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Updated on Saturday, June 25 at 06:35 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Phillipine Eagle,©Jan Wilczur

25 Jun Raven over Woodbridge [Marc Ribaudo ]
24 Jun Fwd: eBird Reports for VA-Beach and Northampton County on the Eastern Shore for Wednesday 06-22-2016 [Jeff Blalock ]
23 Jun Dickcissels, Highland Co. (and additional locations) [Ellison Orcutt ]
22 Jun Two mystery birds ["Marshall Faintich" ]
22 Jun GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS [G B Harris ]
22 Jun Birding Event Central Virginia this Sat ["Ron Kingston" ]
22 Jun Willow flycatcher at Dyke Marsh [Edward Eder ]
22 Jun Resending King and Queen Truhart BBS route [Frederick Atwood via va-bird ]
22 Jun King and Queen Truhart BSS route [Frederick Atwood via va-bird ]
22 Jun FW: DC Area, 6/21/2016 ["Joe Coleman" ]
21 Jun House Sparrow feeding Cowbird/Roanoke County []
21 Jun An update on red-cockaded woodpecker conservation at Big Woods WMA ["Ruthenberg, Jessica (DGIF)" ]
21 Jun A Mid-Summers Update on the 2nd VA Breeding Bird Atlas [Ashley Peele ]
20 Jun H. Fenton Day ["T. M. Day" ]
20 Jun Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk. [Harry Glasgow via va-bird ]
20 Jun 3 Barn swallow nests - Falls Church, VA [Stuart via va-bird ]
20 Jun Least Bittern at Occoquan Bay NWR [Antonio Quezon ]
20 Jun Birding Event Central Virginia - Saturday ["Ron Kingston" ]
20 Jun Mississippi Kite- Huntley [Larry Cartwright ]
20 Jun Re: Piper [Ashley Lohr ]
19 Jun Fw: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh, Jun 19, 2016 ["Marc Ribaudo" ]
19 Jun Great Falls Park Walk (Fairfax County) [Marshall Rawson via va-bird ]
19 Jun Sky Meadows SP, Fauquier Co.; June 18 [Scott Baron ]
18 Jun [va-bird] Occoquan Bay NWR, Woodbridge [Scott Priebe ]
18 Jun Piper [Elizabeth Fedorko ]
18 Jun Mississippi Kite [Jeff Blalock ]
18 Jun Mississippi Kite in Fairfax Station [Antonio Quezon ]
16 Jun 3 JV Red-shouldered Hawks ["Marshall Faintich" ]
16 Jun Re: Use of recordings [Eileen Jones via va-bird ]
16 Jun Use of recordings [John Pancake ]
15 Jun Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Virginia Beach ["goshawk AT cox.net" ]
15 Jun Re: VSO Trip to Highland County – June 10-12, 2016 [Karen Seward via va-bird ]
15 Jun Re: VSO Trip to Highland County – June 10-12, 2016 [Eileen Rowan ]
15 Jun Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un... [Janice Frye ]
15 Jun Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un... [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird ]
15 Jun Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un... [Janice Frye ]
15 Jun Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un... [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird ]
15 Jun VSO Trip to Highland County – June 10-12, 2016 [Meredith Bell ]
15 Jun Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Dyke Marsh- breeders ["Larry Cartwright" ]
15 Jun Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment‏ [Herbert Larner via va-bird ]
15 Jun Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if uninterested] [Janice Frye ]
15 Jun Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if uninterested] [Eileen Rowan ]
15 Jun Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment‏ [Janice Frye ]
15 Jun Virtual Birding Project Help Needed ["MrNussbaum.com" ]
15 Jun Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment [mb b ]
15 Jun Close Encounters ["Marshall Faintich" ]
14 Jun Birds of Shenandoah National Park and Highland County, Va. ["Antonio J. Quezon" ]
14 Jun Leucistic Common Grackle in Arlington [frazmo ]
14 Jun FW: DC Area, 6/14/2016 ["Joe Coleman" ]
14 Jun Common Nighthawk in Portsmouth, VA [Elisa Enders ]
14 Jun Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment ["Kevin Shank" ]
14 Jun Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment ["Marshall Faintich" ]
14 Jun Raven in Arlington, VA on 6/11/2016 [janet anderson via va-bird ]
13 Jun Anhinga location on Rt. 301 [Janice Frye ]
13 Jun Warblers and Vireos ["Marshall Faintich" ]
13 Jun Summer Tanagers [Kelly Krechmer via va-bird ]
13 Jun Bluebirds; Good News, Bad News, Good News [pepherup--- via va-bird ]
13 Jun Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk [Harry Glasgow via va-bird ]
13 Jun use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment [mb b ]
13 Jun Re: Birds at Banshee Reeks June 11 ["Joe Coleman" ]
12 Jun Re: question about catbird behavior [Jean Tatalias ]
12 Jun Re: question about catbird behavior [David Bridge ]
12 Jun Port Royal Breeding Bird Survey Route (mostly King George Co) [Frederick Atwood via va-bird ]
12 Jun Huntley Meadows Saturday [Pam and Ben via va-bird ]
12 Jun Birds at Banshee Reeks June 11 [delandjoyce ]
12 Jun Great Falls Bird Walk 06/12/16 [Dendroica--- via va-bird ]
12 Jun Fwd: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh, Jun 12, 2016 [Phil Silas via va-bird ]
12 Jun Manassas NBP, Yellow-throated Vireo, Acadian Flycatcher [Howard Wu ]
12 Jun Birding Hite Hollow Rd & Swoope [Herbert Larner via va-bird ]
12 Jun Least bitterns, Neabsco Creek, Prince William Co. [Marc Ribaudo ]
12 Jun Fwd: eBird Report - Deerfield Stables (private) Upperville NE, Jun 11, 2016 [Phillip Kenny ]
11 Jun NVBC at Huntley Meadows Park, Jun 11, 2016 [Larry Meade via va-bird ]
11 Jun Warblers, Breeding Tanagers, Eagles ["Marshall Faintich" ]
11 Jun Western Kingbird in James City County [Brian Taber via va-bird ]
11 Jun Re: VA-Bird Mission [Paul Mocko ]
11 Jun Western Kingbird in James City County [Brian Taber via va-bird ]

Subject: Raven over Woodbridge
From: Marc Ribaudo <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 07:34:10 -0400
For the second straight weekend a raven flew over my home in Woodbridge, Prince 
William Co. This is eastern part of the county, near the Potomac. Very unusual 
for the summer months. 


Marc Ribaudo

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
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Subject: Fwd: eBird Reports for VA-Beach and Northampton County on the Eastern Shore for Wednesday 06-22-2016
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder AT gcronline.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 08:48:11 -0400
> Greetings All:
>  
> I made a day trip to VA Beach and Northampton County on the Eastern Shore 
Wednesday stopping first to see the Black-Bellied Whistling-Duck, then went to 
Pleasure House Point which is always a pleasure to bird there. While at 
Pleasure House Point I saw a turtle laying eggs in the sand on the pathway. 
From there I crossed over the bay and went to Magotha Rd and then to Oyster and 
to the Northampton Landfill. 

>  
> On the way back to the CBBT, I stopped off at Magotha Rd again to see if the 
tide had gone down. After making the turn on to Magotha I saw a dove fly up and 
I realized that it was an Eursaian Collared-Dove. At last after all these years 
that I have tried to find then at this area with no luck. Sometimes I stopped 
on the way to Chincoteague and on the way back as well but I never was lucky 
enough to see one. It wasn’t a life or state bird but it bugged the heck out 
of me that I couldn’t find one in the area. On the way down to the end of the 
road I had a Black Snake slide off the road before I could get a picture of it. 

>  
> After leaving Magotha, I then went to the Eastern Shore National Wildlife 
Refuge to check it out which is always a great spot and I saw a female Orchard 
Oriole carrying nesting material to a tree but could find a nest. I got a 
picture of the area and it looks like she just started as a I could see a few 
strands of grass. 

>  
> As I crossed the Bay, I stopped on Island #1 for a quick look around for 
Ruddy Turnstones and didn’t see a single one but did see some very pumped up 
male Rock Doves behind their lady friends but they must have had a headache 
because they turned them down. At least the guys tried. 

>  
> By now I was hot and very hungry and so I went to the Dockside at Lynnheaven 
to eat before heading home and it was a great meal and service again. I love 
their Red-Skinned Potato Salad. Now with a full stomach I got on the road to 
head home and made good time up to the entrance ramp to Interstate 64E which 
was backed up and once I got on the Interstate it wasn’t long before I really 
got in a log jam. It took me 50 minutes to travel from Lynnheaven to Bower’s 
Hill a distance of only 24 miles. Great timing. 

>  
> After I crossed over the draw bridge it was open the rest of the way home and 
even though I got hit with a few rain drops no major down pours occurred as it 
looked like I might run into some heavy rain. 

>  
> I was almost home and it was almost dark when a two Barred Owls flew right 
over in front of me. What I was to end the day. 

>  
> The only thing that I didn’t see was a Bald Eagle and there was no police 
anywhere between Shore Drive and South Boston. And anyone that drives this part 
of 58 around Emporia to South Hill knows that there are always City Police on 
the bypass at Emporia and State Troopers and County Sheriff Officers between 
Emporia to South Hill. Not a single one anywhere last night. 

>  
> The birding was great as I saw Clapper Rail with chicks, Great Egrets, GB 
Herons, Grn Herons, LB Heron, Snowy Egrets, Cattle Egrets, a few Glossy Ibis 
but a great deal of White Ibis at three stops and with 45 at the landfill 
alone. I saw two YCNH at Pleasure House Point and eight BCNH at the landfill. 

>  
> Got good looks at Herring, Laughing and Ring-Billed Gulls and saw Common, 
Royal, Caspian and Black Skimmers. Most of the terns were flying around or out 
on the sandbars at Pleasure House Point and to far away to get any good 
pictures. However I did get one Common Tern male bringing a fish to its mate on 
a piling . 

>  
> Following is links to eBird Reports with some pictures.
>  
> Lake Joyce and Shore Drive
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30355070
>  
> Pleasure House Point
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30360510
>  
> Magotha Road
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30361576
>  
> Magotha Road return visit to check tide nothing new to add but the ECDO.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30361806
>  
> Oyster
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30362052
>  
> Northampton Landfill
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30367532
>  
> Eastern Shore of VA NWR
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30367620
>  
> Island #1 on the CBBT
> http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/view/checklist/S30367793
>  
> May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You
> 
> Jeffrey C. Blalock
> 103 Elizabeth Court
> South Boston, VA 24592
> Home Phone 434-572-8619
> Cell Phone 434-470-4352
> 
> jcbabirder AT gcronline.com
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Subject: Dickcissels, Highland Co. (and additional locations)
From: Ellison Orcutt <mr.ellyo AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:03:23 -0400
Hello birders,

Today while conducting grassland bird surveys in Highland County I
encountered singing Dickcissels south of Doe Hill along Rt 654.  A singing
male and a female were together on the roadside and second singing male was
in the adjacent field.  The species seems to be scarcely reported from the
county though there is plenty of suitable habitat.

In addition to this location I have encountered Dickcissels at two other
locations in the state this June.  At least three singing males were along
Blackjack Rd. east of Culpepper...a fairly "expected" area for the
species.  And again, three singing males were along River Rd west of
Chilhowie in Washington Co.  The species is rarely encountered in far SW
Virginia though again there is plenty of habitat.

Good birds,

Ellison

-- 
Ellison Orcutt
Birder/Naturalist
Richmond, Va
Cell: (804) 339-6976
Mr.EllyO AT gmail.com
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Subject: Two mystery birds
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall AT faintich.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 22:07:10 -0400
And some warblers on Skyline Drive, 6/22/16. Report and photos:

 

 
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2016/2016_06_22.htm

 

___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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Subject: GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS
From: G B Harris <gbhrlh AT cox.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 15:49:00 -0400

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Coles Landing Drive, Jun 22, 2016
> Date: June 22, 2016 at 3:40:36 PM EDT
> To: gbhrlh AT cox.net
> 
> Coles Landing Drive, Gloucester, Virginia, US
> Jun 22, 2016 1:45 PM - 2:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> Comments: GBH-RLH. Phone call from Jason Strickland about GRASSHOPPER 
SPARROWS. Take Route 14 toward Mathews, turn right just before county line 
before Fort Nonsense. 

> 5 species
> 
> Grasshopper Sparrow  3     siinging
> Chipping Sparrow  2
> Field Sparrow  3
> Song Sparrow  2
> Eastern Meadowlark (Eastern)  6
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30346182
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/VA)

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Subject: Birding Event Central Virginia this Sat
From: "Ron Kingston" <kingston AT cstone.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 13:53:35 -0400
22nd ANNUAL PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY
 
    Louisa
County, VA
 Main presentation begins at 11:00a.m.
  http://purplemartinfieldday.org/

Watch130 pairs of martins feeding their nestlings and have 
a chance to meet fellow martin-lovers including
many landlords. 
Receive free literature on martin 
attraction and management, and 
catalogs for martin equipment, as well as 
free VBS handouts on bluebird conservation.
               contact   
purplemartinfieldday AT gmail.com
~     Ron Kingston  

 

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Subject: Willow flycatcher at Dyke Marsh
From: Edward Eder <nutmegz AT mac.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 13:38:44 -0400
A Willow Flycatcher called and later was observed vocalizing near the 
observation platform of the Haul Rd today. 

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Subject: Resending King and Queen Truhart BBS route
From: Frederick Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:31:52 +0000 (UTC)
For some reason the spacing was off on the last email; I think I fixed it 
below. Sorry about that 



----- Forwarded Message -----
 From: Frederick Atwood 
 To: VA-Bird List  
 Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 1:25 PM
 Subject: King and Queen Truhart BSS route
   
Yesterday I conducted the 11th USGS Breeding Bird Survey along the Truhart 
route in lower King and Queen Co.  This is a very rural area that includes 
Dragon Run State Forest, some managed timber lands in various stages of 
regrowth, some swampy areas, and some farm land. As an indication of how rural 
it is, I was passed by only 22 cars during the entire survey.  In a USGS BBS 
route, the observer notes all birds seen and heard for 3 minutes at each of 50 
stops .5 mile apart.   Even in this rural area, there has been a decline of 
Bobwhites since the first year (2006) when 24 were found.   Wood-pewees, 
Acadian flycatchers, Summer tanagers, and Yellow-throated Warblers were more 
common yesterday than in previous years, and a House Sparrow was new for the 
route. Red-bellied Woodpeckers, titmice, gnatcatchers, and red-eyed vireos had 
their all-time low counts, though the latter was still the most abundant bird. 
Carolina Wrens rebounded dramatically from their record low of 4 last year 
(probably due to the previous hard winter). With the nice mix of habitat in 
various stages of forest regrowth there was a good variety of warblers (12 
species)  including a large number of chats, hooded warblers, and prairie 
warblers.  Notable misses were white-breasted nuthatch, black vulture, 
killdeer, wood duck, orchard oriole, red-headed woodpecker, red-tailed hawk, 
redstart, and worm-eating warbler, though these species are not found every 
year. The 9 most abundant species from most to least, all with 30 or more 
birds,  were Red-eyed Vireo, Crow, Indigo Bunting, Ovenbird, Chat and Cardinal 
(tie), Acadian Flycatcher, Pine Warbler, Hooded Warbler, White-eyed Vireo Here 
is the list of 65 species. The first number is the total, the second number is 
the number of sites it was found in (out of 50).Bobwhite 8/7 

Turkey 1, immediately after it gobbled in the woods, the timer rang for the end 
of my last stop-count 

Great Blue Heron 1
Green Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Mourning Dove 27/19
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 9/9
Hummingbird 1
Chimney Swift 3/2
Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 (Lowest count ever)
Downy Woodpecker 8/7
Hairy 2/2
Flicker 4/4
Pileated 2/2
Wood-pewee 19/17 (including a nest) (prev high 17)
Acadian Fly 33/24 (got video of one building a nest) (prev high 27)
Phoebe 3/3
Great Crested FLy 9/9
Kingbird 1
White eyed Vireo 30/23
Yellow-throated Vireo 11/8
Red-eyed Vireo 54/38 (lowest count ever, prev low 64)
Blue Jay 6/4
Am Crow 49/34
Purple Martin 8/1
Barn Swallow 2/1
Carolina Chickadee 6/4
Titmouse 18/15 (lowest count ever, prev low 20)
Carolina Wren 17/16 (significant increase from last year's all time low of 4 
after a hard winter) 

Gnatcatcher 12/10  (lowest count ever, prev low 14)
Bluebird 3/3
Wood Thrush 11/9
Robin 1
Catbird 1
Thrasher 6/5
Mockingbird 1
Starling 3/2
Waxwing 2/1
Ovenbird 40/21
La Waterthrush 1
Black-and-white W 8/7
Prothonotary 5/4
Yellowthroat 17/12
Kentucky Warbler 1
Hooded W 32/27
Parula 10/9
Pine Warb 34/23
Yellow-throated 5/5 (new high count, prev high 3)
Prairie 15/13
Chat  36/35 (highest count since 2009)
Towhee 20/16
Chipping Sparrow 16/12 (ties prev low)
Field Sparrow 14/9 (ties prev high)
Summer Tanager 13/13 (new high count, prev high 12)
Scarlet T 8/8
Cardinal 36/24
Blue Grosbeak 11/9
Indigo BUnting 43/27
Red-winged BB 1
Grackle 9/5
Cowbird 10/8
Goldfinch 7/7
House Sparrow 1 (new for the count!)

All the bestFred



Frederick D. Atwood Flint Hill School, 10409 Academic Dr, Oakton, VA 22124 
703-242-1675 http://www.agpix.com/fredatwood http://www.flinthill.org 
http://tea.armadaproject.org/tea_atwoodfrontpage.html 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/75425046 AT N06/sets/ 


  
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Subject: King and Queen Truhart BSS route
From: Frederick Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:25:08 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday I conducted the 11th USGS Breeding Bird Survey along the Truhart 
route in lower King and Queen Co.  This is a very rural area that includes 
Dragon Run State Forest, some managed timber lands in various stages of 
regrowth, some swampy areas, and some farm land. As an indication of how rural 
it is, I was passed by only 22 cars during the entire survey.  In a USGS BBS 
route, the observer notes all birds seen and heard for 3 minutes at each of 50 
stops .5 mile apart.   Even in this rural area, there has been a decline of 
Bobwhites since the first year (2006) when 24 were found.   Wood-pewees, 
Acadian flycatchers, Summer tanagers, and Yellow-throated Warblers were more 
common yesterday than in previous years, and a House Sparrow was new for the 
route. Red-bellied Woodpeckers, titmice, gnatcatchers, and red-eyed vireos had 
their all-time low counts, though the latter was still the most abundant bird. 
Carolina Wrens rebounded dramatically from their record low of 4 last year 
(probably due to the previous hard winter). With the nice mix of habitat in 
various stages of forest regrowth there was a good variety of warblers (12 
species)  including a large number of chats, hooded warblers, and prairie 
warblers.  Notable misses were white-breasted nuthatch, black vulture, 
killdeer, wood duck, orchard oriole, red-headed woodpecker, red-tailed hawk, 
redstart, and worm-eating warbler, though these species are not found every 
year. The 9 most abundant species from most to least, all with 30 or more 
birds,  were Red-eyed Vireo, Crow, Indigo Bunting, Ovenbird, Chat and Cardinal 
(tie), Acadian Flycatcher, Pine Warbler, Hooded Warbler, White-eyed Vireo Here 
is the list of 65 species. The first number is the total, the second number is 
the number of sites it was found in (out of 50).Bobwhite 8/7Turkey 1, 
immediately after it gobbled in the woods, the timer rang for the end of my 
last stop-count 

Great Blue Heron 1Green Heron 1Turkey Vulture 1Red-shouldered Hawk 1Mourning 
Dove 27/19Yellow-billed Cuckoo 9/9Hummingbird 1Chimney Swift 3/2 

Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 (Lowest count ever)
Downy Woodpecker 8/7Hairy 2/2Flicker 4/4Pileated 2/2Wood-pewee 19/17 (including 
a nest) (prev high 17) 

Acadian Fly 33/24 (got video of one building a nest) (prev high 27)
Phoebe 3/3Great Crested FLy 9/9Kingbird 1White eyed Vireo 30/23Yellow-throated 
Vireo 11/8Red-eyed Vireo 54/38 (lowest count ever, prev low 64) 

Blue Jay 6/4Am Crow 49/34Purple Martin 8/1Barn Swallow 2/1Carolina Chickadee 
6/4Titmouse 18/15 (lowest count ever, prev low 20) 

Carolina Wren 17/16 (significant increase from last year's all time low of 4 
after a hard winter) 

Gnatcatcher 12/10  (lowest count ever, prev low 14)
Bluebird 3/3Wood Thrush 11/9Robin 1Catbird 1Thrasher 6/5Mockingbird 1Starling 
3/2Waxwing 2/1Ovenbird 40/21La Waterthrush 1 

Black-and-white W 8/7Prothonotary 5/4Yellowthroat 17/12Kentucky Warbler 1
Hooded W 32/27Parula 10/9Pine Warb 34/23Yellow-throated 5/5 (new high count, 
prev high 3) 

Prairie 15/13
Chat  36/35 (highest count since 2009)
Towhee 20/16Chipping Sparrow 16/12 (ties prev low)
Field Sparrow 14/9 (ties prev high)
Summer Tanager 13/13 (new high count, prev high 12)
Scarlet T 8/8Cardinal 36/24Blue Grosbeak 11/9Indigo BUnting 43/27Red-winged BB 
1Grackle 9/5Cowbird 10/8Goldfinch 7/7House Sparrow 1 (new for the count!) 


All the bestFred



Frederick D. Atwood Flint Hill School, 10409 Academic Dr, Oakton, VA 22124 
703-242-1675 http://www.agpix.com/fredatwood http://www.flinthill.org 
http://tea.armadaproject.org/tea_atwoodfrontpage.html 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/75425046 AT N06/sets/ 

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Subject: FW: DC Area, 6/21/2016
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 10:03:11 -0400
FYI  - this report is for sightings from June 14 through June 20 and was
compiled by Helen Patton & transcribed by Steve Cordle.
Joe Coleman

Hotline:     Voice of the Naturalist
Date:        6/21/2016
Coverage:    MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: voice AT anshome.org
Compiler:    Helen Patton
Sponsor:     Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
               Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle 

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100; Audubon Advocate
$200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940
Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is
http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, June 14 and was
completed on June 21 at 11:20 a.m.

The top birds this week are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING DUCK in VA and ARCTIC
TERN in DE. 

Other birds of interest this week included  TRUMPETER SWAN, TUNDRA SWAN,
ducks, SOOTY SHEARWATER, ANHINGA, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, LEAST BITTERN,
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, GLOSSY IBIS, MISSISSIPPI KITE, SANDHILL CRANE,
BLACK-NECKED STILT, CHUCK-WILLS-WIDOW, woodpeckers, ALDER FLYCATCHER, CLIFF
SWALLOW, SEDGE WREN, warblers, sparrows, DICKCISSEL, BOBOLINK, EASTERN
MEADOWLARK, BREWER'S BLACKBIRD and BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE.

TOP BIRDS

During the week a BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK was at various places in
Virginia Beach, VA, including: Bayville Farms Park Pond, Shore Drive in the
Dubay Properties and Lake Joyce in the Bay Lake Pines neighborhood.

An ARCTIC TERN was at the Indian River Inlet, Sussex Co, DE on June 17.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

A TRUMPETER SWAN was at the Broken Land/US29 Settlement Pond, Howard Co, MD
on June 20. A TUNDRA SWAN was at Dyke Marsh, Fairfax Co, VA on June 15.

A lingering LONG-TAILED DUCK was reported from the C&O Canal, Violette's
Lock, Montgomery Co, MD on June 16 and another was at Masonville Cove,
Baltimore Co, MD on June 18. Three HOODED MERGANSERS were at Upham Brook
Farm, Henrico Co, VA on June 16.

Three SOOTY SHEARWATERS were at the Indian River Inlet, Sussex Co, DE on
June 17.

A high of six ANHINGAS* were seen at the Carson Wetland in Prince George Co,
VA on June 14, 15 and 16. 

Two AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were at Thousand Acre Marsh, New Castle Co, DE
on June 15, 16 and 17.

On June 20 a LEAST BITTERN was found flying across Easy Road at Occoquan Bay
NWR, Prince William Co, VA. A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was at New Windsor,
Atlee Walking Path, Carroll Co, MD on June 20.

Two GLOSSY IBIS were at the Rte. 213 Bridge in Chesapeake City, Cecil Co, MD
on June 20. Nineteen GLOSSY IBIS were at the Pickering Creek Audubon Center,
Talbot Co, MD also on June 20.

A MISSISSIPPI Kite was at Big Water Farm, Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 17.
MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen in several venues on June 18, including: one
soaring over a house in Fairfax Station, VA, and another at Runt's Farm,
Halifax Co, VA. Another MISSISSIPPI KITE flew over the central wetland at
Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA on June 20.

Two SANDHILL CRANES were at the Thousand Acre Marsh, New Castle Co, DE on
June 15. 

Five BLACK-NECKED STILTS were on Poplar Island, Talbot Co, MD on June 14.

A CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW was at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
(SERC) (private) in Edgewater, Anne Arundel Co, MD on June 17.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA on
June 20. One to four RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were on Mile Land, Mt. Savage,
Allegany Co, MD on June 18, 19 and 20. Two to four RED-COCKADED WOODPECKERS
were at Piney Grove, Sussex Co, VA on June 14.

An ALDER FLYCATCHER was along Straight Fork in Highland Co, VA on June
18 and 20.

Twelve CLIFF SWALLOWS were at Lock Raven Point, Baltimore Co, MD on June 18
and two more were at Sky Meadows SP, Fauquier Co, VA on the same day.

A SEDGE WREN was at the Bald Knob Road fields, Allegany Co, MD on June 18.

On June 15, two WORM-EATING WARBLERS and a HOODED WARBLER were on RTE 610
down from the Blue Ridge Parkway exit at MM 4.5. A WORM-EATING WARBLER was
at Lake Frank, Montgomery Co, MD on June 18. Four to five CERULEAN WARBLERS
were on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Hickory Springs Overlook, VA on June 14 and
15. Another CERULEAN WARBLER was on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Smart View
Recreation Area, Franklin Co, VA on June 18. Four CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS
plus a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK were on the Big Meadow BBS Route, Madison Co,
VA on June 19. A YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was singing loudly at Wheaton Regional
Park, Montgomery Co, MD near the white house by the train tracks on June 17.
Numerous YELLOW-BREASTED CHATS were at Occoquan Bay NWR, Prince William Co,
VA on June 18.

Five SEASIDE SPARROWS were at the New Point Comfort NAP, Matthews Co, VA on
June 14. A late WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was at the Chester River Field
Research Center (Chino Farms) (private), Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 14 and
17.  

Two DICKCISSELS were at Say's Phoebe Corral, Montgomery Co, MD on June 14.
More DICKCISSELS were at Blank Road, Mt. Savage, Allegany Co, MD during the
week. Two DICKCISSELS were on Bradfording Road east of 15017, Washington Co,
MD on June 14.A DICKCISSEL was at the Hughes Road Polo Grounds, Montgomery
Co, MD on June 18, 19 and 20.

On June 20, the unmown fields at Fair Hill NRMA, Cecil Co, MD were populated
by many BOBOLINKS and EASTERN MEADOWLARKS.

Eight BREWER'S BLACKBIRDS were at Ft. Smallwood Park, Anne Arundel Co, MD on
June 17. 

Thirty BOAT-TAILED GRACKLES were found on the roads around Adkins Mill Park,
Wicomico Co, MD on June 20.

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop) is an
excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org.
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as
the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Subject: House Sparrow feeding Cowbird/Roanoke County
From: <nanjyoung AT juno.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:05:24 -0400
I thought you all would enjoy hearing this. Last Friday my granddaughter was 
sitting in the back yard watching the chickens when a bird landed on the ground 
behind her. She took a picture and sent it to me. It was obviously a baby 
Cowbird. Then on Sunday my daughter saw the Cowbird again and wrote, “I think 
I know who is raising the Cowbird.” It was being fed by a male House Sparrow! 
They are still around and she is trying to get a picture. 


Nancy Young
Botetourt County
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Subject: An update on red-cockaded woodpecker conservation at Big Woods WMA
From: "Ruthenberg, Jessica (DGIF)" <Jessica.Ruthenberg AT dgif.virginia.gov>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 15:10:24 +0000
Check out this DGIF blog article for an update on red-cockaded woodpecker 
conservation at Big Woods Wildlife Management Area (WMA). 
https://blog.wildlife.virginia.gov/2016/06/restoring-the-red-cockaded-woodpecker-in-virginia/ 


Big Woods WMA is a site on the Virginia Birding and Wildlife Trail. 
http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/vbwt/site.asp?trail=1&loop=CTW&site=CTW07A 



Jessica Ruthenberg
Watchable Wildlife Biologist
Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries
3909 Airline Blvd., Chesapeake, Virginia 23321
Office: (757) 465-6868; Cell: (804) 229-2556

jessica.ruthenberg AT dgif.virginia.gov 


Discover Our Wild Side! Virginia Birding and Wildlife 
Trail 

Please join us at the 24th annual Eastern Shore Birding and Wildlife 
Festival, Oct. 6 -9. 

Follow DGIF on Facebook!


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Subject: A Mid-Summers Update on the 2nd VA Breeding Bird Atlas
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:35:14 -0400
The breeding season is winging past and the summer solstice has already
arrived!  Many yesterday as the first true day of summer, but birders
might argue that our summer begins when the Neotropical migratory birds
return and set up shop for the breeding season.  We’ve been working on
collecting breeding season data for 3 months now!  Check out the new Atlas
article for details on how the project is progressing, cool breeding
species confirmations, and tips for tackling the rest of the season.



Click here for article: A Mid-Summers Update on the VA Breeding Bird Atlas

 


Or copy/paste this link -

http://ebird.org/content/atlasva/news/a-mid-summers-update-on-the-va-breeding-bird-atlas/ 




Here is a quick excerpt from the article:



*“Let's take a look at how we're doing so far...*

•     *8,672* eBird checklists submitted statewide

•     *352* VA BBA eBird portal users

•     *270* Priority blocks and *1,231* Atlas blocks total receiving data

•     *150* confirmed breeding species, *223* total species reported
statewide

•

Fantastic data results for our first few months of this project!   If
you're curious, here are the VA counties lead the charge with greatest
number of effort hours so far...”



You’ll have to check out the rest of the article to find out!



I hope you are all having a great summer and getting outside as much as
possible to enjoy the beautiful weather.  On Saturday, I got to lead an
Atlas workshop for the Audubon Society of Northern Virginia.  We had lovely
weather for morning birding at Riverbend Park in Fairfax county, followed
by a quick data entry workshop at the park nature center.  Thanks to all
who helped out and attended!



Remember to let your regional coordinators know if you’d like to see an
Atlas workshop put on in your area.  We thrive on feedback and benefit from
hearing how things are going in your local community.



All the best and happy birding!


Ashley Peele, PhD

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator


www.vabba2.org  |  ebird.org/atlasva 

www.facebook.com/vabba2


Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Subject: H. Fenton Day
From: "T. M. Day" <blkvulture AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 21:32:19 -0400
 Greetings,

A couple hours ago I was saddened to learn that my friend Fenton Day died
last Friday. It was sudden and unexpected, and has left everyone who I have
talked to today with a profound sense of loss. Fenton has been a constant
in Virginia birding for around 45 years, starting in his teens, and he is
remembered fondly by everyone I have spoken to today. I am sad that he is
gone, but even sadder for his wife Kathy.

As many of you know, Fenton was the pioneer of keeping bird lists in every
county of the state, and to that end, he visited all 95 counties multiple
times. In doing so, Fenton crossed paths with probably more of Virginia's
birders than anyone. Not only did Fenton know where to find birds in the
remote, under-birded counties, but he also knew the birders who lived
there. Fenton's knowledge of Virginia's birding landscape was unique. It
made him part of the fabric of Virginia birding, and he will be missed. I
will fondly remember Fenton for the rest of my days.

I talked to Fenton a week ago, letting him know about Anhingas in Prince
George County. We talked for over an hour. Anhinga was a new bird for him
in Prince George, a county where he had over 200 birds. He was truly
excited by the number of Anhingas he saw at the location, and he was
certain that they had to be nesting down there, somewhere. He spent some
time looking around for places where he might be able to find others, and
we debated whether or not any of them were seen in Dinwiddie County. That
was Fenton. That's what made him tick as a birder.

Beyond birds, Fenton was a well-rounded naturalist and biologist, with
interest in herps and mammals as well, among others.

There will be a visitation Friday, 24 June, between five and six PM at
Woody Funeral Home, Parham Chapel, in Richmond. It will be followed by a
Memorial Service at six PM at the same location.

More details regarding services are contained in the link below, as well as
a Guest Book where people can leave condolences.


http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=Henry-Day&lc=4710&pid=180392812&mid=6977457 


Sincerely,

Todd

-------------------------------
Todd Michael Day
Jeffersonton, Virginia
Culpeper County
blkvulture AT aol.com
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Subject: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 19:30:48 +0000 (UTC)
 Another cool, crisp morning on this day of the summer solstice as 21 birders 
gathered on the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  We tallied 49 
species, with highlights being the return of two Red-headed Woodpeckers; what 
appeared to be a second brood of Wood Ducks; and a large flock pf Common 
Grackles.  

Canada Goose  30
Wood Duck  18
Mallard  4
Great Blue Heron  7
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  4
Osprey  1
Accipiter sp.  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  2
Chimney Swift  10
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Red-headed Woodpecker  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  6
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
Acadian Flycatcher  8
Eastern Phoebe  3
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  1
Fish Crow  2
crow sp.  3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  5
Tree Swallow  12
Barn Swallow  6
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Carolina Wren  4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  5
Eastern Bluebird  10
American Robin  30
Gray Catbird  1
Prothonotary Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  8
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  12
Indigo Bunting  3
Red-winged Blackbird  65
Common Grackle  200
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
House Finch  3
American Goldfinch  52
House Sparrow  2
The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 
1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical 
storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November  through 
March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders 
meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, 
Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal 
business hours at (703)768-2525. 


Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park




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Subject: 3 Barn swallow nests - Falls Church, VA
From: Stuart via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:55:51 -0400
Hi all:

At the Cove condominiums, underneath the stairwells adjacent to the lake, are 3 
apparently active (and easy to see) 

Barn Swallow nests.

Young not visible yet.

Feel free to email me if you would like to schedule a viewing.  

Note: the birds are visited with a lot of foot traffic. So I don't believe 1 or 
2 extra people will disturb them. 

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Subject: Least Bittern at Occoquan Bay NWR
From: Antonio Quezon <antonio.quezon AT cox.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 11:58:33 -0400
Sunday morning I saw a Least Bittern fly across Easy Road from one side of the 
marsh to the other. This is the marsh a couple hundred yards before reaching 
Deep Hole Point Road. 


A. J. "Tony" Quezon
www.TonyQandSuzanne.com
Sent from my La-Z-Boy
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Subject: Birding Event Central Virginia - Saturday
From: "Ron Kingston" <kingston AT cstone.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 11:48:11 -0400
22nd ANNUAL PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY
 
    Louisa
County, VA
 Main presentation begins at 11:00a.m.
 

http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/

 
https://www.purplemartin.org/education/26/martin-events/

Watch130 pairs of martins feeding their nestlings and have 
a chance to meet fellow martin-lovers including many landlords. 
Receive free literature on martin 
attraction and management, and 
catalogs for martin equipment, as well as 
free handouts on bluebird conservation.

Protecting Nest Boxes and Purple Martin Housing from Snakes (and Other
Climbing Predators)

http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/bluebird%20snake%20guard%20article%203.p
df

 

http://www.richmond.com/life/home-garden/article_2d96a824-6bef-5721-bc8d-5ff
8d7c3ff69.html

~ R Kingston  

 

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Subject: Mississippi Kite- Huntley
From: Larry Cartwright <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 11:12:00 -0400
Just flew over the Central Wetland.

Larry Cartwright 
prowarbler AT verizon.net

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Piper
From: Ashley Lohr <aklohr AT vt.edu>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 10:11:37 -0400
I cried. It was so cute!! Both Piper and Finding Dory. ;)
On Jun 18, 2016 1:20 PM, "Elizabeth Fedorko" <
elizabethholcombefedorko AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Hello!~~If any of you are going to see "Finding Dory" you will LOVE the
> Pixar short before the film: "Piper." The animation is spectacular and the
> story so appealing to birders and everyone!
>
> Cheers!~~Beth Fedorko
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>
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Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh, Jun 19, 2016
From: "Marc Ribaudo" <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 15:30:51 -0400
The weekly walk at Dyke Marsh, sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh and 
open to all, was attended by 15 birders this morning, who enjoyed beautiful 
weather and some decent June birding.  The lesser scaup that has been 
hanging around for a while off the picnic area has been joined by a second 
bird.  The juvenile eagle raised on the tower viewable from the picnic area 
was attended by 2 adults, and after they left it hopped up on the rail and 
exercised its wings.  Other highlights were a family group of great-crested 
flycatchers in the picnic area, a juvenile hairy woodpecker following around 
an adult, an eastern kingbird sitting on a nest, 2 prothonotary warblers 
(one at the entrance to the trail and the second along the shore past the 
dogleg), very vocal warbling vireos, and a pair of northern parulas.  On the 
walk back we came across a black ratsnake on a tree branch,\ that had 
recently shed its skin.  We tallied 50 species in all.  The list is below.

Marc Ribaudo

-----Dyke Marsh, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jun 19, 2016 7:21 AM - 10:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.2 50 species Canada Goose 130 Mallard 24 Lesser Scaup 2 Double-crested Cormorant 4 Great Blue Heron 1 Great Egret 3 Osprey 10 Bald Eagle 5 Ring-billed Gull 2 Mourning Dove 4 Chimney Swift 6 Red-bellied Woodpecker 5 Downy Woodpecker 3 Hairy Woodpecker 3 Northern Flicker 2 Great Crested Flycatcher 5 Eastern Kingbird 3 Warbling Vireo 3 Red-eyed Vireo 1 Blue Jay 1 Fish Crow 2 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 6 Purple Martin 1 Tree Swallow 6 Barn Swallow 2 Carolina Chickadee 3 Tufted Titmouse 5 White-breasted Nuthatch 4 Carolina Wren 5 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 American Robin 8 Brown Thrasher 1 Northern Mockingbird 2 European Starling 12 Cedar Waxwing 1 Prothonotary Warbler 2 Common Yellowthroat 3 Northern Parula 2 Yellow Warbler 3 Song Sparrow 1 Northern Cardinal 8 Indigo Bunting 3 Red-winged Blackbird 20 Common Grackle 14 Brown-headed Cowbird 2 Orchard Oriole 6 Baltimore Oriole 1 House Finch 6 American Goldfinch 3 House Sparrow 4 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30300678 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: Great Falls Park Walk (Fairfax County)
From: Marshall Rawson via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 11:51:43 -0400
Our group of nine tallied 40 species. It was a quiet morning overall, 
punctuated at both ends by singing wood thrushes. A Louisiana waterthrush was 
still singing in the holding basin area along with calling acadian flycatchers. 
Upstream the warbling vireo obliged us with one trill. Grackles in terms of 
numbers had the biggest presence today. All are welcome to join this regular 
Sunday walk that meets at 8:00 am in the visitor's center parking lot. -- 
Marshall Rawson, McLean VA 


Canada Goose  8
Mallard  3
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Great Blue Heron  12
Black Vulture  3
Turkey Vulture  8
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Acadian Flycatcher  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  3
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay  4
Fish Crow  6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow  4
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  10
White-breasted Nuthatch  5
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  1
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Northern Parula  1
Chipping Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  2
Eastern Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Common Grackle  25
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
American Goldfinch  3





-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist 
To: mnr2 
Sent: Sun, Jun 19, 2016 11:37 am
Subject: eBird Report - Great Falls Park, Jun 19, 2016

Great Falls Park, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jun 19, 2016 8:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Sunny, 70s
40 species

Canada Goose  8
Mallard  3
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Great Blue Heron  12
Black Vulture  3
Turkey Vulture  8
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Acadian Flycatcher  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  3
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  6
Blue Jay  4
Fish Crow  6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow  4
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  10
White-breasted Nuthatch  5
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  1
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Northern Parula  1
Chipping Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  2
Eastern Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Common Grackle  25
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30300279

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Sky Meadows SP, Fauquier Co.; June 18
From: Scott Baron <razorbill1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 03:45:46 +0000
Hello,


Today while doing the Sky Meadows SP/Thompson WMA count circle for the 4th of 
July Butterfly Count I came across 2 CLIFF SWALLOWS at Sky Meadows. At first I 
thought they had flown out of one of the outbuildings near the Visitor Center 
but a check produced only Barn Swallow nests. 



Old notes from the 1980s show that Cliff Swallows nested in the park back then.


The butterflying was slow, as it has been for most of the spring in our region.


Happy birding,


Scott Baron

Gaithersburg, Md.

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Subject: [va-bird] Occoquan Bay NWR, Woodbridge
From: Scott Priebe <falco57 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 15:50:12 -0400
Beautiful morning to be out birding at OBNWR. Highlights were numerous 
Yellow-breasted Chats, along with the other 4 local 'yellow' warblers, 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Blue Grosbeak; with 47 species seen or heard. See 
http://ebird.org/ebird/va/view/checklist/S30281296 for list. 


Scott D. Priebe

Springfield, VA

	
        
		Virus-free
		
	
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Piper
From: Elizabeth Fedorko <elizabethholcombefedorko AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 13:19:44 -0400
Hello!~~If any of you are going to see "Finding Dory" you will LOVE the
Pixar short before the film: "Piper." The animation is spectacular and the
story so appealing to birders and everyone!

Cheers!~~Beth Fedorko
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Subject: Mississippi Kite
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder AT gcronline.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 11:44:07 -0400
Greetings to all

I spent 3.75 hrs at Runt's farm in Halifax Co and saw 37 species including an 
adult Bald Eagle, a Mississippi Kite, two RS Hawks and a RT Hawk. 


From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
jcbabirder AT gcronline.com


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Subject: Mississippi Kite in Fairfax Station
From: Antonio Quezon <antonio.quezon AT cox.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:05:24 -0400
We had an adult Mississippi Kite soaring directly over our house in Fairfax 
Station at 1000 Saturday. 


A. J. "Tony" Quezon
www.TonyQandSuzanne.com
Sent from my La-Z-Boy
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Subject: 3 JV Red-shouldered Hawks
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall AT faintich.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 16:27:28 -0400
In my yard in Stoney Creek (Wintergreen); 6/16/16. Report and photos:

 

 
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2016/2016_06_16.htm

 

___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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Subject: Re: Use of recordings
From: Eileen Jones via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 09:57:02 -0400
Could this discussion please be taken to private email exchange?

Thank you.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 16, 2016, at 8:58 AM, John Pancake  wrote:
> 
> Does anyone know of an authoritative study of the impact of recordings on 
birds? A couple of years ago I interviewed a number of ornithologists on the 
subject. Opinion was divided. I could not find any conclusive scientific 
evidence on the question. If there is such a study, a link would be helpful. 

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Subject: Use of recordings
From: John Pancake <jspancake AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 08:58:35 -0400
Does anyone know of an authoritative study of the impact of recordings on 
birds? A couple of years ago I interviewed a number of ornithologists on the 
subject. Opinion was divided. I could not find any conclusive scientific 
evidence on the question. If there is such a study, a link would be helpful. 

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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Virginia Beach
From: "goshawk AT cox.net" <goshawk@cox.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:54:04 -0400
A lone Black-bellied Whistling Duck has been seen in Virginia Beach on Lake 
Joyce in the BayLake Pines neighborhood. Best seen from Dubay Office Park 4301 
Shore Drive. On the last deck on the water, the bird was observed across the 
cove in a residential back yard with several mallards. 


Tim Barry
(757) 575-7960
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Subject: Re: VSO Trip to Highland County – June 10-12, 2016
From: Karen Seward via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:35:24 -0400
Are you able to tell me where the Alder Flycatchers were seen? I'm in Monterey 
tonight. Found the Mourning Warblers on Paddy's Knob but still have not found 
the Alders. 


Karen Seward
Valdosta, Georgia

> On Jun 15, 2016, at 9:15 PM, Eileen Rowan  wrote:
> 
> I know I speak for most when I say the trip was magical, in no small part
> due to Meredith Bell's and Lee Adams' hard work, quality leadership, and
> warm personalities.  The attendees, both experienced and newbies, were a
> great bunch and made for a fine outing.
> 
> Thanks to all, even the snorting, um, bear. Shout-out to Big Fish Cider Co.
> in Monterey, so delish, don't miss it when there.
> On Jun 15, 2016 7:59 PM, "Meredith Bell"  wrote:
> 
> Hi VA-Birders,
> 
> The weather was spectacular for the summer VSO field trip June 10-12, in
> Highland County. 49 enthusiastic birders tallied 102 species over the 3
> days. Great finds included 16 warbler, 8 flycatcher and 7 woodpecker
> species. Many thanks to my fabulous field trip co-chair, Lee Adams, who
> assisted in leading groups on Saturday and Sunday; and to Wayne O'Bryan for
> allowing us to visit their property Sunday morning.
> 
> Friday afternoon was spent at nearby Forks of Water and Rainbow Springs
> Retreat property (a lovely restored 1870s farmhouse where 4 of us stayed).
> We were rewarded with a nice variety including Baltimore Orioles, Warbling
> Vireo, Yellow Warbler and Cedar Waxwings at the first stop, followed by
> more Baltimore Orioles, Yellow Warbler, Broad-winged Hawk and singing Wood
> Thrush at the second.
> 
> Friday evening we gathered at The Real Deal restaurant for dinner, where
> the owners set up a buffet to accommodate our large group, serving
> delicious smoked beef and pork BBQ.
> 
> Saturday we divided into two groups and explored the northwest section of
> the county. We covered the same areas but from opposite directions,
> including Rt. 601 (Bear Mountain Rd), Rt. 54 (Lake Buffalo Rd), Laurel
> Fork, Straight Fork and various stops in-between. Along the way, we found
> many sought-after warblers: Canada, Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian,
> Blackthroated Green, American Redstart and Magnolia. We even found a
> Mourning Warbler along Lake Buffalo Rd, nesting in the exact same spot
> where we found it three years ago. On Rt. 601 we got Vesper Sparrow. The
> other group got Alder Flycatcher, in different spots.
> 
> Sunday morning we birded Wimer Mountain Road and the beautiful O'Bryan
> property. We found Golden-winged Warblers behind the house and off the
> road. That was certainly the target bird, we also enjoyed Bobolink,
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Cedar
> Waxwing and Indigo Bunting.
> 
> Spectacular views of the mountains, hills and valleys of Highland County
> added to the enjoyment. Many first-time visitors said the scenery alone was
> worth the trip. Our fantastic group of birders made this a truly memorable
> weekend! Complete list of species for the 3 days follows.
> 
> Meredith Bell
> VSO Field Trip Co-chair
> 
> Canada Goose
> Mallard
> Great Blue Heron
> Green Heron
> Black Vulture
> Turkey Vulture
> Osprey
> Sharp-shinned Hawk
> Bald Eagle
> Red-shouldered Hawk
> Broad-winged Hawk
> Red-tailed Hawk
> Killdeer
> Rock Pigeon
> Mourning Dove
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo
> Eastern Whip-poor-will
> Chimney Swift
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird
> Belted Kingfisher
> Red-headed Woodpecker
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Downy Woodpecker
> Hairy Woodpecker
> Northern Flicker
> Pileated Woodpecker
> American Kestrel
> Eastern Wood-Pewee
> Acadian Flycatcher
> Alder Flycatcher
> Willow Flycatcher
> Least Flycatcher
> Eastern Phoebe
> Great Crested Flycatcher
> Eastern Kingbird
> Yellow-throated Vireo
> Blue-headed Vireo
> Warbling Vireo
> Red-eyed Vireo
> Blue Jay
> American Crow
> Common Raven
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow
> Purple Martin
> Tree Swallow
> Barn Swallow
> Cliff Swallow
> Black-capped Chickadee
> Tufted Titmouse
> White-breasted Nuthatch
> House Wren
> Carolina Wren
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
> Golden-crowned Kinglet
> Eastern Bluebird
> Veery
> Hermit Thrush
> Wood Thrush
> American Robin
> Gray Catbird
> Northern Mockingbird
> Brown Thrasher
> European Starling
> Cedar Waxwing
> Ovenbird
> Louisiana Waterthrush
> Golden-winged Warbler
> Black-and-white Warbler
> Mourning Warbler
> Common Yellowthroat
> American Redstart
> Northern Parula
> Magnolia Warbler
> Blackburnian Warbler
> Yellow Warbler
> Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Black-throated Blue Warbler
> Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Black-throated Green Warbler
> Canada Warbler
> Eastern Towhee
> Chipping Sparrow
> Field Sparrow
> Vesper Sparrow
> Savannah Sparrow
> Grasshopper Sparrow
> Song Sparrow
> Dark-eyed Junco
> Scarlet Tanager
> Northern Cardinal
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> Indigo Bunting
> Bobolink
> Red-winged Blackbird
> Eastern Meadowlark
> Common Grackle
> Brown-headed Cowbird
> Orchard Oriole
> Baltimore Oriole
> American Goldfinch
> House Sparrow
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Subject: Re: VSO Trip to Highland County – June 10-12, 2016
From: Eileen Rowan <eileenrowan AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:15:01 -0400
I know I speak for most when I say the trip was magical, in no small part
due to Meredith Bell's and Lee Adams' hard work, quality leadership, and
warm personalities.  The attendees, both experienced and newbies, were a
great bunch and made for a fine outing.

Thanks to all, even the snorting, um, bear. Shout-out to Big Fish Cider Co.
in Monterey, so delish, don't miss it when there.
On Jun 15, 2016 7:59 PM, "Meredith Bell"  wrote:

Hi VA-Birders,

The weather was spectacular for the summer VSO field trip June 10-12, in
Highland County. 49 enthusiastic birders tallied 102 species over the 3
days. Great finds included 16 warbler, 8 flycatcher and 7 woodpecker
species. Many thanks to my fabulous field trip co-chair, Lee Adams, who
assisted in leading groups on Saturday and Sunday; and to Wayne O'Bryan for
allowing us to visit their property Sunday morning.

Friday afternoon was spent at nearby Forks of Water and Rainbow Springs
Retreat property (a lovely restored 1870s farmhouse where 4 of us stayed).
We were rewarded with a nice variety including Baltimore Orioles, Warbling
Vireo, Yellow Warbler and Cedar Waxwings at the first stop, followed by
more Baltimore Orioles, Yellow Warbler, Broad-winged Hawk and singing Wood
Thrush at the second.

Friday evening we gathered at The Real Deal restaurant for dinner, where
the owners set up a buffet to accommodate our large group, serving
delicious smoked beef and pork BBQ.

Saturday we divided into two groups and explored the northwest section of
the county. We covered the same areas but from opposite directions,
including Rt. 601 (Bear Mountain Rd), Rt. 54 (Lake Buffalo Rd), Laurel
Fork, Straight Fork and various stops in-between. Along the way, we found
many sought-after warblers: Canada, Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian,
Blackthroated Green, American Redstart and Magnolia. We even found a
Mourning Warbler along Lake Buffalo Rd, nesting in the exact same spot
where we found it three years ago. On Rt. 601 we got Vesper Sparrow. The
other group got Alder Flycatcher, in different spots.

Sunday morning we birded Wimer Mountain Road and the beautiful O'Bryan
property. We found Golden-winged Warblers behind the house and off the
road. That was certainly the target bird, we also enjoyed Bobolink,
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Cedar
Waxwing and Indigo Bunting.

Spectacular views of the mountains, hills and valleys of Highland County
added to the enjoyment. Many first-time visitors said the scenery alone was
worth the trip. Our fantastic group of birders made this a truly memorable
weekend! Complete list of species for the 3 days follows.

Meredith Bell
VSO Field Trip Co-chair

Canada Goose
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Whip-poor-will
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
House Wren
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Golden-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow
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Subject: Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un...
From: Janice Frye <byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 20:50:02 -0400
"Dear Mr. Larner, Please help me understand why, when,and how you use
playback. I thought what you did with the flycatchers was perhaps too much,
but more info might help me to learn." In a private message, text, or phone
call, not on a public listserve.That avoids all kinds of "what for".  He is
quite accessible and a very nice person.  Once again I am reminded why I
(and others) seldom bother with the listserve these days.  I know
better, really, I do.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 8:31 PM,  wrote:

> Not everyone cares to be given "what for" as I get from folks.  It's not
> pleasant, so I don't blame anyone for avoiding it.
>
> In a message dated 6/15/2016 8:28:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com writes:
>
> Not brave enough to properly identify themselves.
>
> On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 8:06 PM,  wrote:
>
> > People took umbrage with my Washington Post commentary a few years back
> > regarding the treatment of birds by people who supposedly care about
> them a
> > great deal.  But the reality is that everyone justifies his/her behavior
> as
> > somehow assisting birds, whether chasing Snowy Owls across fields, wading
> > through wetlands to scare up birds, blinding owls at night with photo
> > flashes, using tapes to draw birds in, etc.
> >
> > No one ever believes his/her actions are harmful just because no one
> means
> > harm.  And few people call anyone out for fear of ridicule by the birding
> > community at large that, despite ethical guidelines, is itself far too
> > often guilty of disregarding them.
> >
> > The only person on this thread to express genuine concern for the welfare
> > of birds is the person who started it.  Kudos to that brave soul.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > Marlene
> >
> > In a message dated 6/15/2016 11:36:43 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> > byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com writes:
> >
> > Well said.
> >
> > Jan Frye
> >
> > On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 11:31 AM, Eileen Rowan 
> > wrote:
> >
> > > [This message is strictly for those interested in this ongoing
> discussion
> > > from this past week.  Otherwise, please move on to the next message;
> yes,
> > > we do know the purpose of VA-Bird.]
> > >
> > > As a long-time professional conservationist and science educator, and
> > > founder/first coordinator of the Virginia Important Bird Area Program,
> > I'd
> > > like to state my disagreement with recent criticism of a VA-Bird report
> > > that noted playback use in its flycatcher ID.  I'm concerned about the
> > > potentially chilling effect on bird conservation from a
> well-intentioned
> > > but overcautious restriction on amateur ornithologists and natural
> > history
> > > educators.
> > >
> > > The flycatcher report in question was by a long-time citizen scientist
> > who
> > > is contributing significantly to bird conservation through regular
> > > participation in DGIF surveys, the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, and
> I'm
> > > sure much more.  He regularly reports his observations on VA-Bird;
> > > these reports
> > > are valuable and very well may end up aiding flycatcher protection.
> > These
> > > are all valid and important methods for citizen scientists to report
> > their
> > > data, be it here on VA-Bird, on E-Bird, the BBA, etc.  The more we know
> > of
> > > a species distibution and abundance, the better we can monitor possible
> > > population decline and the need for habitat protection.  A careful
> > balance
> > > must be struck here.
> > >
> > > If it weren't personally enjoyable, citizen scientists wouldn't do it.
> > But
> > > it's incorrect to call such observations "solely for personal
> enjoyment"
> > if
> > > the results are reported by one of the above-mentioned or other means.
> > >
> > > It's also not "solely for personal enjoyment" if there's an education
> > > component.  Most successful environmental professionals will tell you
> > that
> > > leading a field trip and educating people on birds is the best way to
> > > create more enthusiastic bird habitat conservationists.  Playback can
> > help
> > > if it's accompanied with an explanation of the need to use it
> > responsibly.
> > > I know from experience it's far harder to get people to care about
> > > protecting, say, a wetlands, if they've never seen personally the
> > diversity
> > > of wildlife that uses it.  We can either be satisfied being purists, or
> > if
> > > we really want to help wildlife we can work with the realities of human
> > > nature.
> > >
> > > We of course should continue raising awareness about protecting
> > individual
> > > birds from repeated playback.  If it's reasonable to assume a local
> > > population could be subjected to playback several times over the season
> > by
> > > other birders, you should avoid it unless you believe you're
> contributing
> > > new information that you intend to report.  If you decide to proceed,
> you
> > > can help mitigate it by helping to discourage truly recreational-only
> > > playback and explaining the difference.
> > >
> > > About that terrifying predator-in-the-house metaphor... I don't claim
> to
> > > have reviewed all the literature, but it's my impression we don't have
> > > enough science to know what is the correct anthropomorphic metaphor for
> > the
> > > effect of one playback event on birds.  Is hearing a possible
> competitor
> > > sing for a minute or two for bird just like, as claimed, the
> overwhelming
> > > panic we'd feel at hearing a burglar or other predator downstairs?
> That
> > > was an emotionally grabbing image, to be sure.  But burglars are
> > predators,
> > > not competitors.  And if we hear a burglar, do we abandon our home and
> > > children?   Of course not.   Comparing stress chemical levels in people
> > and
> > > birds isn't meaningful without comparing the resulting behavior.  It
> > would
> > > have been an unsurpassable evolutionary hurdle if birds were in fact
> > > affected in such a drastically counterproductive way.
> > >
> > > If we're to speculate using anthropomorphic metaphors, we might also
> > > speculate that it's like a false rumor that we may be replaced at work.
> > We
> > > don't instantly panic and quit, thereby harming our family; we try to
> > > confirm if the threat is real then relax when it isn't.  The kind of
> > > reaction that helped make our species successful.  Kinda like avian
> > > dinosaurs.  I don't know the answer, but it's not good science to claim
> > to
> > > know one does.
> > >
> > > Meanwhile, like so many conservation methods, the potential risk of
> > > playback must be weighed not on its own, but balanced carefully against
> > > potential benefits.  Let's certainly follow VSO ethics guidelines.
> Let's
> > > also interpret them wisely so as to let the citizen scientists and
> group
> > > leaders who are creating more people who care about birds work their
> > > magic.  Let's not let undeserved criticizm take the joy out of it and
> > drive
> > > them off.  Thanks for reading.
> > >
> > > Eileen Rowan
> > > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com. If you wish
> > to
> > > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > > http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> > >
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as marlenecondon AT aol.com. If you wish
> > to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> >
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as marlenecondon AT aol.com. If you wish
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>
>
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Subject: Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un...
From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 20:31:22 -0400
 
Not everyone cares to be given "what for" as I get from folks.  It's  not 
pleasant, so I don't blame anyone for avoiding it.

 
 
In a message dated 6/15/2016 8:28:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com writes:

Not  brave enough to properly identify themselves.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at  8:06 PM,  wrote:

> People took umbrage  with my Washington Post commentary a few years back
> regarding the  treatment of birds by people who supposedly care about 
them a
> great  deal.  But the reality is that everyone justifies his/her behavior 
 as
> somehow assisting birds, whether chasing Snowy Owls across fields,  wading
> through wetlands to scare up birds, blinding owls at night with  photo
> flashes, using tapes to draw birds in, etc.
>
> No  one ever believes his/her actions are harmful just because no one  
means
> harm.  And few people call anyone out for fear of ridicule  by the birding
> community at large that, despite ethical guidelines, is  itself far too
> often guilty of disregarding them.
>
> The  only person on this thread to express genuine concern for the welfare
>  of birds is the person who started it.  Kudos to that brave  soul.
>
> Sincerely,
> Marlene
>
> In a message  dated 6/15/2016 11:36:43 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
>  byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com writes:
>
> Well said.
>
> Jan  Frye
>
> On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 11:31 AM, Eileen Rowan  
> wrote:
>
> > [This  message is strictly for those interested in this ongoing 
discussion
>  > from this past week.  Otherwise, please move on to the next message;  
yes,
> > we do know the purpose of VA-Bird.]
> >
>  > As a long-time professional conservationist and science educator,  and
> > founder/first coordinator of the Virginia Important Bird Area  Program,
> I'd
> > like to state my disagreement with recent  criticism of a VA-Bird report
> > that noted playback use in its  flycatcher ID.  I'm concerned about the
> > potentially chilling  effect on bird conservation from a 
well-intentioned
> > but  overcautious restriction on amateur ornithologists and natural
>  history
> > educators.
> >
> > The flycatcher  report in question was by a long-time citizen scientist
> who
>  > is contributing significantly to bird conservation through  regular
> > participation in DGIF surveys, the Virginia Breeding Bird  Atlas, and 
I'm
> > sure much more.  He regularly reports his  observations on VA-Bird;
> > these reports
> > are valuable  and very well may end up aiding flycatcher protection.
> These
>  > are all valid and important methods for citizen scientists to  report
> their
> > data, be it here on VA-Bird, on E-Bird, the  BBA, etc.  The more we know
> of
> > a species distibution  and abundance, the better we can monitor possible
> > population  decline and the need for habitat protection.  A careful
>  balance
> > must be struck here.
> >
> > If it  weren't personally enjoyable, citizen scientists wouldn't do it.
>  But
> > it's incorrect to call such observations "solely for personal  
enjoyment"
> if
> > the results are reported by one of the  above-mentioned or other means.
> >
> > It's also not  "solely for personal enjoyment" if there's an education
> >  component.  Most successful environmental professionals will tell  you
> that
> > leading a field trip and educating people on  birds is the best way to
> > create more enthusiastic bird habitat  conservationists.  Playback can
> help
> > if it's  accompanied with an explanation of the need to use it
>  responsibly.
> > I know from experience it's far harder to get people  to care about
> > protecting, say, a wetlands, if they've never seen  personally the
> diversity
> > of wildlife that uses it.   We can either be satisfied being purists, or
> if
> > we really  want to help wildlife we can work with the realities of human
> >  nature.
> >
> > We of course should continue raising  awareness about protecting
> individual
> > birds from repeated  playback.  If it's reasonable to assume a local
> > population  could be subjected to playback several times over the season
>  by
> > other birders, you should avoid it unless you believe you're  
contributing
> > new information that you intend to report.  If  you decide to proceed, 
you
> > can help mitigate it by helping to  discourage truly recreational-only
> > playback and explaining the  difference.
> >
> > About that terrifying  predator-in-the-house metaphor... I don't claim 
to
> > have reviewed  all the literature, but it's my impression we don't have
> > enough  science to know what is the correct anthropomorphic metaphor for
>  the
> > effect of one playback event on birds.  Is hearing a  possible 
competitor
> > sing for a minute or two for bird just like,  as claimed, the 
overwhelming
> > panic we'd feel at hearing a burglar  or other predator downstairs?   
That
> > was an emotionally  grabbing image, to be sure.  But burglars are
> predators,
>  > not competitors.  And if we hear a burglar, do we abandon our home  and
> > children?   Of course not.   Comparing  stress chemical levels in people
> and
> > birds isn't  meaningful without comparing the resulting behavior.  It
>  would
> > have been an unsurpassable evolutionary hurdle if birds  were in fact
> > affected in such a drastically counterproductive  way.
> >
> > If we're to speculate using anthropomorphic  metaphors, we might also
> > speculate that it's like a false rumor  that we may be replaced at work.
> We
> > don't instantly panic  and quit, thereby harming our family; we try to
> > confirm if the  threat is real then relax when it isn't.  The kind of
> >  reaction that helped make our species successful.  Kinda like  avian
> > dinosaurs.  I don't know the answer, but it's not good  science to claim
> to
> > know one does.
> >
>  > Meanwhile, like so many conservation methods, the potential risk  of
> > playback must be weighed not on its own, but balanced  carefully against
> > potential benefits.  Let's certainly  follow VSO ethics guidelines.  
Let's
> > also interpret them  wisely so as to let the citizen scientists and 
group
> > leaders who  are creating more people who care about birds work their
> >  magic.  Let's not let undeserved criticizm take the joy out of it  and
> drive
> > them off.  Thanks for reading.
>  >
> > Eileen Rowan
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird  as byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com. If you wish
> to
> > unsubscribe, or  modify your preferences please visit
> >  http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>  >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as marlenecondon AT aol.com. If  you wish
> to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please  visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird  ***
>
>
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Subject: Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un...
From: Janice Frye <byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 20:27:52 -0400
Not brave enough to properly identify themselves.

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 8:06 PM,  wrote:

> People took umbrage with my Washington Post commentary a few years back
> regarding the treatment of birds by people who supposedly care about them a
> great deal.  But the reality is that everyone justifies his/her behavior as
> somehow assisting birds, whether chasing Snowy Owls across fields, wading
> through wetlands to scare up birds, blinding owls at night with photo
> flashes, using tapes to draw birds in, etc.
>
> No one ever believes his/her actions are harmful just because no one means
> harm.  And few people call anyone out for fear of ridicule by the birding
> community at large that, despite ethical guidelines, is itself far too
> often guilty of disregarding them.
>
> The only person on this thread to express genuine concern for the welfare
> of birds is the person who started it.  Kudos to that brave soul.
>
> Sincerely,
> Marlene
>
> In a message dated 6/15/2016 11:36:43 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com writes:
>
> Well said.
>
> Jan Frye
>
> On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 11:31 AM, Eileen Rowan 
> wrote:
>
> > [This message is strictly for those interested in this ongoing discussion
> > from this past week.  Otherwise, please move on to the next message; yes,
> > we do know the purpose of VA-Bird.]
> >
> > As a long-time professional conservationist and science educator, and
> > founder/first coordinator of the Virginia Important Bird Area Program,
> I'd
> > like to state my disagreement with recent criticism of a VA-Bird report
> > that noted playback use in its flycatcher ID.  I'm concerned about the
> > potentially chilling effect on bird conservation from a well-intentioned
> > but overcautious restriction on amateur ornithologists and natural
> history
> > educators.
> >
> > The flycatcher report in question was by a long-time citizen scientist
> who
> > is contributing significantly to bird conservation through regular
> > participation in DGIF surveys, the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, and I'm
> > sure much more.  He regularly reports his observations on VA-Bird;
> > these reports
> > are valuable and very well may end up aiding flycatcher protection.
> These
> > are all valid and important methods for citizen scientists to report
> their
> > data, be it here on VA-Bird, on E-Bird, the BBA, etc.  The more we know
> of
> > a species distibution and abundance, the better we can monitor possible
> > population decline and the need for habitat protection.  A careful
> balance
> > must be struck here.
> >
> > If it weren't personally enjoyable, citizen scientists wouldn't do it.
> But
> > it's incorrect to call such observations "solely for personal enjoyment"
> if
> > the results are reported by one of the above-mentioned or other means.
> >
> > It's also not "solely for personal enjoyment" if there's an education
> > component.  Most successful environmental professionals will tell you
> that
> > leading a field trip and educating people on birds is the best way to
> > create more enthusiastic bird habitat conservationists.  Playback can
> help
> > if it's accompanied with an explanation of the need to use it
> responsibly.
> > I know from experience it's far harder to get people to care about
> > protecting, say, a wetlands, if they've never seen personally the
> diversity
> > of wildlife that uses it.  We can either be satisfied being purists, or
> if
> > we really want to help wildlife we can work with the realities of human
> > nature.
> >
> > We of course should continue raising awareness about protecting
> individual
> > birds from repeated playback.  If it's reasonable to assume a local
> > population could be subjected to playback several times over the season
> by
> > other birders, you should avoid it unless you believe you're contributing
> > new information that you intend to report.  If you decide to proceed, you
> > can help mitigate it by helping to discourage truly recreational-only
> > playback and explaining the difference.
> >
> > About that terrifying predator-in-the-house metaphor... I don't claim to
> > have reviewed all the literature, but it's my impression we don't have
> > enough science to know what is the correct anthropomorphic metaphor for
> the
> > effect of one playback event on birds.  Is hearing a possible competitor
> > sing for a minute or two for bird just like, as claimed, the overwhelming
> > panic we'd feel at hearing a burglar or other predator downstairs?   That
> > was an emotionally grabbing image, to be sure.  But burglars are
> predators,
> > not competitors.  And if we hear a burglar, do we abandon our home and
> > children?   Of course not.   Comparing stress chemical levels in people
> and
> > birds isn't meaningful without comparing the resulting behavior.  It
> would
> > have been an unsurpassable evolutionary hurdle if birds were in fact
> > affected in such a drastically counterproductive way.
> >
> > If we're to speculate using anthropomorphic metaphors, we might also
> > speculate that it's like a false rumor that we may be replaced at work.
> We
> > don't instantly panic and quit, thereby harming our family; we try to
> > confirm if the threat is real then relax when it isn't.  The kind of
> > reaction that helped make our species successful.  Kinda like avian
> > dinosaurs.  I don't know the answer, but it's not good science to claim
> to
> > know one does.
> >
> > Meanwhile, like so many conservation methods, the potential risk of
> > playback must be weighed not on its own, but balanced carefully against
> > potential benefits.  Let's certainly follow VSO ethics guidelines.  Let's
> > also interpret them wisely so as to let the citizen scientists and group
> > leaders who are creating more people who care about birds work their
> > magic.  Let's not let undeserved criticizm take the joy out of it and
> drive
> > them off.  Thanks for reading.
> >
> > Eileen Rowan
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com. If you wish
> to
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as marlenecondon AT aol.com. If you wish
> to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
>
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Subject: Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if un...
From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 20:06:19 -0400
People took umbrage with my Washington Post commentary a few  years back 
regarding the treatment of birds by people who supposedly care  about them a 
great deal.  But the reality is that everyone justifies  his/her behavior as 
somehow assisting birds, whether chasing Snowy Owls across  fields, wading 
through wetlands to scare up birds, blinding owls at night with  photo 
flashes, using tapes to draw birds in, etc.
 
No one ever believes his/her actions are harmful just because no one means  
harm.  And few people call anyone out for fear of ridicule by the birding  
community at large that, despite ethical guidelines, is itself far too  
often guilty of disregarding them.
 
The only person on this thread to express genuine concern for the  welfare 
of birds is the person who started it.  Kudos to that brave  soul.
 
Sincerely,
Marlene   
 
 
In a message dated 6/15/2016 11:36:43 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com writes:

Well  said.

Jan Frye

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 11:31 AM, Eileen Rowan  
wrote:

> [This message is strictly  for those interested in this ongoing discussion
> from this past  week.  Otherwise, please move on to the next message; yes,
> we do  know the purpose of VA-Bird.]
>
> As a long-time professional  conservationist and science educator, and
> founder/first coordinator of  the Virginia Important Bird Area Program, 
I'd
> like to state my  disagreement with recent criticism of a VA-Bird report
> that noted  playback use in its flycatcher ID.  I'm concerned about the
>  potentially chilling effect on bird conservation from a  well-intentioned
> but overcautious restriction on amateur  ornithologists and natural 
history
> educators.
>
> The  flycatcher report in question was by a long-time citizen scientist 
who
>  is contributing significantly to bird conservation through regular
>  participation in DGIF surveys, the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, and  I'm
> sure much more.  He regularly reports his observations on  VA-Bird;
> these reports
> are valuable and very well may end up  aiding flycatcher protection.  
These
> are all valid and important  methods for citizen scientists to report 
their
> data, be it here on  VA-Bird, on E-Bird, the BBA, etc.  The more we know 
of
> a species  distibution and abundance, the better we can monitor possible
>  population decline and the need for habitat protection.  A careful  
balance
> must be struck here.
>
> If it weren't personally  enjoyable, citizen scientists wouldn't do it.  
But
> it's incorrect  to call such observations "solely for personal enjoyment" 
if
> the  results are reported by one of the above-mentioned or other  means.
>
> It's also not "solely for personal enjoyment" if  there's an education
> component.  Most successful environmental  professionals will tell you 
that
> leading a field trip and educating  people on birds is the best way to
> create more enthusiastic bird  habitat conservationists.  Playback can 
help
> if it's accompanied  with an explanation of the need to use it 
responsibly.
> I know from  experience it's far harder to get people to care about
> protecting,  say, a wetlands, if they've never seen personally the 
diversity
> of  wildlife that uses it.  We can either be satisfied being purists, or  
if
> we really want to help wildlife we can work with the realities of  human
> nature.
>
> We of course should continue raising  awareness about protecting 
individual
> birds from repeated  playback.  If it's reasonable to assume a local
> population could  be subjected to playback several times over the season 
by
> other  birders, you should avoid it unless you believe you're contributing
>  new information that you intend to report.  If you decide to proceed,  
you
> can help mitigate it by helping to discourage truly  recreational-only
> playback and explaining the  difference.
>
> About that terrifying predator-in-the-house  metaphor... I don't claim to
> have reviewed all the literature, but  it's my impression we don't have
> enough science to know what is the  correct anthropomorphic metaphor for 
the
> effect of one playback event  on birds.  Is hearing a possible competitor
> sing for a minute or  two for bird just like, as claimed, the overwhelming
> panic we'd feel  at hearing a burglar or other predator downstairs?   That
>  was an emotionally grabbing image, to be sure.  But burglars are  
predators,
> not competitors.  And if we hear a burglar, do we  abandon our home and
> children?   Of course not.    Comparing stress chemical levels in people 
and
> birds isn't meaningful  without comparing the resulting behavior.  It 
would
> have been an  unsurpassable evolutionary hurdle if birds were in fact
> affected in  such a drastically counterproductive way.
>
> If we're to  speculate using anthropomorphic metaphors, we might also
> speculate  that it's like a false rumor that we may be replaced at work.  
We
>  don't instantly panic and quit, thereby harming our family; we try to
>  confirm if the threat is real then relax when it isn't.  The kind  of
> reaction that helped make our species successful.  Kinda like  avian
> dinosaurs.  I don't know the answer, but it's not good  science to claim 
to
> know one does.
>
> Meanwhile, like so  many conservation methods, the potential risk of
> playback must be  weighed not on its own, but balanced carefully against
> potential  benefits.  Let's certainly follow VSO ethics guidelines.   
Let's
> also interpret them wisely so as to let the citizen scientists  and group
> leaders who are creating more people who care about birds  work their
> magic.  Let's not let undeserved criticizm take the  joy out of it and 
drive
> them off.  Thanks for  reading.
>
> Eileen Rowan
> *** You are subscribed to  va-bird as byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify  your preferences please visit
>  http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
***  You are subscribed to va-bird as marlenecondon AT aol.com. If you wish to 
 unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit  
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Subject: VSO Trip to Highland County – June 10-12, 2016
From: Meredith Bell <merandlee AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 19:58:23 -0400
Hi VA-Birders,

The weather was spectacular for the summer VSO field trip June 10-12, in
Highland County. 49 enthusiastic birders tallied 102 species over the 3
days. Great finds included 16 warbler, 8 flycatcher and 7 woodpecker
species. Many thanks to my fabulous field trip co-chair, Lee Adams, who
assisted in leading groups on Saturday and Sunday; and to Wayne O'Bryan for
allowing us to visit their property Sunday morning.

Friday afternoon was spent at nearby Forks of Water and Rainbow Springs
Retreat property (a lovely restored 1870s farmhouse where 4 of us stayed).
We were rewarded with a nice variety including Baltimore Orioles, Warbling
Vireo, Yellow Warbler and Cedar Waxwings at the first stop, followed by
more Baltimore Orioles, Yellow Warbler, Broad-winged Hawk and singing Wood
Thrush at the second.

Friday evening we gathered at The Real Deal restaurant for dinner, where
the owners set up a buffet to accommodate our large group, serving
delicious smoked beef and pork BBQ.

Saturday we divided into two groups and explored the northwest section of
the county. We covered the same areas but from opposite directions,
including Rt. 601 (Bear Mountain Rd), Rt. 54 (Lake Buffalo Rd), Laurel
Fork, Straight Fork and various stops in-between. Along the way, we found
many sought-after warblers: Canada, Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian,
Blackthroated Green, American Redstart and Magnolia. We even found a
Mourning Warbler along Lake Buffalo Rd, nesting in the exact same spot
where we found it three years ago. On Rt. 601 we got Vesper Sparrow. The
other group got Alder Flycatcher, in different spots.

Sunday morning we birded Wimer Mountain Road and the beautiful O'Bryan
property. We found Golden-winged Warblers behind the house and off the
road. That was certainly the target bird, we also enjoyed Bobolink,
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Cedar
Waxwing and Indigo Bunting.

Spectacular views of the mountains, hills and valleys of Highland County
added to the enjoyment. Many first-time visitors said the scenery alone was
worth the trip. Our fantastic group of birders made this a truly memorable
weekend! Complete list of species for the 3 days follows.

Meredith Bell
VSO Field Trip Co-chair

Canada Goose
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Whip-poor-will
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Willow Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
House Wren
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Golden-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow
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Subject: Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Dyke Marsh- breeders
From: "Larry Cartwright" <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 15:10:40 -0400
Six people joined me for the Northern Virginia Bird Club sponsored bird walk
at Dyke Marsh.  The group observed a lot of breeding activity today, with
Eastern Kingbird, Yellow Warbler, and Orchard Oriole females tending to
nestlings and two fledged Great Crested Flycatchers chased parents around
the southern picnic area begging to be fed. The presence of a Yellow-billed
Cuckoo along the Haul Road dogleg was a bit surprising since this species
has not bred at Dyke Marsh or even been recorded except rarely over the past
several years.  Another surprise was a Tundra Swan that we spotted this
morning in the inlet just south of the marina. 

 

I have listed the 43 species tallied today directly below. 

 

Dyke Marsh, Fairfax, Virginia, US

Jun 15, 2016 8:25 AM - 11:47 AM

Protocol: Traveling

1.3 mile(s)

Comments:     
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.1 Build 65 43 species Canada Goose 120 Tundra Swan 1 Large white waterfowl with black bill, slightly concave-shaped. Mallard 14 Double-crested Cormorant 5 Great Blue Heron 1 Osprey 14 Killdeer 1 Ring-billed Gull 1 Mourning Dove 9 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 5 Downy Woodpecker 4 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 2 Eastern Phoebe 1 Great Crested Flycatcher 6 Includes a breeding pair with 2 fledged young Eastern Kingbird 12 Includes two active nests Warbling Vireo 3 Blue Jay 2 Fish Crow 4 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 6 Tree Swallow 8 Barn Swallow 2 Carolina Chickadee 8 Tufted Titmouse 4 White-breasted Nuthatch 5 Carolina Wren 8 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4 American Robin 12 Gray Catbird 1 European Starling 25 Prothonotary Warbler 3 Common Yellowthroat 2 Northern Parula 3 Yellow Warbler 7 Includes a new nest about 30 feet high found in an elm tree to the east of the bridge. A female was bringing food to begging youngsters. Song Sparrow 1 Northern Cardinal 10 Indigo Bunting 3 Red-winged Blackbird 30 Common Grackle (Purple) 15 Orchard Oriole 7 Includes a nest with young in the picnic area. We heard begging youngsters when the female brought food to the nest. Baltimore Oriole 2 American Goldfinch 2 House Sparrow 8 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30240021 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) Larry Cartwright prowarbler AT verizon.net *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment‏
From: Herbert Larner via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 17:13:30 +0000 (UTC)
Hello all 

All of this got started by my post the other week of using tapes to check out 
two species of Flycatchers that only can be told apart by song or chip notes 
alone . I did this for another person who is not as experienced was stating 
that they had two Alder's in spots that were in fact Willow's & in the area 
there is only one Alder's . I did it to make sure that I was not over looking 
the possibility of not hearing another Alder's . Also I wanted to make sure 
that our Book of Augusta County stays true & not to have false records . Plus 
this area has the highest count of Willow Flycatchers for the past several 
years & I would like to see it continue for many years to come . The other 
place was out at the South River Preserve & when I was out there late spring I 
only heard one Willow singing . I want to keep it that way for a long time so 
others may enjoy the birds that we offer here in Augusta County . For the whole 
time I used these tapes on each sight was one about 1 minute or less each . On 
the areas that had Willow I played Alder's with no response & then played 
Willow & once I got a response that was it no more playing . I moved on to the 
next site & repeated it until I was done . The birds are still there & doing 
well . I know the ethics of birding for they were drilled in me by Yulee Larner 
& she is the one who got me started with being a citizen scientist . You can do 
both by reporting your sighting so that they can be recorded for future use & 
enjoy seeing the birds that you post to these sights . By the way I only 
photograph birds that I need to send a write up to VARCOM . Lets end this on 
the using of tapes . If someone really wants to know go to the VSO website & 
look up the ethics on birding . 


Allen Larner
Staunton Va . 
--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 6/15/16, mb b  wrote:

 Subject: Re: [Va-bird] use of recordings to attract birds solely for your 
personal enjoyment‏ 

 To: "va-bird AT listserve.com" 
 Date: Wednesday, June 15, 2016, 10:25 AM
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Thanks to everyone who wrote in support of the idea that we
 should all put the interests of wildlife first and follow
 the ABA ethics at a minimum. Several people apparently don't
 get the digest, and don't read every individual email they
 receive. Therefore, they were unsure as to which post
 inspired me to post the relevant ABA ethics sections and my
 further personal view that "limited" should mean "by
 scientists and their citizen scientist assistants in service
 of a bird survey or other necessary study." So I have for
 their convenience copied the salient portions below.I would
 note that clearly, bird banding for scientific purposes,
 which comes with its own set of rules, and is done
 infrequently and for good reasons beyond serving someone's
 personal passion/hobby, is not remotely comparable with
 using playback for personal enjoyment purposes. Nor is a
 camera comparable to binoculars, when the camera owner is
 using flash. And I am an avid photographer of birds.I am not
 interes
  ted in arguing with anyone, nor is this the appropriate
 forum for this discussion. Given the post below, I felt it
 was important to post the ABA ethics, and took the further
 liberty of posting my view of how they should best be
 applied. The ethics speak for themselves. My interpretation
 as to what "limited" should include, until more studies are
 done, is mine, but one supported by the few existing
 studies, as well as many ornithological groups. In my view,
 personal anecdotes about how use of playback did not seem to
 you to bother any given bird in any particular situation are
 not data. That goes for use of flash on a nesting bird as
 well. Therefore, if you wish to justify your personal
 decision to use playback, especially over and over with
 range limited birds, or flash on a nesting bird, please do
 not write me to do so. Thank you.Happy birding everyone.The
 post people were requesting is from digest 110, #13, post 2.
 Bolding mine:Hello all This morning after I finished one o
  f the DGIF Quail & Rabbit Surveys that starts out in
 the Goshen area . After finishing I drove up Hite Hollow Rd
 to try & relocate the Winter Wren that Lisa Hamilton
 & Penny Warren had on the BBS thru that area . A few
 Warblers were heard Ovenbird , B T Green , Redstart , Hooded
 , La. Waterthrush , Worm - eating & the surprise Warbler
 Prairie on the hair pin turn on the East side of the
 Mountain . . Several Scarlet tanagers , Red - eyed Vireo
 were heard also . No Winter Wren was found . After leaving
 Hite Hollow Rd I stopped by Smith's pond in the Swoope area
 to see what was around . The first thing that caught my eye
 was a Yellow - billed Cuckoo carrying food to a possible
 nest site . Never did find where that bird went . Also
 around the pond were at least 10 Willow Flycatchers &
 from other reports in the last few days there was an Alder
 Flycatcher reported . I played my Ipod on Alders & no
 response , so I played Willow & every Willow responded
 to the Ipod . All sang a litt
  le as the morning was heating up quickly . After leaving
 Smiths I stopped by where the Alder Flycatcher is hanging
 out & he was singing . I again played the Ipod this time
 on Willow --no response , played Alders & the bird flew
 almost inside of my vehicle . In this stretch of Cattleman's
 Rd along the Middle River there is about 4 Willow & one
 Alders . After this there was another report of another
 Alders up near Livick Rd . I found the bird in question
 & played the Ipod once again . To make the story short
 no response to Alders & a yes response to Willow &
 the bird sang Willow . When ever I played the Willow on the
 Ipod all Willow Flycatchers came in close to see who the
 rival was & with the Alders no response at all . Except
 the one along Cattleman's Rd after leaving Smiths turn right
 onto Cattleman's & just after the bend in the road there
 is a tall sapling tree mixed in with Honeysuckle Bush &
 berry vines on the left . 
 
 
 
 
 
     
         
           
   
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Subject: Re: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if uninterested]
From: Janice Frye <byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 11:35:58 -0400
Well said.

Jan Frye

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 11:31 AM, Eileen Rowan 
wrote:

> [This message is strictly for those interested in this ongoing discussion
> from this past week.  Otherwise, please move on to the next message; yes,
> we do know the purpose of VA-Bird.]
>
> As a long-time professional conservationist and science educator, and
> founder/first coordinator of the Virginia Important Bird Area Program, I'd
> like to state my disagreement with recent criticism of a VA-Bird report
> that noted playback use in its flycatcher ID.  I'm concerned about the
> potentially chilling effect on bird conservation from a well-intentioned
> but overcautious restriction on amateur ornithologists and natural history
> educators.
>
> The flycatcher report in question was by a long-time citizen scientist who
> is contributing significantly to bird conservation through regular
> participation in DGIF surveys, the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, and I'm
> sure much more.  He regularly reports his observations on VA-Bird;
> these reports
> are valuable and very well may end up aiding flycatcher protection.  These
> are all valid and important methods for citizen scientists to report their
> data, be it here on VA-Bird, on E-Bird, the BBA, etc.  The more we know of
> a species distibution and abundance, the better we can monitor possible
> population decline and the need for habitat protection.  A careful balance
> must be struck here.
>
> If it weren't personally enjoyable, citizen scientists wouldn't do it.  But
> it's incorrect to call such observations "solely for personal enjoyment" if
> the results are reported by one of the above-mentioned or other means.
>
> It's also not "solely for personal enjoyment" if there's an education
> component.  Most successful environmental professionals will tell you that
> leading a field trip and educating people on birds is the best way to
> create more enthusiastic bird habitat conservationists.  Playback can help
> if it's accompanied with an explanation of the need to use it responsibly.
> I know from experience it's far harder to get people to care about
> protecting, say, a wetlands, if they've never seen personally the diversity
> of wildlife that uses it.  We can either be satisfied being purists, or if
> we really want to help wildlife we can work with the realities of human
> nature.
>
> We of course should continue raising awareness about protecting individual
> birds from repeated playback.  If it's reasonable to assume a local
> population could be subjected to playback several times over the season by
> other birders, you should avoid it unless you believe you're contributing
> new information that you intend to report.  If you decide to proceed, you
> can help mitigate it by helping to discourage truly recreational-only
> playback and explaining the difference.
>
> About that terrifying predator-in-the-house metaphor... I don't claim to
> have reviewed all the literature, but it's my impression we don't have
> enough science to know what is the correct anthropomorphic metaphor for the
> effect of one playback event on birds.  Is hearing a possible competitor
> sing for a minute or two for bird just like, as claimed, the overwhelming
> panic we'd feel at hearing a burglar or other predator downstairs?   That
> was an emotionally grabbing image, to be sure.  But burglars are predators,
> not competitors.  And if we hear a burglar, do we abandon our home and
> children?   Of course not.   Comparing stress chemical levels in people and
> birds isn't meaningful without comparing the resulting behavior.  It would
> have been an unsurpassable evolutionary hurdle if birds were in fact
> affected in such a drastically counterproductive way.
>
> If we're to speculate using anthropomorphic metaphors, we might also
> speculate that it's like a false rumor that we may be replaced at work.  We
> don't instantly panic and quit, thereby harming our family; we try to
> confirm if the threat is real then relax when it isn't.  The kind of
> reaction that helped make our species successful.  Kinda like avian
> dinosaurs.  I don't know the answer, but it's not good science to claim to
> know one does.
>
> Meanwhile, like so many conservation methods, the potential risk of
> playback must be weighed not on its own, but balanced carefully against
> potential benefits.  Let's certainly follow VSO ethics guidelines.  Let's
> also interpret them wisely so as to let the citizen scientists and group
> leaders who are creating more people who care about birds work their
> magic.  Let's not let undeserved criticizm take the joy out of it and drive
> them off.  Thanks for reading.
>
> Eileen Rowan
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Subject: Playback ethics and VA-Bird as citizen science [disregard if uninterested]
From: Eileen Rowan <eileenrowan AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 11:31:37 -0400
[This message is strictly for those interested in this ongoing discussion
from this past week.  Otherwise, please move on to the next message; yes,
we do know the purpose of VA-Bird.]

As a long-time professional conservationist and science educator, and
founder/first coordinator of the Virginia Important Bird Area Program, I'd
like to state my disagreement with recent criticism of a VA-Bird report
that noted playback use in its flycatcher ID.  I'm concerned about the
potentially chilling effect on bird conservation from a well-intentioned
but overcautious restriction on amateur ornithologists and natural history
educators.

The flycatcher report in question was by a long-time citizen scientist who
is contributing significantly to bird conservation through regular
participation in DGIF surveys, the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, and I'm
sure much more.  He regularly reports his observations on VA-Bird;
these reports
are valuable and very well may end up aiding flycatcher protection.  These
are all valid and important methods for citizen scientists to report their
data, be it here on VA-Bird, on E-Bird, the BBA, etc.  The more we know of
a species distibution and abundance, the better we can monitor possible
population decline and the need for habitat protection.  A careful balance
must be struck here.

If it weren't personally enjoyable, citizen scientists wouldn't do it.  But
it's incorrect to call such observations "solely for personal enjoyment" if
the results are reported by one of the above-mentioned or other means.

It's also not "solely for personal enjoyment" if there's an education
component.  Most successful environmental professionals will tell you that
leading a field trip and educating people on birds is the best way to
create more enthusiastic bird habitat conservationists.  Playback can help
if it's accompanied with an explanation of the need to use it responsibly.
I know from experience it's far harder to get people to care about
protecting, say, a wetlands, if they've never seen personally the diversity
of wildlife that uses it.  We can either be satisfied being purists, or if
we really want to help wildlife we can work with the realities of human
nature.

We of course should continue raising awareness about protecting individual
birds from repeated playback.  If it's reasonable to assume a local
population could be subjected to playback several times over the season by
other birders, you should avoid it unless you believe you're contributing
new information that you intend to report.  If you decide to proceed, you
can help mitigate it by helping to discourage truly recreational-only
playback and explaining the difference.

About that terrifying predator-in-the-house metaphor... I don't claim to
have reviewed all the literature, but it's my impression we don't have
enough science to know what is the correct anthropomorphic metaphor for the
effect of one playback event on birds.  Is hearing a possible competitor
sing for a minute or two for bird just like, as claimed, the overwhelming
panic we'd feel at hearing a burglar or other predator downstairs?   That
was an emotionally grabbing image, to be sure.  But burglars are predators,
not competitors.  And if we hear a burglar, do we abandon our home and
children?   Of course not.   Comparing stress chemical levels in people and
birds isn't meaningful without comparing the resulting behavior.  It would
have been an unsurpassable evolutionary hurdle if birds were in fact
affected in such a drastically counterproductive way.

If we're to speculate using anthropomorphic metaphors, we might also
speculate that it's like a false rumor that we may be replaced at work.  We
don't instantly panic and quit, thereby harming our family; we try to
confirm if the threat is real then relax when it isn't.  The kind of
reaction that helped make our species successful.  Kinda like avian
dinosaurs.  I don't know the answer, but it's not good science to claim to
know one does.

Meanwhile, like so many conservation methods, the potential risk of
playback must be weighed not on its own, but balanced carefully against
potential benefits.  Let's certainly follow VSO ethics guidelines.  Let's
also interpret them wisely so as to let the citizen scientists and group
leaders who are creating more people who care about birds work their
magic.  Let's not let undeserved criticizm take the joy out of it and drive
them off.  Thanks for reading.

Eileen Rowan
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Subject: Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment‏
From: Janice Frye <byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 11:19:46 -0400
I do believe upon further reading that your target would be the man who did
quite a bit of the field work for the book Birds of Augusta County, said
county being one of the best-documented counties in the nation. You can
look up that attribution from the editor in the intro to the third edition.
Citizen science is not personal enjoyment. Have birded with him extensively
in a variety of scenarios, habitat, and weather, and do not ever remember
much playback being used except at times in the car when settling ID
issues, or sometimes over food. He generally has no need for it, except
when there is the occasional question to be answered or some headstrong new
birder sasses him. He is also pretty strict and a good teacher. Not sure
who "mb b" might be or why they don't seem to know the other birder
mentioned here (if they did one might expect that the issue would be taken
up privately rather than on a public listserve?), but the other one has
good ethics and is tireless out in the field when there is a job to be
done. He also posts under his real name in a day and time when some of us
seriously need to know who is gaining access to any part of our lives,
fwiw. Nice to know that WIFL and ALFL are around up there. The mountains
are calling, and there is a 5 year BBA project in progress.  All hands on
deck. Wisconsin had 1001 participants in their BBA when I looked just
now...we have less than 350 in ours at the moment. Have a great day
atlasing!

Jan Frye
Richmond

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 10:25 AM, mb b  wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
>
> Thanks to everyone who wrote in support of the idea that we should all put
> the interests of wildlife first and follow the ABA ethics at a minimum.
> Several people apparently don't get the digest, and don't read every
> individual email they receive. Therefore, they were unsure as to which post
> inspired me to post the relevant ABA ethics sections and my further
> personal view that "limited" should mean "by scientists and their citizen
> scientist assistants in service of a bird survey or other necessary study."
> So I have for their convenience copied the salient portions below.I would
> note that clearly, bird banding for scientific purposes, which comes with
> its own set of rules, and is done infrequently and for good reasons beyond
> serving someone's personal passion/hobby, is not remotely comparable with
> using playback for personal enjoyment purposes. Nor is a camera comparable
> to binoculars, when the camera owner is using flash. And I am an avid
> photographer of birds.I am not interes
>  ted in arguing with anyone, nor is this the appropriate forum for this
> discussion. Given the post below, I felt it was important to post the ABA
> ethics, and took the further liberty of posting my view of how they should
> best be applied. The ethics speak for themselves. My interpretation as to
> what "limited" should include, until more studies are done, is mine, but
> one supported by the few existing studies, as well as many ornithological
> groups. In my view, personal anecdotes about how use of playback did not
> seem to you to bother any given bird in any particular situation are not
> data. That goes for use of flash on a nesting bird as well. Therefore, if
> you wish to justify your personal decision to use playback, especially over
> and over with range limited birds, or flash on a nesting bird, please do
> not write me to do so. Thank you.Happy birding everyone.The post people
> were requesting is from digest 110, #13, post 2. Bolding mine:Hello all
> This morning after I finished one o
>  f the DGIF Quail & Rabbit Surveys that starts out in the Goshen area .
> After finishing I drove up Hite Hollow Rd to try & relocate the Winter Wren
> that Lisa Hamilton & Penny Warren had on the BBS thru that area . A few
> Warblers were heard Ovenbird , B T Green , Redstart , Hooded , La.
> Waterthrush , Worm - eating & the surprise Warbler Prairie on the hair pin
> turn on the East side of the Mountain . . Several Scarlet tanagers , Red -
> eyed Vireo were heard also . No Winter Wren was found . After leaving Hite
> Hollow Rd I stopped by Smith's pond in the Swoope area to see what was
> around . The first thing that caught my eye was a Yellow - billed Cuckoo
> carrying food to a possible nest site . Never did find where that bird went
> . Also around the pond were at least 10 Willow Flycatchers & from other
> reports in the last few days there was an Alder Flycatcher reported . I
> played my Ipod on Alders & no response , so I played Willow & every Willow
> responded to the Ipod . All sang a litt
>  le as the morning was heating up quickly . After leaving Smiths I stopped
> by where the Alder Flycatcher is hanging out & he was singing . I again
> played the Ipod this time on Willow --no response , played Alders & the
> bird flew almost inside of my vehicle . In this stretch of Cattleman's Rd
> along the Middle River there is about 4 Willow & one Alders . After this
> there was another report of another Alders up near Livick Rd . I found the
> bird in question & played the Ipod once again . To make the story short no
> response to Alders & a yes response to Willow & the bird sang Willow . When
> ever I played the Willow on the Ipod all Willow Flycatchers came in close
> to see who the rival was & with the Alders no response at all . Except the
> one along Cattleman's Rd after leaving Smiths turn right onto Cattleman's &
> just after the bend in the road there is a tall sapling tree mixed in with
> Honeysuckle Bush & berry vines on the left .
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
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Subject: Virtual Birding Project Help Needed
From: "MrNussbaum.com" <mrnussbaumcom AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 10:57:12 -0400
I apologize in advance if this is determined as the improper forum for such
a request, but I felt like the project described below would be of high
interest.

Wherethebirdsare.com is a non-profit virtual birding experience designed to
foster awareness of American birds among birders, would-be birders, and
especially young people. The site has been endorsed by the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology and allows players to identify over 350 species in eight
different "virtual" American birding hotspots. The art and animations ave
been produced by some of the top graphic designers in the world and the
game uses empirical BBS data to determine the frequency in which birds
appear in the virtual habitats. The ultimate object is to bird the "Big
Woods" an to identify the Ivory-billed Woodpecker. This habitat and several
others can only be accessed once all birds in previous habitats have been
identified, or, by achieving "streaks" in which users correctly identify 50
or more birds in a row.

The game is 100% free of charge as is the IOS app that was recently
released. I funded the site's development from start to finish with the
only goal of spreading my passion for American birds.

There is a function of the game that needs completion that I'd be willing
to pay a knowledgeable birder on this forum to complete. When a user
misidentifies a particular bird, a screen appears comparing the selected
(incorrect) bird with the correct bird. On this screen, are field marks for
each birds that includes the marks that differentiate them from birds they
are often misidentified as. For example, if a Downy Woodpecker appeared,
and the player selected Hairy Woodpecker, the screen would list the field
marks of each bird and then would read "Told from Downy Woodpecker by
larger size and longer bill' or something like that. I need such field
marks and descriptions for approximately 120 bird species, males and
females. Lists and more details will be provided.

You can see actual examples by playing the game. If this is something you
might be interested in, or, for more details, please e-mail me. Any
additional feedback about the game would be appreciated also.


-- 
Sincerely,

Greg Nussbaum
Founder
Nussbaum Education Network

*Follow me on:*
Facebook 
Twitter 
Edmodo 
Pinterest 

*See My Reviews on:*
Our Testimonials Page 
Common Sense Media



*My Sites:*
http://www.mrnussbaum.com - Flagship - 3 million kids per month and counting
http://mrnussbaum.com/the-lost-lunchbox/
- Educational RPG for kids ages 9
+
http://mrnussbaum.com/html5.html - My games and activities optimized for
tablets
Mr. Nussbaum XTEND   A whole platform
to EXTEND mrnussbaum.com, powered by Free and Paid MrNussbaum.com APPS.
Virtual Birder  - Online Birdwatching! Look at these
graphics!
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Subject: Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment
From: mb b <marlabeth AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 14:25:23 +0000





Thanks to everyone who wrote in support of the idea that we should all put the 
interests of wildlife first and follow the ABA ethics at a minimum. Several 
people apparently don't get the digest, and don't read every individual email 
they receive. Therefore, they were unsure as to which post inspired me to post 
the relevant ABA ethics sections and my further personal view that "limited" 
should mean "by scientists and their citizen scientist assistants in service of 
a bird survey or other necessary study." So I have for their convenience copied 
the salient portions below.I would note that clearly, bird banding for 
scientific purposes, which comes with its own set of rules, and is done 
infrequently and for good reasons beyond serving someone's personal 
passion/hobby, is not remotely comparable with using playback for personal 
enjoyment purposes. Nor is a camera comparable to binoculars, when the camera 
owner is using flash. And I am an avid photographer of birds.I am not interes 

 ted in arguing with anyone, nor is this the appropriate forum for this 
discussion. Given the post below, I felt it was important to post the ABA 
ethics, and took the further liberty of posting my view of how they should best 
be applied. The ethics speak for themselves. My interpretation as to what 
"limited" should include, until more studies are done, is mine, but one 
supported by the few existing studies, as well as many ornithological groups. 
In my view, personal anecdotes about how use of playback did not seem to you to 
bother any given bird in any particular situation are not data. That goes for 
use of flash on a nesting bird as well. Therefore, if you wish to justify your 
personal decision to use playback, especially over and over with range limited 
birds, or flash on a nesting bird, please do not write me to do so. Thank 
you.Happy birding everyone.The post people were requesting is from digest 110, 
#13, post 2. Bolding mine:Hello all This morning after I finished one o 

 f the DGIF Quail & Rabbit Surveys that starts out in the Goshen area . After 
finishing I drove up Hite Hollow Rd to try & relocate the Winter Wren that Lisa 
Hamilton & Penny Warren had on the BBS thru that area . A few Warblers were 
heard Ovenbird , B T Green , Redstart , Hooded , La. Waterthrush , Worm - 
eating & the surprise Warbler Prairie on the hair pin turn on the East side of 
the Mountain . . Several Scarlet tanagers , Red - eyed Vireo were heard also . 
No Winter Wren was found . After leaving Hite Hollow Rd I stopped by Smith's 
pond in the Swoope area to see what was around . The first thing that caught my 
eye was a Yellow - billed Cuckoo carrying food to a possible nest site . Never 
did find where that bird went . Also around the pond were at least 10 Willow 
Flycatchers & from other reports in the last few days there was an Alder 
Flycatcher reported . I played my Ipod on Alders & no response , so I played 
Willow & every Willow responded to the Ipod . All sang a litt 

 le as the morning was heating up quickly . After leaving Smiths I stopped by 
where the Alder Flycatcher is hanging out & he was singing . I again played the 
Ipod this time on Willow --no response , played Alders & the bird flew almost 
inside of my vehicle . In this stretch of Cattleman's Rd along the Middle River 
there is about 4 Willow & one Alders . After this there was another report of 
another Alders up near Livick Rd . I found the bird in question & played the 
Ipod once again . To make the story short no response to Alders & a yes 
response to Willow & the bird sang Willow . When ever I played the Willow on 
the Ipod all Willow Flycatchers came in close to see who the rival was & with 
the Alders no response at all . Except the one along Cattleman's Rd after 
leaving Smiths turn right onto Cattleman's & just after the bend in the road 
there is a tall sapling tree mixed in with Honeysuckle Bush & berry vines on 
the left . 






 		 	   		  
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Subject: Close Encounters
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall AT faintich.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 10:20:16 -0400
Of the warbler and bear kind on the Blue Ridge Parkway; 6/14/16. Report and
photos:

 

 
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2016/2016_06_14.htm

 

___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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Subject: Birds of Shenandoah National Park and Highland County, Va.
From: "Antonio J. Quezon" <antonio.quezon AT cox.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 17:49:02 -0400
My wife and I did a whirlwind tour of Shenandoah NP and Highland County, Va.
from Thursday
to mid-day Sunday this past weekend.  Coincidentally, VSO had their trip to
Highland County at
the same time.  I don't think we saw anything unexpected for the areas, but
following are the
birds I especially enjoyed seeing.

Shenandoah NP:  Cerulean, Canada, Chestnut-sided, Yellow and Hooded Warbler;
American
Redstart; Peregrine Falcon; Broad-winged Hawk; Osprey

Highland County and vicinity: Chestnut-sided, Blackburnian, Mourning,
Black-throated Blue
and Black-throated Green Warbler; Red-breasted Nuthatch; Dark-eyed Junco;
Grasshopper
Sparrow; Baltimore Oriole; Yellow-billed and Black-billed Cuckoo;
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Disappointing miss:  Golden-winged Warbler at the location they had been
reliable to us for
the past couple of years and Ruffed Grouse.

Regards,
TonyQ
-----------------------
Antonio J. Quezon
11691 Yates Ford Road
Fairfax Station, VA 22039
www.TonyQandSuzanne.com


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Subject: Leucistic Common Grackle in Arlington
From: frazmo <frazmo AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 14:32:55 -0400
About 215 pm today I saw a Common Grackle at Long Branch Nature Center in
Arlington with a very prominent white bar on its left wing. It was near the
building just up the intermittent stream. I did not get a look at the other
wing and was unable to secure a photo. There was a flock of about 8 to 10
in the area. Cool- looking bird. Cheers, Steve Young
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Subject: FW: DC Area, 6/14/2016
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 11:24:55 -0400
FYI  - this report is for sightings from June 7 through June 13 and was
compiled by Gerry Hawkins & transcribed by Steve Cordle.
Joe Coleman

-----Original Message-----  
Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2016 10:30 AM
To: BIRDEAST AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: DC Area, 6/14/2016

Hotline:     Voice of the Naturalist
Date:        6/14/2016
Coverage:    MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: voice AT anshome.org 
Compiler:    Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor:     Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
               Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle 

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of the
Voice (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature Steward $100; Audubon Advocate
$200). The membership number is 301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940
Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is
http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org.

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon Naturalist
Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday, June
7 and was completed on June 14 at 6:30 a.m.

The top bird this week was WESTERN KINGBIRD in VA.  

Other birds of interest this week included SNOW GOOSE, TRUMPETER SWAN,
BLUE-WINGED TEAL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, CANVASBACK, REDHEAD, SURF and BLACK
SCOTERS, LONG-TAILED DUCK, RUDDY DUCK, RED-THROATED LOON, ANHINGA, AMERICAN
WHITE and BROWN PELICANS, AMERICAN BITTERN, WHITE IBIS, MISSISSIPPI KITE,
SANDHILL CRANE, AMERICAN AVOCET, MARBLED GODWIT, WHITE-RUMPED and WESTERN
SANDPIPERS, LEAST, GULL-BILLED and BLACK TERNS, BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO, ALDER
FLYCATCHER, COMMON RAVEN, BROWN CREEPER, MOURNING and YELLOW-RUMPED
WARBLERS, WHITE-THROATED and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS, DARK-EYED JUNCO,
DICKCISSEL, BOBOLINK, RED CROSSBILL and PINE SISKIN. 

TOP BIRD

On June 11 a WESTERN KINGBIRD was photographed at the College Creek
Hawkwatch in James City Co, VA.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

A solitary SNOW GOOSE was at Cranberry Reservoir in Carroll Co, MD on June
12 and Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 13. 

Two TRUMPETER SWANS continue in a restricted area at the Smithsonian
Environmental Research Center, Anne Arundel Co, MD, with the latest sighting
on June 10. Another continuing TRUMPETER SWAN was seen at the Route 29/Exit
18 stormwater pond in Howard Co, MD on June 12. The longstanding tagged
TRUMPETER SWAN at Lake Churchill in Montgomery Co, MD was most recently
reported on June 12.

Lingering migratory dabbling ducks included a continuing male BLUE-WINGED
TEAL at Forestville Pond in Shenandoah Co, VA on June 12, a pair of
BLUE-WINGED TEAL in the Merganser Pond in the North Tract of the Patuxent
Research Refuge, Anne Arundel Co, MD on June 8 and 9, and a continuing male
BLUE-WINGED TEAL and three male NORTHERN SHOVELERS at the Craney Island
Disposal Area, Portsmouth, VA on June 9. 

Lingering migratory diving ducks included a male CANVASBACK off McMullens
Wharf in Perryville, MD on June 11; a male REDHEAD at the Chesapeake Bay
Environmental Center (Horsehead), Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 8 and at
Poplar Island, Talbot Co, MD on June 9; a BLACK SCOTER at Assateague Island
NS, Worcester Co, MD on June 10; two BLACK SCOTERS and a SURF SCOTER at
Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on June 7 and 8; a female LONG-TAILED DUCK
at Masonville Cove, Baltimore, MD on June 8 and 10; and a male and female
LONG-TAILED DUCK at Poplar Island, Talbot Co, MD on June 9. In addition,
RUDDY DUCKS were seen at several locations, including one at Crabbs Branch
Pond, Montgomery Co, MD on June 7, two at Cranberry Reservoir, Carroll Co,
MD on June 8, and three at the Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, VA
on June 9.

On June 12 a RED-THROATED LOON was reported from the Life of the Marsh Trail
and Old Ferry Landing at Assateague Island NS, Worcester Co, MD.
A high of six ANHINGAS*, including some engaged in apparent courtship
activity, were seen at the Carson Wetland in Prince George Co, VA on June 12
and 13. Another ANHINGA*, possibly one of these same birds, was seen in
flight over the City Point Unit of Petersburg National Battlefield Park,
Hopewell, VA on June 13. 

On June 8 a resident of Fredericksburg, VA was surprised to see an AMERICAN
WHITE PELICAN in flight. On June 9 observers counted 32 BROWN PELICANS at
the Craney Island Disposal Area, Portsmouth, VA. 

On June 10 an AMERICAN BITTERN was found along Riley Roberts Road in Deal
Island WMA, Somerset Co, MD. 

Continued northward movement of WHITE IBIS was suggested by several recent
sightings, including six individuals along the causeway to Assateague SP,
Worcester Co, MD on June 11, 12 individuals in flight over the Assawoman
Wildlife Area, Sussex Co, DE on June 12, and single individuals at locations
in Worcester Co, MD on June 9 and 12. 

Sightings of MISSISSIPPI KITE, another northward moving species, included
individual birds at Ben Brenman Park in Alexandria, VA and over Huntsman
Lake in Fairfax Co, VA on June 10, which may have been the same bird, and an
individual over Centre Park Drive in Howard Co, MD on June 11. In addition,
two apparently continuing individuals were seen in flight from Bayfield Lane
in Fauquier Co, VA on June 8 and 9. 

On June 8 two SANDHILL CRANES were photographed while feeding in an
agricultural field along Entry School Road in Augusta Co, VA. On the same
day a single SANDHILL CRANE was photographed near the Rapidan River, just
past the intersection of Rt. 20 and Rt. 231, in Madison Co, VA. 

A small number (34) of AMERICAN AVOCETS remained at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent
Co, DE on June 8 but by the end of the week they were all gone.
Five MARBLED GODWITS were seen in Tom's Cove at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack
Co, VA on June 8 and 11. WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS were reported at several
locations, including an area high of six at Prime Hook NWR, Sussex Co, DE on
June 7; two at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE on June 11; two along Wildlife
Drive at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on June 11; and a single
individual at Fort Monroe, Hampton, VA on June 8 and 9. Inland, an apparent
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was reported in a wet/muddy area along 9324-9344
Greenfield Farm Road in Albemarle Co, VA on June 12. The only WESTERN
SANDPIPER reported in the area during the week was found along Figgs Landing
Road in Worcester Co, MD
on June 7.   

On June 11 a relatively uncommon LEAST TERN was photographed at Laurel Lake
in Prince George's Co, MD. On June 7 a GULL-BILLED TERN was seen along Figgs
Landing Road and a short distance north of this location in Worcester Co,
MD, which may have been the same bird. A few GULL-BILLED TERNS also were
reported at various locations in southeastern Virginia, where this species
breeds locally in small numbers. Three BLACK TERNS were seen during a
regular survey of Poplar Island, Talbot Co, MD on June 9. A BLACK TERN also
was reported flying south at Assateague Island NS, Worcester Co, MD on June
13.   

A BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO was heard singing in woods at private Deerfield
Stables in Fauquier Co, VA on June 11 and seen along Randolph Avenue in
Northampton Co, VA on June 12. 

The ALDER FLYCATCHER that has been present along Cattleman Road in the
Swoope Area of Highland Co, VA for over a week was seen and heard again on
June 9. 

Lowland COMMON RAVENS included a couple of adults and four juveniles
interacting with BALD EAGLES and AMERICAN CROWS at the Howard County
Conservancy in Howard Co, MD on June 10. 

An out-of-season BROWN CREEPER was a surprise sighting at Battle Creek
Cypress Swamp, Calvert Co, MD on June 7 and 8. 

Late migratory warblers included a MOURNING WARBLER found in a residential
yard in Howard Co, MD on June 7 and a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER photographed at
Schoolhouse Pond in Prince George's Co, MD on June 13. 

A late WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was present all week at the Chester River Field
Research Center (Chino Farms) (private), Queen Anne's Co, MD. Late sparrows
also included a total of three WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS at locations in
Carroll and Queen Anne's Co, MD on June 9 and 10 and three DARK-EYED JUNCOS
photographed at Lake Frank in Montgomery Co, MD on June 11.  

A couple of male DICKCISSELS were present all week in fields along Hughes
Road a short distance before the intersection with River Road in Montgomery
Co, MD. DICKCISSELS also continue along Grassdale Road in Fauquier Co, VA,
with a high of three reported on June 8, 9, 10 and 12. Birders interested in
seeing a DICKCISSEL in this area also might check the uncut fields by the
nearby Savannah Branch Road mudflat, which hosted a singing male earlier in
the month. 

On June 11 birders from the Cecil Bird Club enjoyed watching as many as 30
BOBOLINKS and the unveiling of a new grassland nesting bird sign at
protected fields along North Appleton Road in Fairhill NRMA, Cecil Co, MD. 

RED CROSSBILLS continue at Briery Branch Gap in Rockingham Co, VA, with a
high of 14 on June 10 and four on June 12.

On June 7 a PINE SISKIN made an unexpected visit to a residential feeder
near New Hope in Augusta Co, VA.  

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop)is an
excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org.
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as well as
the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning contact, e-mail or
phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee

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Subject: Common Nighthawk in Portsmouth, VA
From: Elisa Enders <elisaenders AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 09:54:57 -0400
On the evenings of 6-11-16 and 6-13-16, a Common Nighthawk was seen and heard 
near the intersection of West Norfolk Road and Cedar Lane in Portsmouth. The 
respective times were 8:38pm and 8:15pm. Each time the bird was seen briefly 
before it headed in a northeast direction. 


Elisa Flanders 
Portsmouth, VA
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment
From: "Kevin Shank" <birds AT naturefriendmagazine.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 09:18:57 -0400
Thank you for posting.

Kevin Shank



-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird
[mailto:va-bird-bounces+birds=naturefriendmagazine.com AT listserve.com] On
Behalf Of Marshall Faintich
Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2016 8:34 AM
To: va-bird AT listserve.com
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] use of recordings to attract birds solely for your
personal enjoyment

I understand that this list-server is for reporting the sightings of birds
in Virginia, but I feel that responding to a posting from yesterday is in
order. Although I am confident that the posting was not directed towards me,
it still struck a nerve, as I have been, albeit rarely, accused of taking
too many bird photos.

 

First, let me be clear. I am opposed to the "overuse" of playback recordings
to attract birds, but "overuse" has to be a decision to be made at the time
and is relative to whether or not a bird seems to be agitated, and to what
degree. A predator bird flying near a nest surely must be more stressful to
a bird than hearing a recording, and I do not know of birds abandoning their
nests if a hawk or other predator flies nearby. After 5+ years as the
birding activity manager at the Rockfish Valley Trail, I never observed any
birds leaving the area or abandoning nests because of occasional and limited
playing of recordings.

 

With regard to bird photography, I am fairly certain that a bird cannot
distinguish between a camera lens and a binocular lens. If a blind is
recommended for bird photographers, it should apply to all birders. If fact,
I have often started to photograph a bird and then it would fly close to me,
land nearby, and start singing. I don't feel that this can be defined as
agitation. Perhaps seeing that I was not a threat to the bird was of far
greater importance than my lifting my camera to photograph the bird.

 

My photographs have been viewed millions of times, and often by non-birders
who may have been encouraged to either start birding, or at a minimum, to
become aware of birds and the need to preserve bird habitat. I have never
had a non-birder comment to me that they had read a list of birds seen on
someone's posting.

 

The Smith's Longspur (February 2015), and the Franklin's Gull in Dayton,
Virginia (May 2016) that Walt Childs and I saw, and I photographed, would
have remained unknown without my photos.

 

I have much greater concern about loss of avian habitat rather than playing
of recordings, and while I understand the need to conduct ornithological
studies, I am certain that the catching and banding of a bird is of far
greater stress to a bird than playing a recording. 

 

We need to keep our birding activities in perspective, and not outright
criticize other birders without considering all of the parameters.

 

___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
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Subject: Re: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall AT faintich.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 08:33:34 -0400
I understand that this list-server is for reporting the sightings of birds
in Virginia, but I feel that responding to a posting from yesterday is in
order. Although I am confident that the posting was not directed towards me,
it still struck a nerve, as I have been, albeit rarely, accused of taking
too many bird photos.

 

First, let me be clear. I am opposed to the "overuse" of playback recordings
to attract birds, but "overuse" has to be a decision to be made at the time
and is relative to whether or not a bird seems to be agitated, and to what
degree. A predator bird flying near a nest surely must be more stressful to
a bird than hearing a recording, and I do not know of birds abandoning their
nests if a hawk or other predator flies nearby. After 5+ years as the
birding activity manager at the Rockfish Valley Trail, I never observed any
birds leaving the area or abandoning nests because of occasional and limited
playing of recordings.

 

With regard to bird photography, I am fairly certain that a bird cannot
distinguish between a camera lens and a binocular lens. If a blind is
recommended for bird photographers, it should apply to all birders. If fact,
I have often started to photograph a bird and then it would fly close to me,
land nearby, and start singing. I don't feel that this can be defined as
agitation. Perhaps seeing that I was not a threat to the bird was of far
greater importance than my lifting my camera to photograph the bird.

 

My photographs have been viewed millions of times, and often by non-birders
who may have been encouraged to either start birding, or at a minimum, to
become aware of birds and the need to preserve bird habitat. I have never
had a non-birder comment to me that they had read a list of birds seen on
someone's posting.

 

The Smith's Longspur (February 2015), and the Franklin's Gull in Dayton,
Virginia (May 2016) that Walt Childs and I saw, and I photographed, would
have remained unknown without my photos.

 

I have much greater concern about loss of avian habitat rather than playing
of recordings, and while I understand the need to conduct ornithological
studies, I am certain that the catching and banding of a bird is of far
greater stress to a bird than playing a recording. 

 

We need to keep our birding activities in perspective, and not outright
criticize other birders without considering all of the parameters.

 

___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
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Subject: Raven in Arlington, VA on 6/11/2016
From: janet anderson via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 05:48:12 -0400
Raven seen in the Cherrydale area of Arlington, Arlington County, VA on  
6/11/2016.
 
 
Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Subject: Anhinga location on Rt. 301
From: Janice Frye <byrdnyrd33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 22:35:58 -0400
Had a request for good directions, and since I had difficulty looking it up
on my phone yesterday I decided to post.  Using 600 Johns Rd.in  Carson for
a GPS unit should get you there.  The spot (reminds me of Harrells Mill
pond, for those that know it) is actually .4 miles north of Johns Rd. on
Rt. 301/S. Crater Rd., adjacent to the 35.6 mile marker over the fence
along I-95 south. Take exit 37 from I-95 south, then go left on Rt. 301 for
a couple of miles. Nearby roads include Rowanty, Cabin Point, Johns, and
Halligan Park. There is room for at least 3 or 4 cars on the grass, and
traffic was sparse but fast late in the day.  The best view I got was by
walking north along the guard rail almost to the end, past a culvert under
the road. Look back along the water in the direction of the car. Find the
EAKI nest while you are on that end.  :-)

Jan Frye
Richmond
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Subject: Warblers and Vireos
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall AT faintich.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 19:51:17 -0400
In Albemarle and Louisa Counties. Warblers: Prothonotary, Yellow-throated,
Common Yellowthroat, Prairie. Vireos: Red-eyed, White-eyed, Warbling. Report
and photos:

 

 
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2016/2016_06_13.htm

 

__________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
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Subject: Summer Tanagers
From: Kelly Krechmer via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 19:43:03 -0400
I went out to the Hogue Tract this morning and spotted the Summer Tanager pair 
in a tree in the parking area. 


If you are participating in the VA Breeding Atlas and go out to Hogue check 
where you are mapping to. I suggest GPS coordinates rather than using the 
hotspot. The handicapped hunters parking lot at the Phelps WMA is in the 
Germanna Block NE. 


 If you use the Phelps WMA Hogue Tract hotspot it maps to the wrong block.

Kelly Krechmer
Fauquier County


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Bluebirds; Good News, Bad News, Good News
From: pepherup--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 16:45:49 -0400
 I have been so happy that a bluebird pair chose my nest box recently to start 
a family, and for the first time ever I have been able to get them to eat dried 
mealworms from a small container attached to the back of the nest box pole. I 
have been feeding them in the morning and again late in the evening. Eventually 
4 beautiful blue eggs were laid in the nest. On Sat. evening, I went out to put 
mealworms in the container and discovered all four eggs on the ground under the 
nest box. Three were crushed and one was still whole. I checked the box to see 
what the nest looked like and to make sure the female had not been killed in 
the box. The nest itself was not disturbed and no dead bird inside. I have no 
idea who did this. I don't have any house wrens around and this year not even 
Carolina wrens. I was so saddened about it all, I can't tell you. I returned 
the one undamaged egg to the nest and put mealworms in the container. 
Eventually the male bluebird came t 

 o eat but I have not seen a female since until today. I watched as a female 
sat on a perch looking at 2 males having a vicious battle with each other all 
over my yard. I don't know if this is the original pair and have mixed emotions 
about another clutch of eggs being laid in the nest box only to be destroyed. I 
have predator guards in place but they didn't seem to help much. 

 I am encouraged that the bluebird is still coming to the mealworms. Hopefully 
I can keep that up and will have a way to offer food this winter. They have 
never before come to feeders in the yard. Any words of wisdom on bluebirds 
would be appreciated. 


Peggy Lyons
Concord
Campbell County
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Subject: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
From: Harry Glasgow via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 19:46:30 +0000 (UTC)
One of those rare, beautiful days greeted the 25 or so birders who gathered 
today for the Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk.  We tallied 57 species, 
with highlights that included a Yellow-throated Vireo, a large group of Common 
Grackles, and Wood Duck and Hooded Merganser family groups. 


Canada Goose  22
Wood Duck  23
American Black Duck  1
Mallard  5
Hooded Merganser  12
Great Blue Heron  5
Green Heron  5
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  3
Osprey  2
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  5
Chimney Swift  7
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  3
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  1
Acadian Flycatcher  6
Eastern Phoebe  5
Great Crested Flycatcher  5
Eastern Kingbird  1
White-eyed Vireo  1
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  5
Blue Jay  2
Fish Crow  1
crow sp.  6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  17
Barn Swallow  8
Carolina Chickadee  25
Tufted Titmouse  2
Carolina Wren  4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  6
Eastern Bluebird  3
American Robin  40
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  1
Cedar Waxwing  1
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  12
Chipping Sparrow  3
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  3
Red-winged Blackbird  52
Common Grackle  220
Brown-headed Cowbird  6
House Finch  3
American Goldfinch  69
The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 
1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical 
storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 7AM (8AM from November  through 
March), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders 
meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, 
Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal 
business hours at (703)768-2525. 


Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park




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Subject: use of recordings to attract birds solely for your personal enjoyment
From: mb b <marlabeth AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 14:45:26 +0000
Here are the ABA ethics on use of sound recordings to attract
birds.

 

1(b) To avoid stressing
birds or exposing them to danger, exercise restraint and caution during
observation, photography, sound recording, or filming.

Limit the use of
recordings and other methods of attracting birds, and never use such methods in
heavily birded areas, or for attracting any species that is Threatened,
Endangered, or of Special Concern, or is rare in your local area;

Keep well back from nests
and nesting colonies, roosts, display areas, and important feeding sites. In
such sensitive areas, if there is a need for extended observation, photography,
filming, or recording, try to use a blind or hide, and take advantage of
natural cover.

 

Now, I realize that it is only the southwestern willow
flycatcher that has been officially listed as endangered. And the question of
the rarity of Willow flycatchers around here is up for discussion, though they 
are range restricted. 


 

But my personal view, supported by many ornithological societies
and their members in the US, and worldwide, is that recording should not be
used to see birds for one's personal enjoyment. If researchers are doing a
survey and need to estimate how many of what type of birds are in a certain
area, that is one thing. But just so an individual can get a photograph, or see
a bird, that is another thing. 

 

It is perhaps one thing to make psshing noises, which may
cause certain birds to peek out and investigate, like I would do if I thought I
heard the mailman. That is, according to what I have read, not nearly as
stressful on the bird as hearing another, previously unknown in the area, bird 
of 

its species in its territory, which is what playback does. In terms of cortisol 
levels and stress, playback is 

apparently more, in terms of stress, like me thinking I hear a burglar when I 
hear an unexpected 

noise downstairs.

 

Until further studies are done of the effect of playback
on birds, particularly nesting birds who may abandon their nests if disturbed,
it should be known that playback may well cause birds to expend energy, become
stressed, or divert time from other activities, and that is not a good thing. 
That includes increased vocalizations. 

Obviously, in this report, this was the case, as every willow flycatcher was 
reported to have stopped what it was doing (eating, hunting, mating, nest 
building, etc) and responded to the playback to give the 

birders a look. Giving birders a look at a bird, to me, is not sufficient
reason to use playback and stress the birds or divert them from feeding or
other necessary activities to sustain their life or their nests.
I would apply the same considerations on use of flash with nesting birds.
Others may disagree, but I prefer to err on the side of the bird's health and 
safety, and not on the side of my desire to see it or get a nice photo. 

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Subject: Re: Birds at Banshee Reeks June 11
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 09:55:50 -0400
Mary Ann,
Did you post to eBird already?
Joe

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul, Julie [mailto:Julie.Paul AT loudoun.gov] 
Sent: Monday, June 13, 2016 8:49 AM
To: delandjoyce ; va-bird AT listserve.com
Cc: joecoleman AT rstarmail.com; magood1 AT verizon.net
Subject: RE: Birds at Banshee Reeks June 11

Nice list. I will get this up on ebird (unless someone else has done it 
already). 

Thank you!

Julie Paul
Naturalist
Banshee Reeks Nature Preserve 
21085 The Woods Rd
Leesburg, VA 20175
571.233.0433 (C)

“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.” 
-John Muir

-----Original Message-----
From: delandjoyce [mailto:delandjoyce AT peoplepc.com] 
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2016 3:02 PM
To: va-bird AT listserve.com
Cc: joecoleman AT rstarmail.com; magood1 AT verizon.net
Subject: Birds at Banshee Reeks June 11

Seven birders came to the regular monthly birdwalk at Banshee Reeks Nature 
Preserve in Loudoun County. The walk is sponsored by Loudoun Wildlife 
Conservancy and the Friends of Banshee Reeks and is held at 8 am on the second 
Saturday of the month. A total of 58 birds were recorded, which is average for 
the walk in June. 

The list follows:
Canada Goose
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Great-crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough Wing Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow-breasted Chat
Scarlet Tanager
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch

Mary Ann Good and Del Sargent


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Subject: Re: question about catbird behavior
From: Jean Tatalias <jtatalias AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 21:34:06 -0400
All are the sources for this info using the same definition of "learned?"

This section from Brood parasitism from Stanford University seems to use
"learned" for species behavior derived from natural selection:

https://web.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Brood_Parasitism.html

"Cowbirds thus can place powerful selection pressure on a host bird species
to learn to recognize and reject cowbird eggs. Behaviorist Stephen
Rothstein of the University of California at Santa Barbara has shown
experimentally that some North American species have, indeed, learned to do
this. He placed artificial and real Brown-headed Cowbird eggs in the nests
of 43 other species, and found that those species divided rather neatly
into acceptor species and "rejector species." Acceptors include many
warblers, vireos, phoebes, and Song Sparrows, while robins, catbirds, Blue
jays, and Brown Thrashers are rejectors. The Song Sparrow just happens to
have eggs very similar in size and spotting pattern to those of the
cowbird, and almost invariably raises the cowbird young. In contrast,
catbirds and robins, which lay unmarked blue eggs, almost invariably eject
cowbird eggs from their nests. Phoebes, strangely, usually have unmarked
eggs but are acceptors -- perhaps their habit of nesting in dark recesses
has reduced their awareness of egg pattern.

Rothstein found very little sign of transitional species -- that is, ones
with some individuals that accepted and others that rejected. The reason,
he hypothesized, was that once the genetic ability to reject appeared in a
species, it would spread very rapidly and very soon all individuals would
be rejectors. That notion is certainly supported by rates of parasitism
observed in acceptor species. In various studies, for example, 40 to 70
percent of the nests of Red-eyed Vireos were parasitized, about 20 percent
of Eastern Phoebe nests were parasitized, and about 40 percent of Song
Sparrow nests were parasitized. Reduction in the fledging rate of
parasitized nests was well over 50 percent in the vireos and phoebes, and
about 40 percent in the Song Sparrows."

On Sun, Jun 12, 2016 at 8:22 PM, David Bridge 
wrote:

> The origin for this information is probably:
> Herbert Friedmann, See
>
> http://library.si.edu/digital-library/book/bulletinunitedst2331963unit
>
> see the Catbird account, pages 69-70
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> >From: Stephen Johnson 
> >Sent: Jun 10, 2016 4:24 PM
> >To: VA-Bird 
> >Subject: [Va-bird] question about catbird behavior
> >
> >
> >Hello birders,
> >
> >I read this at the Birds of North America web site, concerning Gray
> Catbirds.  Does this make sense to you?  If so, can you please explain to
> my poor puzzled brain?
> >
> >
> >Although Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) parasitize the Gray
> Catbird, they rarely are successful. This catbird is one of only about a
> dozen species known to recognize cowbird eggs and eject them from its
> nest—an ability that is learned, not innate.
> >
> >
> >I understand that some bird behaviors are learned, not innate.  But, how
> does a young catbird learn this one?
> >
> >Steve Johnson
> >Fairfax, Virginia
> >
> >*** You are subscribed to va-bird as bridgedavid AT earthlink.net. If you
> wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jtatalias AT gmail.com. If you wish to
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Subject: Re: question about catbird behavior
From: David Bridge <bridgedavid AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:22:04 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
The origin for this information is probably:
Herbert Friedmann, See

http://library.si.edu/digital-library/book/bulletinunitedst2331963unit

see the Catbird account, pages 69-70


-----Original Message-----
>From: Stephen Johnson 
>Sent: Jun 10, 2016 4:24 PM
>To: VA-Bird 
>Subject: [Va-bird] question about catbird behavior
>
>
>Hello birders,
>
>I read this at the Birds of North America web site, concerning Gray Catbirds. 
Does this make sense to you? If so, can you please explain to my poor puzzled 
brain? 

>
>
>Although Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) parasitize the Gray Catbird, 
they rarely are successful. This catbird is one of only about a dozen species 
known to recognize cowbird eggs and eject them from its nest—an ability that 
is learned, not innate. 

>
>
>I understand that some bird behaviors are learned, not innate. But, how does a 
young catbird learn this one? 

>
>Steve Johnson
>Fairfax, Virginia
>
>*** You are subscribed to va-bird as bridgedavid AT earthlink.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird *** 


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Subject: Port Royal Breeding Bird Survey Route (mostly King George Co)
From: Frederick Atwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 22:47:49 +0000 (UTC)
This morning I conducted the Port Royal Breeding Bird Survey route for USGS.  
USGS BBS surveys are all 50 stops long with .5 miles between each stop.  Each 
stop is along a road and the observer looks and listens for 3 minutes at each 
stop. I started at 5:15 and finished at 10:18.  This route goes from Port 
Royal in Caroline County over the 301 bridge (where the cliff swallow colony 
seems like it is doing well) and then rambles through King George county ending 
up at Mathias Point near Dahlgren. There was nothing unexpected along the route 
this year. I could not hear any dickcissels in the spot they were last year. 
The habitat is basically the same as it has been for the several years I have 
been doing the route, except that ecological succession is changing some of the 
habitat, and a new housing development is advertised at one part of the route. 
So I don't know how much longer meadowlark, bobwhite, grasshopper sparrow, 
chat, and prairie warbler will be around.  The 3 most abundant species were 
American Crow, Red-eyed Vireo and Tufted Titmouse. Only 9 species of warbler 
were found this year. The 3 most common warblers were ovenbird, yellowthroat, 
and yellow-breasted chat. 


I found the following 74 species. The first number is the total noted, the 
second number is the number of sites (out of 50) where it was found. Canada 
Goose 1 

Wood Duck 2/1
DC Cormorant
Killdeer 1
Bobwhite 4/3
Green Heron 1
Black Vulture 1
Turkey Vulture 7/3
Osprey 9/5
Red-shouldered Hwk 2/1
Mourning Dove 27/21
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 6/5
Barred Owl fledglings 2/1
Chimney Swift 15/7
Red-bellied Woodpecker 21/17
Red-headed Woodpecker 3/2
Flicker 2/2
Downy 4/4
Hairy 3/3
Pileated 11/9
Kingfisher 2/1
Wood-pewee 20/18
Acadian Fly 25/20
Phoebe 4/4
Great Crested Fly 11/11
Kingbird 4/4
White-eyed Vireo 13/10
Yellow-throated Vireo 8/7
Red-eyed Vireo 59/31
Blue Jay 20/15
Am Crow 60/31
Horned Lark 1
Purple Martin 11/2
Cliff Swallow 25/2
Barn Swallow 11/3
Car CHickadee 9/8
Titmouse 55/35
WB Nuthatch    5/3
Car Wren 33/23
BG Gnatcatcher 14/9
Bluebird 10/8
Wood Thrush 11/11
Robin 32/17
Catbird 2/1
Thrasher 4/4
Mocker 14/12
Starling 7/5
Waxwing 3/2
Ovenbird 21/14
La Waterthrush 2/2
Yellow-throated Warb 2/2
Yellowthroat 15/11
Hooded Warb 1
Parula 4/4
Pine Warb 2/2
Prairie 2/1
Chat 7/6
Towhee 4/4
Chipping Sparrow 33/21
Field Sp 3/3
Grasshopper Sp 4/3
Summer Tanager 3/3
Scarlet Tanager 5/5
Cardinal 46/25
Blue Grosbeak 17/10
Indigo Bunting 27/17
Redwinged B 24/2
Grackle  47/17
Meadowlark 1
Cowbird 7/7
Orchard Oriole 4/3
House Finch 19/12
Goldfinch 10/9
House Sparrow 9/5


All the bestFred Atwood

Frederick D. Atwood Flint Hill School, 10409 Academic Dr, Oakton, VA 22124 
703-242-1675 http://www.agpix.com/fredatwood http://www.flinthill.org 
http://tea.armadaproject.org/tea_atwoodfrontpage.html 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/75425046 AT N06/sets/ 

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Subject: Huntley Meadows Saturday
From: Pam and Ben via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 16:39:32 -0400
Just the usual breeding birds.  Most interesting sighting was a cardinal
feeding a cowbird in the path.  But I thought it worth mentioning that the
purple milkweed in the meadows on either side of the platform at the end of
the Hike/Bike Trail is in full bloom.  A good diversity butterflies and odes
as well.

 

Ben Jesup

Alexandria

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Subject: Birds at Banshee Reeks June 11
From: delandjoyce <delandjoyce AT peoplepc.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 14:02:27 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
Seven birders came to the regular monthly birdwalk at Banshee Reeks Nature 
Preserve in Loudoun County. The walk is sponsored by Loudoun Wildlife 
Conservancy and the Friends of Banshee Reeks and is held at 8 am on the second 
Saturday of the month. A total of 58 birds were recorded, which is average for 
the walk in June. 

The list follows:
Canada Goose
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Great-crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough Wing Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow-breasted Chat
Scarlet Tanager
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch

Mary Ann Good and Del Sargent

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Subject: Great Falls Bird Walk 06/12/16
From: Dendroica--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 14:54:13 -0400
Birds were relatively inactive and silent this morning in the  midst of the 
nesting season, especially woodpecker species.  Eight  participants 
recorded 39 species.  One highlight was  observing a cooperative two-foot long 
green snake near the water's edge. 
 
We meet at 8 am in the visitors' center parking lot. All  birders are 
welcome.
 
Ralph Wall
 
The list:
 
Canada Goose  7
Mallard  6
Double-crested Cormorant   3
Great Blue Heron  12
Black Vulture  4
Turkey Vulture   4
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Chimney Swift  5
Downy Woodpecker   1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Acadian Flycatcher  1
Eastern  Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  6
Warbling Vireo   2
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  2
Fish  Crow  4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow   8
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  6
White-breasted  Nuthatch  2
Carolina Wren  3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher   2
Eastern Bluebird  4
Wood Thrush  4
American Robin   1
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Northern Parula  1
Chipping  Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern  Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird   5
Common Grackle  6
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore  Oriole  1

View this checklist online at  
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30194674

This report was generated  automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


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Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh, Jun 12, 2016
From: Phil Silas via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 14:18:28 -0400
 VA-Birders,
Eighteen birders braved the warmth today at the every Sunday at 8, free and 
open to all birdwalk sponsored by the Friends of Dyke Marsh. Some close-up 
treats today were Orchard Orioles, Prothonotary Warbler and Northern Parula. 
The Osprey, swallows, gnatcatchers, blackbirds, and grackles were in abundance. 
The best highlight was the male Least Bittern viewed close to the SW from the 
end of the boardwalk. He flew into the reeds toward us where a female was also 
seen! The flight was caught in a beautiful photo by Don Little that is embedded 
in the online checklist you can click on at the bottom of this email. Thanks to 
Don, Dick Bauder, our 3 new USFWS friends, and everyone else for a pleasant 
morning observing 54 avian species. 

Phil Silas
Woodbridge, VA

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist 
To: epsdcva 
Sent: Sun, Jun 12, 2016 1:20 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Dyke Marsh, Jun 12, 2016

Dyke Marsh, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jun 12, 2016 7:00 AM - 9:52 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: 18 folks at peak (0840), hiked from N pkg to Hunting Creek Bridge and 
back between 7 & 7:30
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.1 Build 65 54 species (+1 other taxa) Canada Goose 180 most in shallow waters and mudflats of Hunting Creek where tide was going out and low at 0918 Wood Duck 1 drake on upstream side of Hunting Creek bridge Mallard 38 Lesser Scaup 1 continuing off picnic area Double-crested Cormorant 10 Least Bittern 2 Male was seen first and perched higher where all got great looks, He then flew into the reeds (photo from Don Little below) where the lower female was seen well for a short time. We were at end of boardwalk when the male appeared to the SW, very close, not across the channel to the island to the NW as last year. Great Blue Heron 7 Great Egret 2 Osprey 12 2 young, one at marina provided best views Cooper's Hawk 1 Bald Eagle 2 perched on power tower right of Masonic Memorial, seen from Hunting Creek bridge early Red-shouldered Hawk 1 Perched between bike trail and water at where Milepost 8 sign used to be (an orange traffic cone is there presently). The raptor was not welcome, but didn't move while I watched a male Baltimore Oriole, then male Orchard Oriole, then male Northern Cardinal all strike it in sequence while females of each species flew close. Killdeer 2 mudflats at Hunting Creek Ring-billed Gull 3 mudflats at hunting Creek Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 5 Mourning Dove 9 Chimney Swift 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker 5 Downy Woodpecker 4 Hairy Woodpecker 1 Pileated Woodpecker 1 Eastern Kingbird 4 Warbling Vireo 4 Blue Jay 2 American Crow 1 Fish Crow 1 crow sp. 2 Northern Rough-winged Swallow 14 Tree Swallow 16 Barn Swallow 4 Carolina Chickadee 2 Tufted Titmouse 5 White-breasted Nuthatch 2 Carolina Wren 5 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 10 American Robin 7 Brown Thrasher 2 Northern Mockingbird 1 European Starling 30 Cedar Waxwing 3 Prothonotary Warbler 2 Common Yellowthroat 3 Northern Parula 1 We stopped at start of Haul Road at bench to tally birds where we could hear one of the Prothonotary Warblers singing when a male Northern Parula came within 10 feet of us to hunt caterpillars on tree limbs hanging over the road. Yellow Warbler 2 Song Sparrow 1 Singing on island across (NE) from end of boardwalk Northern Cardinal 11 Indigo Bunting 1 Red-winged Blackbird 28 Common Grackle 14 Brown-headed Cowbird 3 Orchard Oriole 8 Baltimore Oriole 4 one fuzzy tennis ball-like nest observed near the end of Haul Road House Finch 1 American Goldfinch 4 House Sparrow 2 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30190689 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: Manassas NBP, Yellow-throated Vireo, Acadian Flycatcher
From: Howard Wu <howiewu1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 12:25:55 -0400
Hi, all:

I took a short walk this morning at Manassas National Battlefield Park this
morning before the heat and humidity got oppressive. I started at 7:45AM or
so at the Stone Bridge area. As long been known, swallows nest under the
highway (29) bridge, I believe these are all Barn Swallows. At one point a
flock (between 15 to 20) were resting in a tree between the two bridge
(Stone Bridge and the highway bridge).

At the beginning of the boardwalk, I saw and photographed a singing
Yellow-throated Vireo. Then along the river, I encountered one, maybe two
(I lost track of it/them when it/they disappeared and re-appeared), Acadian
Flycatcher(s).

Photos:
http://www.travelerathome.com/manassas/yellow-throated_vireo1.jpg
http://www.travelerathome.com/manassas/acadian_flycatcher1.jpg
http://www.travelerathome.com/manassas/acadian_flycatcher2.jpg

Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
(www.travelerathome.com)
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Subject: Birding Hite Hollow Rd & Swoope
From: Herbert Larner via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 16:05:12 +0000 (UTC)
Hello all 

This morning after I finished one of the DGIF Quail & Rabbit Surveys that 
starts out in the Goshen area . After finishing I drove up Hite Hollow Rd to 
try & relocate the Winter Wren that Lisa Hamilton & Penny Warren had on the BBS 
thru that area . A few Warblers were heard Ovenbird , B T Green , Redstart , 
Hooded , La. Waterthrush , Worm - eating & the surprise Warbler Prairie on the 
hair pin turn on the East side of the Mountain . . Several Scarlet tanagers , 
Red - eyed Vireo were heard also . No Winter Wren was found . After leaving 
Hite Hollow Rd I stopped by Smith's pond in the Swoope area to see what was 
around . The first thing that caught my eye was a Yellow - billed Cuckoo 
carrying food to a possible nest site . Never did find where that bird went . 
Also around the pond were at least 10 Willow Flycatchers & from other reports 
in the last few days there was an Alder Flycatcher reported . I played my Ipod 
on Alders & no response , so I played Willow & every Willo 

 w responded to the Ipod . All sang a little as the morning was heating up 
quickly . After leaving Smiths I stopped by where the Alder Flycatcher is 
hanging out & he was singing . I again played the Ipod this time on Willow --no 
response , played Alders & the bird flew almost inside of my vehicle . In this 
stretch of Cattleman's Rd along the Middle River there is about 4 Willow & one 
Alders . After this there was another report of another Alders up near Livick 
Rd . I found the bird in question & played the Ipod once again . To make the 
story short no response to Alders & a yes response to Willow & the bird sang 
Willow . When ever I played the Willow on the Ipod all Willow Flycatchers came 
in close to see who the rival was & with the Alders no response at all . Except 
the one along Cattleman's Rd after leaving Smiths turn right onto Cattleman's & 
just after the bend in the road there is a tall sapling tree mixed in with 
Honeysuckle Bush & berry vines on the left . 


From Smith's pond to Livick Rd  there are 

Alders Flycatcher -- 1

Willow Flycatcher -- 15+ 


Allen Larner
Staunton
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Subject: Least bitterns, Neabsco Creek, Prince William Co.
From: Marc Ribaudo <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 11:00:20 -0400
I visited Neabsco Creek this morning in Woodbridge to look for least bitterns 
and other marsh birds. I watched from both the Neabsco Rd and Blackburn Rd 
sides. I observed one flying least bittern and heard at least 3 others. 
Multiple birds were heard calling from the Blackburn Rd side, where I followed 
the dirt track down to marsh level. I also saw 3 green herons but heard no 
rails. 


Marc Ribaudo 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
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Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Deerfield Stables (private) Upperville NE, Jun 11, 2016
From: Phillip Kenny <philkenny AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 08:08:46 -0400
Russ Taylor & I birded Deerfield Stables in Upperville, VA yesterday. We were 
surveying the hayfields on this private property for a Smithsonian study on 
grass types. Highlights were a Black-billed Cuckoo heard singing from the 
nearby woods, a Northern Bobwhite and dozens of Bobolinks. The land owner 
delays cutting hay until mid-July to allow these beautiful birds the chance to 
breed. Photos are on Flickr and embedded in the eBird checklist link. 


I checked by bluebird boxes yesterday and the box I thought had Great-crested 
Flycatchers was actually a Carolina Wren nest!! Not what I was hoping for, but 
an unusually nest box user nonetheless. 


If anyone has a info on Mount Rogers, I would really appreciate any suggestions 
on hiking, birding or where to stay! Please email me directly. We are planning 
a family excursion in a couple of weeks. Thanks!! 

Phil


Phillip Kenny
1731 Killarney Court
Vienna, VA 22182-2133
703-255-5423
philkenny AT verizon.net



> Begin forwarded message:
> 
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Deerfield Stables (private) Upperville NE, Jun 11, 
2016 

> Date: June 12, 2016 at 7:51:06 AM EDT
> To: philkenny AT verizon.net
> 
> Deerfield Stables (private) Upperville NE, Fauquier, Virginia, US
> Jun 11, 2016 6:25 AM - 8:10 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.1 Build 65 > 46 species > > Canada Goose 30 > Wood Duck 6 > Northern Bobwhite 1 > Green Heron 2 > Black Vulture 1 > Turkey Vulture 1 > Cooper's Hawk 1 > Red-shouldered Hawk 1 > Killdeer 1 > Mourning Dove 6 > Black-billed Cuckoo 1 > Chimney Swift 3 > Red-headed Woodpecker 4 > Red-bellied Woodpecker 2 > Downy Woodpecker 2 > Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 > Great Crested Flycatcher 2 > Eastern Kingbird 2 > Blue Jay 1 > American Crow 2 > Fish Crow 2 > Common Raven 1 > Purple Martin 15 > Tree Swallow 4 > Barn Swallow 2 > Tufted Titmouse 1 > Carolina Wren 4 > Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1 > Eastern Bluebird 6 > Wood Thrush 2 > Brown Thrasher 4 > Northern Mockingbird 1 > European Starling 7 > Common Yellowthroat 1 > Grasshopper Sparrow 8 > Chipping Sparrow 1 > Eastern Towhee 2 > Northern Cardinal 4 > Indigo Bunting 6 > Bobolink 25 > Red-winged Blackbird 20 > Eastern Meadowlark 8 > Common Grackle 12 > Brown-headed Cowbird 2 > House Finch 2 > American Goldfinch 4 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30172901 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/content/atlasva) *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: NVBC at Huntley Meadows Park, Jun 11, 2016
From: Larry Meade via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 16:43:48 -0400
 The Northern Virginia Bird Club held its annual "Bug Hunt" at Huntley Meadows 
where we started a bit later so that we could focus on dragonflies and 
butterflies. Of course, we found birds too. Avian highlights included Hooded 
Merganser and Wood Duck ducklings, a Great Egret, Green Heron, a Belted 
Kingfisher and a heard only Yellow-throated Vireo. We found ten dragonfly 
species: Prince Baskettail, Common Whitetail, Common Pondhawk, Painted Skimmer, 
Great Blue Skimmer, Slaty Skimmer, Spangled Skimmer, Blue Dasher, Eastern 
Amberwing, and lots of Swamp Darners. Damselflies were Ebony Jewelwing and 
Variable Dancer. Butterflies were a bit scarce because the flowers are not yet 
in full bloom. We did find Summer Azure, Great Spangled Fritillary, Red-Spotted 
Purple, Cabbage White, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Question Mark, Appalachian 
Brown, Northern Pearly-eye, Little Wood-Satytr, Silver-spotted Skipper, Zabulon 
Skipper, Least Skipper, and Little Glassywing. 


Larry Meade
Merrifield, VA

 

 


Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Jun 11, 2016 9:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: NVBC birds, butterflies & dragonflies walk led by Larry Meade.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.1 Build 65 37 species Canada Goose 35 Wood Duck 6 Mallard 3 Hooded Merganser 5 Great Blue Heron 3 Great Egret 1 Green Heron 3 Osprey 1 Distant flyover Cooper's Hawk 1 Mourning Dove 3 Chimney Swift 2 Belted Kingfisher 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 3 Downy Woodpecker 5 Pileated Woodpecker 2 Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 Heard only Acadian Flycatcher 3 Eastern Phoebe 1 Great Crested Flycatcher 1 Heard only Yellow-throated Vireo 1 Heard only at beginning of board walk. Red-eyed Vireo 8 Blue Jay 1 Heard only Tree Swallow 6 Barn Swallow 10 Carolina Chickadee 3 Tufted Titmouse 1 Heard only Carolina Wren 2 Heard only Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 6 Eastern Bluebird 1 American Robin 10 Common Yellowthroat 12 Northern Cardinal 8 Indigo Bunting 2 Red-winged Blackbird 30 Common Grackle 20 Brown-headed Cowbird 3 American Goldfinch 10 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30178493 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) *** You are subscribed to va-bird as jsiler AT birdingonthe.net. If you wish to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit http://mailman.listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird ***
Subject: Warblers, Breeding Tanagers, Eagles
From: "Marshall Faintich" <marshall AT faintich.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 13:08:49 -0400
Plus more in Augusta County, Virginia; 6/10/16. Report and photos:

 

 
http://www.faintich.net/Blog2016/2016_06_10.htm

 

___________________________

Marshall Faintich

Nellysford, VA

marshall AT faintich.net

www.faintich.net  

In real life, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight
line, so you might as well enjoy the journey !!

____________________________________________________________________________
_______________________

 

 

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Subject: Western Kingbird in James City County
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:38:39 -0400
...forgot to add...that the photo is on the Blog of Coastal VA Wildlife 
Observatory website www.cvwo.org 


Brian Taber
CVWO
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Subject: Re: VA-Bird Mission
From: Paul Mocko <prmocko AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:38:30 -0400
Let's not remove "... in Virginia".


On Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 11:32 AM, Deapesh Misra  wrote:

> Hi,
>
> How does one decide what is "interesting" and "interesting" to whom?
>
> Perhaps we should remove that word from the mission statement?
>
> Cheers,
> Deapesh.
>
>


-- 
Paul Mocko
Arlington, VA
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Subject: Western Kingbird in James City County
From: Brian Taber via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:35:55 -0400
There's a photo of a Western Kingbird that was at the College Creek Hawkwatch 
site this morning, in James City County. It wasn't re-found a little later, but 
I'll post if it's seen again. There are few June reports in VA of this species. 


Brian Taber
Coastal VA Wildlife Observatory
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