Northern Harrier | -- |
| Bald Eagle | -- |
| American Oystercatcher | 39 |
| Black-bellied Plover | 242 |
| Semipalmated Plover | 1,432 |
| Piping Plover | 31 |
| Killdeer | 10 |
| Spotted Sandpiper | 1 |
| Greater Yellowlegs | 132 |
| Willet | 52 |
| Lesser Yellowlegs | 10 |
| Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs | 2 |
| Whimbrel | 43 |
| Marbled Godwit | 1 |
| Ruddy Turnstone | 271 |
| Red Knot | 16 |
| Sanderling | 2,309 |
| Dunlin | 2,889 |
| Least Sandpiper | 19 |
| White-rumped Sandpiper | 1 |
| Semipalmated Sandpiper | 8,000 |
| peep sp. | 2,060 |
| Short-/Long-billed Dowitcher | 751 |
| Laughing Gull | 155 |
| Ring-billed Gull | 8 |
| Herring Gull | 311 |
| Lesser Black-backed Gull | 88 |
| Great Black-backed Gull | 118 |
| Least Tern | 78 |
| Common Tern | 18 |
| Forster's Tern | 46 |
| Royal Tern | 1 |
| Black Skimmer | 81 |
| Mourning Dove | -- |
| Yellow-billed Cuckoo | -- |
| Chuck-will's-widow | -- |
| Northern Flicker | -- |
| Merlin | -- |
| Eastern Wood-Pewee | -- |
| Great Crested Flycatcher | -- |
| Eastern Kingbird | -- |
| American Crow | -- |
| Fish Crow | -- |
| crow sp. | -- |
| Purple Martin | -- |
| Tree Swallow | -- |
| Barn Swallow | -- |
| Tufted Titmouse | -- |
| Brown-headed Nuthatch | -- |
| House Wren | -- |
| Carolina Wren | -- |
| American Robin | -- |
| Gray Catbird | -- |
| Northern Mockingbird | -- |
| European Starling | -- |
| Cedar Waxwing | -- |
| Black-and-white Warbler | -- |
| Common Yellowthroat | -- |
| Yellow Warbler | -- |
| Pine Warbler | -- |
| Yellow-throated Warbler | -- |
| Prairie Warbler | -- |
| Yellow-breasted Chat | -- |
| Eastern Towhee | -- |
| Chipping Sparrow | -- |
| Field Sparrow | -- |
| Song Sparrow | -- |
| Northern Cardinal | -- |
| Blue Grosbeak | -- |
| Indigo Bunting | -- |
| Red-winged Blackbird | -- |
| Eastern Meadowlark | -- |
| Common Grackle | -- |
| Boat-tailed Grackle | -- |
| Brown-headed Cowbird | -- |
| Orchard Oriole | -- |
| Baltimore Oriole |  |
| House Sparrow | -- |

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Subject: Bald Eagle association with cattle grazing???
From: Eric Harrold via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 16:52:21 +0000 (UTC)
The following statement appears in a blog posting on Blue Ridge Discovery 
Center's website. I am curious about the conclusion that extensive cattle 
pastures are somehow benefitting Bald Eagles??? What aspect of their biology is 
benefitted by cattle pastures? This is the kind of misinformation that should 
not be disseminated to the general public through non-profits masquerading as 
environmental education organizations. The same author recently implied that 
Golden-winged Warbler declines were due to hybridization and forest succession, 
making no mention of the fact that habitat loss of forests previously occupied 
by GWWAs occurred when those forests were converted to cattle pastures. It 
would appear he is either naive or has a strange agenda as an educator.  

Eric Harrold Hays, NC
From Virginia Society of Ornithology records research and conversation with 
wildlife officers, we have concluded that this is the first documented active 
bald eagle nest in Grayson County for 100 years. We have heard that bald eagles 
have been nesting below Byllesby and Buck Dams, and though adjacent to Grayson, 
that section of the New is in Carroll County. In general, the increase in bald 
eagle sightings in Grayson has concentrated along the New, from Fries to Mouth 
of Wilson. This resurgence points directly to a renewal of healthy populations 
and the success of conservation efforts. “The newly-discovered eagle nest in 
Grayson County is a welcome sign of the recovery of our Bald Eagle population, 
nearly lost from the widespread use of DDT decades over 50 years ago.” (Allen 
Boynton, formerly with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, is 
now employed by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission.)The nest was discovered 
in a somewhat remote section of the New, with a cattle farm on one side and a 
steep forested slope on the other. Grayson contains a considerable amount of 
wilderness areas, private, state and national. Combine that with extensive 
cattle grazing lands, and a picture of viable habitat for the bald eagles 
emerges. 



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Subject: Meadowood Dickcissel - YES
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 12:15:40 -0400
At about 10:20 this morning I had good looks at, and got a number of clear, 
definitive photographs of an energetically singing male Dickcissel at the 
Meadowood recreation area in Fairfax county. 

 This is surely the same bird that David Ledwith found and reported yesterday. 
THANK YOU DAVID! I found the bird along the Mustang Trail out of the parking 
lot off of Harley Road. I took the trail closest to Gunston Road and found the 
bird out about 100 yards, it was first singing in the grass and then it flew up 
to the top of the large cedar tree on the ridge and sang for about 10 minutes. 
I had excellent looks and got excellent photographs. The bird was still singing 
from the same perch when I left. 

   Donald Sweig
     Falls Church, Va

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 12:14:39 -0400

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Gadwall (1 Prince William)
Mississippi Kite (2 Virginia Beach)
American Coot (2 Virginia Beach)
Semipalmated Plover (1 Fauquier)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1 Fauquier)
Sandwich Tern (1 Mathews)
Eurasian Collared-Dove (1 Virginia Beach)
Alder Flycatcher (5 Highland)
Loggerhead Shrike (1 Isle of Wight)
Seaside Sparrow (1 Mathews)
Dark-eyed Junco (2 Bedford)
Dickcissel (1 Prince William)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert.The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View or unsubscribe to this 
alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Gadwall (Anas strepera) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 20:02 by kelly krechmer
- US-VA-Gainesville-13550 Heathcote Blvd, Prince William, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.803419,-77.595034&ll=38.803419,-77.595034 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23637529
- Comments: "Skittish and first time sighted sitting on wood fence next to 
marshy water" 


Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 18:10 by Ron Furnish
- Furnish Yard, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.863836,-76.1009207&ll=36.863836,-76.1009207 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23626127
- Comments: "Watched as bird worked its way towards us from the east. Flight 
was a combination of long, soaring glides, combined with the occasional sharp 
arcing movement. The Kite continued in our direction until it got very close to 
the house, then it disappeared behind a tree line to the north." 


Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 18:10 by Marie Mullins
- Furnish Yard, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.863836,-76.1009207&ll=36.863836,-76.1009207 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23626146
- Comments: "Watched as bird worked its way towards us from the east. Flight 
was a combination of long, soaring glides, combined with the occasional sharp 
arcing movement. The Kite continued in our direction until it got very close to 
the house, then it disappeared behind a tree line to the north." 


American Coot (Fulica americana) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 08:00 by Rob Bielawski
- Back Bay NWR - CSY06, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.6779,-75.9159&ll=36.6779,-75.9159 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23631153
- Comments: "Located in same spot as on Friday (5/22) and Saturday (5/23) along 
West Dike Trail just before entering the maritime forest when travelling 
southward. Bird was sitting out on shallow spot in pond. Photographed." 


American Coot (Fulica americana) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 07:45 by Jason  Strickland
- Back Bay NWR - CSY06, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.6779,-75.9159&ll=36.6779,-75.9159 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23638549
- Comments: "Black, ducklike bird, white chicken-shaped bill, "strutted" as it 
swam; in small open pool where Rob had previously seen it.( recently)" 


Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) (2)
- Reported May 25, 2015 11:10 by Elton Morel
- Belvoir Pond, Fauquier, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.8498133,-77.8269331&ll=38.8498133,-77.8269331 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23626793
- Comments: "Slightly bigger than SESAs, white underparts except for single 
breast band, mud brown upper parts, short blunt bill." 


Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) (5)
- Reported May 25, 2015 11:10 by Elton Morel
- Belvoir Pond, Fauquier, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.8498133,-77.8269331&ll=38.8498133,-77.8269331 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23626793
- Comments: "Peeps smaller than SEPLs, pale grayish above, whitish below, no 
brownish tones to either the back or breast as in LESA. Couldn't see leg color 
at distance & heat shimmer. Long distance scope view." 


Sandwich Tern (Thalasseus sandvicensis) (5)
- Reported May 25, 2015 11:20 by Ellison Orcutt
- New Point Wharf - CMT07, Mathews, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.3448,-76.2749&ll=37.3448,-76.2749 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23633229
- Comments: "Medium sized terns, all black bills with light tips; 3 in breeding 
plumage." 


Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 07:40 by Jason  Strickland
- Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.852951,-75.977951&ll=36.852951,-75.977951 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23642974
- Comments: "Pale gray dove, black stripe on collar, squared tail..regularly 
seen here..photos available" 


Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 11:00 by William  Leigh
- Margaret Obryan's  WV, Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5346717,-79.5217037&ll=38.5346717,-79.5217037 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23635438

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 09:40 by John Shea
- Route 640 (Highland Co.), Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5243628,-79.539299&ll=38.5243628,-79.539299 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23635179
- Comments: "heard well and detected by others over the past few days"

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 12:40 by William  Leigh
- Route 642 - Laurel Fork Rd., Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5023278,-79.6047878&ll=38.5023278,-79.6047878 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23635439
- Comments: "heard"

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 12:30 by John Shea
- Route 642 - Laurel Fork Rd., Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5023278,-79.6047878&ll=38.5023278,-79.6047878 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23635448
- Comments: "beaver ponds - known location"

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2015 09:40 by William  Leigh
- Wimer Mountain Road 640, Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5292332,-79.5289135&ll=38.5292332,-79.5289135 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23635436
- Comments: "foy"

Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 09:00 by Adam Bollinger
- Burwells bay rd at Purvis rd, Isle of Wight, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.0452443,-76.7022514&ll=37.0452443,-76.7022514 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23642806
- Comments: "Gray bird with distinctive black mask, white throat and 
underbelly, black and white wing; fighting with mockingbird..went to a nest in 
a tree that looked like a Bradford pear, not sure if it was raiding or going to 
its own nest. Photographs available." 


Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) (6)
- Reported May 25, 2015 08:38 by Ellison Orcutt
- Bethel Beach Natural Area Preserve - CMT04, Mathews, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.4102069,-76.2489138&ll=37.4102069,-76.2489138 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23632315
- Comments: "Certainly more.  Vocal and visible"

Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 08:05 by James Marcum
- Apple Orchard Mountain, Bedford, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.5169,-79.5106&ll=37.5169,-79.5106 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23633660
- Comments: "Single bird clearly seen in area where three were seen yesterday."

Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) (3)
- Reported May 23, 2015 08:00 by James Marcum
- Apple Orchard Mountain, Bedford, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.5169,-79.5106&ll=37.5169,-79.5106 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23632341
- Comments: "Birds were singing and making themselves quite visible. Not 
uncommon for these higher elevations." 


Dickcissel (Spiza americana) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 25, 2015 14:25 by Elton Morel
- Prince William County, rural - Aden, Nokesville, Brentsville, Prince William, 
Virginia 

- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.6549211,-77.5367859&ll=38.6549211,-77.5367859 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23631041
- Comments: "Heard only. Corner of Brookfield Road & Parkgate Drive. In field 
on SW corner of intersection. Previously reported at this location." 


***********

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Subject: Online Birding Resources
From: "R. Bruce Richardson" <rbrucegrp AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 10:08:32 -0400
Dear Va-Birders,

There is a world of birding info out there. For those of you who would like to 
receive your own eBird Virginia Rare Bird Alert, it is only a couple of clicks 
away from landing in your inbox every morning. 


Simply go to eBIrd http://ebird.org/content/ebird/ and click on "My eBird then 
scroll down the right side to: Manage My Alerts and click that. You will then 
be on a page where you can select Virginia and or any number of states 
(including the entire ABA Area) and have the alerts emailed to you daily. You 
can change them at any time! And if youre traveling to other states, you can 
add those as well. 


Also, under the Explore Data page, the new "Explore a Region" section is 
wonderful! You just enter an area such as Richmond, VA and it will give you all 
the top Hot Spots, the latest sightings and top listers. Just a bit of 
exploring around eBird can bring you a wealth of information. 


And I should also mention Facebook. Sometimes the first postings and 
information on rare and unusual bird sightings hit Facebook before the list 
serves. Check out Birding Virginia: 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/456751061044163/ or the ABA Mid-Atlantic page: 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/722057611173718/ or the ABA Rare Bird Alert 
Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ABArare/ and Carolina Birders might be of 
interest to many of you: 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/carolinabirders/753047218104220/?notif_t=like 
There are other birding oriented groups on Facebook, just have a look around to 
see what interests you. 


I made a similar post last January, but I thought I would put this info out 
there again. I hope some of you find it helpful. I am not particularly 
technologically inclined, but these are some of the resources that have helped 
me to find some very good birds (and hopefully many more) and I wanted to share 
this with those of you who might not be familiar with them. 


Cheers,
R. Bruce Richardson
Manns Harbor, NC
Global Citizen 
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Subject: Old Courthouse Spring Branch, Tysons Corner, Ffx co.
From: Russell W Taylor <gnatcatcher AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 09:03:24 -0400
Walked the bluebird trail in the local stream valley park in the early 
afternoon yesterday. Net was 40 spp in a pre and post lunch pass through. 
Highlight for me were three Acadian Flycatchers, which have become an uncertain 
breeder in this particular spot. Also present were Eastern Wood-Peewees, 
Eastern Phoebe, and Great Crested Flycatchers, completing the resident 
flycatcher set. Late day warblers were limited to Common Yellowthroat and a 
Blackpoll. 


Interesting observation: I had identified a Fish Crow nest in a pine next to an 
office building a month ago. Walking by there, the two crows were going 
berserk. Getting closer, I could see there was an adult Red-tailed Hawk sitting 
in the nest eating the babies. I returned 70 minutes later and the hawk was 
still there dining. 


Good birding,

Russ Taylor 

Ineptly thumbed into my iPhone
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Subject: Dickcissel at Meadowoods Recreational Area (Fairfax County)
From: "Ron Vogel" <vireo AT cox.net>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 08:10:29 -0400
Early this morning I was able to quickly relocate the dickcissel that David
Ledwith

reported yesterday. It was signing from the tops of small shrubs to the
right of the blue bird nesting boxes

as you leave the parking area at the Mustang Trailhead. There may actually
be two birds.

As an added bonus, I observed a pair of bobolinks signing from the tops of
the red cedars closest to the parking area.

This is my  first springtime sighting of bobolinks at the Meadowood
Recreational Area.

 

A pair of blue grosbeaks, which are generally common at this location, is
also hanging around the parking area, making for some easy photo

opportunities.

 

Ron Vogel

Annandale, VA

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Subject: Ruth Beck Tribute
From: Brian and Deborah Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 06:31:05 -0400
A Tribute to our friend and friend to all birds, Ruth Beck, who passed away in 
early May, is on the website at www.cvwo.org. 



Brian Taber
Coastal VA Wildlife Observatory 
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Subject: Northern Virginia Bird Club walk Wednesday, May 27 - A request for help
From: "Larry Cartwright" <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 22:27:33 -0400
A Mr. Ezekiel Jakub is arriving from Panama to attend a conference on
Golden-winged Warbler conservation on the wintering grounds.  He would like
to attend the NVBC-sponsored walk at Huntley Meadows this Wednesday before
the conference, but lacks transportation.  He is located close to Southside
815 Restaurant at 815 S. Washington Street in Alexandria which is just after
the Washington St/Jefferson St intersection (5 blocks south of the Duke
Street intersection).  

 

If there is anybody near this location or going by this location to the
Huntley Meadows walk this Wednesday, and would be willing to provide
transportation to and from the walk for this gentleman, please let me know. 

 

Larry Cartwright

prowarbler AT verizon.net  

703-941-3142 

 

 

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Subject: Chincoteaguw NWR - GADWALL, Black-bellied Plover
From: Alyssa Freeman <tsiporah.shani AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 22:13:39 -0400
Today at Chincoteague, I saw an adult male Gadwall across from the
Boardwalk Trail/visitor's center in Tom's Cove. He was swimming out far
from the waterfowl that were resting on the sandbar, off the right, as if
he was going to go to the beach to Parking Lot 1. I needed a scope to see
him. I tried to get some pictures, but he was so far out. I think I got one
or two that are usable. However, I'm still in the area and it will be a few
days before I can upload them. I also had an adult Black-bellied Plover in
full breeding plumage. I saw it in the evening, around 7pm or so. I was
driving along the road toward the beach. He was walking in the mudflats off
the right side of the road, no more than 10 feet or so from the road. I got
some great looks and pictures of it.

Bald Eagles were also highly entertaining today. There was an adult sitting
next to a large tire in the marsh (seen along the Wildlife Loop) with an
IMMATURE eagle. The immature was clearly eating something, though it was
impossible to tell what because of how far off it was. The adult just sat
next it while "Junior" ate. The adult eventually flew off and "Junior" just
sat there, as if it was waiting for the adult to return (which it probably
was). Then, along the back part of the trail, facing east, I was watching
some shorebirds when I saw another immature sitting on what looked like the
remains of a wooden tower. It eventually hopped off and walked around the
mudflats next to it, picked something up, and returned to its perch. When I
zoomed in with the scope to see what it was he'd "caught," I discovered
that it was a ball! It was white and big - baseball-sized or softball-sized
- hard to tell for sure how big. He had it in his mouth, then put it
between his toes and tried to pick at it. It seemed confused! Got some pics
of it. Hopefully, they turned out ok. As I was leaving the island at
sunset, something scared the daylights out of a large flock of seagulls -
at least 100, I'd say (the best of my knowledge, none of themw ere singing,
"I Ran (So Far Away)," though I had the windows up so I can't say for
certain - LOL!) - probably another eagle. The full list is below/


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23639134


Alyssa Freeman,
Richmond. VA
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Subject: Re: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
From: "Walter L. Barrows" <wbarrows AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 19:59:41 -0400
I've added 7 photos to my Huntley Meadows gallery from this morning's
birdwalk. http://wlb3.smugmug.com/Virginia-Parks/Huntley-Meadows-Park/

Thanks, Harry.

Cheers

*Walt*

*Follow me for a daily bird photo .*

On Mon, May 25, 2015 at 7:18 PM, Harry Glasgow 
wrote:

> More than 25 birders gathered for today's Memorial Day edition of the
> Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  We spotted 61 species, with some
> highlights being a Warbling Vireo and Yellow-throated Vireo seen near the
> tower.  A Least Bittern was clearly heard in the wetland as well.  We would
> like to thank Sally Lindfors and David Keegan for hosting the group for the
> traditional post birding breakfast, and to the many birders who brought
> some very delicious offerings for the breakfast.
>
> Canada Goose  35
> Wood Duck  7
> American Black Duck  1
> Mallard  4
> Hooded Merganser  7
> Least Bittern  1
> Great Blue Heron  3
> Great Egret  1
> Green Heron  6
> Turkey Vulture  2
> Osprey  4
> Bald Eagle  1
> Red-shouldered Hawk  3
> American Coot  1
> Mourning Dove  3
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
> Chimney Swift  3
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  5
> Downy Woodpecker  5
> Hairy Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
> Acadian Flycatcher  9
> Willow Flycatcher  1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  2
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Warbling Vireo  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  8
> Blue Jay  1
> American Crow  1
> Fish Crow  1
> crow sp.  1
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
> Tree Swallow  10
> Barn Swallow  10
> Carolina Chickadee  6
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Carolina Wren  1
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  20
> Eastern Bluebird  2
> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  6
> Gray Catbird  2
> Cedar Waxwing  10
> Prothonotary Warbler  1
> Common Yellowthroat  10
> American Redstart  1
> Eastern Towhee  1
> Chipping Sparrow  1
> Song Sparrow  2
> Northern Cardinal  6
> Blue Grosbeak  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  50
> Common Grackle  20
> Brown-headed Cowbird  2
> House Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  6
>
> The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows
> since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during
> electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from
> November through March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is
> open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701
> Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff
> during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.
>
> Harry Glasgow
> Friends of Huntley Meadows Park
>
>
>
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Subject: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 23:18:03 +0000 (UTC)
 More than 25 birders gathered for today's Memorial Day edition of the Huntley 
Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  We spotted 61 species, with some highlights 
being a Warbling Vireo and Yellow-throated Vireo seen near the tower.  A Least 
Bittern was clearly heard in the wetland as well.  We would like to thank 
Sally Lindfors and David Keegan for hosting the group for the traditional post 
birding breakfast, and to the many birders who brought some very delicious 
offerings for the breakfast. 

Canada Goose  35
Wood Duck  7
American Black Duck  1
Mallard  4
Hooded Merganser  7
Least Bittern  1
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  6
Turkey Vulture  2
Osprey  4
Bald Eagle  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  3
American Coot  1
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Chimney Swift  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  5
Downy Woodpecker  5
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Acadian Flycatcher  9
Willow Flycatcher  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  8
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  1
crow sp.  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  10
Barn Swallow  10
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  20
Eastern Bluebird  2
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  2
Cedar Waxwing  10
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  10
American Redstart  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  6
Blue Grosbeak  1
Red-winged Blackbird  50
Common Grackle  20
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  6
The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 
1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical 
storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November through March), 
is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in 
the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. 
Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at 
(703)768-2525. 

Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park

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Subject: 5/25/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR - 4 Red Knots
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 15:47:12 -0400
Folks,

If anyone happens to be out birding in the Virginia Beach area today...
Jason Strickland & I encountered 4 Red Knots along the beach while walking
from False Cape State Park northward to the parking area at Back Bay NWR at
about 1 PM. The birds were seen roughly 1 mile south of the Back Bay NWR
parking areas. Perhaps these are some holdovers from the group encountered
on Friday by Ron Furnish & Marie Mullins. Either way, they were a state
first for me, and the first I've seen in breeding plumage, showing off
their namesake coloring! Shorebirds species were low along this stretch
with just Sanderlings, Semipalmated Sandpipers, 2 Ruddy Turnstones & 2
Black-bellied Plovers seen, so they were a welcome sight in that regard as
well!

Rob Bielawski
Virginia Beach, VA
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Subject: Dickcissel - Meadowood Recreation Area, Lorton
From: <dcharlesl AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 12:19:40 -0400
This afternoon, I saw a singing Dickcissel at Meadowood Recreation Area, 
Mustang Trailhead, Gunston and Harley Roads, Lorton. 


David Ledwith

Falls Church, VA
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Birding Around Concord and Questions about Piliated WP
From: pepherup--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 10:21:20 -0400
 Yesterday morning I spent a couple of hours birding in areas not more than 5 
miles from my home. I was looking for lingering bobolinks but with no luck. 
However, I was in one area with a creek and tall trees and 2 piliated 
woodpeckers were in a tree just over my head. The noise was deafening. So much 
so that I thought there must be more than 2 of them. I was able to watch them 
and as the noise continued, neither one of them were opening their bills as 
they called. Do piliated make that noise without opening their mouths? If not, 
there were definitely more than 2 there in the trees and I couldn't find them. 
They kept it up for more than 5 minutes. 

 Other birds of note heard or seen: BOBWHITE QUAIL! , chats, white eyed vireo, 
prairie warbler, pair of blue grosbeaks, barn and tree swallows, blue birds, 
indigo buntings, towhees, chipping and field sparrows, meadowlarks and flocks 
of goldfinches. 

 In my yard, there is a nesting pair of Baltimore orioles. Don't know exactly 
where. Saw male attacking a crow and saw the female working the holly bushes. 
Large flocks of cedar waxwings visiting the mulberry tree which has berries 
this year. 


Peggy Lyons
Concord
Campbell County
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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 10:00:59 -0400

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Swan (1 Accomack)
Common Merganser (1 Fairfax)
Horned Grebe (1 Accomack)
White-faced Ibis (1 Accomack)
Forster's Tern (1 Rockingham)
Sandwich Tern (Cabot's) (1 Hampton)
Sandwich Tern (1 Hampton)
Eurasian Collared-Dove (1 Accomack, 1 Virginia Beach)
Alder Flycatcher (6 Highland, 1 Prince William)
Loggerhead Shrike (1 Isle of Wight)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (1 Grayson)
Tennessee Warbler (1 Fairfax)
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (3 Madison)
Dark-eyed Junco (1 Madison)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert.The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View or unsubscribe to this 
alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus) 
- Reported May 19, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Chincoteague NWR, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.9084456,-75.3516541&ll=37.9084456,-75.3516541 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23612976

Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) (3) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 24, 2015 08:00 by Anonymous eBirder
- Great Falls National Park - CGF10, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.9937,-77.2553&ll=38.9937,-77.2553 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23609658
- Comments: "year round residents of the  Potomac River at Great Falls"

Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 12:30 by Joanne Laskowski
- Metompkin Island, VA, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.7694444,-75.5388889&ll=37.7694444,-75.5388889 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23618188
- Comments: "Bird was seen in channel behind Metompkin Island between the 
Island and the mainland marshes. Bird was in breeding plumage. Took photos b/c 
knew it was a late season sighting. 

Horned Grebe 1 

Horned Grebe 2" 


White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) 
- Reported May 19, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Chincoteague NWR, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.9084456,-75.3516541&ll=37.9084456,-75.3516541 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23612976

Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri) (2)
- Reported May 21, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23613085

Sandwich Tern (Cabot's) (Thalasseus sandvicensis) (4)
- Reported May 23, 2015 11:30 by Lee Schuster
- Grandview Beach, Hampton, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.08267,-76.2743962&ll=37.08267,-76.2743962 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23614246
- Comments: "Seen with a group of gulls and terns. Observed fairly close with 
the black beak with yellow tip very obvious." 


Sandwich Tern (Thalasseus sandvicensis) (6)
- Reported May 20, 2015 11:50 by Lee Schuster
- Grandview Beach, Hampton, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.08267,-76.2743962&ll=37.08267,-76.2743962 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23613963
- Comments: "Spotted with a large group of mixed royal terns, common terns, 
gull-billed terns. Smaller than the royals and the black bill with yellow tip 
was very obvious." 


Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) (2)
- Reported May 19, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Sandpiper Rd, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.7167252,-75.9344745&ll=36.7167252,-75.9344745 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23612986

Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 18:12 by Gary Smith
- US-VA-Chincoteague-6001–6131 Hallie Whealton Smith Dr, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.937715,-75.356465&ll=37.937715,-75.356465 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23617881
- Comments: "Single EUCD seen feeding or getting grit in the driveway of the 
Elementary School. Approx 1 mi from prevoiusly reported location on Pension 
St." 


Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (4)
- Reported May 23, 2015 by Greg Moyers
- Highland Co., Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4853072,-79.5080566&ll=38.4853072,-79.5080566 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23613078

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 23, 2015 08:30 by Elisa Enders Flanders
- O'Bryan's, Wimer Mountain Road (Virginia), Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.53376,-79.52327&ll=38.53376,-79.52327 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23613382
- Comments: "along Wimer Mtn Road, nearby"

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 23, 2015 08:30 by Stacey Maggard
- Occoquan Bay NWR - CPW02, Prince William, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.6455061,-77.2361183&ll=38.6455061,-77.2361183 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23611395
- Comments: "Heard only, very husky "fee-be-oo" call"

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 22, 2015 07:30 by John Pancake
- Route 640 (Highland Co.), Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5243628,-79.539299&ll=38.5243628,-79.539299 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23608427
- Comments: "calling below Margaret's, distinct three part call "fee-b-er" with 
emphsis on the last part of the call. ID'd by Bob Ake first." 


Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 22, 2015 07:30 by Barry Kinzie
- Route 640 (Highland Co.), Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5243628,-79.539299&ll=38.5243628,-79.539299 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23608137
- Comments: "calling below Margaret's, distinct three part call "fee-b-er" with 
emphsis on the last part of the call. ID'd by Bob Ake first." 


Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 22, 2015 08:20 by John Pancake
- Route 642 - Laurel Fork Rd., Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5023278,-79.6047878&ll=38.5023278,-79.6047878 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23608999
- Comments: "Calling at Straight Fork beaver ponds...call  "fee-b-r","

Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 22, 2015 08:20 by Barry Kinzie
- Route 642 - Laurel Fork Rd., Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5023278,-79.6047878&ll=38.5023278,-79.6047878 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23608813
- Comments: "Calling at Straight Fork beaver ponds...call  "fee-b-r","

Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 09:00 by Jason  Strickland
- Burwells bay rd at Purvis rd, Isle of Wight, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.0452443,-76.7022514&ll=37.0452443,-76.7022514 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23611691
- Comments: "Gray bird with distinctive black mask, white throat and 
underbelly, black and white wing; fighting with mockingbird..went to a nest in 
a tree that looked like a Bradford pear, not sure if it was raiding or going to 
its own nest. Photographs available." 


Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa) (2)
- Reported May 24, 2015 10:30 by James Shelton
- Mt. Rogers - VA Rt. 600 - Mt. Rogers NRA - MMR08, Grayson, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.6597,-81.5447&ll=36.6597,-81.5447 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23619176
- Comments: "Have clear photos will post this week."

Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina) (1)
- Reported May 23, 2015 08:27 by Seth Factor
- US-VA-Vienna-901 Lauren Ln SE, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.898357,-77.246484&ll=38.898357,-77.246484 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23607351
- Comments: "Heard singing. Seen. Responded to playback."

Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis) (5)
- Reported May 24, 2015 09:45 by Robert Mains
- Big Meadows, Shenandoah NP - MSD05, Madison, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.518,-78.4321&ll=38.518,-78.4321 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23614056
- Comments: "Seen in several locations in woods near Big Meadows"

Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis) (2)
- Reported May 23, 2015 07:58 by Linda Chittum
- Limberlost Trail, Shenandoah NP - MSD03, Madison, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5732,-78.3795&ll=38.5732,-78.3795 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23610298

Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis) (1)
- Reported May 19, 2015 09:30 by Ron-Tracy Snyder-George
- Shenandoah NP--multiple locations, Madison, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5273012,-78.4008708&ll=38.5273012,-78.4008708 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23607817
- Comments: "flashing white of tail, slate gray back, head, and breast"

Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) (1)
- Reported May 24, 2015 09:10 by Thomas Jones
- big meadows, Madison, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5191944,-78.4336281&ll=38.5191944,-78.4336281 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23608283
- Comments: "nothing surprising"

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Subject: Willow Flycatcher, Markham Rd, Pittsylvania Co.
From: Mary Foster <chathambirds08 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 23:01:14 -0500
Sorry for the late post.  Mom and I were riding around Saturday AM and 
heard and then saw a Willow Flycatcher on Markham Rd. near North Meadows
 Rd. in Pittsylvania County.  This is a section of river bottom near the
 Banister River.  It was in the cut over area singing loudly!

Mary Foster
Dry Fork 		 	   		  
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Subject: Willow Flycatcher, Markham Rd., Pittsylvania Co.
From: Mary Foster <chathambirds08 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 22:59:53 -0500
Sorry for the late post. Mom and I were riding around Saturday AM and heard and 
then saw a Willow Flycatcher on Markham Rd. near North Meadows Rd. in 
Pittsylvania County. This is a section of river bottom near the Banister River. 
It was in the cut over area singing loudly! 


Mary Foster
Dry Fork
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Willow Flycatcher, Markham Rd., Pittsylvania Co.
From: Mary Foster <chathambirds08 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 22:59:39 -0500
Sorry for the late post. Mom and I were riding around Saturday AM and heard and 
then saw a Willow Flycatcher on Markham Rd. near North Meadows Rd. in 
Pittsylvania County. This is a section of river bottom near the Banister River. 
It was in the cut over area singing loudly! 


Mary Foster
Dry Fork
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Saxis WMA
From: Alyssa Freeman <tsiporah.shani AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 23:43:10 -0400
Drove around this WMA on the bay side of the Eastern Shore peninsula
(opposite side form Chincoteague, about) this morning. Saw and heard my
first Marsh Wren of the year and only my second one ever. Didn't get a very
good look, though. ID'd more by song that appearance. Also, saw the typical
gulls, immature Bald Eagles, a Common Yellowthroat, three tern species
(Forster's, Common, and Least), Dunlin,a Baltimore Oriole, and others.

Chincoteague today turned up a Blue Grosbeak in the same spot he was in
yesterday, another Baltimore Oriole, an Orchard Oriole,a Chestnut-sided
Warbler (ID'd by voice), Brown-headed Nuthatches, and a couple of
Tricolored Herons (one on the wildlife loop and a couple around Tom's
Cove). Also saw a D.P. Fox Squirrel and a couple of ponies.

Alyssa Freeman
Richmond, VA
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Subject: Blue-winged Warblers, Broad-winged Hawk, Chats and more, Blue Ridge Center Lo Co
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 22:49:06 -0400
Thirty-five birders showed up for the regularly scheduled monthly bird walk
at the 900-acre Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship in
northwestern Loudoun County this past Saturday morning. This month's walk
was sponsored by both the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy and the Northern
Virginia Bird Club and split into two different groups. One group, led by
Elton Morel & Marc Ribaudo, concentrated on the area around the Education
Center & organic farm and found 59 species; the other group, led by Joe
Coleman & Mary Ann Good, walked the trails at the southern end of the
property and found 57 species. Neither group spent much time in the forest
and, for the most part, found the same species with some notable exceptions
such as the four Chats found around the Education Center. After the
scheduled walk a couple people briefly visited the open areas under the
power line on Arnold Road and added American Robins and two counter-singing
Orchard Orioles to the days list. 

 

The highlights of the 70 species were five Blue-winged Warblers, a couple of
which were well-seen, a flyover Broad-winged Hawk, one Cerulean Warbler, and
4 Yellow-breasted Chats. 

 

For a complete list of the birds see the combined eBird lists below.

 

Information on the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship can be
found at   http://www.blueridgecenter.org.
Information on the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy and its many free activities
can be found at   www.loudounwildlife.org
and information on the Northern Virginia Bird Club can be found at
http://www.nvabc.org/.

 

Joe Coleman

 

Canada Goose  6

Great Blue Heron  2     

Black Vulture  3

Turkey Vulture  9

Cooper's Hawk  1

Bald Eagle  3

Red-shouldered Hawk  3

Broad-winged Hawk  1

Red-tailed Hawk  1

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  26

Mourning Dove  6

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  4

Chimney Swift  18

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3

Red-bellied Woodpecker  7

Downy Woodpecker  3

Hairy Woodpecker  3

Northern Flicker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  4

Eastern Wood-Pewee  3

Acadian Flycatcher  6

Eastern Phoebe 1

Great Crested Flycatcher  10

Eastern Kingbird  4

White-eyed Vireo  6

Yellow-throated Vireo  2

Red-eyed Vireo  25

Blue Jay  3

American Crow  9

Fish Crow  3

Common Raven 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1

Tree Swallow  9

Barn Swallow  14

Carolina Chickadee  8

Tufted Titmouse  15

White-breasted Nuthatch  2

House Wren 3

Carolina Wren  5

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  9

Eastern Bluebird  6

Wood Thrush  2

American Robin  2

Gray Catbird  5

Northern Mockingbird 2

Brown Thrasher  2

European Starling  8

Cedar Waxwing  27

Ovenbird  1

Louisiana Waterthrush  1

Blue-winged Warbler  5

Kentucky Warbler  1

Common Yellowthroat  8

American Redstart  8

Cerulean Warbler 1

Yellow-breasted Chat  4

Eastern Towhee  5

Chipping Sparrow  3

Field Sparrow  15

Grasshopper Sparrow  1

Song Sparrow  1

Scarlet Tanager  4

Northern Cardinal  12

Indigo Bunting  25

Eastern Meadowlark 1

Common Grackle  3

Brown-headed Cowbird  18

Orchard Oriole  2

American Goldfinch  30

House Sparrow 2

 

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Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - G.R. Thompson WMA - MFR02, May 24, 2015
From: Phillip Kenny <philkenny AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 21:53:47 -0400
Dear Virginia Birders,
I birded upper Thompsons WMA, Fauquier County, Virginia, this morning. At the 
first parking lot off of Freezeland Road, there were signing Kentucky Warblers 
heard as soon as I got out of the car! Nice way to start the day birding!!! 
There were also Cerulean, Scarlet Tanager, lots of Redstarts and a Hooded 
Warbler further down the path. 

At the second stop, there was a Red-headed Woodpecker, Raven and Rose-Breasted 
Grosbeak heard near the road, and Worm-eating, Black and White, and Black Pole 
Warblers along the trail. Redstarts were in abundance, and Cerulean plentiful. 
Red-eyed Vireo, Wood Thrush, Acadian and Pewee could always be heard. 

My third stop was at the end of the FireRoad. I found another Kentucky, 
Ceruleans, one Chat and lots of Indigo Buntings. 

It was a great day to be outside and birding, but a tough day for photography. 
The birds were well ensconced in leaves, high up and fast moving. Here is a 
link to some of the photos of the day, including my life Zebra Swallowtail: 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/95123562 AT N07/sets/72157653406496415
Cheers,
Phil


Phillip Kenny
1731 Killarney Court
Vienna VA 22182-2133
703-255-5423
philkenny AT verizon.net


Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - G.R. Thompson WMA - MFR02, May 24, 2015
> Date: May 24, 2015 at 9:01:52 PM EDT
> To: philkenny AT verizon.net
> 
> G.R. Thompson WMA - MFR02, Fauquier, US-VA
> May 24, 2015 6:42 AM - 10:36 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8 > 42 species > > Black Vulture 1 > Turkey Vulture 1 > Red-tailed Hawk 1 > Mourning Dove 4 > Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 > Red-headed Woodpecker 1 > Red-bellied Woodpecker 4 > Downy Woodpecker 1 > Pileated Woodpecker 1 > Eastern Wood-Pewee 8 > Acadian Flycatcher 8 > Great Crested Flycatcher 3 > Red-eyed Vireo 8 > Blue Jay 1 > American Crow 3 > Common Raven 2 > Carolina Chickadee 1 > Tufted Titmouse 2 > White-breasted Nuthatch 1 > Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1 > Wood Thrush 6 > American Robin 2 > Gray Catbird 4 > Cedar Waxwing 12 > Ovenbird 5 > Worm-eating Warbler 6 > Black-and-white Warbler 1 > Kentucky Warbler 3 > Hooded Warbler 5 > American Redstart 25 > Cerulean Warbler 15 Many birds seen and heard. > Blackpoll Warbler 2 > Yellow-breasted Chat 1 > Eastern Towhee 5 > Chipping Sparrow 1 > Scarlet Tanager 6 > Northern Cardinal 4 > Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 > Blue Grosbeak 1 > Indigo Bunting 1 > Brown-headed Cowbird 1 > American Goldfinch 1 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23611605 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: Common Nighthawks, Badger Rd (Augusta Co., today)
From: Diane L via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 20:19:33 +0000 (UTC)
On Badger Road late this morning, a brownish bump on a White Oak's gray bark 
looked a bit out of place. Well, it turned out to be a bird head -- Common 
Nighthawk. Which was not at all out of place, as we've had several reports of 
C. Nighhawks there. Most recently, I believe, by Dan Perkuchin. And, as I 
recall, first in a prior year by Gabriel Mapel. 



Along with finding a second C. Nighthawk in flight, Greg Moyers and I watched 
two Red-headed Woodpeckers excavating a nest hole. Sorry to report that when 
both birds briefly left the job-site, starlings snooped at the hole. Among 
other finds were Grasshopper and Savannah Sparrows. 


Diane Lepkowski
Harrisonburg

PS - We saw a flying C. Nighthwak first, then searched trees from every angle 
imaginable after studying Cornell's 'Birds of North America' website for info 
on the species' preferred daytime roosts. Just a tiny window in the 
fully-leafed oak offered a view. (This bird had apparently not done its 
homework...it was facing west on a west-facing limb, a 180 degree spin from my 
reading of its likely position(!)) 



A few pics:  

http://birdtrek.smugmug.com/Animals/Shenandoah-Valley-VA-Spring-2015/48359800_hDPkR8#!i=4080607547&k=Wwjw3Q9 

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Subject: Dyke Marsh, Alexandria
From: "Marc Ribaudo" <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 15:07:28 -0400
About 30 people attended the weekly walk at Dyke Marsh in Alexandria. The walk 
is sponsored by Friends of Dyke Marsh and open to all. It was a beautiful 
morning and the few migrants we saw is indicative of the tail end of the spring 
migration. Highlights were 2 greater yellowlegs on the mudflats seen from the 
picnic area, 3 spotted sandpipers, a little warbler flock containing 1 each of 
American redstart, magnolia warbler, and blackpoll warbler, 2 eastern kingbirds 
working on a nest, 3 osprey chicks getting fed at the nest next to the marina, 
a migrant scarlet tanager in the picnic area before the walk, 2 male Baltimore 
orioles offering great views, 2 warbling vireos, and a grey-cheeked thrush seen 
by only a few. We tallied 60 species in all. 


Marc Ribaudo
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Subject: Mississippi Kite - Dismal Swamp Canal Trail - Chesapeake VA
From: Tracy Tate <tltaterbug44 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 14:40:12 -0400
Good birding on the Canal Trail this afternoon.  I am reporting a
Mississippi Kite soaring high and toward Lake Drummond just south of
Balyhack Rd.  Nice look at the flight profile and adult plumage! Cool!

All the expected species including a singing Wood Thrush that came to my
imitation and gave very cooperative profiles.

Good birding and be safe!

Tracy Tate
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Subject: Great Falls Walk
From: Marshall Rawson via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 13:20:20 -0400
Our group of fourteen birders tallied 50 species. It was a very busy morning in 
the park. Highlights included a mourning warbler which was just beyond the 
stream as you leave the picnic area for the holding basin. An acadian 
flycatcher was in the same general area. We spotted a pair of nesting 
waterthrushes in the holding basin area. It was a beautiful morning but the 
birding was slow. All are welcome to join this regular Sunday morning walk that 
meets in the visitors center parking lot at 8:00am. --m Marshall Rawson, McLean 
VA 


Canada Goose  4
Mallard  1
Common Merganser  3    
Double-crested Cormorant 5
Great Blue Heron  12
Black Vulture  22
Turkey Vulture  1
Bald Eagle  3    
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
Chimney Swift  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
Acadian Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  5
Eastern Kingbird 1
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay 4
American Crow  2
Fish Crow  2
Tree Swallow  2
Carolina Chickadee 2
Tufted Titmouse  12
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  1
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
Cedar Waxwing  8
Louisiana Waterthrush 3
Mourning Warbler  1
Northern Parula  3
Blackpoll Warbler  3
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  10
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  12
Common Grackle  6
Brown-headed Cowbird 2
Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  3

View this
checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23609658



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Subject: 2 Mississippi Kites in Burke, VA
From: janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 13:00:04 -0400
May 21, 2015
 
2 Mississippi Kites seen in a tree close to the road at Gaines and Jackson  
Street in Burke, Fairfax County, VA
 
Janet M. Anderson
Falls Church, VA
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Subject: Killdeer distraction display
From: Stephen Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 11:18:52 -0400
Hello birders,

I birded today along a powerline cut in eastern Loudoun County, near the county 
parkway. Nothing unusual species-wise, but a cool bit of behavior. 


At the end I did a perfunctory check of a construction site with a couple of 
temporary puddles, and found a Solitary Sandpiper and 2 Killdeer. I spooked the 
Killdeer as I arrived, then concentrated on ID-ing the Solitary. 


Then I heard a strange sound. In binoculars I found that the Killdeer was 
making this funny twittering sound, with its tail fanned and tilted and wings 
slightly opened. I lost track of the other Killdeer, and this bird was looking 
back over its shoulder - apparently, at me. 


I realized this was a distraction display, so approached slowly closer. 
(Watching my step to avoid stepping on a nest.) The bird moved further and 
repeated all of the above, including the cocked head back towards me. 


We did 2 more reps of this interesting dance, then I left. (Again, watching out 
for the nest - didn't find it.) 


Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Subject: Willow Flycatcher at Occoquan bay NWR
From: Candice Lowther <candiceylowther AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 09:21:58 -0400
VA-birders,

There is currently a singing Willow Flycatcher near the main parking area at 
Occoquan bay NWR. It is singing from the top of one of the trees around the 
small pond. 


Good birding!

Candice Lowther
Bristow, VA

Live long and prosper.

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Subject: Eastern shore birds - Black Scoters, White Ibises, Summer Tanager, Chuck-Will's-Widows, more
From: Alyssa Freeman <tsiporah.shani AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 22:24:39 -0400
Hope everyone is having a nice Memorial Day weekend so far! I decided to
head out the Chincoteague for the long weekend. Along the way, on Route 13,
I had four Black Scoters on the ocean side of the CBBT, off Island #1.
Also, quite a few Ruddy Turnstones - no Purple Sandpipers, though. I then
proceeded to Eastern Shore NWR. The highlights there included 8 singing
Indigo Buntings (in various places), Northern Bobwhites calling (FOY), a
good look at a pair of Orchard Orioles (both male - one adult, 1 immature),
a Ruby-throated Hummingbird seen as I was trying to call out a White-eyed
Vireo, and at least two immature Bald Eagles. There were also several
Prairie Warblers singing.

A brief stop at Mockhorn/GATR WMA (off of SR's 600 and 750) netted five
White Ibises that flew up in front of me into a tree and gave me great
looks. I think this was a state bird for me. I got several photos of them,
but can't upload photos until I get back to Richmond. Also picked p a
Red-headed Woodpecker and a Summer Tanager doing his pikituk call. I think
that was the first time I ever heard one call (rather than sing). I got a
quick look at it - enough to know what it was.

Ended the day at Chincoteague NWR. Tons of peeps but the only ones I could
ID were Semipalmated Plovers AND Semipalmated Sandpipers. There were also a
number of Dunlin, Lesser Yellowlegs, and Short-billed Dowitchers. Saw over
a dozen Glossy Ibises - no White-faced, unfortunately. As I was leaving
around 8:30 or so, I heard a pair of Chuck-Will's-Widow's (FOY) in the
parking lot. The highlight was about 50 Snowy Egrets with about 5 Glossy
Ibises taking off en masse and overhead when an adult Bald Eagle got too
close for comfort.They all eventually settled down right back where they
were.

66 species altogether today, as well as about a dozen butterfly species,a
Red Saddlebag dragonfly, and two mammals (2 Gray Squirrel and 2 Eastern
Cottontails). Good birding!

Alyssa Freeman,
Richmond, VA
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Subject: Huntley Meadows, FRFX Co, 23 May 2015
From: "Kurt Gaskill" <KurtCapt87 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 22:03:13 -0400
VA BIRDers,

I visited Huntley Meadows today and the highlight was Mourning Warbler,
singing along the entrance road towards the maintenance facility, near where
the trail and road diverge. It quickly moved north along the creek as I
tried to watch it at about 0630 this morning. By the way, from my No. VA
records, the period from 18 to 25 May is peak for finding Mourning Warblers.

I worked the area from the Telegraph Rd side of the park early in the
morning and then visited the VC side in the early evening. Other highlights
were Hooded Merganser with 6 - 2 week old merglets, Wild Turkey gobbling
behind the maintenance area, Spotted Sandpiper along Barnyard Run, American
Woodcock flying in a copse of woods next to the woodcock meadow (maybe a
breeder?), Willow Flycatcher in the woodcock meadow, Bank Swallow over the
small lake, Veery, Gray-cheeked Thrush, YB Chat, Field Sparrow singing in
the meadow to the east of the platform, and Lincoln's Sparrow in the "Coast
Guard Marsh". I recorded 72 species, a tie with an effort on this same date
in 2001  (Also a tie with 5/19/08; all other years produced fewer species
for this date give or take a few days), which means it was a good day at
Huntley for this time of year.

I started a bit after 6am heading down the road from the Telegraph Rd
parking area. I did the pond trail and then the woodcock meadow, afterwards
heading through forest to the Coast Guard Marsh, then off trail until back
to the new asphalt trail to the water control feature - probably about 4
miles. Despite finding the Mourning Warbler early in the morning, the
warbler diversity was quite paltry with many misses - yet, good counts of
Magnolia (8), American Redstart (7) and Ovenbird (10) plus singles of YB
Chat and the Mourning. The local breeding Common Yellowthroats tallied 35.
Thrush were perhaps a bit less than average:

Eastern Bluebirds 4
Veery 1
Gray-cheeked 1
Swainson's 5
Wood 1, this latter is surprising, heard only in a portion of the park with
very little invasive Japanese Stiltgrass
American Robin 14

A good count for Great Crested Flycatcher (7) was obtained but only one
Eastern Kingbird. A pair of White-eyed Vireos, 32 Red-eyed Vireos, and
single Carolina and House Wrens (the former is surprising). A few Gray
Catbirds, 18 Cedar Waxwings, and a surprising 6 Eastern Towhees as I never
considered this species as widespread breeders in the park (at least the
west section) - this year I appear to be wrong.  The Blue Grosbeak tally was
4 suggesting movement through the area, ditto for Scarlet Tanager with 7
tallied.  Indigo Buntings were only 10, so perhaps the bulk of this species
has moved through. A single Baltimore Oriole was singing east of the main
boardwalk leg.

Big Misses?  Red-shouldered Hawk - I am still flabbergasted. 

Kurt Gaskill


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Subject: Thompson WMA- scads of Redstarts
From: Scott Priebe <falco57 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 01:30:04 +0000
Spent the morning at Thompson WMA, mainly for the warblers, esp. Cerulean, 
Kentucky, and Hooded. Had good looks at all but the Kentucky, one of which was 
singing within 20-30 ft of the trail in deep cover. 



Redstarts were all over the mountainside, mostly calling. I counted 31 that I 
could be sure of, but I suspect that was a significant undercount. I found one 
female visiting a substantial nest; she was bringing nesting material. While 
she was away, a Red-eyed Vireo came to the nest and poked about for a minute or 
so. 



Scott Priebe

Springfield 


Species: 36 

Broad-winged Hawk          
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Red-bellied Woodpecker     
Downy Woodpecker           
Hairy Woodpecker           
Eastern Wood-Pewee         
Acadian Flycatcher         
Yellow-throated Vireo      
Red-eyed Vireo             
Blue Jay                   
Common Raven               
Barn Swallow               
Carolina Chickadee         
Tufted Titmouse            
White-breasted Nuthatch    
Carolina Wren              
Gray-cheeked Thrush        1
Wood Thrush                
American Robin             
Gray Catbird               
Brown Thrasher             
Ovenbird                   8
Worm-eating Warbler        1
Louisiana Waterthrush      1
Kentucky Warbler           2
Hooded Warbler             8
American Redstart          31
Cerulean Warbler           
Eastern Towhee             
Chipping Sparrow           
Scarlet Tanager            9
Northern Cardinal          
Rose-breasted Grosbeak     5
Indigo Bunting             
Brown-headed Cowbird       
American Goldfinch         


Birder's Diary - www.BirdersDiary.com - 5/23/2015






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Subject: 5/22/15 & 5/23/15 - Virginia Beach - Back Bay NWR & False Cape SP
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 21:23:38 -0400
Folks,

*Highlights*
*Back Bay NWR (5/22/15)* - 3:45 to 7:00 PM - 1 female Black Scoter on
northernmost freshwater impoundment along West Dike Trail, 1 American Coot
on pond north of maritime forest, FOY Yellow-billed Cuckoo (3 in maritime
forest), FOY American Redstart (male on Bay Trail), FOY Cattle Egret
(overhead fly-by on Bay Trail), Greater Yellowlegs, Indigo Buntings, Blue
Grosbeaks, Eastern Kingbirds, Orchard Orioles.
*Back Bay NWR (5/23/15) *- 7:40 to 9:20 AM - American Redstart (female
behind visitor center on Bay Trail), Flycatcher (likely Acadian but unable
to determine off quick look), two separate warblers seen along Bay Trail as
fleeting looks that were unable to ID, Orchard Orioles, 1 American Coot in
same spot as before, Greater Yellowlegs, Indigo Buntings, Blue Grosbeaks,
Eastern Kingbirds, No scoter present this time along West Dike Trail.
*False Cape SP (5/23/15) *- 9:20 to 10:10 AM - FOY Summer Tanager (male &
female near visitor center), Prairie Warbler, Ruby-throated Hummingbird,
Indigo Buntings, Ruddy Turnstone, No Red Knots present along beach today.
*Back Bay NWR (5/23/15) *- 10:10 to 11:50 AM - No Red Knots presents today,
Black-bellied Plovers, Ruddy Turnstones, Royal Tern, lots of Brown Pelicans
over dune line but essentially no other birds flying in the windy
conditions, Cedar Waxwings.

*Outing Photographs*
*http://www.rbnature.com/galleries/we-20150524/
*

*Full Species List(s)*
*http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23584822
*

*http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23594916
*

*http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23595010
*

*http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23595105
*

*Full Details*

Memorial Day weekend got off to a nice start with beautiful sunny skies and
weather in the low 70s on Friday evening. After work, I headed down to Back
Bay NWR, arriving about 3:45 PM, parking near the Loop Road entrance. With
success that many folks have had at the base of the Bay Trail, I made a
quick stop to see if I could find any warblers here, but seeing & hearing
nothing after a few minutes, headed down the Loop Road's western side
instead. *Red-winged Blackbirds* were frequently seen, but birds were quiet
on the Loop Road. One Northern Watersnake was seen swimming in the ponds
adjacent to the gravel roadway, and photographed. This particular snake
kept submerging itself and swimming down into the vegetation at the bottom
of the shallow pond, then would rise up with just its head sticking out of
the water's surface. I've never seen one act quite like this before, but it
made for some neat photographs (see link above). Reaching the junction with
the West Dike Trail, a pair of *Eastern Kingbirds* flew across the trail
and headed off to the southeast. Throughout the next stretch of the
trail, *Boat-tailed
& Common Grackles* were seen, and one *Great Egret* made a fly-over, but
still, pretty quiet for birds. Reaching the southwest corner of the large,
marshy impoundment, I spotted a duck sitting out on the water, thinking it
was probably a* Mallard* since they're really the only species around right
now in any numbers. However, as I got closer, it was obvious that the bird
was actually a female *Black Scoter*. I believe this is the first one I've
ever photographed on freshwater before, and it was a strange feeling seeing
it against a marshy backdrop rather than the open ocean. The bird never
took to the air, but did dive several times, coming up to see where I was,
then diving again. After a few dives, and a few photographs, I continued on
my walk so that it wouldn't be disturbed. Near here, there is a junction
with a trail that cuts east-west across the impoundments, forming the
northern edge of a large rectangular pond. On this pond, there are a couple
small mudflats, though most of the pond is just open water. *Semipalmated
Plovers *and *Greater Yellowlegs* could be seen on the mudflats in small
numbers, with a pair of female *Red-breasted Mergansers* that were sitting
on the exposed surface. Mallards & *Canada Geese* were out on the water
swimming, and 7 *Snowy Egrets* were hunting out in the middle where it must
be quite shallow. One *Caspian Tern* could be seen all the way across the
pond on the eastern shore, and it later did a flyby of my location,
providing some nice looks at the large amount of black on its underwings.


Over the next stretch of trail, I passed the pumphouse that floods the
impoundments with water from Back Bay when needed, and continued south,
nearing the entrance to the maritime forest. In the couple hundred yards
north of the maritime forest, I've been seeing a fair amount of *Orchard
Orioles*, which seem to enjoy the few trees that dot this portion of the
trail. On the pond near here was 1 *American Coot*, which is hanging around
quite late into the month, and also a pair of *Greater Yellowlegs* that
seem to be in this area each time I walk nearby. A beautiful male *American
Goldfinch* was seen with a female companion in one of the small trees along
the trail here as well, making it the second time I've seen one this week
out far from suburbia and feeders. Entering the maritime forest, a *Blue
Grosbeak *was seen calling from high up a tall tree. Also, a single *Mourning
Dove* was perched up in a tree where the east-west trail crossing the
park's interior hits the roadway. Along the roadway, I finally encountered
my first *cuckoos* of the year when two *Yellow-billeds* jumped from an
overhanging branch visible from the road up into the protection of the
canopy. I snapped a few shots of one of the birds before it flew off into
the forest (see above link). A single *Prothonotary Warbler* was heard in
the forest also, and it actually flew right across the road in front of me,
giving me good looks of a bird that I don't often spend time trying to put
eyes on in this section due to the thickness of the foliage. A pair of *Great
Crested Flycatchers* also provided nice looks and photos along the forested
roadway. Upon exiting the forest, a Nutria was pulled up on the shoreline
of the adjacent ditch, cleaning itself and shaking off for a few minutes. I
walked a hundred yards or so to the south, sadly seeing a very small, young
Cottonmouth smashed on the roadway. The young snakes have a beautiful
pattern of varying brown colors and are a sight to behold when alive, so
this was a quite sad to see. I turned around here and headed back
northward, seeing a couple of Carolina Chickadees in the forest but not
much else. The coot, yellowlegs, and Black Scoter were all present on the
northward journey again, and more photographs were taken. When I reached
the northern end of the West Dike Trail, I took the Loop Road around to the
east, hoping to get some looks at a Prairie Warbler, which are quite common
along this section. Unfortunately, I didn't get my Prairie this time, but
did find a pair of Blue Grosbeaks up near the Dune Trail's boardwalk. I
opted not to walk down to the beach this time, instead heading directly up
to the Bay Trail, which I walked out and back. Walking westward, about
mid-way between the Bayside Trail boardwalk connection and the pond at the
west end, a small songbird flew across the trail, pausing briefly on a
branch before disappearing into the thick foliage. Fortunately, I got a
good look at the bird while perched, clearly a male *American Redstart*
showing just a little bright-orange and a mostly black body, my first of
the year. Continuing west, I reached the end of the trail & made the
turn-around, seeing a white bird flying over quite high up. Sporting yellow
legs, a stocky yellow bill, and a rusty patch on the chest, this bird was
my first *Cattle Egret *of the year, so the Bay Trail turned out to be a
good move this time. I headed back to the vehicle, not re-locating the
redstart for a photo unfortunately, but still excited to have seen one here.


After good success on Friday evening at the park, and after reading and
hearing about the Red Knots that Ron Furnish & Marie Mullins had spotted
along the beachfront near the False Cape SP border, I headed down to Back
Bay again as soon as I woke up on Saturday, arriving at 7:40 AM. I started
off with a walk down the Bay Trail, which again turned out to be a good
decision. I had a warbler cross in front of me, that looked to have several
colors on it, but it never stopped or stood still long enough to let me
focus on it unfortunately. A part of me hopes this might be the Magnolia
Warbler spotted near here by Karen & Tom Beatty recently, and all of me
hopes if this is the case, that it sticks around so I can actually get a
look at it! Behind the visitor center, in the hotspot apparent of the last
couple of weeks I got a female American Redstart, and photos this time, so
I was excited about that! Also, a flycatcher that was most likely an
Acadian hopped through the dense foliage, but I couldn't get good enough
looks to validate the ID. So the birds are definitely around this area, but
they weren't giving me much time to see them today. The wind was really
howling from the northeast at probably 15-20 mph, continuously, so birds in
general today were tough to find in the open. Heading down the Loop
Road, a *Common
Tern* flew over me, as did a couple of *Ospreys*, but again the dominant
birds now are the Red-winged Blackbirds. Walking the West Dike Trail
yielded the same typical birds I'd seen the day before (Blue Grosbeaks,
Indigo Buntings, Orchard Orioles, Eastern Kingbirds), but nothing new was
sighted. A *Great Blue Heron* was seen trying to swallow a rather massive
Bluegill that it must have caught just before I spotted it. A few decent
photographs of this bird show just how gluttonous they can be. I wondered
exactly how they're able to swallow these fish whole and digest them
without the spines on the fins hurting their throats or stomachs, but I
guess they've been doing for a while, and have figured it out. The Black
Scoter had disappeared overnight and could not be re-located on any of the
visible impoundments from the roadway, which I was happy about, since I was
concerned it might be an injured bird given its behavior on Friday evening.
The American Coot sighted yesterday was sitting right about in the same
spot, as were the pair of Greater Yellowlegs.


Entering the maritime forest, I felt I might see more birds than I had out
in the open, given that the area was protected from the winds. Great
Crested Flycatchers were again see, and Prothonotary Warblers were heard,
but still the birds remained tough to find here. Exiting the forest, what
was likely the same Nutria was seen again cleaning itself up. At the border
road with False Cape SP I headed eastward, turning south at the main entry
road towards the visitor center. Along this roadway a flock of *Double-crested
Cormorants* cruised by overhead, and again many Red-winged Blackbirds were
seen. Eastern Kingbirds, Tufted Titmice and Indigo Buntings were also seen
here, and a single* Red-tailed Hawk* was flying in circles overhead. Near
the visitor center, two birds flew by me overhead, calling a song I didn't
recognize. They landed in a tree nearby, one, a red bird, the other, a
greenish-yellow bird. Getting the binoculars up on them got me excited when
I realized they were *Summer Tanagers,* a male & female, and also the first
I've seen this year. I never see a lot of these birds in any given year,
last year I believe I only saw 2 as well (at First Landing SP), so they
were a welcomed sight. Continuing eastward from the visitor center towards
Barbour Hill and the beachfront yielded a Blue Grosbeak, and good looks at a*
Prairie Warbler* that was calling from a roadside shrub. A *Ruby-throated
Hummingbird *was seen along a powerline, and another was seen near some
honeysuckle. A Mud Turtle, and a newly hatched Snapping Turtle were also
seen where the powerlines cross the road and there is a small marshy spot.
When I reached the beach, I quickly scanned both directions hoping to
locate the Red Knots I was after, but couldn't see them from the hilltop
anywhere along the beachfront. Walking north on the beach, I had a pack of
*Sanderlings* staying out in front of me for the first mile or so, before I
finally walked closer to the duneline to get around them without spooking
them.* Ruddy Turnstones, Black-bellied Plovers, and Semipalmated Sandpipers*
were noted among the Sanderlings, but these were the only shorebirds seen
for the day. With the winds whipping into shore, and the waves crashing,
almost no birds were seen in flight over the open water. Brown Pelicans,
about 50 of them in total, were sighted flying over the duneline, but again
staying off the open ocean. Only a single* Royal Tern*, and two other
unidentified terns were seen the entire way from False Cape to the parking
area trails of Back Bay.


Heading over the dunes on the Dune Trail to the Loop Road yielded an*
Eastern Towhee* in the area they're typically seen and heard. Walking the
Loop Road north, I stopped and attempted to put eyes on a few birds that
were calling from cover, but just never could. I opted to walk the Bay
Trail one more time, hoping to re-spot the warblers I couldn't get good
looks at earlier in the day, but the trail remained quiet, with just one
Indigo Buntings calling from a very visible spot high up a tree. I did get
some nice looks at a Marsh Rabbit that was hiding in my favorite warbler
spot. As a final check, I walked the Kuralt Trail, which is the short
boardwalk north of the parking area, turning up a flock of *Cedar Waxwings*
and a *Carolina Chickadee*, but nothing out of the ordinary. So I headed
back to the car after the 10.5 mile walk, to go home and relax / sift
through all the photos from the last two days. Hopefully tomorrow brings
nice weather again, maybe a little less windy though so the smaller birds
can be a bit more visible!


*In-Depth Weekly Accounts & Photographs:*

*http://www.rbnature.com/blog-index/ *


Rob Bielawski

Virginia Beach, VA
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Subject: Highland (the usual Black-billed Cuckoos, GW Warblers, Mourning Warbler, and two Alders) (5/23)
From: Andrew Rapp <lax3birder AT live.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 21:11:25 -0400
Hey Everyone,
Today in hopes of seeing some interesting butterflies and well I guess birds :) 
I made a trip up to Highland. My Dad who has never been up to Highland in the 
summer got three lifers (impressive) while I sadly had none but I am not 
complaining as we had beautiful weather and some awesome stuff. We started off 
at Forks of Water where we heard a Warbling Vireo (FOY), then headed to 
Margaret's. On the way we stopped by the graveyard and stream where we had a 
Cliff Swallow, tons of Bobolinks, and a Willow Flycatcher. Then we snaked our 
way up 640 to Margaret's. On the way we saw Alder (Lifer for my pops) and Least 
Flycatchers (both FOYs). We arrived at Margaret's to about ten cars! and saw a 
flock of birders well doing what birders do best bird. My Dad and I talked with 
them to figure out what was around the area and they pointed us in the way of a 
GW Warbler. My Dad and I had great looks of a male and female (FOY). A 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak showed up for the group. Then we were ca 

 lled over to a Black-billed Cuckoo on the WV side :(. A lifer for my Dad so we 
stuck around and watched it for a while. It was bringing nesting materials to a 
bush along the field (next weekend I will check up on the progress of the 
nest). Butterflies seen were Common Ringlets, Hobomok Skipper, American Copper, 
Meadow Fritillary, Azure sp. (Not big enough or light enough for Appalachian 
which will show up in a week); My only lifer of the trip was a Northern Pygmy 
Clubtail (Dragonfly). Then we headed off sald yin a different way than the bird 
club towards Straight Fork. On Heverner's I didn't give much effort into Vesper 
Sparrows because I have already seen a few and I wanted to find Meadow 
Fritillaries (Which I couldn't find). But the highlight of Heverner's was a 
pair of Black-billed Cuckoos chasing each other across the field (of all 
places) into a large tree. In the area were lots of tent caterpillars so they 
were probably feeding on these. On Laurel Fork we had a pair of 

 Bald Eagles, Blackburnian Warblers, Veeries, Magnolia Warblers, a Hermit 
Thrush, a Canada Warbler for another year along the river beside the cabin, 
Alder Flycatcher, Least Flycatchers, Aurora Damsel, Tiger Swallowtails (either 
Appalachian or Eastern), and Maryland Yellowthroats as my dad calls them. WE 
then made our way up to the fire road where we were able to locate a male 
Mourning Warbler and hear a Veery. An awesome day all in all with nine FOYs for 
me and three lifers for my dad. Pictures from the trip can be seen at 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/115043594 AT N05/ 

Good Birding,
Andrew Rapp
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Highland County Report, 5/23 (4 Alder Flycatchers)
From: Diane L via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 00:05:15 +0000 (UTC)
Beautiful day in Highland County today! Greg Moyers and I started at Paddy 
Knob, headed north to Laurel Fork as far as the Beaver Dams, then up Hevener, 
and east on Hardscrabble to Wimer Mt Rd near Margaret O'Bryan's. Then south on 
Wimer Mt, ending with just a brief stop at Forks of Water. Nothing out of the 
ordinary...that is if one dares to call Highland County OR its birds 
"ordinary!" 



Some highlights:

Well, one treat/surprise was finding three Alder Flycatchers at and near the 
Beaver Ponds. One seen, heard and videotaped/ photographed near the road at the 
water. Two more heard -- one sounded a fair distance upstream from the road, 
the other was well downstream. We heard Least FC near the ponds as well, plus 
Common Yellowthroat and Yellow Warbler. 


A Mourning Warbler sang, and mostly stayed in good view (mid-level in trees, 
often staying still), for about 15 minutes near Paddy Knob. A Ruffed Grouse was 
drumming. 



Laurel Fork: two Vesper Sparrows in close proximity, roadside before the road 
enters forest. Bobolinks (near Hevener)...also found these on Hardscrabble. 
Both heading up and heading down the mountain, we heard one Cerulean Warbler 
near what appears (on maps) to be a ridge-line. 



Hevener: Grasshopper Sparrow.

On Wimer Mt Road: Golden-winged Warbler, Black-billed Cuckoo, Willow 
Flycatcher, Yellow Warblers and an Alder Flycatcher heard. The latter probably 
the same individual reported a day or two ago by an avid, shore-dwelling, 
ebird-user (thank you, Bob Ake!) All except the Willow FC were within 1/4 mi or 
so of M. O'Bryan's. 


Other warblers along the way included Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated 
Green, Black-and-white, A. Redstart, Blackburnian and Ovenbird. 


Diane Lepkowski

Harrisonburg

PS - video of the Alder FC is here, for those interested...wind noise is a real 
distraction...and beeps are camera clicks, courtesy of Greg(!) -- 


http://birdtrek.smugmug.com/Animals/Highland-County-VA/15713761_pmwzDK#!i=4079051254&k=SKQn9zX 

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Subject: Fwd: Black-necked Stilts at Hog Island
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 19:43:32 -0400
 Correction!  Been watching too many Black-*winged* Stilts recently in
Spain!  Before you all get excited, what we saw today were Black-necked
Stilts!

 Wendy Ealding

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Wendy Ealding 
Date: Sat, May 23, 2015 at 7:39 PM
Subject: Black-necked Stilts at Hog Island
To: Bird sightings in Virginia 


Paul Bedell, Gerry Weinberger and I birded at Hog Island this morning.
Shorebirds were few and distant as the water levels are very high.  We were
surprised to see a couple of Black-winged
Stilts.  Large numbers of Great Blue Herons, no other egrets or herons. We
had six Bald Eagles in the air at one time and a flock of Cedar Waxwings
were feasting on mulberries.

Full list at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23595122

 Wendy Ealding
Midlothian


-- 
Wendy Ealding



-- 
Wendy Ealding
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Subject: Black-necked Stilts at Hog Island
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 19:39:39 -0400
 Paul Bedell, Gerry Weinberger and I birded at Hog Island this morning.
Shorebirds were few and distant as the water levels are very high.  We were
surprised to see a couple of Black-winged
Stilts.  Large numbers of Great Blue Herons, no other egrets or herons. We
had six Bald Eagles in the air at one time and a flock of Cedar Waxwings
were feasting on mulberries.

Full list at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23595122

 Wendy Ealding
Midlothian


-- 
Wendy Ealding
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Subject: Re: Whimbrel duke marsh
From: Gerry Hawkins <maineusa AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 19:22:32 -0400
Nine Whimbrels are on the far side of the mudflats on the river side now with 
eight Spotted Sandpipers, three Semipalmated Plovers, a pair of Lesser Scaup, 
two pairs of Wood Ducks, a Caspian Tern and two Laughing Gulls among other 
birds. 

Gerry Hawkins
Arlington, VA

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 23, 2015, at 5:49 PM, "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" 
 wrote: 

> 
> Whimbrels at hunting creek mudflats now
> Kurt Gaskill
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
> 
> Robnoblestar via va-bird  wrote:
> 
>> 8 whimbrel currently (4;10pm)perched on tree branch mid channel behind the 
island at the end of the boardwalk (adjacent to nps boundary buoy) 

>> 
>> 
>> Rob Young
>> Alexandria,va
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net. If you wish to 
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> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as maineusa AT comcast.net. If you wish to 
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Subject: Mississippi Kite - Lake Accotink Park, Springfield
From: <dcharlesl AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 18:13:10 -0400
This afternoon, I saw a Mississippi Kite while I was at Lake Accotink Park in 
Springfield. 


David Ledwith

Falls Church, VA
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: Whimbrel duke marsh
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 17:49:14 -0400
Whimbrels at hunting creek mudflats now
Kurt Gaskill
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Robnoblestar via va-bird  wrote:

>8 whimbrel currently (4;10pm)perched on tree branch mid channel behind the 
island at the end of the boardwalk (adjacent to nps boundary buoy) 

>
>
>Rob Young
>Alexandria,va
>
>
>
>Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Whimbrel duke marsh
From: Robnoblestar via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 16:09:01 -0400
8 whimbrel currently (4;10pm)perched on tree branch mid channel behind the 
island at the end of the boardwalk (adjacent to nps boundary buoy) 



Rob Young
Alexandria,va



Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Red Headed Woodpecker
From: wesley233 AT comcast.net
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 19:51:37 +0000 (UTC)
Noted on my feeder and an Oak beside my deck a Red Headed Woodpecker. They are 
resident here at Lake Monticello, Fluvanna County. Quite a sight. Liz 

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Subject: Blackpoll warbler and hummingbirds
From: mb b <marlabeth AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 15:04:45 +0000
Blackpoll warbler in my holly tree in my front yard near the King Street Metro 
in Alexandria. Spent the day. Didn't seem to mind the trains. I never get 
anyone from the migration through here - I always see them down at Dyke Marsh, 
so this was a treat. 

As to hummers, what I would like to know is, if they eat insects while they are 
nesting, so it is normal not to see them at feeders until the juvenile has 
fledged, why do I always hear so many people talking about how they have 5 and 
10 at their feeders all season, and they get to see the males at the feeder? I 
get one female adult, and the juvenile, and not until August. Never 5 or 10. I 
set out my feeders on tax day, put out nesting material, plant flowers they 
love, and one year I got to see them on and off from May-September, but never 
the male. All the rest of the years, nada. I heard that if they don't like your 
food, heaven forbid you are a day late changing it, they will put a bad review 
on bird Yelp for your restaurant and you will never get one again. So I even 
hire someone to change the feeder when I am out of town to make sure it does 
not go bad. I am always worried that I missed a day changing the feeder and 
that is why I have to wait until late in the season to 

 see them. So who are these people that get 5 and 10, including males, and what 
can I do to be one of them? 

Also, If they are feeding on insects, will they come in for mealworms? 

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Subject: Prairie Warbler
From: "Otis G. Sowell, Jr." <otissowell AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 10:34:56 -0400
A nice looking Prairie Warbler stopped by my back yard this morning for a photo 
opportunity. 


This is my first ever sighting of this fast mowing warbler. I heard it singing 
for a couple of weeks. I’m glad it decided to pay me a visit. 


Indigo Buntings, Brown Thrashers, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Red-eyed Vireos, 
Blue-grey Gnatcatchers, American Robins, Scarlet Tanagers, Hummingbirds, 
Chipping Sparrows, Carolina Wrens, Carolina Chickadees, Mockingbirds, Grey 
Catbirds, Great-crested Flycatchers, American Crows, Tufted Titmice,Northern 
Cardinals…and more stop by on a daily basis. 


Some photos from this morning and yesterday afternoon can be seen here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/otissowell/?

Otis Sowell, Jr.

Palmyra, Va.
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Subject: Chalet Woods Park (Centreville, Fairfax County) 22 May
From: Stephen Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 17:08:59 -0400
I visited this neighborhood park this morning. It includes backyards and woods, 
some wet meadows and a stream. On a sunny morning like today, it looks like 
dynamite habitat. Last year (May 2014) I had my highest-ever day for warblers, 
and this park contributed most of them. 


Today was different. I found 19 total species in 90 minutes starting at 
sunrise. All were common summer residents. The most interesting one to me was a 
female Scarlet Tanager. 


I have to guess that either migration is mostly over; or else, I was too early. 
It was really chilly there!! 


Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Subject: [va-bird] Leesylvania SP & Julie Metz Wetlands
From: Scott Priebe <falco57 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 15:09:01 -0400
Birded Leesylvania from 5:30-10:00 and Julie Metz from 10:15-12:00.  

Most numerous bird at Leesylvania were Cedar Waxwings - 150+ Started at the gun 
battery and with 20-25 Waxwings in the trees, a flock of 50-60 flew by; walking 
down the ridge, they were in groups of 10s in many of the trees; a couple dozen 
in the picnic area; and a couple dozen at Bushy Pt (that I could see). Eight 
species of warbler including Louisiana Waterthrush, Black-throated Green, 
Canada (2), Magnolia and Blackpoll. 

Oddly, no N. Parula heard or seen.

Had 7 species of wabler at Julie Metz, including N. Parula, with highlights 
being Northern Waterthrush and Hooded Warblers. 


Scott D. Priebe

Springfield, VA
                  
LEESYLVANIA SP - 
Canada Goose                  
Wood Duck                     
Mallard                       
Double-crested Cormorant      
Great Blue Heron              
Osprey                        
Bald Eagle                    
Red-tailed Hawk               
Spotted Sandpiper             3
Mourning Dove                 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo          
Chimney Swift                 
Red-bellied Woodpecker        
Northern Flicker              
Pileated Woodpecker           
Eastern Wood-Pewee            
Eastern Phoebe                
Great Crested Flycatcher      
Eastern Kingbird              
Red-eyed Vireo                
Blue Jay                      
American Crow                 
Fish Crow                     
Tree Swallow                  
Barn Swallow                  
Carolina Chickadee            
Tufted Titmouse               
White-breasted Nuthatch       
Carolina Wren                 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher         
Eastern Bluebird              
Swainson's Thrush             1
Wood Thrush                   1
American Robin                
Northern Mockingbird          
European Starling             
Cedar Waxwing                 150+
Louisiana Waterthrush         1
Prothonotary Warbler          1
Common Yellowthroat           3
Magnolia Warbler              1
Blackpoll Warbler             2
Yellow-throated Warbler       3
Black-throated Green Warbler     1
Canada Warbler        2        
Chipping Sparrow              
Scarlet Tanager               
Northern Cardinal             
Indigo Bunting                
Red-winged Blackbird          
Common Grackle                
Orchard Oriole                
Baltimore Oriole              
American Goldfinch            

METZ WETLANDS/NEABSCO CR. - 
Canada Goose                  
Great Blue Heron              
Bald Eagle                    
Red-shouldered Hawk           
Mourning Dove                 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo          
Belted Kingfisher             
Red-bellied Woodpecker        
Downy Woodpecker              
Hairy Woodpecker              
Great Crested Flycatcher      
Eastern Kingbird              
White-eyed Vireo              
Red-eyed Vireo                
Carolina Chickadee            
Tufted Titmouse               
Carolina Wren                 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher         
American Robin                
Gray Catbird                  
Cedar Waxwing                 1
Northern Waterthrush          1
Prothonotary Warbler          2
Common Yellowthroat           7
Hooded Warbler                2
Northern Parula               4
Yellow Warbler                2
Yellow-throated Warbler       1
Scarlet Tanager               
Northern Cardinal             
Indigo Bunting                
Red-winged Blackbird          
Common Grackle                
Orchard Oriole                
American Goldfinch            
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Dutch Gap (Chesterfield County) this morning 5/22/15, COMMON GALLINULE
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 14:43:11 -0400
 A very pleasant morning at Dutch Gap.  Highlight was a COMMON GALLINULE at
the first overlook.  It was still there when I left at 11 AM.  Numerous
Prothonotary Warblers including one that landed four feet in front of me on
the deck rail at the kayak launch at the lagoon.  Don't know which of us
was more surprised.

Full list at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23575597

 Wendy Ealding
Midlothian


-- 
Wendy Ealding
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Subject: Hummingbirds .....
From: Craig Zalk <craig.zalk AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 13:33:11 -0400
(Reporting from south Reston, Fairfax County, N. VA).  The posts on
Hummingbirds have been extremely interesting to me as I live for my
hummers.  Just a few additional comments.  Keep in mind that populations of
bird species tend to naturally fluctuate from year to year due to weather
and other conditions at the wintering grounds, headwinds during migration,
lack of food upon arrival, storms, etc.  Also, on walks in the woods, I
have noticed a VERY large number of flowering trees and bushes - seemingly
and unscientifically much higher than normal (and the pollen counts tend to
support this), so this alone could result in our seeing fewer hummers at
our feeders.  On a slightly different note, after reading all of the posts
I had concluded that I was having the same "low count" experience that is
being reported.  Yesterday, I worked from home and was able to keep watch
on my hummingbird feeders.  What I discovered was a normal flow of hummers
for this time of year (normally low, in fact) - early spring when most
hummers are "in the chase," gathering material for nesting, sitting on
nests or just enjoying the normal variety of flora in the neighborhood.
So, I have no reason to be alarmed.  Thank you for reading to this point.
Happy hummer-birding.  Craig

-- 
----------------------------------------------------------
Craig Zalk
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Subject: Radcliffe Appomattox River Conservation Area 5/22
From: Adam D'Onofrio <bigadfromlb AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 17:30:18 +0000 (UTC)
Had a nice morning at Radcliffe Park in Chesterfield County. Not tons of birds 
but some nice variety and quality. Top birds included WILSON'S WARBLER, CANADA 
WARBLER and GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH. I pasted an ebird list below for anyone 
interested. Good birding. 


Adam D'Onofrio 
North Dinwiddie 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23577672 

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Subject: Fwd: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert
From: "kurtcapt87 AT verizon.net" <kurtcapt87@verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 12:29:11 -0400

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [eBird Alert] Virginia Rare Bird Alert 
From: ebird-alert AT cornell.edu
To: 
CC: 

*** Species Summary:

Tundra Swan (1 Accomack)
Horned Grebe (2 Portsmouth)
Semipalmated Plover (1 Fauquier)
Least Sandpiper (1 Tazewell)
Short-billed Dowitcher (1 Highland)
Forster's Tern (1 Rockingham)
Sandwich Tern (1 Hampton)
Eurasian Collared-Dove (1 Virginia Beach)
Alder Flycatcher (1 Fairfax)
Brown-headed Nuthatch (1 Caroline)
Bicknell's Thrush (1 Alexandria)
White-crowned Sparrow (1 Charlottesville)
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (1 Arlington)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the  Virginia Rare Bird Alert.The report 
below shows observations of rare birds in Virginia. View or unsubscribe to this 
alert at http://ebird.org/ebird/alert/summary?sid=SN35646 

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus) (1)
- Reported May 20, 2015 16:10 by Thomas Jones
- Chincoteague NWR - CES18, Accomack, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.9106228,-75.3479719&ll=37.9106228,-75.3479719 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23566109
- Comments: "Large white swan with black bill.  Seen from P1 parking lot."

Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) (1)
- Reported May 21, 2015 07:00 by Erin Chapman
- Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9065,-76.37&ll=36.9065,-76.37 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23566935
- Comments: "counted individually at less than 100 meters; small "stiff-tailed" 
diving duck; at this locations in the hundreds throughout" 


Horned Grebe (Podiceps auritus) (1)
- Reported May 21, 2015 05:55 by Bill Williams
- Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.9065,-76.37&ll=36.9065,-76.37 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23565432
- Comments: "not unexpected; full alternate plumage; small grebe with gently 
sloping forehead; orange "ear" tufts; black neck; red eye; sat low in the 
water" 


Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) (32)
- Reported May 20, 2015 07:24 by Richard Rieger
- Belvoir Pond, Fauquier, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.8498133,-77.8269331&ll=38.8498133,-77.8269331 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23573423
- Comments: "exact count; small, dark-brown backed plover with single, complete 
black band across white breast; white forehead, dark cheeks; orange legs; bill 
orange towards base, dark tip;" 


Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (2)
- Reported May 21, 2015 13:30 by Clancey Deel
- Burke's Garden - MMH04, Tazewell, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.1001,-81.3434&ll=37.1001,-81.3434 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23565164
- Comments: "From eBird 
Photos_2015 

From eBird 
Photos_2015 

From eBird 
Photos_2015" 


Short-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus griseus) (3)
- Reported May 21, 2015 11:48 by John Spahr
- Route 642 - Laurel Fork Rd., Highland, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.5023278,-79.6047878&ll=38.5023278,-79.6047878 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23561942
- Comments: "White bellied dowitchers with Buffy-red, spotted breast 
transitioning to splotchy barring on flanks. Did not fly or call" 


Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri) (2)
- Reported May 21, 2015 11:45 by Diane Lepkowski
- Silver Lake - MNR01, Rockingham, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.4239,-78.941&ll=38.4239,-78.941 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23571473
- Comments: "One in adult breeding plumage, bill orange with black tip. 
Photographed." 


Sandwich Tern (Thalasseus sandvicensis) 
- Reported May 20, 2015 09:00 by Erin Chapman
- Hampton, Hampton, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=37.04921,-76.3639&ll=37.04921,-76.3639 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23569962
- Comments: "Tern with yellow tipped black bill"

Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) (1)
- Reported May 20, 2015 12:45 by Pamela Monahan
- Eurasian Collared Dove power line, Virginia Beach, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.7053272,-75.9299791&ll=36.7053272,-75.9299791 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23568083
- Comments: "Documented numerous times in this area. Larger than Mourning Dove 
with lighter plumage." 


Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) (1)
- Reported May 22, 2015 06:30 by Robert Steele
- Huntley Meadows Park--Hike and Bike Trail, Fairfax, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.7599063,-77.1169853&ll=38.7599063,-77.1169853 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23574011
- Comments: "Heard "fee-beer" song from Hike-Bike Trail past woods and past 
pond trail on right near to sign on right while walking toward marsh. Recording 
available." 


Brown-headed Nuthatch (Sitta pusilla) (1)
- Reported May 20, 2015 10:00 by Greg Tito
- Beaver pond behind offices, in TA 24B, Caroline, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.078811,-77.3205435&ll=38.078811,-77.3205435 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23561118
- Comments: "part of the breeding pair I reported from this same location not 
long ago. Bird was moving around in the pine trees on the peninsula in the 
middle of the pond, making its squeaky-toy calls frequently. The nest is 
unfortunately inaccessible, but seems to still be active." 


Bicknell's Thrush (Catharus bicknelli) (1)
- Reported May 18, 2015 14:00 by Mich Coker
- Monticello Park - CGF02, Alexandria, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.8331055,-77.0700252&ll=38.8331055,-77.0700252 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23541724
- Comments: "Identified as Bicknell's based primarily on aggressive response to 
pre-recorded Bicknell's playback (bird flew in quickly, perched in the open and 
delivered scold notes), followed by prolonged vocalizing. The individual did 
not respond to Gray-cheeked playback. Song, call notes, and "chatter" calls 
were recorded and compared to Bicknell's vocalizations on xenocanto. Happy to 
share recordings by email. 


Visually, the observed individual was consistent with Bicknell's: lower 
mandible mostly yellow and rusty feathers obvious in tail and on rump." 


White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys) (1)
- Reported May 21, 2015 07:05 by Janet Paisley
- The Rivanna Trail - Riverview Park - PMR03, Charlottesville, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.0238,-78.4547&ll=38.0238,-78.4547 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23558625
- Comments: "Broad stripes on crown ' bicycle helmet', grey on sides of neck, 
distinguishing it from white throated." 


Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis) (1)
- Reported May 17, 2015 09:25 by Paul Pisano
- OLQP, Arlington, Virginia
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=38.8541967,-77.083278&ll=38.8541967,-77.083278 

- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23570014
- Comments: "Bird was seen by the garden in the rectory yard. It allowed fairly 
close approach, but hopped away a little bit when I got too close. Picture 
taken with Samsung smart phone. All gray above, white belly, pinkish bill: From 2013-05 
- Red-throated Loon & Surf Scoter" 


***********

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Subject: Theodore Roosevelt Island, DC; May 22
From: Scott Baron <razorbill1 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 12:06:50 -0400
Hi,

Theodore Roosevelt Island was slow 
today, with some expected birds missing. But a highlight was a 
Lincoln's Sparrow foraging under some boxwoods at the monument.

A Peregrine Falcon, observed from the parking lot, was flying near the tall 
buildings in Rosslyn. 


Scott Baron
Gaithersburg, Md. 		 	   		  
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Subject: White-crowned sparrow
From: Marc Ribaudo <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 09:08:30 -0400
An adult white-crowned sparrow is currently under my feeder on Woodbridge.

Marc Ribaudo

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
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Subject: Common Gallinule at Dutch Gap, Chesterfield County
From: Wendy Ealding <wendy.ealding AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 08:37:48 -0400
Seen from first overlook

Wendy Ealding
Midlothian
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Subject: Willow Flycatcher at Dyke Marsh
From: Edward Eder <nutmegz AT mac.com>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 20:50:05 -0400
South of the Haul Road before the bridge, calling at intervals around 8AM 
today. 






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Subject: Red-Tail Hawk breeding report
From: Stephen Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 17:59:30 -0400
Hello everyone,

For weeks I'd planned this post as a question. But after today's observations, 
it has turned into a report. 


I've been watching a pair of Red-Tailed Hawks on a nest in Chantilly (Fairfax 
County) for almost 2 months now. At first, one adult was constantly atop it 
hunkered down low, and occasionally a second bird was standing next to it. 


Then for the past 3 weeks or so, timed with the warmer weather, I've mostly 
seen them either perched on the nest (standing, not nestled down on top of it); 
or else perched on a nearby snag 20-30 feet away from the nest. 


I was concerned that they were no longer hunkering down low on it, and 
frequently out of the nest entirely, even though the weather was warmer. From 
my viewing angle, I can be sure whether the adult is on the nest or not, but I 
can't see down into it. 


When the adult is perched on the snag, it is mobbed by jays and grackles every 
time I look. I only check a few times a day but the mobsters are always there 
when I do. 


I've been wondering if there ever were any eggs, and if so, have they hatched. 
Well this afternoon I finally got an answer. There was at least one white, 
fluffy juvenile standing up and wobbling a bit. The adult was not in sight, but 
it had been nearby (and on the nest once) at 3 other times today. 


So my previous question is answered. Nesting Red-Tails (at least, this pair) 
don't stay on the nest all the time. As the weather got warmer, this pair spent 
a lot of time (both birds) at least 20-30 feet away from it. 


Since the weather turned warm (2-3 weeks ago?) I have not seen both adults at 
the same time. I can't be sure there still are two. 


Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Subject: Re: hummingbirds no va
From: Scott Priebe <falco57 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 17:48:25 -0400
Also, the Tulip Poplars are blooming, a regular smorgasbord for hummers with 
nectar and small bugs. 


Scott D. Priebe

Springfield, VA

> Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 14:49:58 +0000
> From: bigadfromlb AT comcast.net
> To: marlabeth AT hotmail.com
> CC: va-bird AT listserve.com
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] hummingbirds no va
> 
> Everybody just relax. The hummingbirds are here. They just aren't coming to 
feeders much right now for various reasons. This happens every year. Just keep 
making your nectar solution (1 part sugar to 4 parts water, no red dye 
necessary), change it every 3 days and wait for them to come back. Good 
birding. 

> 
> Adam D'Onofrio 
> North Dinwiddie 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> 
> From: "mb b"  
> To: va-bird AT listserve.com 
> Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2015 10:22:49 AM 
> Subject: [Va-bird] hummingbirds no va 
> 
> I even put nesting material out and I have had the feeders out since the 
beginning of April and nothing. I thought maybe they started the migration 
later because the winter was so cold but i keep seeing all these entries - 
Annandale - hummingbirds, etc, so I don;t know what is wrong in my yard but 
they are not here. 

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> 
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Subject: Hummingbirds
From: wesley233 AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 20:11:26 +0000 (UTC)
I'm in Fluvanna County east of Charlottesville. I had female RTH earlier this 
season, I noted one this week at my feeder. I have many Tulip Poplars in my 
neighborhood maybe that's part of it. Liz 

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