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Updated on Monday, March 20 at 06:51 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Blackpoll Warbler,©Barry Kent Mackay

20 Mar American Widgeons at Silver Lake (Haymarket) [Julie Anne Cooper ]
19 Mar Woodcock Display at Huntley Meadows ["Larry Cartwright" ]
19 Mar Songs at Huntley Meadows [Pam and Ben via va-bird ]
19 Mar Beth Fedorko has shared an eBird checklist with you from Sandy Point Road, Wicomico Church, VA on Mar 18, 2017 [Beth Fedorko via eBird ]
19 Mar Buckroe Beach no eared grebe this afternoon [Shea Tiller ]
19 Mar Late Post, Shenandoah University [Cheryl Walsh ]
19 Mar Sunday walk at Dyke Marsh WP, Fairfax Co [Gerry Hawkins ]
19 Mar Re: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co. [KELLY K ]
19 Mar Great Falls Bird Walk 03/19/17 Fairfax County [Dendroica--- via va-bird ]
16 Mar European goldfinch still at Leesylvania, Prince William county [Candice Lowther ]
16 Mar MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS [Donald Sweig ]
18 Mar Re: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co. []
18 Mar NVBC walk at Aquia Landing Beach Park and Crow's Nest NAP, Stafford County, Saturday, March 18, 2017 [Elton Morel via va-bird ]
15 Mar Fox sparrows Fort CF Smith Arlington [David Farner ]
15 Mar Lapland longspurs [Apple via va-bird ]
18 Mar Re: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co. [K Bell ]
18 Mar Riverbend Tundra Swans (3/18) afternoon [Stuart via va-bird ]
16 Mar Invasion Of The Foxes [pepherup--- via va-bird ]
18 Mar Red-headed Woodpecker at Luria Park, Fairfax County [John Greenwood via va-bird ]
17 Mar Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS ["Spears, David (DMME)" ]
18 Mar Baltimore Orioles [David Matson ]
17 Mar Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS [Scott Priebe ]
15 Mar Birding in Arlington, Virginia [Kenneth Rosenthal ]
17 Mar European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co. []
17 Mar Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS [Donald Sweig ]
14 Mar VABBA2 Tip - Adding data to heavily birded areas [Ashley Peele ]
17 Mar Final Deadline: VSO 2017 Annual Meeting Call for Papers ["L. Abigail Walter" ]
18 Mar Birding Halifax County [Jeff Blalock ]
18 Mar Back Bay NWR [Rob Bielawski ]
17 Mar Broadlands Wilson's Snipe [Cheryl Walsh ]
19 Mar Fox Sparrows [Katherine Cummings via va-bird ]
17 Mar Sully Woodlands 16 March - coyotes [Stephen Johnson ]
16 Mar Re: Lapland longspurs [Thomas Nardone ]
15 Mar Revels Island, back in the day. [Harry Armistead ]
15 Mar Lapland Longspur at Meadowood BLM facility [Larry Cartwright ]
15 Mar Re: Lapland Longspur at Meadowood BLM facility [Dixie Sommers via va-bird ]
15 Mar Richmond Osprey Cam [akb ]
15 Mar Re: Lapland Longspur at Meadowood BLM facility [Fred Atwood ]
17 Mar Singing Birds on St. Patty's Day [Ashley Peele ]
16 Mar Fox Sparrow Arlington [Chileddie via va-bird ]
15 Mar FYI: Senior National Park Pass to Increase from $10 to $80 [Vineeta ]
16 Mar Sparrows - snow days - FFx county [Deapesh Misra via va-bird ]
15 Mar European goldfinch still at Leesylvania SP. [Fred Atwood ]
16 Mar Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS [Stephen Johnson ]
18 Mar Merlin at Barcroft Park [Kenneth Rosenthal ]
14 Mar Northeast Reservoir, Lake Anna, Colonial Heights Walmart [Shea Tiller ]
18 Mar Fox Sparrows for Cornell's Backyard Feeder Watch count day [Walter Hadlock ]
18 Mar Bird Identification [Dolores Crooke ]
16 Mar Re: Lapland longspurs [Donald Sweig ]
10 Mar Fox Sparrows in Charlottesville [Janet Paisley ]
10 Mar Question re Chickadee at Huntley Meadows, Alexandria [Janis Stone ]
8 Mar Huntley Meadows - Fairfax County [Dixie Sommers via va-bird ]
11 Mar European goldfinch, Leesylvania sp [Marc Ribaudo ]
07 Mar Eagle's nest at Riverbend Park [Walter Hadlock ]
10 Mar Western Atlas Training Session in Blacksburg [Ashley Peele ]
8 Mar Red-breasted Nuthatch [David Matson ]
07 Mar Osprey pair at Dyke Marsh [Edward Eder ]
11 Mar Sully Woodlands shrike and other birds [Howard Wu ]
10 Mar Trumpeter Swan Louisa specimen [Andrew Rapp ]
10 Mar Guatemala birding tour [Shipman Nancy ]
11 Mar More early migrants at CM Crockett Park [KELLY K ]
11 Mar Riverbend Park:Tundra Swan Delights [Donald Sweig ]
11 Mar Banshee Reeks and Dulles Greenway Wetlands Bird Walk Results ["Joe Coleman" ]
8 Mar Chukar partridge in Beverly Hills neighborhood of Alexandria [Vineeta ]
07 Mar Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC area, February 28-March 6, 2017 [Gerry Hawkins ]
7 Mar Wood Ducks in OWL BOX by my driveway!!!!!! (western Albemarle) [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird ]
7 Mar OOPS--Purple Finches here March 4, not March 6 [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird ]
8 Mar Chincoteague NWR Shorebird/Gull Survey March 6 [Joelle Buffa ]
11 Mar Tundra swans at Riverbend Park [Karen Brandt via va-bird ]
8 Mar On the Hunt for VA's Breeding Birds [Ashley Peele ]
7 Mar FW: Lake Accotink Bald Eagle nest [Jack via va-bird ]
11 Mar European goldfinch details, Leesylvania State Park, Mar 11, 2017 ["Marc Ribaudo" ]
27 Feb Loudoun County [Gerco H ]
27 Feb Breeding Codes into Atlas Portal [Ashley Peele ]
27 Feb Test [Jeff Blalock ]
26 Feb Re: Red-Headed Woodpeckers in Falls Church, VA [Vineeta Anand ]

Subject: American Widgeons at Silver Lake (Haymarket)
From: Julie Anne Cooper <julieannecooper AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 06:40:43 -0500 (CDT)
Birding this AM at Silver Lake Regional Park in Haymarket, we found 8 American 
Widgeons (a first for us), and also the season's first Tree Swallows. 



Pictures of Widgeons and complete checklist at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35252889 

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Subject: Woodcock Display at Huntley Meadows
From: "Larry Cartwright" <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 23:25:41 -0400
Sasha Munters and I went to Huntley Meadows this evening to check out the
woodcock display and we were not disappointed.  The Woodcock Meadow has been
burned and has expanded open space for the woodcocks to display while making
it easier for us to observe.  We estimate at least 5 displaying birds. We
had wonderful views displaying both on the ground and in the air and one
female observing the display from the periphery of the field.  I assume
female because the individual was not a display participant, but just sat
there while the display was going on.  Sasha documented the first peent at
7:37 this evening and activity was still going on when we departed at 8:00. 

 

Larry Cartwright

prowarbler AT verizon.net   

 

 

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Subject: Songs at Huntley Meadows
From: Pam and Ben via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 22:44:47 -0400
After several weekends traveling, I finally got back to the Hike/Bike Trail
Saturday morning.  Given the weather, the foliage looked no more advanced
than three weeks ago.  But there were some songs of note.  Top of the list
were vocalizing PIED-BILLED GREBES, two pairs and a single.  Love their
weird vocalizations.  Will they breed again after several decades?  Several
of the half dozen FOX SPARROWS I saw were singing-I never get tired of this
song, which I rarely hear.  The few singing RUSTY BLACKBIRDS-well, someone
must like it.  And in the Woodcock Meadow I heard the first THRASHER song of
the year.

 

The 48 species I encountered included a decent mix of waterfowl (including a
pair of BUFFLEHEADS, not common at the park), a couple of PHOEBES (not
surprising), and good numbers of TOWHEES and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS.  The
two burned areas attracted a lot of action (mostly sparrows, flickers, and a
few robins).

 

Ben Jesup

Alexandria

 

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Subject: Beth Fedorko has shared an eBird checklist with you from Sandy Point Road, Wicomico Church, VA on Mar 18, 2017
From: Beth Fedorko via eBird <ebird-share AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 21:25:17 -0400 (EDT)
To accept this checklist into your eBird account, click on the link below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/shared?subID=UzM1MjkzMjYx&s=t

You will then be able to view, edit, or delete it. Learn more about eBird's 
checklist sharing process at 



http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010555-understanding-the-ebird-checklist-sharing-process 


---------

Lots of waterfowl present at the mouth of the Great Wicomico River in 
Northumberland County, VA. We had a flock of well over 100 Cedar Waxwings in 
our front (riverside) yard roosting in the oak trees. A Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker gave us a nice view, and two Red-headed Woodpeckers worked the trees 
on our property that was until a Bald Eagle perched in their favorite beach 
oak. The RHWO took off to the woodsy part of our property chattering up a storm 
from two far apart perches in willow oak trees. A great day! I posted a few 
photos on ebird. 

Cheers and Happy Birding!
Beth Fedorko
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Subject: Buckroe Beach no eared grebe this afternoon
From: Shea Tiller <sheagordontiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 20:03:23 -0400
Hi, all. I made a short stop at Buckroe Beach this afternoon, and only
found gannets, gulls, buffleheads, red-breasted mergansers, mixed gulls,
and pigeons. No grebes. The grebe was seen this morning, just not when I
was there. Does anyone have any tips on when is the best time to go to try
and see it? Or how much longer it will probably be here? I was thinking
maybe through the first week of April.

Anyways, here is a link to some of the other birds I found at the beach and
at Fountain/Boat Lake in Richmond this afternoon (not all are posted as of
sending) :https://www.flickr.com/photos/148002166 AT N03/

Good birding
Shea
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Subject: Late Post, Shenandoah University
From: Cheryl Walsh <wrwccw AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 17:50:29 -0400
We walked around the old golf course along the Shenandoah River Saturday to
look at the progress of the Great Blue Heron rookery and the Bald Eagle
nest across the river. The rookery was very active with herons constantly
coming and going. They are still reinforcing the stick nests. The eagle is
sitting high in its nest but we couldn't see if it had hatchlings yet. We
also saw a pair of Common Mergansers out on the river.

Bill and Cheryl Walsh
Aldie, VA
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Subject: Sunday walk at Dyke Marsh WP, Fairfax Co
From: Gerry Hawkins <maineusa AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 16:51:30 -0400
Seven persons joined me for all or part of the weekly walk at Dyke Marsh WP
sponsored by The Friends of Dyke Marsh, which starts at 8 a.m. each Sunday
morning  at the south end of the parking lot for the Belle Haven picnic area
and is open to all. Waterfowl highlights included several REDHEADS in a raft
of LESSER SCAUP, several COMMON MERGANSERS, two female RED-BREASTED
MERGANSERS and a small number of lingering BUFFLEHEAD. Waterbirds also
included 12 HORNED GREBES, including a group of eight individuals, and six
PIED-BILLED GREBES. Raptor highlights included a COOPER¹S HAWK, seven BALD
EAGLES, six OSPREY and a distant resident PEREGRINE FALCON perched on the
Woodrow Wilson Bridge. An apparent pair of PILEATED WOODPECKERS was well
seen near the beginning of Haul Road.  Songbird highlights included two FOX
SPARROWS seen and heard along Haul Road and an additional five FOX SPARROWS
at the edge of the picnic area seen by several of us at the end of the walk.
Songbird highlights also included a BROWN CREEPER, WINTER WRENS and RUSTY
BLACKBIRDS in a mixed species flock of blackbirds.  For those interested, a
complete list of the 48 species encountered on the walk may be viewed at the
following link: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35277306
  
Thanks to regular field trip leaders Larry Cartwright, Phil Silas and Ed
Eder and all other persons who were not deterred by the cold, rainy, snowy
weather early this morning and joined me for all or part of the field trip.
 
Gerry Hawkins      
Arlington, VA


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Subject: Re: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co.
From: KELLY K <tripacct1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 20:31:14 +0000
I looked for the European Goldfinch on March 16, 2017, from 1pm to 4:15pm
in all areas near the visitor center, picnic area, and boat house with no
success. Apparently, the last birders to see it did so around the time I
arrived. I saw two other birders when I drove in so I am guessing these
were the two that last reported it to eBird. I also tried to locate it on
March 17 in the morning. Both times, I saw plenty of juncos and two
American Goldfinch foraging all through the picnic area to areas by the
boat house. On the 16th, I did spot an American Woodcock in the sun next to
a tree in the picnic area closest to the first boat house parking area. A
first for me in this park and a first for a close up daytime sighting...so
I am glad I made the trip.

Kelly Krechmer
Fauquier County
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Subject: Great Falls Bird Walk 03/19/17 Fairfax County
From: Dendroica--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 16:08:37 -0400
Keith Huffman led this morning's walk.  A tally of 8 Eastern Phoebes  
highlighted the list of 30 species observed. We meet every Sunday morning,  
weather permitting, in the visitors center parking lot at 8 AM. All birders are 

welcome to join us.  
 
Posted  by Ralph Wall
 
The list: 
 Canada Goose  12
American Black Duck  4
Mallard   2
Ring-necked Duck  6
Bufflehead  25
Common Merganser   2
Great Blue Heron  1
Black Vulture  2
Bald Eagle   1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied  Woodpecker  3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker   3
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern  Phoebe  8
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  4
Carolina  Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  5
White-breasted Nuthatch   5
Brown Creeper  1
Carolina Wren  5
Eastern Bluebird   5
American Robin  8
Dark-eyed Junco  25
Song Sparrow   1
Northern Cardinal  7
Red-winged Blackbird  3

View this  checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35283938

This  report was generated automatically by eBird v3  (http://ebird.org)
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Subject: European goldfinch still at Leesylvania, Prince William county
From: Candice Lowther <candiceylowther AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 15:00:18 +0000
Dave Larsen and I just spotted the European Goldfinch at Leesylvania in the
picnic area along the river.  It is the same area it has been spotted in on
past days.  Beautiful male bird!

Good birding!

Candice Lowther
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Subject: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 17:57:10 -0400
Two Fox Sparrows finally showed up in my Falls Church yard this morning. 
They've been around most of the day. 

   First ones I've had in probably five or more years.
   So very nice.
    Donald Sweig
    Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Re: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co.
From: david.boltz4 AT gmail.com
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 13:07:54 -0400
Did anyone try for the European Goldfinch today? If so, please post ASAP, 
whether success or not. 


Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 17, 2017, at 4:57 PM, david.boltz4 AT gmail.com wrote:

Although I encountered at least 6 other birders in pursuit, 2 of whom had been 
there since just after 9 a.m., nobody saw the bird by the time I left at 3:20. 
There were only 2 Am. Goldfinches feeding in the newly planted grass in the 
picnic area near the boat launch end. I believe that this is the first day 
since it was first seen that nobody reported it. 


If it is seen later today or tomorrow morning, please post ASAP. I will still 
be in the area and have some time in the afternoon to go again. 


Thanks.

Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: NVBC walk at Aquia Landing Beach Park and Crow's Nest NAP, Stafford County, Saturday, March 18, 2017
From: Elton Morel via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 20:31:51 +0000 (UTC)
 

VA Birders: 
The Northern Virginia Bird Club held a walk this morning at Aquia Landing Beach 
Park and then Crow's Nest Natural Area Preserve, both in Stafford County.  We 
collectively found 60 species.  Our highlights at Aquia Landing were a male 
and female Common Goldeneye,  a male Greater Scaup, excellent views of a 
Brown Thrasher feeding at the grassy edges of the entrance road, Wood Ducks 
including a female inspecting a nest box, a Northern Harrier over the marsh, 
both species of swans, Horned Grebes, Ospreys, Canvasbacks, both species of 
kinglets, Killdeers along the beach and finally, a Winter Wren. 

We then switched over to Crow's Nest where a few of us saw a couple of American 
Tree Sparrows along the boardwalk, flybys of Wilson's Snipe, a good number of 
Green-winged Teal, and an excellent view of a perched up Belted Kingfisher 
having just caught a fish.  The most entertaining event was when we were 
compiling our tally -- a pair of very territorial Red-shouldered Hawks attacked 
a passing by Red-tailed Hawk and quite the raucous aerial combat ensued. 

Both eBird checklists are below.
Elton MorelArlington, VA
 
Aquia Landing Park, Stafford, Virginia, US
Mar 18, 2017 7:40 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments: NVBC walk led by David Ledwith and Elton Morel.
46 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose 4
Mute Swan 4
Tundra Swan 5
Wood Duck 3
Gadwall 50
Mallard 2
Canvasback 60
Greater Scaup 1
Lesser Scaup 100
Bufflehead 30
Common Goldeneye 2
Red-breasted Merganser 20
Ruddy Duck 70
Pied-billed Grebe 6
Horned Grebe 4
Double-crested Cormorant 50
Great Blue Heron 4
Osprey 3
Northern Harrier 1
Bald Eagle 8
Killdeer 6
Ring-billed Gull 1200
Herring Gull 40
Mourning Dove 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 4
Downy Woodpecker 2
Pileated Woodpecker 2
American Crow 8
Fish Crow 2
crow sp. 15
Carolina Chickadee 5
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Winter Wren 1
Carolina Wren 6
Golden-crowned Kinglet 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Eastern Bluebird 1 Heard only
Brown Thrasher 1
White-throated Sparrow 25
Song Sparrow 30
Swamp Sparrow 4
Northern Cardinal 15
Red-winged Blackbird 50
Common Grackle 60
House Finch 1 Heard only
American Goldfinch 1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35250195

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)Crow's 
Nest Natural Area Preserve, Stafford, Virginia, US 

Mar 18, 2017 10:15 AM - 11:55 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments: NVBC walk led by David Ledwith and Elton Morel.
35 species

Canada Goose 2 Heard only
Wood Duck 12
American Black Duck 15
Green-winged Teal 20
Great Blue Heron 4
Black Vulture 2
Turkey Vulture 10
Osprey 1
Bald Eagle 4
Red-shouldered Hawk 2
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Killdeer 15
Wilson's Snipe 7
Ring-billed Gull 3
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Pileated Woodpecker 2
Blue Jay 6
American Crow 4
Tree Swallow 1
Carolina Chickadee 4
Tufted Titmouse 2
Carolina Wren 4
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
American Robin 5
American Tree Sparrow 2
White-throated Sparrow 8
Song Sparrow 20
Swamp Sparrow 8
Eastern Towhee 1 Heard only
Northern Cardinal 2
Red-winged Blackbird 60

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35252490

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



   
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Subject: Fox sparrows Fort CF Smith Arlington
From: David Farner <dfarner AT arlingtonva.us>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 13:14:25 +0000
I've seen recent reports about fox sparrows moving throughout the area. 
Evidence of that this morning at Fort CF Smith park where there are 9 of them 
currently under the feeders in back of the house. 


David Farner
Fort CF Smith Park
Arlington, VA 22207

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Subject: Lapland longspurs
From: Apple via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 15:03:40 -0400
Still at Meadowood. Along edge of road to stable, near curve. Being flushed 
occ. by a passing car, but have returned in 5-10 minutes. 


Rich Rieger
Alexandria 

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co.
From: K Bell <karenbell723 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 16:31:15 -0400
I was at Leesylvania between 2 pm and 4 pm today and did not see it. I saw
one American Goldfinch only at the entrance to Lees Woods Trail.

I chatted with another birder with a scope; he had not see. Any goldfinch.

Karen Bell


On Saturday, March 18, 2017,  wrote:

> Did anyone try for the European Goldfinch today? If so, please post ASAP,
> whether success or not.
>
> Dave Boltz
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 17, 2017, at 4:57 PM, david.boltz4 AT gmail.com  wrote:
>
> Although I encountered at least 6 other birders in pursuit, 2 of whom had
> been there since just after 9 a.m., nobody saw the bird by the time I left
> at 3:20. There were only 2 Am. Goldfinches feeding in the newly planted
> grass in the picnic area near the boat launch end. I believe that this is
> the first day since it was first seen that nobody reported it.
>
> If it is seen later today or tomorrow morning, please post ASAP. I will
> still be in the area and have some time in the afternoon to go again.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Dave Boltz
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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>
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Subject: Riverbend Tundra Swans (3/18) afternoon
From: Stuart via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 15:21:53 -0400
Hi all:  Saw 20 or so tundra swans opposite from the boat slip.

Unfortunately they flew upstream.  Maybe they will float back down.

Eagle nest is still active.

Good birding all!

Stuart
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Subject: Invasion Of The Foxes
From: pepherup--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:38:27 -0400
Good Morning Everyone,

 This morning I looked out the window to see if the 2 fox sparrows, who have 
been here for weeks, were still here and instead of the two, I counted 5. I 
guess the word is out in the bird world, stop by Concord for breakfast, lots of 
seeds under the bushes there. 

 Of course, this also invites the early morning hoard of grackles, cowbirds and 
red winged blackbirds but they mostly empty the three sunflower feeders. 

 The cold weather has all the bluebirds visiting their feeder in the field as 
the insect hatch that occurred during the warm weather have disappeared. 

    Spring is on the way, no matter what.

Peggy Lyons
Concord
Campbell County
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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker at Luria Park, Fairfax County
From: John Greenwood via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:35:23 -0400
A Red-headed Woodpecker was active ON the trail between the boardwalk and the 
Fallowfield Dr entrance this morning. Excellent views of a Pileated Woodpecker 
were had near the Holmes Run Dr entrance. 


And not to be left out, we've had a Fox Sparrow in our backyard; the first in 
several years. 


Jack Greenwood
Falls Church

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS
From: "Spears, David (DMME)" <David.Spears AT dmme.virginia.gov>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 16:20:50 +0000
One Fox Sparrow at the feeder and around the yard this morning (Friday 3/17) in 
Buckingham County. Must be a big wave of them coming through. 


David Spears

Dillwyn VA



-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird 
[mailto:va-bird-bounces+david.spears=dmme.virginia.gov AT listserve.com] On Behalf 
Of Scott Priebe 

Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 9:08 PM
To: VA-Bird
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS



First Fox Sparrow seen in our yard today here inSpringfield.



Sent from my iPod



> On Mar 16, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Stephen Johnson 
> wrote: 


>

>

> Ditto, in our yard south of Reston today - single bird sharing the foraging 
area with a Cardinal and a Song Sparrow. 


>

> Steve Johnson

> Fairfax, Virginia

>

>

>

>> On Mar 16, 2017, at 5:57 PM, Donald Sweig wrote:

>>

>> Two Fox Sparrows finally showed up in my Falls Church yard this morning. 
They've been around most of the day. 


>>  First ones I've had in probably five or more years.

>>  So very nice.

>>   Donald Sweig

>>   Falls Church, Virginia

>>

>> Sent from my iPad

>> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as 
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>

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Subject: Baltimore Orioles
From: David Matson <wrenpt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 11:46:26 -0500
TWO full-breeding plumaged adult male Baltimore Orioles today are at the
feeders.

*****

We have had one off-and-on for a month--previously to that, this same one
likely was that at a neighbor's house.

Now, this one has been joined by a compadre.

David Matson
-- 
David Matson
Suffolk and Onancock, Virginia
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Subject: Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS
From: Scott Priebe <falco57 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 01:08:03 +0000
First Fox Sparrow seen in our yard today here inSpringfield.

Sent from my iPod

> On Mar 16, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Stephen Johnson  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> Ditto, in our yard south of Reston today - single bird sharing the foraging 
area with a Cardinal and a Song Sparrow. 

> 
> Steve Johnson
> Fairfax, Virginia
> 
> 
> 
>> On Mar 16, 2017, at 5:57 PM, Donald Sweig wrote:
>> 
>> Two Fox Sparrows finally showed up in my Falls Church yard this morning. 
They've been around most of the day. 

>>  First ones I've had in probably five or more years.
>>  So very nice.
>>   Donald Sweig
>>   Falls Church, Virginia
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net. If you wish 
to unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
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> 
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as falco57 AT msn.com. If you wish to 
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Subject: Birding in Arlington, Virginia
From: Kenneth Rosenthal <rosenthal.k AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 14:52:33 -0400
Hi All,

Arlington County Parks and Recreation Department is sponsoring free,
family bird walks to highlight the great spots to bird in Arlington County.
Please join us for a walk or two! (We do ask for registration so we have an
idea of the number to expect.)

Thank you.

Birding Arlington!

Families ages 8 and up. Register children and adults; children must be
accompanied by a registered adult. Explore Arlington's birding hot spots
with our new bird watching series for families! We’ll visit different
birding spots in Arlington throughout the year and build our County bird
lists. Birders of all experience levels can participate and loaner
binoculars are available. For information: 703-228-3403.


Barcroft Park - 4200 S Four Mile Run Dr

Saturday, March 18, 8-9:30 a.m.  #632857-K



Potomac Overlook Regional Park - 2845 Marcey Rd

Saturday, April 15, 8-9:30 a.m.  #632857-L



Gulf Branch & Old Glebe parks - 3608 Military Rd

Saturday, April 22, 8-9:30 a.m.  #632857-M



Potomac Overlook Regional Park - 2845 Marcey Rd

Saturday, April 29, 8-9:30 a.m.  #632857-N



Fort C. F. Smith - 2411 N. 24th Street

Saturday, May 6, 8-9:30 a.m.  #632857-O



Free. Register both children and adults; children must be accompanied by a
registered adult. Register by phone at 703-228-4747, or online at
https://registration.arlingtonva.us.


Ken Rosenthal
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Subject: European Goldfinch Not Seen Today - Leesylvania SP, Prince Wm. Co.
From: david.boltz4 AT gmail.com
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 16:57:54 -0400
Although I encountered at least 6 other birders in pursuit, 2 of whom had been 
there since just after 9 a.m., nobody saw the bird by the time I left at 3:20. 
There were only 2 Am. Goldfinches feeding in the newly planted grass in the 
picnic area near the boat launch end. I believe that this is the first day 
since it was first seen that nobody reported it. 


If it is seen later today or tomorrow morning, please post ASAP. I will still 
be in the area and have some time in the afternoon to go again. 


Thanks.

Dave Boltz

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 18:07:07 -0400
Still two at my house, all day today.
   Donald Sweig
   Falls church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 17, 2017, at 12:20 PM, "Spears, David (DMME)" 
 wrote: 

> 
> One Fox Sparrow at the feeder and around the yard this morning (Friday 3/17) 
in Buckingham County. Must be a big wave of them coming through. 

> 
> David Spears
> 
> Dillwyn VA
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: va-bird 
[mailto:va-bird-bounces+david.spears=dmme.virginia.gov AT listserve.com] On Behalf 
Of Scott Priebe 

> Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 9:08 PM
> To: VA-Bird
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS
> 
> 
> 
> First Fox Sparrow seen in our yard today here inSpringfield.
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> 
> 
>>> On Mar 16, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Stephen Johnson 
> wrote: 

>> 
> 
> 
>> Ditto, in our yard south of Reston today - single bird sharing the foraging 
area with a Cardinal and a Song Sparrow. 

> 
> 
>> Steve Johnson
> 
>> Fairfax, Virginia
> 
> 
> 
> 
>>> On Mar 16, 2017, at 5:57 PM, Donald Sweig wrote:
> 
> 
>>> Two Fox Sparrows finally showed up in my Falls Church yard this morning. 
They've been around most of the day. 

> 
>>> First ones I've had in probably five or more years.
> 
>>> So very nice.
> 
>>>  Donald Sweig
> 
>>>  Falls Church, Virginia
> 
> 
>>> Sent from my iPad
> 
>>> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as 
stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net. If you wish to 
unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit 
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> 
> 
>> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as 
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> 
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Subject: VABBA2 Tip - Adding data to heavily birded areas
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:47:54 -0400
Hi Folks,

Recently, some folks have raised questions about whether they should log
Atlas data to the same areas this year OR move on to a new area.  I thought
I would address this and a couple related questions.

First, remember that the Atlas is not focused on repeat sampling.  Once a
species has been confirmed as a breeder, it doesn't need to be
're-confirmed' the next year.  Once an Atlas block has been completed, you
don't need to keep visiting it.  In fact!  *We'd far rather you move on to
a new Atlas block, once you've met the key benchmarks for block completion*
.

These benchmarks can be found in the Atlas Handbook
 on
pages 29-31.  The most important goals to shoot for are: (1) you've spent
at least 20 hours surveying in your block, (2) these visits were spread out
over the breeding season, (3) included different habitats present within
your block, and (4) that a couple night visits were carried out.

Continuing to add data to a heavily birded area isn't a bad thing, but
generating data for a new area is a huge help to the project.  If your
interested in where to Atlas, consider visiting an area, preferably a
Priority block, that has little or no data logged within it.  You may be
surprised how easy it is to find such a block near your home base.

To check out what blocks are already signed up for, visit the Atlas Block
Explorer at: *http://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/BBA2/BlockExplorer/
*

To see what data has already been logged to the Atlas eBird portal, visit
the 'Explore Data' page at: *http://ebird.org/ebird/atlasva/explore
*

Always feel free to email us with questions about where to Atlas.

Thanks much to all the folks contributing Atlas data this Spring.  We're
really excited to see what data we can generate in our second field
season!  Stay warm this week and be careful if you venture out to bird in
the icy conditions.

All the best,

Ashley Peele, PhD
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator
Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Subject: Final Deadline: VSO 2017 Annual Meeting Call for Papers
From: "L. Abigail Walter" <lawalter AT udel.edu>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 15:42:48 -0400
This year’s Virginia Society of Ornithology meeting is scheduled May 5-7,
2017, and will be hosted by the Richmond Audubon Society at the Wyndham
Virginia Crossings Hotel & Conference Center. The scientific paper session
is set for Saturday, May 6, from 2-4pm. Presentations should be 15 minutes
long, including time for questions. If you are interested in giving an oral
presentation at the conference about your research, please submit the
following information by March 17, 2017 in an e-mail to Abby Walter,
Programs Coordinator (lawalter AT udel.edu).

   -

   Name
   -

   E-mail address
   -

   Phone Number
   -

   Names of co-authors (if applicable)
   -

   Institutional affiliation (if applicable)
   -

   Title of oral presentation
   -

   Brief abstract (250 word limit)
   -

   Audio-visual needs (e.g. laptop and LCD projector, overhead projector,
   slide projector)

Applications will reviewed on a first-come, first-served basis. The board
will review submissions and applicants will be notified of their acceptance
and time slot by March 31.
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Subject: Birding Halifax County
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder AT gcronline.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 17:23:23 -0400
Greetings all

I started at 0650 hrs at Banister River WMA where I had 2 Woodcocks, an 
Immature Bald Eagle, three Barred Owls, Wood Ducks and a Great Blue Heron. 


I stopped at Runts store to get a candy bar for some energy and had 1500 
Grackles along the sides of Dan River Church Rd but no YH Blackbird. One day I 
hope one shows up. 


At Edmunds Park the Ruddy Duck that was there earlier this week was still there 
as well as 7 Wilson's Snipes. 


I next went to Clover and at the Power plant cooling pond there was 8 
Red-Breasted Mergansers. 


At the pond behind the Visitor Center at Staunton River Battlefield State Park 
I had Wood, Mallard and Ring-Necked Ducks just two of each. 


On the trail to Randolph I had a Red-Shoulder Hawk and a Northern Harrier but I 
did not see a Bald Eagle on the nest, in the trees or soaring around anywhere 
which was very disappointing. I hope they haven't abandoned the nest and move 
on elsewhere. 


In the duck impoundments below the park was only one Coot no Great Blue Herons. 


Not a bad day but I was hoping to find an American Bittern and disappointed 
about the Eagles. 



From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
jcbabirder AT gcronline.com



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Subject: Back Bay NWR
From: Rob Bielawski <robbielawski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 07:59:07 -0400
There are hundreds, if not thousands of both loon species, Horned Grebes,
and Razorbills on the move and inshore this morning. Lots of Bonapartes
Gull in close also. To anyone on the coast, keep your eyes open for Little
or Black-head Gulls mixing with the Bonaparte's. Look for alcids with the
Razors, and maybe a Pacific Loon is around somewhere too. Lots of movement
this AM.
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Subject: Broadlands Wilson's Snipe
From: Cheryl Walsh <wrwccw AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 15:24:31 -0400
We saw about 20 Wilson's Snipe along the central pond shore from the
boardwalk overlook today at the Van Metre Nature Perserve in Broadlands,
Loudoun County.

Bill and Cheryl Walsh
Aldie, VA
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Subject: Fox Sparrows
From: Katherine Cummings via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 00:22:32 -0400
I have 6 Fox Sparrows coming to my feeders since March 14. 
Basye, Shenandoah County. 

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Sully Woodlands 16 March - coyotes
From: Stephen Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 07:24:04 -0400
late report, Sully Woodlands, Fairfax County, yesterday March 16 morning --

I couldn't find the Shrike, but a few other interesting things showed up.

I saw 3 coyotes there - one healthy-looking pair with a lot of reddish fox 
coloration; and later, a lone grayer one with poorer quality looking fur. The 
first pair walked quite close to a herd of deer, which I didn't see until I 
flushed them minutes later. They were separated by a row of cedars and maybe 
40-ish yards, as the coyotes went by. Either the two species were not 
interested in each other; or they didn't notice each other. 


Several Meadowlarks were at Sully Woodlands, and also at Rock Hill Park 
(nearby). Also at Rock Hill, the usual trio (or so) of White-crowned Sparrows. 


Finally to "pile on" with other reports, I found Fox Sparrows spread all around 
the fields at Sully Woodlands yesterday - 4 total - and another at our home 
feeders. 


"No such thing as bad weather - just bad clothing."

Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia

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Subject: Re: Lapland longspurs
From: Thomas Nardone <nardonet AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:43:11 -0400
I went to the area this morning and didn't see the longspurs. I drove the road 
to the stables several times between trips to other nearby birding spots. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 16, 2017, at 12:16 PM, Donald Sweig  wrote:
> 
> Hey Rich,
> About the Longspurs: 
> Do I understand correctly they are on the entrance road up to the stables 
from Gunston Road? 

> I never use that road; can you give me a better idea where to look sir. 
> Also how many birds did you see please?
>  I can't go today, but I can go Friday morning.
>   Any Fox Sparrows?
>   Donald Sweig
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Mar 15, 2017, at 3:03 PM, Apple via va-bird  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Still at Meadowood. Along edge of road to stable, near curve. Being flushed 
occ. by a passing car, but have returned in 5-10 minutes. 

>> 
>> Rich Rieger
>> Alexandria 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Revels Island, back in the day.
From: Harry Armistead <harryarmistead AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 15:02:56 +0000
REVELS ISLAND, back in the day, during George Shiras’s time.


Curtis Badger has done a good service by calling attention to the pioneering 
wildlife photographer George Shiras III (1859-1942) and his documentation of 
birds of the Eastern Shore’s Revel Island. Revel Island is slightly west of the 
south tip of Parramore Island, Accomack County, Virginia. Curtis’ article is in 
Virginia Wildlife, March/April 2017, pages 26-29, and has 5 of Shiras’ 
evocative photographs, taken over 100 years ago. For much of what appears below 
I’m indebted to Curtis. 



Shiras’ Revel Island experiences and writings are also reprised in Seashore 
chronicles: three centuries of the Virginia barrier islands edited by Brooks 
Miles Barnes & Barry R. Truitt (U. Press of Virginia, 1997, 248pp.), to which I 
am also indebted. But much of the analysis and detail below is my own. 



In his day Revel Island was much more extensive, boasted several buildings for 
club members, was staffed by a celebrated African-American woman cook as well 
as local white guides, grew vegetables, had a resident beast of burden, an ox, 
and there was waterfowl and shorebird gunning, meals with fresh clams, oysters, 
and fish, and the good fellowship those old clubs enjoyed. Those were the 
Halcyon years. However, spring hunting, especially of shorebirds, and egging, 
especially of Laughing Gull eggs, were still a feature at the time Shiras 
joined the Revels Island Club, in 1894. Shiras was instrumental in fostering 
legislation that made such activities illegal. 



Shiras’ splendid, magisterial book Hunting wild life with camera and flashlight 
(2 volumes, National Geographic Society [NGS], 1935, 904 pages in aggregate) 
celebrates his times at Revel Island in 2 chapters: “Chapter V - part I, 
Eastern Shore of Virginia - earlier visits to Revels Island” pp. 63-82, and 
“Chapter V - part II, Last days at Revels Island,” pp. 83-96. I was lucky 
enough to come by a set of this title, I think in the 1960s, for a mere $5, but 
haven’t given it the attention it deserves. 



Species photographed by Shiras at Revels, and/or their eggs, nests, and 
youngsters, in his book are: Northern Bobwhite (but … a mainland nest), Green 
Heron, Osprey, Clapper Rail, Wilson’s Plover, American Oystercatcher, Greater 
Yellowlegs, Willet, Ruddy Turnstone, Red Knot, Pectoral Sandpiper, Laughing 
Gull, Black Skimmer, Common Tern, Common Nighthawk (but see commentary below), 
Northern Flicker, Fish Crow, Barn Swallow, Tree Swallow, Eastern Meadowlark, 
and Common Grackle. There are 42 Revels Island photographs. It is common for 
people familiar with such places to give them the possessive, as in Hooper’s 
Island, Fishermans Island, Elliotts Island, with or without the apostrophe, 
even if the “correct” name is not possessive. 



Some of the shots show shorebirds coming in to decoys. Shiras has the endearing 
quality of often referring to birds by their colloquial names: Calico Back 
(turnstone), Black-headed Gull (Laughing Gull), Robin Snipe (knot), Seaside 
Finch (Seaside Sparrow) et al. I’ve some familiarity with such names, but Grass 
Snipe (Pectoral Sandpiper) I hadn’t heard before. Many Eastern Shore folks 
refer to the Loblolly Pine as the Yellow Pine. So does Shiras. 



Shiras was no shrinking violet, hunted a lot, was a lawyer, angler, served in 
the U. S. Congress (1903-1905), was on the board of NGS, and otherwise gathered 
no moss. His father was a Supreme Court justice. His book rambles all over. 
Volume 1 concentrates on the Lake Superior region, but Volume 2 has chapters on 
Newfoundland, New Brunswick, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, the Bahamas, 
Louisiana, Mexico, Panama, Yellowstone, Arizona, and Alaska. It is a gem. Over 
a period of several decades Shiras periodically visited Revel Island. 



But it does have some mistakes in the Revels Island chapters. The 2 photographs 
of a “Chuck-will’s-widow” on pp. 84 & 85 are of a Common Nighthawk. The 
Virginia barrier island surveys by Bill Williams, Jerry Via, et al., done for 
many years recently, sometimes found a pair or 2, apparently breeders, on the 
islands. Up in Delaware they breed in the Cape Henlopen area. On p. 75 “Calico 
backs are swift on the wing” instead of an all-turnstone cast, shows 2 
oystercatchers in the foreground and a rather distant turnstone behind them. 



Those were the good old days. In spite of the slaughters going on, this is the 
sort of remembrance that makes me wish for a time machine. Shiras refers to 
such obsolete phenomena as kerosene torch, naptha launches, leg-of-mutton 
sails, and snipe potpies as well as birds being “awing” (on the wing?). The 
first clubhouse was built in 1885. Most of the later buildings are in a 
photograph on page 67 and there are photographs of Jerry the ox, a huge pile of 
harvested Laughing Gull eggs, an old catboat, and a pile of eggshells in a dump 
created by predatory Fish Crows. 



Revel Island, what’s left of it, lies within the Nassawadox Christmas Bird 
Count circle on its north perimeter. One of my fantasies is to camp there and 
spend the entire count day on the island, scoping the rough waters of Quinby 
Inlet and the south end of Parramore Island. Maybe … some day. Revels is the 
only Eastern Shore island I’ve never been to. 



Going back even further there is Frank M. Chapman’s Bird studies with a camera: 
with introductory chapters on the outfit and methods of the bird photographer 
(D. Appleton & Co., 1900, 218pp.) with over 100 photographs. It’s not that much 
of a stretch at all to proceed from Shiras and Chapman to a next step: the 
NGS’s Stalking birds with color camera (1951, 328pp., by Cornell’s venerable 
Arthur A. Allen), chock full of great photographs and hundreds of charming 
captions, such as “Tail erect, air sacs inflated, a Ruddy Duck courts his lady 
love” and “Like Ulysses, the Sanderling ‘Cannot rest from travel.’ “ The 
chapter “Birds of timberline and tundra” inspired me, eventually, to take the 
whole family on a trip to Churchill, Manitoba. 



Farther afield is An eye for a bird by the great English photographer, Eric 
Hosking, who lost an eye when attacked by a Tawny Owl (p. 20, Paul S. Eriksson, 
Inc., 1970, 302pp.). Hosking was the pre-eminent European bird photographer of 
his time. Allan Cruickshank, Frederick Kent Truslow, Samuel A. Grimes, and 
Roger Tory Peterson (photos well showcased in his Birds over America [Dodd, 
Mead & Co., 1948, 342pp.]) were other great American bird photographers, before 
the days of modern equipment. In our own time Brian Small, Adam Riley, and 
Kevin Karlson are outstanding. There are many others. Hundreds in these days of 
sophisticated photographic armamentarium (armanmentaria?). 



Best to all. - Harry Armistead, Philadelphia.
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Subject: Lapland Longspur at Meadowood BLM facility
From: Larry Cartwright <prowarbler AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 12:01:00 -0400
Along the drive to the stables off Gunston Road, Mason Neck, Fairfax County. 
There are two birds. Being seen now. 


Sherman Suter and Larry Cartwright,

Prowarbler AT verizon.net

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Lapland Longspur at Meadowood BLM facility
From: Dixie Sommers via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 14:23:35 -0400
still present, with Savannah Sparrows

Dixie Sommers
dixiesommers AT cs.com

On Wednesday, March 15, 2017 Fred Atwood  wrote:
Nice find guys!! Still present now. Glad I checked my email before leaving 
Pohick Bay where there were lots of close waterfowl. 


Sent from my iPhone

> 

On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:01 PM, Larry Cartwright  wrote:
> 
> Along the drive to the stables off Gunston Road, Mason Neck, Fairfax County. 
There are two birds. Being seen now. 

> 
> Sherman Suter and Larry Cartwright,
> 
> Prowarbler AT verizon.net
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Richmond Osprey Cam
From: akb <arun1bose AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 19:02:59 -0400
Hello Birders,
Locals will already know about the Richmond Osprey Cam, a project of Richmond
Outside.com . The HD camera is positioned
below the Manchester Bridge on one of the old bridge trestles that Ospreys
now use to nest upon. You can view the stunning live feed and learn more
about the project at

https://www.richmondospreycamera.com/

https://www.richmondospreycamera.com/about/

The camera comes to you courtesy of Richmond Outside.com
 and other sponsors including: James River
Association , Riverside Outfitters
, Terrain360
 and Elwood Thompson's
Local Market 


Arun Bose
Richmond VA
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Subject: Re: Lapland Longspur at Meadowood BLM facility
From: Fred Atwood <fatwood AT flinthill.org>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 13:11:46 -0400
Nice find guys!! Still present now. Glad I checked my email before leaving 
Pohick Bay where there were lots of close waterfowl. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:01 PM, Larry Cartwright  
wrote: 

> 
> Along the drive to the stables off Gunston Road, Mason Neck, Fairfax County. 
There are two birds. Being seen now. 

> 
> Sherman Suter and Larry Cartwright,
> 
> Prowarbler AT verizon.net
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Singing Birds on St. Patty's Day
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 09:25:04 -0400
Hi Atlas Folks!

 

Just a quick message on this St. Patty's Day to remind us of the proper use for 
the S and S7 breeding codes, when reporting your breeding observations to the 
VA Breeding Bird Atlas project. 


 

Love is in the air for many of our resident bird species. Our woods, fields, 
and neighborhoods are full of the songs and breeding vocalizations of males 
establishing their territories and advertising for females. As we enter the 
second Atlas season, let’s make sure we’re using the S or S7 breeding codes 
for bird songs and calls that are specifically tied to breeding activity. 


 

S= Singing Male or S7= Singing Male Present >7 days. This code only applies to 
species that have a song or vocalization directly associated with breeding 
behavior. Examples include everything from the Carolina Wren’s classic song 
to a Barred Owl’s ‘Who-cooks-for-you’ call. However, many species of 
birds make sounds that are not associated with breeding. In some cases, these 
are actual songs (e.g. nuthatches), but in most cases these are simpler 
vocalizations or ‘calls’. Detections of such vocalizations should not be 
labeled with the S or S7 code. 


 

Examples of such species include nuthatches, waxwings, kingfishers, shorebirds, 
waterfowl, wading birds, vultures, terns and gulls, and corvids. It may not 
happen right away, but if you log a singing Great Blue Heron, eventually an 
Atlas reviewer is going to be messaging you. 


 

Lastly, there are still a few spots open for the Charlottesville Training 
session next Saturday, March 25th. If you are a new volunteer or would just 
like a refresher, please join us for this fun day of birding and learning! 
Register at: https://goo.gl/forms/DwOOGFUIWCObDvD12  For more info, check out 
the Atlas Events page on our website. 


 

Enjoy the St. Patty's day revelry and hopefully a weekend of good birding!

 

 

Ashley Peele, PhD  

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator 

www.vabba2.org  |  ebird.org/atlasva         

www.facebook.com/vabba2  

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office   

(540) 231-7019 fax

ashpeele AT vt.edu

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Subject: Fox Sparrow Arlington
From: Chileddie via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 22:55:21 -0400
We also hosted a Fox Sparrow in our yard for about 2 hours today.  

Eddie Gomez
South Arlington
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Subject: FYI: Senior National Park Pass to Increase from $10 to $80
From: Vineeta <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 17:43:07 -0400
From another list that I'm on.
Vineeta Anand


The fee for a lifetime pass for citizens 62 and older will go from $10 to
$80. An annual pass will cost them $20, which they can apply to the cost of
a lifetime pass at a later point if they decide they want one.

But if you get a lifetime pass before the change is implemented, it will
cost only $10. Passes can be purchased online for an additional service fee
of $10 or at any of the parks without an extra charge.

National Park Service officials are unsure how long it will take to
implement the change, but it’s expected before the end of 2017. Meantime,
they are spreading the word informally.
http://travel.aarp.org/articles-tips/articles/info-
2016/national-parks-lifetime-pass-cost-increase.html






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Subject: Sparrows - snow days - FFx county
From: Deapesh Misra via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 21:02:15 +0000 (UTC)
 blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px 
#715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white 
!important; } Hi, 

We have had great luck with fox sparrows these last two days at our feeders at 
home in Centreville (Fairfax county). 


Day before yesterday (march 14 2017) we had 4 FOX SPARROWS and yesterday we had 
5 at our feeders. 


Other sparrow highlights included the lone CHIPPING SPARROW who came for the 
first time to our feeder over the weekend and has continued to stay since then. 


WHITE THROATED SPARROWS continue to stay around - but I feel that this year we 
have had fewer and leaner ones !! 


We had one TOWHEE yesterday. This winter season I have strongly felt that the 
number of towhees has been drastically lower than last year's numbers.  


Of course the feeders had the usual 4-5 SONG SPARROWS. 

A couple of HOUSE SPARROWS and about 20 DARK EYED JUNCOS complete the sparrow 
population at our feeder. 





- Deapesh.Fairfax county.
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Subject: European goldfinch still at Leesylvania SP.
From: Fred Atwood <fatwood AT flinthill.org>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 10:40:12 -0400
On ground in picnic area near visitor center. Also present along road and 
parking lot edges were 22 fox sparrows. 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: MY TURN: FOX SPARROWS
From: Stephen Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 20:31:40 -0400
Ditto, in our yard south of Reston today - single bird sharing the foraging 
area with a Cardinal and a Song Sparrow. 


Steve Johnson
Fairfax, Virginia



On Mar 16, 2017, at 5:57 PM, Donald Sweig wrote:

> Two Fox Sparrows finally showed up in my Falls Church yard this morning. 
They've been around most of the day. 

>   First ones I've had in probably five or more years.
>   So very nice.
>    Donald Sweig
>    Falls Church, Virginia
> 
> Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Merlin at Barcroft Park
From: Kenneth Rosenthal <rosenthal.k AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:50:15 -0400
Today two intrepid birders joined me for the Birding Arlington: Barcroft
Park hike at 8 a.m. The highlights of the hike were a FOS Eastern Phoebe
and a Merlin. We watched the Merlin feed on its catch for several minutes,
and it seemed completely unconcerned about us. At the end of the walk we
circled back and it had remained on its perch. It was in a tall tree at the
back of the main (largest) baseball diamond, right above the paved trail.

Ken Rosenthal
Arlington, VA
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Subject: Northeast Reservoir, Lake Anna, Colonial Heights Walmart
From: Shea Tiller <sheagordontiller AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 08:56:56 -0400
Hi, all.
On Sun, Mar. 12th I birded the locations listed in the subject header.
At NE Res., the only waterfowl was a horned grebe, which gave pretty good
looks. On the fishing access road, I got very close views of a red-tailed
hawk, and I heard a red-winged blackbird singing.

At Lake Anna, I visited dike 3. I saw a common loon fishing extremely close
to the shore, but it only came to the surface for a brief second each time.
I also saw a male red-breasted merganser fishing near the dike.

At the Walmart pond, I couldn't find the glaucous gull previously seen, but
I did get good looks at 4 lesser-black-backed gulls (lifer number 237).

Here is a link to my photos from these visits on Flickr:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/148002166 AT N03/

Good birding
Shea
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Subject: Fox Sparrows for Cornell's Backyard Feeder Watch count day
From: Walter Hadlock <jaybirdncarol AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 08:35:32 -0400
Good morning,

We have two Fox Sparrows in the backyard. It was nice of them to show up on one 
of our Cornell Project Feeder Watch count days. Other birds include: 
White-throated Sparrow, American Robin, American Goldfinch (with males starting 
to show some color), Dark-eyed Junco, House Finch, Downy Woodpecker, and, we 
can’t forget, some House Sparrows. 


Good birding to all,
Jay and Carol Hadlock
Herndon, VA (Fairfax County)
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Subject: Bird Identification
From: Dolores Crooke <dluv2quilt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 13:14:51 -0400
Looking for some help with the bird in the attached pics that showed up at the 
suet feeder yesterday. I am thinking a young or female American Restart. I have 
never had one at a feeder before so I wanted to check 



Thanks!


Dolores Crooke

"Proceed until apprehended"
Florence Nightingale

dluv2quilt AT gmail.com




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Subject: Re: Lapland longspurs
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:16:19 -0400
Hey Rich,
About the Longspurs: 
 Do I understand correctly they are on the entrance road up to the stables from 
Gunston Road? 

I never use that road; can you give me a better idea where to look sir. 
 Also how many birds did you see please?
  I can't go today, but I can go Friday morning.
   Any Fox Sparrows?
   Donald Sweig

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 15, 2017, at 3:03 PM, Apple via va-bird  wrote:
> 
> Still at Meadowood. Along edge of road to stable, near curve. Being flushed 
occ. by a passing car, but have returned in 5-10 minutes. 

> 
> Rich Rieger
> Alexandria 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Fox Sparrows in Charlottesville
From: Janet Paisley <janetpaisley AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 17:26:23 -0500
The Fox Sparrow that has been foraging under my feeders for the past week has 
been joined this afternoon by two more. They are scratching along the garden 
path amongst the dozens of white-throats, song sparrows, juncos, and a Chipping 
Sparrow. A nice surprise to come home to. 


Janet Paisley
Charlottesville, VA
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Subject: Question re Chickadee at Huntley Meadows, Alexandria
From: Janis Stone <janis49 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 17:24:16 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
While birding at Huntley Meadows Park yesterday, I encountered a chickadee 
feeding which looked somewhat different than normal Carolina Chickadees. While 
I'm pretty sure (maybe) it's a Carolina Chickadee, it looked larger than 
normal, had significant white streaking on its coverts and tail edges, and 
showed somewhat buffy underneath. Also the white on the cheeks go all the way 
back to the nape. Which *could* indicate a Black-capped or hybrid. Or maybe 
not. I know we're just south of the normal range for Black-capped, but someone 
reported one here last fall. Can anyone give some insight into this? What I 
should be concentrating on for ID, given what we can see here? : 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/nature-flics/albums/72157677859349523

 - Janis
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Subject: Huntley Meadows - Fairfax County
From: Dixie Sommers via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 12:53:25 -0500
On this absolutely perfect morning, 9 birders encountered 36 species on the
wetland side of Huntley Meadows on a Northern Virginia Bird Club walk I led.
We. We had wonderful views of Wood Ducks busy with their courting, including
a male sitting on top of a nest box near the boardwalk, glowing in lovely
morning light. Sixteen Northern Shovelers also showed off their colors,
especially the males' brilliant green heads.  

 

An Osprey circled the wetland and a number of Tree Swallows swooped, early
signs of spring.  

 

While we heard one and saw one Red-Shouldered Hawk, we were unable to locate
the nesting spot along the path from the visitor center to the boardwalk.
Red-headed Woodpeckers put in a good appearance, and a nice group of Rusty
Blackbirds was in the woods. 

 

Huntley Meadows Park--Boardwalk, Fairfax, Virginia, US Mar 8, 2017 8:28 AM -
11:14 AM

Protocol: Traveling

1.75 mile(s)

Comments:     Northern Virginia Bird Club walk

36 species

 

Canada Goose  14

Wood Duck  8

Mallard  7

Northern Shoveler  16

Bufflehead  1

Hooded Merganser  4

Pied-billed Grebe  4

Great Blue Heron  2

Black Vulture  1

Osprey  1

Red-shouldered Hawk  2

Red-tailed Hawk  1

American Coot  3

Mourning Dove  5

Red-headed Woodpecker  5

Red-bellied Woodpecker  3

Downy Woodpecker  1

Hairy Woodpecker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  1

Eastern Phoebe  1

American Crow  8

Fish Crow  18

Tree Swallow  5

Carolina Chickadee  5

Tufted Titmouse  3

White-breasted Nuthatch  4

Carolina Wren  3

Golden-crowned Kinglet  2

American Robin  3

White-throated Sparrow  8

Song Sparrow  2

Swamp Sparrow  2

Northern Cardinal  4

Red-winged Blackbird  50

Rusty Blackbird  45

Common Grackle  300

 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35043018

 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 

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Subject: European goldfinch, Leesylvania sp
From: Marc Ribaudo <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 10:50:12 -0500
In picnic area.

Marc Ribaudo

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Droid
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Subject: Eagle's nest at Riverbend Park
From: Walter Hadlock <jaybirdncarol AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 13:29:51 -0500
Good afternoon,

We took a walk at Riverbend Park (Fairfax County) on March 6. An adult American 
Bald Eagle was on the nest and was observed by several people. The nest is up 
river from the Visitor Center. You can go as far as the trail that leads to the 
Nature Center and still get good looks at the nest that is near the top of 
Sycamore Tree on an island in the Potomac River. 


In addition to the Eagle, we counted close to 100 Bufflehead on the river, a 
number of Canada Geese, as well as at least 12 Common Merganser—mostly pairs. 


For those who like native flowers, the Virginia Bluebells are up, some have 
flower buds, and there were some Spring Beauty open as well. 


It was a nice afternoon for a walk.

Good birding to all,

Jay and Carol Hadlock
Herndon, VA

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Subject: Western Atlas Training Session in Blacksburg
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 09:09:35 -0500
Hi Folks,

The *fourth Atlas training session* will be held in *Blacksburg* on *April
15th* from 0800-1300ish.

This session will include morning bird walks in the Blacksburg area,
followed by an eBird and data entry workshop at Torgersen Hall on the VA
Tech campus.  Local Atlas volunteers will be leading the morning walks and
will focus on tips and strategies for collecting breeding information while
birding.  The indoor component will focus on data entry, tips for eBird
use, mapping tools for your smartphone, etc.


We have limited space for this event, so please register today to secure
your spot!


*Register here:* https://goo.gl/forms/N4ObEtUhMTGkleGn2


If you have questions about other training sessions going on around the
state, check out Atlas Events page on our website, www.vabba2.org


All the best and stay warm this weekend, as winter seems to be barreling
back toward us!



Ashley Peele, PhD
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator
Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
From: David Matson <wrenpt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 12:51:58 -0600
All,

While Red-breasted Nuthatch is not unknown this time of year and reports
have occurred in Virginia this winter, this species last occurred at our
feeders before Christmas, then a single individual, and mention of the
species has been infrequent o the listserve in recent weeks.

Today, one was singing in the pines as I walked the (our North Suffolk)
yard.

David Matson
-- 
David Matson
Suffolk and Onancock, Virginia
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Subject: Osprey pair at Dyke Marsh
From: Edward Eder <nutmegz AT mac.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 16:47:38 -0500
Nest building began promptly with the arrival of the female Osprey at Dyke 
Marsh. The male has been arriving at the site for nearly 8 years and is 
identifiable by a linear scar defect in his left iris. 

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Subject: Sully Woodlands shrike and other birds
From: Howard Wu <howiewu1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 11:46:44 -0500
Hi, all:

This morning I took a walk at Sully Woodlands in Fairfax County again,
between 7:45AM and 9AM.

I was immediately greeted by a few singing Eastern Towhees (FOS for me),
although I did not get a good look at them. One would later perch in front
of me to let me get some good shots.

The Northern Shrike -- it was still here! Amazingly, if it stays for
another 10 days, it will have stayed the whole season! I first saw it in
the burned field, and just when I was about to leave, it flew to a tree
right next to the barn, allowing me the closest viewing of it to date. It
was very vocal today, singing and chirping, the first time I heard it
singing (although other birders reported this before). This also reminded
me that despite its viciousness, it is still a songbird.

I walked around the woodland. Notable observations are: a raucous mob of
crows were making loud noises in the northwestern corner of the field, but
I could not see what the commotion was about. I did see a couple of
Red-shouldered Hawks flying out of that spot. A small flock (maybe 2-5) Fox
Sparrows were seen in the field. I also saw a singing Field Sparrow. Most
abundant are Song Sparrows, some singing.

Rather depressingly, when I was leaving, I saw a feral cat moving into the
bushes near the entrance.

You can see some of my photos on the rolling update site below:
http://www.travelerathome.com/2016_10_shrike/2016_10_shrike.html

Cheers,
Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
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Subject: Trumpeter Swan Louisa specimen
From: Andrew Rapp <lax3birder AT live.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 16:08:45 +0000
Found the continuing trumpeter Swan in Louisa at goldmine marsh sadly it is 
deceased. I didn't know if maybe some museum would want him. 

Good Birding,
Andrew Rapp
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Subject: Guatemala birding tour
From: Shipman Nancy <nancy.shipman AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2017 11:13:00 -0500
LAST MINUTE BIRDING OPPORTUNITY: join Virginia Society of Ornithology-sponsored 
birding tour to Guatemala 1-10 April 2017 led by local Guatemala expert John 
Cahill; visit lowlands, highlands, three days in/around Tikal. Late 
cancellation makes one or two spaces available. Contract Bob Shipman for 
details 703-883-3868 or ships333 AT yahoo.com . 


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Subject: More early migrants at CM Crockett Park
From: KELLY K <tripacct1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 20:03:26 +0000
I headed out to Germantown Lake this morning hoping to find a FOY Tree
Swallow. Got there about 8am. A frigid 28 degrees with black ice in the
parking lot, I wasn't expecting much. The Ruddy Ducks and at least one
Bufflehead were on the far side of the lake as they have been almost
everyday this winter.

New arrivals for 2017:

I spotted a Common Loon (alternate plumage) in the middle of the lake. Then
suddenly a mass of Tree Swallows swooped down over the lake... and as they
went to the right side of the lake they broke apart so I could see them
individually. I counted 67 although there were possibly a few more! They
flew low over the lake    back and forth.

On my way out of the park, I spotted a Chipping Sparrow foraging on the
ground of the farm right at the gate. Tried to get a photo but my iPhone
took a super poor shot.

The coldest weather days are best for birding this popular park. Bad
weather usually means few visitors and less maintenance/construction by the
park staff. Hoping for more early migrants.

Kelly Krechmer
Fauquier County
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Subject: Riverbend Park:Tundra Swan Delights
From: Donald Sweig <skybirds.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 18:29:05 -0500
Following up on a tip from my good friend Keith Huffman, I went over to 
Riverbend park this afternoon to see if I could find some Tundra Swans. I was 
not disappointed. Swimming quietly and feeding in the middle of the river, just 
downriver from the visitor center, I found 48 picturesque Tundra Swans "cooing" 
softly, and well illuminated in the bright afternoon sunshine. What a Treat !! 

 I also found 3 to 6 Tree Swallows hocking insects in the air over the river, 
right above the swans. Amazing . 


 Duckwise, I found about 100 to 150 Bufflehead, and a few Ring-necked ducks, 
Scaup, and Coots. 


 But the real show was the Swans, which I watched and photographed for over an 
hour. The afternoon light on the river and the swans, at Riverbend, was really 
spectacular. 

 Just as I was leaving about 4:30, a kayaker entered the river from the boat 
ramp at the park. The swans, all of them, immediately began to swim downriver, 
away from the kayaker, and toward the cofferdam. As the Kayaker got closer to 
them in the river, they all took off and flew. I could only see that happen 
through the trees. 

 I don't know whether they will now continue their northward migration, or will 
be back on the river tomorrow morning. 

   But, it was certainly wonderful to see and hear them this afternoon.
   Donald Sweig
    Falls Church,
 Va.

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Banshee Reeks and Dulles Greenway Wetlands Bird Walk Results
From: "Joe Coleman" <joecoleman AT rstarmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 17:20:17 -0500
Four of us showed up for the regular monthly bird walk at the Banshee Reeks
Nature Preserve this morning. In spite of the beginning (25) and ending (32)
temps it was a very pleasant morning for a bird walk. While there weren't a
lot of species, we did find a first-of-year (for most of us) Eastern Phoebe.
However, except for a few large mixed flocks there weren't a lot of birds.

 

After we finished at Banshee Reeks three of us went over to the private
(restricted access) Dulles Greenway Wetlands Mitigation Project to see what
work the bluebird trail (managed by the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy) might
need. It had warmed up to 35 by then but since the Wetlands is largely
sheltered from the west winds it wasn't bad. Because the beavers have been
very successful in building a dam at the Dulles Greenway Wetlands spillway
there is much more water on the wetlands than there used to be. Not only is
there little exposed mud for shorebirds, the ducks can easily hide in the
extensive scrub, much of which has its feet in water. The ducks that were
there were rather skittish, perhaps because of the active Bald Eagle nest
there or for some other reason.  In addition to a Bald Eagle sitting in the
nest we saw a  variety of ducks and 2 Am Coots (see below for the complete
list) and a number of ducks we were unable to ID as they darted this way &
that in the sky & the scrub.

 

For a complete list of the birds observed at Banshee Reeks and the Dulles
Greenway Wetlands pls see the eBird reports below.

 

The regular monthly free bird walk (every 2nd Sat) at the Banshee Reeks
Nature preserve is sponsored by the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy (
 www.loudounwildlife.org) & the Friends of
Banshee Reeks (  www.bansheereeks.org );
information on both and their upcoming events can be found on their
websites. While there are no regular walks at the private Dulles Greenway
Wetlands Mitigation Project which has restricted access we do periodically
survey the birds there and occasionally lead walks there - check out our
website for 

 

Good birding (regardless of the weather)!

Joe Coleman for the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy

 

Banshee Reeks Nature Preserve, Loudoun, Virginia, US Mar 11, 2017 8:00 AM -
10:30 AM

Protocol: Traveling

2.4 mile(s)

 

34 species

 

Canada Goose  3

Great Blue Heron  1

Black Vulture  5

Turkey Vulture  3

Red-shouldered Hawk  3

Red-tailed Hawk  1

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  35

Mourning Dove  4

Red-bellied Woodpecker  5

Downy Woodpecker  4

Hairy Woodpecker  2

Northern Flicker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  3

Eastern Phoebe  1

Blue Jay  5

American Crow  6

Fish Crow  2

Carolina Chickadee  15

Tufted Titmouse  6

White-breasted Nuthatch  5

Brown Creeper  1

Carolina Wren  2

Eastern Bluebird  4

American Robin  50

Northern Mockingbird  2

European Starling  2

Field Sparrow  4

Dark-eyed Junco  30

White-throated Sparrow  20

Song Sparrow  6

Swamp Sparrow  1

Northern Cardinal  8

House Finch  2

American Goldfinch  2

 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35112630

 

Dulles Greenway Wetlands Mitigation Project, Loudoun, Virginia, US Mar 11,
2017 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Protocol: Traveling

0.8 mile(s)

 

30 species (+1 other taxa)

 

Canada Goose  X

Wood Duck  2

Gadwall  8

Mallard  2

Green-winged Teal  12

Ring-necked Duck  2

Hooded Merganser  2

duck sp.  30

Wild Turkey  3     seen by one person earlier in the day before the Banshee
Reeks walk

Black Vulture  6

Turkey Vulture  6

Cooper's Hawk  1

Bald Eagle  1     on nest

Red-shouldered Hawk  2

American Coot  2

Red-bellied Woodpecker  1

Downy Woodpecker  11

Pileated Woodpecker  1

Blue Jay  2

American Crow  4

Fish Crow  2

Carolina Chickadee  2

Tufted Titmouse  1

White-breasted Nuthatch  1

Carolina Wren  2

Eastern Bluebird  2

American Robin  2

White-throated Sparrow  2

Song Sparrow  2

Northern Cardinal  1

Red-winged Blackbird  1

 

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35112908

 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 

 

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Subject: Chukar partridge in Beverly Hills neighborhood of Alexandria
From: Vineeta <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 15:10:51 -0500
A neighbor in the Beverly Hills section of Alexandria (at Portner Place,
off Portner Road) has a chukar partridge hanging out in her front yard. The
bird is "pooping up a storm," she says.
She's worried that a dog or cat might get the bird. Any suggestions for her?
Thanks, Vineeta Anand



"In the end only three things matter: how much you loved, how gently you
lived, and how gracefully you let go of things not meant for you."
-Gautama Buddha
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Subject: Voice of the Naturalist, Greater DC area, February 28-March 6, 2017
From: Gerry Hawkins <maineusa AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 09:35:25 -0500
Hotline:     Voice of the Naturalist
Date:        3/7/2017
Coverage:    MD/DC/VA/central and southern DE/WV panhandle
Reports, comments and questions: voice AT anshome.org
Compiler:    Gerry Hawkins
Sponsor:     Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central
               Atlantic States (independent of NAS)
Transcriber: Steve Cordle

Please consider joining ANS, especially if you are a regular user of
the Voice of the Naturalist (Individual $50; Family $65; Nature
Steward $100; Audubon Advocate $200). The membership number is
301-652-9188, option 12; the address is 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy
Chase, MD 20815; and the web site is http://www.AudubonNaturalist.org
 .

This is the Voice of the Naturalist, a service of the Audubon
Naturalist Society. This report covers the week starting Tuesday,
February 28 and was completed on Tuesday, March 7 at 8:30 a.m.

Information on noteworthy birds is presented below in taxonomic order,
as set forth in the American Ornithologists' Union Checklist for North
and Middle American birds, as revised through the 57th Supplement
(July 2016).

The top birds this week were PINK-FOOTED GOOSE* in DE, GREEN-WINGED
TEAL (EURASIAN) in MD, RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD in MD, SCISSOR-TAILED
FLYCATCHER* in MD, WESTERN TANAGER* in VA and YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
in MD. In addition, a Neotropical BLACK-BACKED ORIOLE* continues a
short distance outside the reporting area in PA.

Other birds of interest this week included GREATER WHITE-FRONTED,
ROSS'S and CACKLING GEESE, TRUMPETER SWAN, EURASIAN WIGEOEN, COMMON
EIDER, RED-NECKED and EARED GREBES, EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, SANDHILL
CRANE, AMERICAN AVOCET, PIPING PLOVER, MARBLED GODWIT, LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHER, AMERICAN WOODCOCK, RAZORBILL, GLAUCOUS GULL, GREAT
CORMORANT, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, TRICOLORED and GREEN HERONS, GOLDEN
EAGLE, LOGGERHEAD and NORTHERN SHRIKES, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW,
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, MARSH WREN, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, RED
CROSSBILL, LAPLAND LONGSPUR, SNOW BUNTING, BLACK-AND-WHITE,
ORANGE-CROWNED and NASHVILLE WARBLERS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, AMERICAN
TREE, CLAY-COLORED and LINCOLN'S SPARROWS, PAINTED BUNTING, BREWER'S
BLACKBIRD and BALTIMORE ORIOLE.

TOP BIRDS

A continuing PINK-FOOTED GOOSE* near Prime Hook NWR in Sussex Co, DE
was seen all week in large flocks of SNOW GEESE along Cods Road and
nearby Fowler Beach and Prime Hook Roads. This is the second record of
this species in Delaware, and the first since 1953.

On March 6 a male of the Eurasian subspecies of the GREEN-WINGED TEAL,
which is considered a separate species known as EURASIAN or COMMON
TEAL by many authorities, was found in the wetland across from the
Home Depot on Route 40 in Edgewood, Harford Co, MD.

A continuing young female RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD in the Wildewood
neighborhood in St. Mary's Co, MD was seen most recently on March 4.

On March 1, 4, 5 and 6 a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER* was observed
actively foraging at the bay-side ball field bordered by 3rd and 4th
Streets, and to a lesser extent an adjacent ball park bordered by
these same streets, in Ocean City, MD.

A male WESTERN TANAGER* that returned to a residential feeder in
Settlers' Mill, Williamsburg, VA on November 4 for the eighth winter
in a row was last seen on March 5.

On February 28 a YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD was seen for the second
consecutive day at a feeder along Raley Road in St. Mary's Co, MD.

A continuing BLACK-BACKED ORIOLE*, a Central American endemic that has
been recorded in the ABA checklist area only one other time, was seen
all week a short distance outside the reporting area at 20 and 21
Indiana Avenue in Sinking Spring, Berks Co, PA.

OTHER BIRDS OF INTEREST

On March 4 a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was spotted in a large flock
of SNOW GEESE along Draper Road in Sussex Co, DE. On February 28 and
March 2-5 1-2 ROSS'S GEESE also were spotted in large flocks of SNOW
GEESE in Sussex Co, DE, near the intersection of Fowler Beach and Cods
Roads, the intersection of Cods and 13 Curves Roads and along Prime
Hook Road. On February 28 a single ROSS'S GOOSE was spotted at Bombay
Hook NWR, Kent Co, DE. A continuing ROSS'S GOOSE was seen at Falls
Mills Lake in Tazewell Co, VA on February 28 and along Bell's Lane in
Staunton, VA on March 6. On March 4 and 5 two CACKLING GEESE were at
Broadford Lake in Garrett Co, MD.

A longstanding, tagged TRUMPETER SWAN continues at Lake Churchill in
Montgomery Co, MD, with the latest sighting on March 5.

A EURASIAN WIGEON was reported at Swan Cove and along the Wildlife
Loop at Chincoteague NWR, Accomack Co, VA on March 1 and 3,
respectively. Noteworthy diving ducks included COMMON EIDERS at
several locations, including a single individual at The Point in Point
Lookout SP, Worcester Co, MD on March 3 and 5; a high of seven
individuals at the Ocean City Inlet, Worcester Co, MD on March 2, 4
and 6; and four individuals at Island No. 3 at the Chesapeake Bay
Bridge-Tunnel, Northampton Co, VA on March 4.

A continuing RED-NECKED GREBE at Loch Raven Reservoir-Loch Raven Point
in Baltimore Co, MD was seen most recently on March 5. A RED-NECKED
GREBE also was reported at Island Nos. 1 and 3 at the Chesapeake Bay
Bridge-Tunnel in VA on March 5 and 4, respectively, and at Little
Island Park in Virginia Beach, VA on March 2. A continuing EARED GREBE
off Black Walnut Point in Talbot Co, MD was seen most recently on
March 5. On the same day a continuing EARED GREBE also was seen again
at Buckroe Beach in Hampton, VA.

On March 1 a continuing EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE was photographed at 7
West McCabe Street, Selbyville, Sussex County, DE.

On March 4 two continuing SANDHILL CRANES were seen along the
Sanctuary Trail in Algonkian Nature Preserve, Loudoun Co, VA.

Wintering AMERICAN AVOCETS included an area high 111 individuals at
Broadkill Marsh and other locations in Prime Hook NWR, Sussex Co, DE
on March 1-6; a high of ten individuals at Bombay Hook NWR, Kent Co,
DE on February 28 and March 3; and 62 individuals counted during the
weekly survey at the Craney Island Disposal Area in Portsmouth, VA on
March 2. A distant PIPING PLOVER was seen from Castaways Campground
(Eagle's Nest) in Worcester Co, MD on March 4 and 6. A continuing
MARBLED GODWIT also was seen from this location on March 1. During the
week many birders enjoyed encounters with migrating AMERICAN
WOODCOCKS, including at such traditional locations as Bombay Hook NWR,
Kent Co, DE, Sycamore Landing Road in Montgomery Co, MD, the hike-bike
trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax Co, VA and Kenilworth Park in
Washington, DC. Migrating shorebirds also included 12 LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHERS reported at Truitt's Landing in Worcester Co, MD on March 4
and eight LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS at Prime Hook NWR, Sussex Co, DE on
March 6. The early stage of shorebird migration also was indicated by
GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS at several
locations.  

Northward moving RAZORBILLS continue to be observed at several
locations in Virginia Beach, VA, including 133 individuals at Rudee
Inlet on March 3 and a high of 117 individuals at Little Island Park
on February 28 and March 2 and 6. RAZORBILLS also were observed a
short distance north at Island No. 4 at the Chesapeake Bay
Bridge-Tunnel in Northampton Co, VA, with a high of five individuals
seen on March 4 and 5. Elsewhere, 1-2 RAZORBILLS were seen at the
Indian River Inlet in Sussex Co, DE on February 28 and March 3-5, and
a high of six RAZORBILLS were seen at the Ocean City Inlet in
Worcester Co, MD on February 28 and March 4-6.

A GLAUCOUS GULL was found at the ponds near the Walmart in Colonial
Heights, VA on March 1 and at the Salisbury Landfill-Naylor Mill Rd.
Pond in Wicomico Co, MD on March 2.

A small number of GREAT CORMORANTS was seen at expected coastal
locations, with multiple sightings consisting of a high of 10
individuals from the Lewes-Cape May Ferry on March 3 and 5; two
individuals at the Indian River Inlet in Sussex Co, DE on February 28;
a high of four individuals at Black Walnut Point, Talbot Co, MD on
February 28 and March 5; and two individuals at each of Island Nos. 3
and 4 at the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel in VA on March 4.

A high of 27 continuing AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were seen at Hog
Island WMA, Surry Co, VA on March 1 and 6. A single continuing
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN was seen during the weekly survey of
Hart-Miller Island, Baltimore Co, MD on March 6. AMERICAN WHITE
PELICANS continue to winter at and near Blackwater NWR in Dorchester
Co, MD, with a high of 48 individuals counted along nearby DeCoursey
Bridge Road on March 5.

A continuing TRICOLORED HERON was seen at the Indian River Inlet in
Sussex Co, DE on March 2 and nearby at Delaware Seashore SP-Burton's
Island on March 3, which may be the same bird. A wintering GREEN HERON
continues at Ben Brenman Park in Alexandria, VA, with the most recent
sighting on March 4.
  
A GOLDEN EAGLE was observed in flight from West Old Philadelphia Road
in Cecil Co, MD on March 2 and at the Fort Smallwood Park Hawk Watch
in Anne Arundel Co, MD on March 6.

A LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was found along Walkers Creek Valley Road in Giles
Co, VA on March 6, and a continuing LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE at the Smith
Farm in Lunenburg Co, VA was seen again on March 1. On March 3 a
NORTHERN SHRIKE was found along the Observation Point Trail in Prime
Hook NWR, Sussex Co, DE. A NORTHERN SHRIKE* that has been present at
the Sully Woodlands in Fairfax Co, VA since at least early October
2016 was seen most recently on March 1.

On March 4 an early NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW was spotted in
flight with a large number of TREE SWALLOWS at Dick Cross WMA,
Mecklenburg Co, VA.

Confirmed sightings of irruptive BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES included
single individuals at Loch Raven Reservoir-Skeet and Trap Club in
Baltimore Co, MD on February 28; 39 Gammy Drive in Elkton, Cecil Co,
MD on February 28; and Mariner Point Park in Harford Co, MD on March
4. In addition, on March 1 and 6 two continuing BLACK-CAPPED
CHICKADEES were seen at Swan Harbor Farm Park in Harford Co, MD.

On February 28 a wintering MARSH WREN was seen again at Swan Creek
Wetland-Cox Creek in Anne Arundel Co, MD.

On March 2 an apparent wintering BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER was seen again
at Camp Pendleton State Military Reservation (restricted access) in
Virginia Beach, VA.

On March 5 a high of 39 RED CROSSBILLS were counted at Briery Branch
Gap in Rockingham Co, VA.

On March 4 a LAPLAND LONGSPUR was spotted with HORNED LARKS at Curles
Neck Farm (restricted access), Henrico County, VA. A continuing SNOW
BUNTING was seen at The Point at Point Lookout SP, St. Mary's Co, MD
on March 1-3 and 5. SNOW BUNTINGS also continue at the Craney Island
Disposal Area in Portsmouth, VA, with a high of 15 individuals
reported on March 2 and 3, and at Fort Monroe in Hampton, VA, where
seven individuals were seen on March 5.

An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was found at several locations in Sussex Co,
DE, consisting of a private yard in Selbyville on March 3; along Cods
Road on March 5; a private yard in Lewes on March 1, 4 and 5; and a
private yard in Rehoboth Beach on March 5. In Maryland a continuing
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen at Masonville Cove in Baltimore Co on
February 28 and Swan Harbor Farm Park in Harford Co on March 5, and a
single individual was found at Bayside Development Marsh in Worcester
Co on March 6. On February 28 an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen on
Kingman Island in Washington, DC. In Virginia a continuing
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen near the intersection of Bayview and
Charlie Roads in Occoquan Bay NWR, Prince William Co on February 28
and March 4 and 5. Other sightings of this species in Virginia
included a high of three individuals at Elizabeth River Park in
Chesapeake on March 2 and 4.

On February 28 a wintering NASHVILLE WARBLER was seen again on Kingman
Island in Washington, DC. On March 2 a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER was
photographed at Deep Creek Lock Park in Chesapeake, VA and a COMMON
YELLOWTHROAT was found at Fort Holabird Park in Baltimore Co, MD.

A small number of AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS was seen at several
locations, with multiple sightings outside of Garrett Co, MD limited
to 3-4 individuals at the Irvine Nature Center in Baltimore Co, MD on
March 4 and 5, and two individuals at the Oaks Landfill (private) in
Montgomery Co, MD on March 5. A continuing CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was
seen most recently at Big Water Farm (private) in Queen Anne's Co, MD
and at 103 Exeter Court in James City Co, VA on March 6. A wintering
LINCOLN'S SPARROW at Occoquan Bay NWR, Prince William Co, VA also was
seen most recently on March 6.

On March 4 a continuing male PAINTED BUNTING was photographed at a
residence along Chesapeake Circle in Chesapeake, VA.

On March 3 ten continuing BREWER'S BLACKBIRDS were observed near the
intersection of West Gibbs and Blackwater Roads in Virginia Beach, VA.

On February 28 and March 2 a continuing male BALTIMORE ORIOLE was seen
at Barboursville Vineyard in Orange Co, VA. On March 4 another
wintering male BALTIMORE ORIOLE was reported at 188 Farmville Lake
Road in Prince Edward Co, VA. On March 5 a continuing male BALTIMORE
ORIOLE was photographed at a feeder in a residential yard in Berlin,
Worcester Co, MD. 

***

This week's report was based on reports on the DE, MD, VA, and WV list
servers, eBird records and various birding pages on Facebook.

The Audubon Sanctuary Shop (301-652-3606, http://anshome.org/shop)is
an excellent source for guidebooks and many other nature-related
titles.

To report bird sightings, e-mail your report to voice AT anshome.org.
Please post reports before midnight Monday, identify the county as
well as the state, and include your name and a Tuesday morning
contact, e-mail or phone.

Thank you for your interest, and enjoy the birds.

*Of interest to the applicable state records committee



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Subject: Wood Ducks in OWL BOX by my driveway!!!!!! (western Albemarle)
From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 21:54:26 -0500
Just thought I'd report a Wood Duck pair has decided to use one of my owl  
boxes--even though it is probably only about 10 feet from my driveway and 
about  1400 feet from the local river!!!!!!  The pair was checking it out a 
few  days ago and I believe the female has begun to lay eggs!  Seems like such 
 an unlikely location for them to nest as the box is not well into the 
woods nor  particularly close to water.
 
What is fascinating is that there are plenty of snags on my property with  
holes made in previous years by nesting Pileateds, yet screech owls (and  
now Wood Ducks!) have shown a preference for an artificial cavity.  This  has 
also been the case for small birds and even flying squirrels--all of  which 
could nest deeper into my forest.  This says to me that scientists  have 
under-rated edge habitat for some cavity-nesting species.  I  believe these 
animals prefer to be on the edge of my nature-friendly yard  because it makes 
getting a meal so much easier for them.  There's far more  food in open, 
sunny areas (if the land is covered in a variety of plants  rather than lawn) 
than within shady woods.
 
Oh--I still had a few Purple Finches here on March 6; a Red-breasted  
Nuthatch and a Black-capped Chickadee (its presence seems quite upsetting to my 

Carolina Chickadees) on March 6; and a Fox Sparrow was here  today. 
 
Sincerely,
Marlene
 
 
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Subject: OOPS--Purple Finches here March 4, not March 6
From: MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 22:03:20 -0500
CORRECTED REPORT:
 
Just thought I'd report a Wood Duck pair has decided to use one of my  owl  
boxes--even though it is probably only about 10 feet from my  driveway and 
about  1400 feet from the local river!!!!!!  The pair  was checking it out 
a 
few  days ago and I believe the female has begun  to lay eggs!  Seems like 
such 
an unlikely location for them to nest as  the box is not well into the 
woods nor  particularly close to  water.

What is fascinating is that there are plenty of snags on my  property with  
holes made in previous years by nesting Pileateds, yet  screech owls (and  
now Wood Ducks!) have shown a preference for an  artificial cavity.  This  
has 
also been the case for small birds  and even flying squirrels--all of  
which 
could nest deeper into my  forest.  This says to me that scientists  have 
under-rated edge  habitat for some cavity-nesting species.  I  believe 
these 
animals  prefer to be on the edge of my nature-friendly yard  because it 
makes  
getting a meal so much easier for them.  There's far more  food in  open, 
sunny areas (if the land is covered in a variety of plants   rather than 
lawn) 
than within shady woods.

Oh--I still had a few  Purple Finches here on March 4; a Red-breasted  
Nuthatch and a  Black-capped Chickadee (its presence seems quite upsetting  
to my  
Carolina Chickadees) on March 6; and a Fox Sparrow was here  today.  

Sincerely,
Marlene
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Subject: Chincoteague NWR Shorebird/Gull Survey March 6
From: Joelle Buffa <clyde_joelle AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 01:00:09 +0000 (UTC)
Below are the results of our weekly shorebird/gull survey conducted at 
Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge on Monday March 6, 2017. All water areas 
(impoundments and beach areas) were covered in the 6 hour survey. All 
individuals are counted for the target species; other birds seen or heard on 
the survey are followed by a dash.    

It was another interesting shorebird survey at the Chincoteague National 
Wildlife Refuge. We counted 1,464 individual shorebirds of 13 species. Dunlin 
were the most common with 1,150 followed by Black-bellied Plover 130, Willet 89 
and Greater Yellowlegs 32. The most exciting for us was our first sighting of 
the year of a Piping Plover. This handsome male was doing its foot wiggling in 
the sand as it tested the beach (just north of the Parking Lots) for 
sub-surface food. The other highlight was an early Pectoral Sandpiper on South 
Wash Flats.Our next survey will be March 20th. 

Clyde Morris and Joelle Buffa


| Snow Goose | -- |
| Canada Goose | -- |
| Tundra Swan | -- |
| Gadwall | -- |
| Eurasian Wigeon | 1 |
| American Wigeon | -- |
| American Black Duck | -- |
| Mallard | -- |
| Northern Shoveler | -- |
| Northern Pintail | -- |
| Green-winged Teal | -- |
| Greater/Lesser Scaup | -- |
| Surf Scoter | -- |
| Black Scoter | -- |
| Long-tailed Duck | -- |
| Bufflehead | -- |
| Hooded Merganser | -- |
| Red-breasted Merganser | -- |
| Red-throated Loon | 26 |
| Common Loon | 122 |
| Horned Grebe | 46 |
| Northern Gannet | 127 |
| Great Blue Heron | -- |
| Great Egret | -- |
| Turkey Vulture | -- |
| Bald Eagle | -- |
| Red-tailed Hawk | -- |
| American Oystercatcher | 17 |
| Black-bellied Plover | 130 |
| Piping Plover | 1 |
| Killdeer | 7 |
| Marbled Godwit | 15 |
| Ruddy Turnstone | 4 |
| Sanderling | 26 |
| Dunlin | 1,150 |
| Pectoral Sandpiper | 1 |
| Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher | 8 |
| Greater Yellowlegs | 32 |
| Willet | 89 |
| Lesser Yellowlegs | 1 |
| Ring-billed Gull | 150 |
| Herring Gull | 182 |
| Lesser Black-backed Gull | 33 |
| Great Black-backed Gull | 44 |
| Forster's Tern | 11 |
| Mourning Dove | -- |
| Belted Kingfisher | -- |
| Red-bellied Woodpecker | -- |
| Northern Flicker | -- |
| Peregrine Falcon | 1 |
| American Crow | -- |
| Carolina Chickadee | -- |
| Brown-headed Nuthatch | -- |
| American Robin | -- |
| Northern Mockingbird | -- |
| European Starling | -- |
| Pine Warbler | -- |
| Yellow-rumped Warbler | -- |
| Dark-eyed Junco | -- |
| White-throated Sparrow | -- |
| Savannah Sparrow | -- |
| Song Sparrow | -- |
| Northern Cardinal | 1 |
| Red-winged Blackbird | -- |
| Eastern Meadowlark | -- |
| Boat-tailed Grackle | -- |
| American Goldfinch | -- |



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Subject: Tundra swans at Riverbend Park
From: Karen Brandt via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 13:41:08 -0500
Just saw 43 Tundra swans down river from visitors center, feeding and preening 
mid-river by rocks. Making hoh! calls 


Sent from my Mobile device


Karen 

Sent from my Mobile device
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Subject: On the Hunt for VA's Breeding Birds
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 09:04:15 -0500
Good Wednesday morning!

Early this morning, I sat on my porch and marveled at the huge upswing in
bird activity around our place.  Phoebes are singing and nest-building
under my eaves.  Carolina Wrens are doing the same thing.  I watched
White-breasted Nuthatch courtship behavior in our woods yesterday.  The
season is in full swing and these behaviors are occurring much earlier than
last year.



For those of you who have not yet done so, remember to *switch your eBird
data entry over to the Atlas portal (ebird.org/atlasva
*).  Spring is upon us and the time for Atlas
data entry has begun.



*Don’t forget that a unique and important element of the Atlas project is
confirming as many species as you can within about 20 hours of effort in a
given block, then moving on!  *You don’t need to worry about re-documenting
breeding behavior for the same species in the same blocks this season.  If
you feel you’ve completed an Atlas block, notify your regional coordinator
and move on to a new priority block in your area.



Check out a recent article on the Atlas project in *VA Wildlife Magazine*.
Last Fall, I put out a call to gauge how many of our Atlas volunteers were
also hunters or fishermen.  We really appreciated your responses, some of
which were used by the reporter in this article.



Follow this link to view the PDF of this article, *On the Hunt for
Virginia’s Breeding Birds
*.



Spring is upon us early, but we’re raring to go for Season Two of the Atlas
project.  Don’t forget about our *spring training sessions* being offered
in March, April, and May of this year.  Check out www.vabba2.org for
details!


Lastly, don't forget to check out the *new Atlas Facebook group* here:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/VABBA2/. If you're a FB user, it's a great
and easy way to share breeding observations and photos with the community.
The group is already receiving some interesting posts and generating good
conversation.


Sorry for the doozy email, but lots to share with the birding community
this lovely Wednesday morning.


A Tree Swallow just flew by my office window... Spring is definitely here!
Enjoy it and happy birding!

Ashley Peele, PhD
Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator
Conservation Management Institute - Virginia Tech
Office: 540-231-9182
Fax: 540-231-7019
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Subject: FW: Lake Accotink Bald Eagle nest
From: Jack via va-bird <va-bird AT listserve.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:36:40 -0500

Who knew? I didn’t. While hiking around the lake on Friday I noticed a very 
large nest on the opposite side of the lake. Having only my binocs with me I 
couldn’t get a good view because of the distance. I returned with my scope 
today to get a better view and do some digiscoping. I observed the nest for 
about 30 minutes without seeing any activity. However, due to the size of the 
nest an eagle could have been home without being seen from ground level. I 
stopped by the visitor center to ask if they were aware of the nest. They were 
and have a nice photo montage of eagles doing their things around the lake. One 
eagle was seen on Friday and two today. The other unusual bird species of 
interest today, at least to me, was a group of seven Gadwalls. 


Jack Greenwood
Falls Church

Sent from Mail for Windows 10hings around t
He lake

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Subject: European goldfinch details, Leesylvania State Park, Mar 11, 2017
From: "Marc Ribaudo" <moribaudo AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 13:25:46 -0500
Only 4 people attended the Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Leesylvania 
State Park this morning, counting the leaders, and we found a gem.  We found 
a male European goldfinch in the picnic area with a flock of American 
goldfinches.  When first seen its back was to us and what I noticed was two 
bright yellow wing panels.  It then turned its head and I knew what we were 
looking at.  Dave Ledwith, Bob Butterworth, Tobin Hardwick and I got good 
scope views, and Toby got several good photos that will be added to the 
ebird checklist (I got some fuzzy cell-phone shots).  We followed the bird 
around until the flock flew off.  Later, Dave and I met up with Kurt Gaskill 
and we refound the bird.  We got long, extended views and Kurt also got some 
photos.  We did not see any leg bands and the plumage showed no signs of 
wear.  The bird was also singing.  Sort of like an abbreviated American 
goldfinch that cuts off abruptly.  Really cool.

As for the rest of the trip, highlights were a Bonaparte's gull up Powell's 
creek, 7 hermit thrushes, and a brown thrasher.

Marc Ribaudo

-----Original Message----- 
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2017 1:05 PM
To: moribaudo AT verizon.net
Subject: eBird Report - Leesylvania State Park, Mar 11, 2017

Leesylvania State Park, Prince William, Virginia, US
Mar 11, 2017 7:37 AM - 11:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.7 mile(s)
49 species

Canada Goose  20
Tundra Swan  3
American Black Duck  200
Mallard  30
Canvasback  3
Greater Scaup  1
Lesser Scaup  14
Bufflehead  1
Ruddy Duck  25
Double-crested Cormorant  5
Great Blue Heron  5
Black Vulture  3
Turkey Vulture  7
Osprey  3
Bald Eagle  6
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Bonaparte's Gull  1
Ring-billed Gull  300
Herring Gull  12
Mourning Dove  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  10
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  4
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  5
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  10
Fish Crow  3
Carolina Chickadee  18
Tufted Titmouse  12
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Winter Wren  1
Carolina Wren  6
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Eastern Bluebird  18
Hermit Thrush  7
American Robin  18
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  16
Dark-eyed Junco  50
White-throated Sparrow  40
Song Sparrow  8
Northern Cardinal  8
Common Grackle  60
American Goldfinch  20
European Goldfinch  1     With flock of American goldfinches.  Same size. 
Bright yellow wing panel.  Red face behind flesh-colored bill, bordered by 
white and then black.  Brownish-green back.  Dark buffy upper chest and 
along flanks.  Underside of short tail black at tip, white at the base. 
Heard singing; song like an abbreviated American goldfinch with an abrupt 
cut-off.  No leg bands observed, and plumage showed now signs of wear.

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35104035

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 

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Subject: Loudoun County
From: Gerco H <drgerco AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2017 15:57:29 +0000
This morning was interesting bird wise.


A male purple finch was seen at the feeder at home.

An early Eastern Phoebe was heard singing in the yard (it also was reported by 
my neighbor earlier on eBird). 


A couple of Northern Harriers were observed while driving to work.

Brown-headed Cowbirds have been seen in the yard. Likewise more Common Grackles 
have been seen flying over in the past few days. 


Eastern Bluebirds are checking out the various nest boxes in the yard.


Winter or Spring? Who knows what it really is.


Happy birding!


Gerco

Leesburg, VA
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Subject: Breeding Codes into Atlas Portal
From: Ashley Peele <ashpeele AT vt.edu>
Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2017 09:17:49 -0500
Good morning on this chilly Monday!  

 

With such unusually warm late winter weather, bird breeding activity is popping 
up all over VA.  As a result, many breeding codes are showing up on 
checklists, which is great to see!  However, many of these lists are being 
entered into the ‘regular’ eBird or Virginia eBird portals.  Please 
remember that the VA Breeding Bird Atlas project needs any and all of your 
breeding observations as we enter our second season of the Atlas project.  


 

If you’re an Atlas volunteer, it’s time to switch your default eBird portal 
back to the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas (on your smartphone or computer).  If 
you’re not signed up for the Atlas project, we’d still like to receive your 
breeding observations!  We’d ask you to also submit any checklists with 
breeding codes to the Atlas eBird portal.  Don’t forget that you can also 
shift previously entered checklists into the Atlas portal from your computer.  
Just open the checklist, click the ‘Change Portal’ button at the bottom 
right corner of the screen, and select ‘Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas’ from 
the dropdown list of portals. 


 

Check out this eBird article, Atlasing vs. eBirding, for more information on 
when and how to submit breeding observations to the Atlas portal!  


 

If you have questions about when it is appropriate to submit data to the Atlas, 
feel free to email myself, your regional coordinator, or post your question to 
our Facebook page.  For those folks who are already Atlas volunteers, remember 
to post questions via our Atlas mailing list or Facebook group 
(https://www.facebook.com/groups/VABBA2/). 


 

Happy birding in this early, incredibly spring-like weather!

 

Ashley Peele, PhD  

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator 

www.vabba2.org  |  ebird.org/atlasva         

www.facebook.com/vabba2  

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office   

(540) 231-7019 fax

ashpeele AT vt.edu

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Subject: Test
From: Jeff Blalock <jcbabirder AT gcronline.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2017 02:51:44 -0500
This is a test to see if I'm back on the list

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
jcbabirder AT gcronline.com



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Subject: Re: Red-Headed Woodpeckers in Falls Church, VA
From: Vineeta Anand <vineetaa AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 21:54:04 -0500
I saw the male yesterday morning as well a pair of very active Downy 
woodpeckers and a Red-bellied woodpeckers. It's a gem of a park. Vineeta Anand. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2017, at 9:36 PM, janet anderson via va-bird 
 wrote: 

> 
> February 24, 2017 -
> 
> 2 Red-Headed Woodpeckers seen at Luria Park in Falls Church, Fairfax  
> County, VA
> 
> Janet M. Anderson
> City of Falls Church, VA
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