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Updated on Sunday, September 25 at 04:21 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Ruby-crowned Kinglet,©Julie Zickefoose

25 Sep Re: Burnt Rock Mt. [Patti Haynes ]
24 Sep Burnt Rock Mt. [Chris Rimmer ]
25 Sep warbler app [Ruth ]
24 Sep Bay-breasted, Philly Vireo, Surf Scoters, et al. [Scott Morrical ]
24 Sep Dickcissel & Great Gormorant [Ken Cox ]
23 Sep Dickcissel at Lake Runnemede [Chris Rimmer ]
23 Sep Re: Connecticut Warblers in Middlebury [Spencer Hardy ]
23 Sep Re: Connecticut Warblers in Middlebury [Patti Haynes ]
22 Sep Re: Late hummer in Rochester [Jan Miles ]
22 Sep Re: Late hummer in Rochester [John Snell ]
22 Sep Late hummer in Rochester [Graham Bates ]
22 Sep Connecticut Warblers in Middlebury ["Trombulak, Stephen C." ]
21 Sep Great Cormorant at Mill Pond, Windsor [Michael Foster ]
21 Sep im. Great Cormorant Windsor [Kent McFarland ]
20 Sep Fork-tailed Flycatcher (West Leb, NH) [Larry Clarfeld ]
20 Sep Trinidad and Tobago [Janet Watton ]
18 Sep BrattleboroNighthawk, 9/18 [Paul Miksis ]
18 Sep Re: Mt. Mansfield final fling [Nancy Goodrich ]
18 Sep Merlin [JJ Allen ]
17 Sep Big day on Putney MT [Theresa Armata ]
17 Sep Cape May ["Charles M. Gangas" ]
17 Sep Cape May ["Charles M. Gangas" ]
17 Sep Cape May ["Charles M. Gangas" ]
17 Sep Cape May_Fm ["Charles M. Gangas" ]
17 Sep Prothonotary [Craig Provost ]
17 Sep Re: Helping Loons from Florida to Alberta [Ruth ]
17 Sep Re: Mt. Mansfield final fling [Ruth ]
16 Sep Common Nighthawk at Charlotte Park and Wildlife Refuge [Clem Nilan ]
16 Sep Hawks [Sue ]
16 Sep Mt Philo hawk (and shorebird) counts [Liz Lackey ]
15 Sep Mt. Mansfield final fling [Chris Rimmer ]
15 Sep American Golden Plover, etc. @ Delta Park [Isis Erb ]
15 Sep towhee - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Sep 15, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
15 Sep Re: Unsubscribe [Miriam Lawrence ]
15 Sep Unsubscribe [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
14 Sep Plovers at Delta Park [alison wagner ]
14 Sep Re: 4 Black Vultures - Middlebury [Ron Payne ]
14 Sep 4 Black Vultures - Middlebury [Spencer Hardy ]
13 Sep Re: Osprey and bald eagle in Montpelier [Chip Darmstadt ]
13 Sep Re: bird guide apps [Mamuniaangel ]
12 Sep Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
12 Sep Osprey and bald eagle in Montpelier [Alex DePillis ]
12 Sep Re: sick finch [Eugenia Cooke ]
11 Sep American Golden-Plover, Delta Park (Colchester) [Kyle Rosenblad ]
11 Sep Nighthawk [Sue ]
10 Sep Little Gull photos [Tyler Pockette ]
10 Sep Ruddy Turnstone & Sanderling at Sandbar Causeway [Scott Morrical ]
10 Sep THREE Little Gulls- Tri-town Water; Addison [Tyler Pockette ]
9 Sep importance of our corridor [Scott Sainsbury ]
9 Sep sick finch [Eugenia Cooke ]
9 Sep Ravens- Mt. Independence Rd, Orwell, Sep 9, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
8 Sep Egrets ---Dean Farm, Brandon, Sep 8, 2016 [Sue ]
7 Sep Hummers etc. [Sue ]
7 Sep Feisty Hummer [stowelulu ]
6 Sep Re: Young Hummingbirds [Eve Ticknor ]
6 Sep Possible American three Toed [Thomas Berriman ]
6 Sep Re: Young Hummingbirds [Jane Stein ]
6 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Veer Frost ]
6 Sep hummer behavior [Jean Arrowsmith ]
6 Sep Rudy Turnstone Yes (Sandbar Causeway) [Isis Erb ]
6 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Sue ]
5 Sep Re: BCNH family [Charlie La Rosa ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Jane Stein ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [John Snell ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Jane Stein ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Barbara Brosnan ]
5 Sep BCNH family [Barbara Brosnan ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Jane Stein ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Jean Harrison ]
5 Sep Re: Ruddy Turnstone continues at Sandbar Causeway [Scott Sainsbury ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Sue ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Sue ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Jane Stein ]
5 Sep Indigo buntings Brandon Pearl St, Sep 3, 2016 [Sue ]
5 Sep Re: Hummingbirds [Eugenia Cooke ]
5 Sep Hummingbirds [Sue ]

Subject: Re: Burnt Rock Mt.
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Sep 2016 17:17:28 -0400
As in Fayston?? Somehow I doubt it. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 24, 2016, at 10:29 PM, Chris Rimmer  wrote:
> 
> Bird activity was minimal on Burnt Rock Mountain this afternoon, but I had
> a close encounter with a Bicknell's Thrush, which approached silently about
> 1/2 km below the summit. Otherwise, just 2 Black-capped Chickadees, 8
> Yellow-rumped Warblers, and a Western Palm Warbler. A flock of Canada Geese
> was heard but unseen overhead. Stupendous views.
> 
> Chris
> 
> ________________________
> 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x1
> http://vtecostudies.org/
> 
> 
Subject: Burnt Rock Mt.
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 22:29:29 -0400
Bird activity was minimal on Burnt Rock Mountain this afternoon, but I had
a close encounter with a Bicknell's Thrush, which approached silently about
1/2 km below the summit. Otherwise, just 2 Black-capped Chickadees, 8
Yellow-rumped Warblers, and a Western Palm Warbler. A flock of Canada Geese
was heard but unseen overhead. Stupendous views.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: warbler app
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Sep 2016 01:43:37 +0000
Does anyone know if Stephenson's Warbler App is available for an Android 
platform? 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: Bay-breasted, Philly Vireo, Surf Scoters, et al.
From: Scott Morrical <Scott.Morrical AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 20:53:32 +0000
Hello:

I birded Red Rocks Park early this morning and then joined Ted Murin to visit 
McCuen Slang, Whitney Creek, and Tri-town this morning/early afternoon. 
Highlights included: 


Bay-breasted Warbler (ad. male) at Red Rocks

Philadelphia Vireo, Tennessee Warbler, and Lincoln's Sparrow at Whitney Creek. 
Plus several other warblers and 4 flycatcher species. 


Surf Scoter (2 drakes) at Tri-town.

Full checklists on eBird.

Scott
Subject: Dickcissel & Great Gormorant
From: Ken Cox <kencox5 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 14:40:54 -0400
The Dickcissel found by Kent McFarland and others yesterday at L. Runnemede
was relocated this AM.  The bird was very vocal singing from a butternut
tree a little more than half way around the Meadow Loop Trail.  Walking
clockwise around the trail the tree is a couple 100' beyond the gazebo and
before the bat roosting box at trailside.  This bird with photos and a
complete sighting list will be posted on eBird.

The Great Cormorant and Great Egret continue at Mill (Kennedy's) Pond.  The
cormorant was seen standing on the sediment delta at the south or upper end
of the pond, where it has been seen previously by others.   Early morning
fog hampered visibility and photo.   I checked again shortly after noon and
was not seen.  This seems to be the pattern: present early AM and early
evening but elsewhere during the day.

-- 
Kenneth Cox
South Reading, VT
http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
Subject: Dickcissel at Lake Runnemede
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 21:35:26 -0400
Kent McFarland, George Clark, Ed Hack and I managed to find a Dickcissel at
Lake Runnemede in Windsor this morning. It popped up in a dense stand of
goldenrod, then flew into a nearby dead elm, where it provided excellent
views for 12-15 seconds. Kent was able to snap a few photos (see eBird
checklist), and we suspect the bird was a first-year male.

Otherwise, birding was fairly quiet, though we encountered good numbers of
W. Palm Warblers, one of which we heard singing.

Highlights among the 26 species:

Wood Duck  23
Double-crested Cormorant  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Gray Catbird  9
Common Yellowthroat  7
Palm Warbler (Western)  8
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  1
Wilson's Warbler  1
White-throated Sparrow  5
Savannah Sparrow  8
Song Sparrow  28
Swamp Sparrow  3
Indigo Bunting  3
Dickcissel  1
Purple Finch  7

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S31720307

We were unable to find the immature Great Cormorant observed and
photographed at nearby Mill Pond on Wednesday.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Re: Connecticut Warblers in Middlebury
From: Spencer Hardy <curlewsandpiper17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 09:40:21 -0400
One bird did indeed have quite a few ticks on its face (as well as feather lice 
on its primaries), otherwise it appeared healthy. 


A closer look is here:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4115989 
 


My best guess is that they are deer tick larvae, but I would be interested to 
here what others think. 


Spencer Hardy
Middlebury, VT


> On Sep 23, 2016, at 9:04 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
> 
> Has anyone taken a close look at the 2nd photo where the bird is facing left? 
There appears to be 4 ticks or mites or something below the eye. Does anyone 
know what's going on with this? 

> 
> Patti
> Moretown 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Sep 22, 2016, at 11:10 AM, Trombulak, Stephen C. 
 wrote: 

>> 
>> It may be of interest to some that Spencer Hardy, Don Jones, and I (along my 
natural history students) have caught two Connecticut Warblers at our banding 
station in Middlebury this past week. While we have caught them here before 
(one in 2009 and one in 2010; never before 2009 going back to 1986), netting 
two in a single week made us think it was worth reporting. One of the birds has 
been caught two days in a row. 

>> 
>> The habitat is riparian vegetation along the Otter Creek and near adjacent 
swampland south of Middlebury’s town center. Nets are set low (less than 2.5 
meters), so the birds have to be moving through the vegetation close to the 
ground. 

>> 
>> Photos at the links below.
>> 
>> 
>> http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4116025
>> http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4173539
>> 
>> 
>> Steve Trombulak
Subject: Re: Connecticut Warblers in Middlebury
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 09:04:50 -0400
Has anyone taken a close look at the 2nd photo where the bird is facing left? 
There appears to be 4 ticks or mites or something below the eye. Does anyone 
know what's going on with this? 


Patti
Moretown 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 22, 2016, at 11:10 AM, Trombulak, Stephen C.  
wrote: 

> 
> It may be of interest to some that Spencer Hardy, Don Jones, and I (along my 
natural history students) have caught two Connecticut Warblers at our banding 
station in Middlebury this past week. While we have caught them here before 
(one in 2009 and one in 2010; never before 2009 going back to 1986), netting 
two in a single week made us think it was worth reporting. One of the birds has 
been caught two days in a row. 

> 
> The habitat is riparian vegetation along the Otter Creek and near adjacent 
swampland south of Middlebury’s town center. Nets are set low (less than 2.5 
meters), so the birds have to be moving through the vegetation close to the 
ground. 

> 
> Photos at the links below.
> 
> 
> http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4116025
> http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4173539
> 
> 
> Steve Trombulak
Subject: Re: Late hummer in Rochester
From: Jan Miles <jancmiles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 20:00:14 -0400
John,
I see your name here on occasion. Do you ever bird at North Branch? We have a 
birding group going out from there tomorrow morning at 7:30. 

Jan Miles
Murray Hill

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 22, 2016, at 7:56 PM, John Snell  wrote:
> 
> I too have had one here in Montpelier the last several days including today, 
mostly feeding on Nasturtium. 

> John Snell
> Montpelier
> 
>> On Sep 22, 2016, at 7:51 PM, Graham Bates  wrote:
>> 
>> Had a juvenile hummingbird feeding on some fall flowers here in Rochester 
this evening. 

>> 
>> Graham
>> Rochester, VT
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Late hummer in Rochester
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 19:56:55 -0400
I too have had one here in Montpelier the last several days including today, 
mostly feeding on Nasturtium. 

John Snell
Montpelier

On Sep 22, 2016, at 7:51 PM, Graham Bates  wrote:

> Had a juvenile hummingbird feeding on some fall flowers here in Rochester 
this evening. 

> 
> Graham
> Rochester, VT
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Late hummer in Rochester
From: Graham Bates <batesg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 19:51:09 -0400
Had a juvenile hummingbird feeding on some fall flowers here in Rochester this 
evening. 


Graham
Rochester, VT

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Connecticut Warblers in Middlebury
From: "Trombulak, Stephen C." <trombula AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 15:10:17 +0000
It may be of interest to some that Spencer Hardy, Don Jones, and I (along my 
natural history students) have caught two Connecticut Warblers at our banding 
station in Middlebury this past week. While we have caught them here before 
(one in 2009 and one in 2010; never before 2009 going back to 1986), netting 
two in a single week made us think it was worth reporting. One of the birds has 
been caught two days in a row. 


The habitat is riparian vegetation along the Otter Creek and near adjacent 
swampland south of Middlebury’s town center. Nets are set low (less than 2.5 
meters), so the birds have to be moving through the vegetation close to the 
ground. 


Photos at the links below.


http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4116025
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4173539


Steve Trombulak
Subject: Great Cormorant at Mill Pond, Windsor
From: Michael Foster <mfoster AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 20:24:03 -0400
I drove to Windsor after work and arrived at Mill pond at 5:30 to look for the 
bird reported by Kyle Jones. It was not there, although I did see a great egret 
a solitary sandpiper and some killdeer. I decided to check Lake Runnemede to 
see if went there, again with no luck. On a whim I went back to Mill pond at 
6:30 and to my great delight the bird was there. I watched it for about 15 
minutes when it took off, circled the pond flying right in front of me and 
left. Not sure where it was heading or if it will return. I got some very poor 
pics that I posted on my ebird checklist. 


Michael Foster
Website    breezyhillturning.com
Email        mfoster.vt AT gmail.com
Subject: im. Great Cormorant Windsor
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:16:33 -0400
Kyle Jones just texted me and ask that I pass this on. Imm. Great Cormorant
is at Mill Pond in Windsor. It is at the far end so a scope is needed to
see it well. He is looking at it as I type.
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher (West Leb, NH)
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 21:11:37 -0400
Hi VTBirders,

I was surprised not to see this posted to VTBIRD yet, but a Fork-tailed
Flycatcher was seen in West Lebanon, NH, today, just a stone's throw from
VT. I have not seen it myself, but wanted to pass on the info. Below are
links to some eBird reports, and additional info can be found on both the
NH and MA listservs.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31680212
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31681363

Good Birding,
Larry

-- 

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

*Caterpillar Fest! *
Sunday, September 25. 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Fee: $10 for nonmembers, $8 for members and $5 kids
Come meet hundreds of native New England caterpillars at North Branch
Nature Center. Engaging educators from The Caterpillar Lab
, including founder Sam Jaffe, will be
here to tell you all about dozens of species you never knew might be hiding
in your own backyards. This year, they will bring some unique and exciting
early fall species. You'll meet strange and surprising slug caterpillars,
camouflaged prominents that blend perfectly into leaf edges, giant silkmoth
species preparing to pupate for the cold months, and more! Be sure to save
the date for this unique exhibition!

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org 
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Trinidad and Tobago
From: Janet Watton <musbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 16:16:02 -0400
> Hello all you Vermont birders! There is a fine birding trip scheduled for 
December 1- 9 to Trinidad/Tobago run by Merlin Wildlife Tours (603) 746-2535. I 
have signed up but they are looking for more takers. Offline I can send you all 
kinds of attachments with descriptions, costs, expected sitings, etc. I am 
especially interested in one more female to join in, as I will have to pay a 
big sum for single occupancy and I am totally compatible! Friends of mine have 
done tours with this same outfit and give it big kudos. Robert A. Quinn is 
their director and the one who will be on the trip. It looks just fabulous. 

> Thanks for offline responses.
> Janet Watton
> Randolph Center
Subject: BrattleboroNighthawk, 9/18
From: Paul Miksis <pjmiksis AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2016 18:39:57 -0400
One moving south, 6:35 pm
Paul Miksis
Subject: Re: Mt. Mansfield final fling
From: Nancy Goodrich <nancyg3219 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2016 13:09:08 -0400
Re: Chris Rimmer, er al--Many thanks to all of our citizen scientists for
26 years of bird records!! from a VERY amateur birder, Nancy Goodrich

On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 11:12 PM, Chris Rimmer 
wrote:

> VCE 2016 field season on Mt. Mansfield wrapped up with a flourish this
> Tuesday-Wednesday. Both weather and birds made dramatic appearances,
> especially yesterday morning. Kent McFarland, John Lloyd, UMass colleague
> Bill DeLuca and I returned to witness the annual mid-September resurgence
> of Bicknell's Thrush (BITH) activity. We arrived on the ridgeline at 5 pm
> on Tuesday to set up 20 mist nets, mainly on the Amherst, Lakeview and Long
> trails. Winds were humming from the west, temperatures cool, and birds
> quiet until about 7 pm, when 8-10 BITH piped up, calling and even singing
> with surprising vigor. For a bird that is not territorial in the classic
> sense, it's a mystery why BITH resume vocalizing just prior to migration
> (most are gone by October 1), but this is a reliably annual phenomenon. We
> captured 10 birds (3 Blackpoll and 7 Yellow-rumped warblers) before closing
> our nets after dark.
>
> Clouds began moving in at dawn, providing a striking sunrise, and the west
> wind slackened enough to allow for good netting conditions. BITH again
> announced their presence via a dawn "chorus" (though not nearly as robust
> as in mid-June). The first hour of netting was slow, but an approaching
> cold front ushered in a remarkable influx of migrants beginning ~7 am.
> Suddenly, and for the next 2 hours, our 20 nets were dripping with birds,
> several festooned with 9-10 at a time. We've never had such volume in 25
> years, and we struggled to keep up at our banding table. If it hadn't
> started raining at 9:00, there is no question we'd have had to close our
> nets and release many birds unbanded, just to avoid being overwhelmed. The
> rain and accompanying gusty winds left us no choice but to close all nets,
> and leave them closed. We took our huge backlog of netted birds, with many
> bags holding 2-3 individuals, and retreated down the toll road to the ski
> patrol hut, where we finished banding, out of the harsh elements.
>
> Blackpoll Warblers were the undisputed bird of the day, as we apparently
> intercepted their migratory peak - we banded 46 individuals, more than in
> any single morning over the past 25 years, even during the autumns of
> 1995-97, when we banded on the ridgeline 5 days/week from mid-August to
> mid-October. Other notable species were 3 Tennessee Warblers, single
> Bay-breasted and Blackburnian warblers, and a Lincoln's Sparrow. We
> captured 4 BITH, including 2 previously banded males - one that we banded
> as an immature on 16 Sept 2015 and recaptured this year in June, and a
> second that we first banded on 3 June 2011. Our only other recapture was of
> an adult male White-throated Sparrow that we banded on 23 June.
>
> A PBS NewsHour reporter and photographer who joined us to do a piece on
> Blackpoll Warblers definitely left with plenty of material, and a good
> soaking - the good, the bad and the ugly of studying mountaintop birds!
>
> Our netting totals for the visit included 84 individuals of 11 species:
>
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Bicknell's Thrush  4
> Tennessee Warbler  3
> Bay-breasted Warbler  1
> Blackburnian Warbler  1
> Blackpoll Warbler  46
> Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  20
> Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  5
> White-throated Sparrow  1
> Lincoln's Sparrow  1
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
> checklist/S31598413
>
> Other noteworthy sightings included a first-year Bald Eagle, Merlin, and an
> eastern chipmunk (scrounging in the parking lot at 3900' elevation - the
> first we've seen up there this year). Red squirrels continue to be absent.
>
> We'll be back at it next May for year #26...
>
> Chris
>
> ________________________
>
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x1
> http://vtecostudies.org/
>
> 
>
Subject: Merlin
From: JJ Allen <jjapple88 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2016 06:01:01 -0400
A beautiful Merlin slicing its way South through a warm south wind over White 
Rocks Mountain in Middlesex. 

Jeffrey Allen
Subject: Big day on Putney MT
From: Theresa Armata <tarmat AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 18:24:01 -0400
Yesterday the Putney MT Hawkwatch had the biggest single day total of migrating 
hawks ever. 

2303 counted . Several bursts of Broadwings throughout the day. 
Between 1 and 1:30 PM 700, a lull, then a kettle of 293 spotted, final burst 
came at 5 PM when, with the day losing 

heat a fallout of over 500 birds occurred. Right over our heads, no binoculars 
needed. Epic! 


Terri Armata
Bennington
Subject: Cape May
From: "Charles M. Gangas" <dashlast AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 13:08:00 -0400
On the Cape May posted previously, seems the narrative didn’t post:

A slightly late post but one I’d thought I’d share. While up on Mt. 
Mansfield early Wednesday morning I found a female Cape May warbler embedded 
with a mixed flock moving across the ridge line on the Long Trail. 






Charles M. Gangas
dashlast AT me.com 
Subject: Cape May
From: "Charles M. Gangas" <dashlast AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 13:07:59 -0400
On the Cape May posted previously, seems the narrative didn’t post:

A slightly late post but one I’d thought I’d share. While up on Mt. 
Mansfield early Wednesday morning I found a female Cape May warbler embedded 
with a mixed flock moving across the ridge line on the Long Trail. 






Charles M. Gangas
dashlast AT me.com
Subject: Cape May
From: "Charles M. Gangas" <dashlast AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 13:01:46 -0400
Sorry folks, the correct link to the Cape May is below, sorry for the 
confusion: 




http://www.charlesgangas.com/p28534559/h18128b89#h18128b89




Best,

Chuck Gangas


Charles M. Gangas
dashlast AT me.com
Subject: Cape May_Fm
From: "Charles M. Gangas" <dashlast AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 12:57:36 -0400
A slightly late post but one I’d thought I’d share. While up on Mt. 
Mansfield early Wednesday morning I found a female Cape May warbler embedded 
with a mixed flock moving across the ridge line on the Long Trail. 


For those interested an image of the bird is provided by the link below:

http://www.zenfolio.com/charlesgangasphotography/e/p28534559

Best,

Chuck Gangas


Charles M. Gangas
dashlast AT me.com
Subject: Prothonotary
From: Craig Provost <cprovost88 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 11:12:32 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Craig Provost" 
Date: Sep 17, 2016 11:09 AM
Subject: Prothonotary
To: "Eddy Edwards" , "Charlotte Bill" <
vtcrossbill AT yahoo.com>
Cc:

Had a 1st year bird on Black Creek trail. Go straight past Maquam Crk trl
and bird was near where the trail bends west along the creek. Have photos
to share later.
Subject: Re: Helping Loons from Florida to Alberta
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 01:07:50 +0000
My question to you, Eric, is how did Wideman determine this loon was a female?

Networking - it's what science/life is all about.


On a paddle on Gale Meadow on Tues. I found no loons. Hope the 
'bachelors/bachelorettes' return to nest there next year. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: hello AT email.gopostmatic.com  on behalf of 
Vermont Center for Ecostudies  

Sent: Friday, September 16, 2016 1:46 PM
To: birder_rws
Subject: Helping Loons from Florida to Alberta


[http://vtecostudies.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/logo-large AT 2x.png]
Helping Loons from Florida to 
Alberta 




[Loon entangled in fishing line during in November. The loon has undergone most 
of its fall molt. Photo by Ray Richer] 


A Common Loon entangled in fishing line in November after it has nearly 
finished its fall molt. Photo by Ray Richer 


Our political boundaries keep almost all of our loon conservation efforts 
focused in Vermont, but during the past few years, I've received many phone 
calls and emails asking for assistance from far away places - Florida, North 
Carolina, Virginia, California, Minnesota, New Hampshire and across Canada. 
They find us on the internet. If you google loons and rescue or distress, VCE 
and the Loon Preservation Committee of New Hampshire rise to the top of the 
list. With the network of biologists who study and manage loons around the 
country and from our own experience, I can usually find the right answer or the 
right person to help whomever asks. 


Just last week, Riley Wideman, a park ranger in Alberta, Canada, emailed asking 
for ideas on what to do with a loon that was tangled in fishing gear and eluded 
capture. I contacted my fellow loon biologists in New York and New Hampshire 
for their opinion too. Between the three of us, we gave Riley enough 
information to help him capture the loon and free it from the fishing gear. 


Riley wrote, "Success! Last night we managed to catch the loon, and after 
bringing the loon to a wildlife rescue, the hooks have been removed and we will 
be releasing her this afternoon! I would personally like to thank the three of 
you for your exceptional willingness to help, without your advice this success 
story would not have been possible. Again, I really appreciate all of your 
outgoing nature and attribute this success to you." 


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Subject: Re: Mt. Mansfield final fling
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 00:57:43 +0000
Nothing like an Unprecedented Extravagant Avian Finale to end the season... 
just the impetus to keep you going and wondering "What surprises will next year 
bring?" 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Chris Rimmer 
 

Sent: Thursday, September 15, 2016 11:12 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mt. Mansfield final fling

VCE 2016 field season on Mt. Mansfield wrapped up with a flourish this
Tuesday-Wednesday. Both weather and birds made dramatic appearances,
especially yesterday morning. Kent McFarland, John Lloyd, UMass colleague
Bill DeLuca and I returned to witness the annual mid-September resurgence
of Bicknell's Thrush (BITH) activity. We arrived on the ridgeline at 5 pm
on Tuesday to set up 20 mist nets, mainly on the Amherst, Lakeview and Long
trails. Winds were humming from the west, temperatures cool, and birds
quiet until about 7 pm, when 8-10 BITH piped up, calling and even singing
with surprising vigor. For a bird that is not territorial in the classic
sense, it's a mystery why BITH resume vocalizing just prior to migration
(most are gone by October 1), but this is a reliably annual phenomenon. We
captured 10 birds (3 Blackpoll and 7 Yellow-rumped warblers) before closing
our nets after dark.

Clouds began moving in at dawn, providing a striking sunrise, and the west
wind slackened enough to allow for good netting conditions. BITH again
announced their presence via a dawn "chorus" (though not nearly as robust
as in mid-June). The first hour of netting was slow, but an approaching
cold front ushered in a remarkable influx of migrants beginning ~7 am.
Suddenly, and for the next 2 hours, our 20 nets were dripping with birds,
several festooned with 9-10 at a time. We've never had such volume in 25
years, and we struggled to keep up at our banding table. If it hadn't
started raining at 9:00, there is no question we'd have had to close our
nets and release many birds unbanded, just to avoid being overwhelmed. The
rain and accompanying gusty winds left us no choice but to close all nets,
and leave them closed. We took our huge backlog of netted birds, with many
bags holding 2-3 individuals, and retreated down the toll road to the ski
patrol hut, where we finished banding, out of the harsh elements.

Blackpoll Warblers were the undisputed bird of the day, as we apparently
intercepted their migratory peak - we banded 46 individuals, more than in
any single morning over the past 25 years, even during the autumns of
1995-97, when we banded on the ridgeline 5 days/week from mid-August to
mid-October. Other notable species were 3 Tennessee Warblers, single
Bay-breasted and Blackburnian warblers, and a Lincoln's Sparrow. We
captured 4 BITH, including 2 previously banded males - one that we banded
as an immature on 16 Sept 2015 and recaptured this year in June, and a
second that we first banded on 3 June 2011. Our only other recapture was of
an adult male White-throated Sparrow that we banded on 23 June.

A PBS NewsHour reporter and photographer who joined us to do a piece on
Blackpoll Warblers definitely left with plenty of material, and a good
soaking - the good, the bad and the ugly of studying mountaintop birds!

Our netting totals for the visit included 84 individuals of 11 species:

Hairy Woodpecker  1
Bicknell's Thrush  4
Tennessee Warbler  3
Bay-breasted Warbler  1
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Blackpoll Warbler  46
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  20
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  5
White-throated Sparrow  1
Lincoln's Sparrow  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S31598413

Other noteworthy sightings included a first-year Bald Eagle, Merlin, and an
eastern chipmunk (scrounging in the parking lot at 3900' elevation - the
first we've seen up there this year). Red squirrels continue to be absent.

We'll be back at it next May for year #26...

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Common Nighthawk at Charlotte Park and Wildlife Refuge
From: Clem Nilan <Vtclem AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 13:53:16 -0400
A Common Nighthawk was roosting in a tree for several hours today and still 
there when I left around 12:30. It's located 100' beyond trail marker #6 off 
the left side of the trail. 

Subject: Hawks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 11:26:39 -0400
Two high soaring Broadwings over my house this morning.
Also one low sitting immature one sitting in the same area along Rt7.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Mt Philo hawk (and shorebird) counts
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 09:37:32 -0400
Here are some hawk counts for Mt Philo.  

Sept 3: 12 Bald Eagles, 43 Broadwngs Total raptors 58 (North Wind) 

Sept 5: 3 Bald Eagles, 32 Broadwings Total raptors 38 (North Wind) 

Sept 15: 17 Bald Eagles, 883 Broadwings, 1 Red-shouldered, 9 Sharpies, 15 
Kestrels Total Raptors 943 (North Wind) 



We also saw a Common Nighthawk and a lone shorebird fly over yesterday. Ted 
Murin called out “American Golden Plover” seconds BEFORE we heard it call a 
couple of times and the rest of us got on the bird. Never doubt this man’s 
skill. Also quite a nice addition to Mt Philo’s bird list! 


Winds from the North instead of the Northwest, yield good numbers of Broadwings 
visible from Philo. At least this seems to be the pattern to date. 


Keep looking up,

Liz Lackey
Subject: Mt. Mansfield final fling
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 23:12:54 -0400
VCE 2016 field season on Mt. Mansfield wrapped up with a flourish this
Tuesday-Wednesday. Both weather and birds made dramatic appearances,
especially yesterday morning. Kent McFarland, John Lloyd, UMass colleague
Bill DeLuca and I returned to witness the annual mid-September resurgence
of Bicknell's Thrush (BITH) activity. We arrived on the ridgeline at 5 pm
on Tuesday to set up 20 mist nets, mainly on the Amherst, Lakeview and Long
trails. Winds were humming from the west, temperatures cool, and birds
quiet until about 7 pm, when 8-10 BITH piped up, calling and even singing
with surprising vigor. For a bird that is not territorial in the classic
sense, it's a mystery why BITH resume vocalizing just prior to migration
(most are gone by October 1), but this is a reliably annual phenomenon. We
captured 10 birds (3 Blackpoll and 7 Yellow-rumped warblers) before closing
our nets after dark.

Clouds began moving in at dawn, providing a striking sunrise, and the west
wind slackened enough to allow for good netting conditions. BITH again
announced their presence via a dawn "chorus" (though not nearly as robust
as in mid-June). The first hour of netting was slow, but an approaching
cold front ushered in a remarkable influx of migrants beginning ~7 am.
Suddenly, and for the next 2 hours, our 20 nets were dripping with birds,
several festooned with 9-10 at a time. We've never had such volume in 25
years, and we struggled to keep up at our banding table. If it hadn't
started raining at 9:00, there is no question we'd have had to close our
nets and release many birds unbanded, just to avoid being overwhelmed. The
rain and accompanying gusty winds left us no choice but to close all nets,
and leave them closed. We took our huge backlog of netted birds, with many
bags holding 2-3 individuals, and retreated down the toll road to the ski
patrol hut, where we finished banding, out of the harsh elements.

Blackpoll Warblers were the undisputed bird of the day, as we apparently
intercepted their migratory peak - we banded 46 individuals, more than in
any single morning over the past 25 years, even during the autumns of
1995-97, when we banded on the ridgeline 5 days/week from mid-August to
mid-October. Other notable species were 3 Tennessee Warblers, single
Bay-breasted and Blackburnian warblers, and a Lincoln's Sparrow. We
captured 4 BITH, including 2 previously banded males - one that we banded
as an immature on 16 Sept 2015 and recaptured this year in June, and a
second that we first banded on 3 June 2011. Our only other recapture was of
an adult male White-throated Sparrow that we banded on 23 June.

A PBS NewsHour reporter and photographer who joined us to do a piece on
Blackpoll Warblers definitely left with plenty of material, and a good
soaking - the good, the bad and the ugly of studying mountaintop birds!

Our netting totals for the visit included 84 individuals of 11 species:

Hairy Woodpecker  1
Bicknell's Thrush  4
Tennessee Warbler  3
Bay-breasted Warbler  1
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Blackpoll Warbler  46
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  20
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  5
White-throated Sparrow  1
Lincoln's Sparrow  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
checklist/S31598413

Other noteworthy sightings included a first-year Bald Eagle, Merlin, and an
eastern chipmunk (scrounging in the parking lot at 3900' elevation - the
first we've seen up there this year). Red squirrels continue to be absent.

We'll be back at it next May for year #26...

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: American Golden Plover, etc. @ Delta Park
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 11:29:41 -0400
The Black-bellied Plovers and at least one American Golden Plover are still
at Delta Park (where you walk out onto the beach/marshy area when wet), as
well as some other great shorebirds — as of now they're still here.

Also a nice mix of warblers in the woods leading to the beach/marsh.

Good luck if you try for them,

Isis Erb
Jericho


-- 
Isis Erb
Jericho, VT

Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: towhee - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Sep 15, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 14:37:33 +0000
Towhees and a field sparrow were busy feeding, as were the warblers. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Thursday, September 15, 2016 10:30:07 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Sep 15, 2016 

Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Sep 15, 2016 8:25 AM - 9:45 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
18 species 

Canada Goose 18 
Ruffed Grouse 1 
Mourning Dove 2 
Pileated Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 
Eastern Phoebe 4 
Red-eyed Vireo 1 
Blue Jay 3 
American Crow 2 
Black-capped Chickadee 3 
American Robin 1 
Gray Catbird 3 
Common Yellowthroat 2 
Magnolia Warbler 1 
Field Sparrow 1 
Eastern Towhee 2 
Northern Cardinal 1 
American Goldfinch 1 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31590365 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Re: Unsubscribe
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 09:24:38 -0400
Jeffrey, I'm sure I won't be the only one to reply to this, but you can
change your settings to "digest" so you only get one email per day. All the
instructions are here under Listserv commands.

http://www.uvm.edu/~ebuford/vtbird.html

--Miriam Lawrence
Monkton

On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 9:12 AM, Jeffrey Sonshine <
jeffrey.sonshine AT gmail.com> wrote:

> I'm sorry to ask you to remove my name from your list.  There are just too
> many emails received and they are turning into clutter.  I subscribe to the
> CT list and the submissions go to one entity and are consolidated to just
> one email/day.  I can handle one email but not as many as I get from
> Vermont Birds.  Thank you.
>
> Jeff
>
> --
> Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
> 36 Laurel Ledge Court
> Stamford, CT 06903
> 973-441-1115
>



-- 
Miriam Lawrence
mirslamlawrence AT gmail.com
(c) 802-238-1830
Subject: Unsubscribe
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 09:12:11 -0400
I'm sorry to ask you to remove my name from your list.  There are just too
many emails received and they are turning into clutter.  I subscribe to the
CT list and the submissions go to one entity and are consolidated to just
one email/day.  I can handle one email but not as many as I get from
Vermont Birds.  Thank you.

Jeff

-- 
Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
36 Laurel Ledge Court
Stamford, CT 06903
973-441-1115
Subject: Plovers at Delta Park
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 20:24:55 -0400
Red Rover, Red Rover...I dare birders to come over! Thanks, Kyle, for your post 
of the American Goldens, and for others elBird entries since. I had a window of 
time this afternoon to get over there this afternoon. At first I only saw 
Semipals on the Burlington shore line, but walked around the point in time to 
see a large flock of plovers put up. I counted 25 Black and 2 Goldens. There 
maths even more lurking behind the rise of sand n the far shore! 


Ali
Huntington
Subject: Re: 4 Black Vultures - Middlebury
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 08:53:52 -0400
I was with some Audubon folks at the Hurd Grassland last week and we
saw four Black Vultures fly overhead. They were up very high headed
South, so I didn't think they might be hanging around the area, but the
number of our two sightings is an interesting coincidence. 
 
Also, relevant to Middlebury birders, I saw a Philadelphia Vireo at
Otter View Park this morning. 

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 08:34:23 -0400, Spencer Hardy  wrote:

       At least 4 Black Vultures just picked up from the Middlebury
compost pit and slowly headed south. Given how attractive this place is
for Turkey Vultures and other scavengers, it might be worth checking
out from time to time.
The larger birds often flush when approached from the South st.
Extension side, but I have had better luck viewing from the TAM along
the golf course.

Spencer Hardy
Middlebury VT

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: 4 Black Vultures - Middlebury
From: Spencer Hardy <curlewsandpiper17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 08:34:23 -0400
At least 4 Black Vultures just picked up from the Middlebury compost pit and 
slowly headed south. Given how attractive this place is for Turkey Vultures and 
other scavengers, it might be worth checking out from time to time. 

The larger birds often flush when approached from the South st. Extension side, 
but I have had better luck viewing from the TAM along the golf course. 


Spencer Hardy
Middlebury VT 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Osprey and bald eagle in Montpelier
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2016 09:14:11 -0400
There's been an adult Bald Eagle hanging around the Winooski in Montpelier as 
well. Last week I watched if flying downstream near the high school. And I've 
heard quite a few reports from Wrightsville Reservoir as well. 

Cheers, Chip


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Alex DePillis
Sent: Monday, September 12, 2016 5:33 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Osprey and bald eagle in Montpelier

Immature bald eagle interacting with an osprey over the Winooski River (main 
branch), by the Taylor Street bridge, about 4 p.m. ​ 


*Alex DePillis*
Subject: Re: bird guide apps
From: Mamuniaangel <mamuniaangel AT NETSCAPE.NET>
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2016 07:13:55 -0400
Hi!
I used the free version of Chirp for quite a while and was very pleased with 
its quality as a freebie. A friend showed me iBird Pro, $9.99, and I decided to 
buy it. It has many more features, including numerous examples of calls and 
live photographs of most species. Note: I never "pish" with the app; I turn the 
sound down and hold my phone to my ear for identification. Best part of birding 
apps: studying calls of potential sightings ahead of bird walks. 

Not sure about Android or Amazon compatibility. There are several iBird apps to 
choose from. Pro seemed the most useful to a "freshman" birder. 

Angel Harris



-----Original Message-----
From: Ruth 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Sun, Aug 21, 2016 10:01 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] bird guide apps

I am just looking into buying my first tablet and am considering an Android or 
Amazon's Fire inexpensive tablets. I am looking for a recommendation for NA 
bird guide app. I particularly want an app that will give me bird songs which I 
can take into the field. No, I am not considering a Smart Phone. 



I suspect most will run on an Android. What about compatibility with the Amazon 
OS? Suggestions welcome. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 21:45:30 -0400
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday September 17, 2016 on
the Stephen Young Marsh Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the refuge parking lot
on Tabor Rd, about 1 mile past the Visitor Center.  If you have any
questions, email me at copenhvr AT gmail.com.

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 77 months of walks we have observed 143 species. Hope to see you
there!


--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: Osprey and bald eagle in Montpelier
From: Alex DePillis <Alex AT DEPILLIS.ORG>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 17:32:47 -0400
Immature bald eagle interacting with an osprey over the Winooski River
(main branch), by the Taylor Street bridge, about 4 p.m.  ​

*Alex DePillis*
Subject: Re: sick finch
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 11:06:21 -0700
Thanks!

On Sep 12, 2016 9:54 AM, "anneboby" <
00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> A tad of chlorox in the wash water will help disinfect the feeder by
> killing any of the disease causing bacterium possibly left there by the
> bird.
>
> Bob Yunick
> Schenectady, NY
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Eugenia Cooke 
> To: VTBIRD 
> Sent: Fri, Sep 9, 2016 2:46 pm
> Subject: [VTBIRD] sick finch
>
> We've had a finch that looks like it has conjunctive Finch eye disease in
> our yard for a few days. It eats for long periods of time from our thistle
> feeder and is not afraid of a human being 6 inches away from it. The eyes
> are open and they blink from time to time but it behaves as if it's blind.
> After it leaves today we will wash the feeder. Is there anything else we
> should do? We have scores of birds of all kinds feeding at our feeders.
>
Subject: American Golden-Plover, Delta Park (Colchester)
From: Kyle Rosenblad <kyle.c.rosenblad AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2016 16:21:50 -0400
Hi birders,

I just found an American-Golden Plover with five Black-Bellied and a few 
Pectorals, Yellowlegs, Killdeer, and Semipalmated Plovers at Delta Park in 
Colchester. (I'll put the full list on EBird shortly.) They were on a small 
mudflat near shore just about due east from the large sandbar "island". There's 
a large driftwood trunk nearby. Good luck if you try for it! I got great looks 
without a scope. 


Cheers,
Kyle Rosenblad
Winooski
Subject: Nighthawk
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2016 11:47:58 -0400
Driving north out of Rutland by the Williams Farmstand I saw a lone nighthawk 
flying along the stream. This at about 11:15 this morning! 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Little Gull photos
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 16:23:49 -0400
Hi all,

It's been a while since I've posted any photos to my primary Flickr
account, as I've been very busy taking photos for my Vermont photo big
year, where I keep only 1 photo per species on that Flickr page. However, I
thought folks might be interested in seeing some of the Little Gull photos
I got today from my kayak.

Here's the link:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/106350684 AT N05/with/29298898400/

I hope you enjoy!
Tyler Pockette
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone & Sanderling at Sandbar Causeway
From: Scott Morrical <Scott.Morrical AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 17:15:20 +0000
Hello:


Ted Murin & I birded the Sandbar Causeway and adjacent wetlands this morning 
from about 8:45-10:00 AM. A lot of shorebirds were present. Highlights 
included: 



1 Ruddy Turnstone-- seen at close range, turning stones and eating worms, on 
the south side of the causeway proper, about 30 yards east of the bridge. A 
favored spot seem to be the old tire with a large driftwood log pointing at it. 



1 Sanderling-- on the mud "island" with peeps and plovers

6 Pectoral Sandpipers

20 Semipalmated Plovers

20+ Killdeer

16 Least Sandpipers

5 Semipalmated Sandpipers


3 American Pipits


2 Pied-billed Grebes

10 Great Egrets

5 Great Blue Herons

8 Green-winged Teal

50+ Mallards

2 Wood Ducks


Good Birding,


Scott Morrical



South Burlington
Subject: THREE Little Gulls- Tri-town Water; Addison
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 12:02:24 -0400
I just got off the water from a paddle in my kayak on Lake Champlain in the
area in front of Tri-town Water. The clear highlight was seeing THREE
Little Gulls, one of which was still in nearly complete breeding plumage.
Two other non-breeding adults were seen in view at the same time for a
certain count of 3. Lots of Bonaparte's Gulls out here as well which is a
welcome sight after not seeing any in further up the lake for nearly two
weeks now.

Good luck if you try, I was able to quickly spot the breeding adult through
my scope just now as I viewed from Tri-town.

-Tyler Pockette
Subject: importance of our corridor
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 15:21:56 -0400
A new map published by the Nature Conservancy 
http://maps.tnc.org/migrations-in-motion/#6/42.626/-81.211 shows the projected 
pathways that species will follow to find their favored environments as climate 
change progresses. 


One of the striking results is the degree to which the corridor through the 
Catskills / Hudson Valley and up the Champlain Valley and Vermont Highlands 
figure in the projections. 


All the more reason to stand strongly behind land conservation, land use 
protection, zoning and scientific study right here where we bird. (And where we 
vote) 


Scott
Moretown
Subject: sick finch
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 11:46:08 -0700
We've had a finch that looks like it has conjunctive Finch eye disease in
our yard for a few days. It eats for long periods of time from our thistle
feeder and is not afraid of a human being 6 inches away from it. The eyes
are open and they blink from time to time but it behaves as if it's blind.
After it leaves today we will wash the feeder. Is there anything else we
should do? We have scores of birds of all kinds feeding at our feeders.
Subject: Ravens- Mt. Independence Rd, Orwell, Sep 9, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 17:42:32 +0000
An astounding number of ravens were seen . They came streaming up the lake 
nonstop heading in a north easterly direction. 

A nice group of Magnolia warblers were eating on the go! 
Bottle gentian is in perfect bloom as well. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Friday, September 9, 2016 1:36:13 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Mt. Independence Rd, Orwell, Sep 9, 2016 

Mt. Independence Rd, Orwell, Addison, Vermont, US 
Sep 9, 2016 7:15 AM - 11:15 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
3.0 mile(s) 
27 species 

Canada Goose 6 
Ruffed Grouse 1 
Double-crested Cormorant 2 
Great Blue Heron 3 
Turkey Vulture 2 
Osprey 2 
Bald Eagle 2 seen on N.Y. side perched in a tree, both adult plumage. 
Ring-billed Gull 46 
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 
Downy Woodpecker 1 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 3 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 
Eastern Phoebe 1 
Great Crested Flycatcher 2 
Blue Jay 11 
American Crow 3 
Common Raven 19 large flock flying from south west to north east. 
Black-capped Chickadee 12 
White-breasted Nuthatch 1 
American Robin 3 
American Redstart 1 
Magnolia Warbler 4 
Yellow-rumped Warbler 3 
Prairie Warbler 1 song heard only 
Northern Cardinal 5 
Purple Finch 1 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31494519 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Egrets ---Dean Farm, Brandon, Sep 8, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 8 Sep 2016 13:29:19 -0400
Three great egrets fishing in the pond. Two flocks of turkeys and Canada geese 
enjoying the fields. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: September 8, 2016 at 1:26:56 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Dean Farm, Brandon, Sep 8, 2016
> 
> Dean Farm, Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Sep 8, 2016 12:45 PM - 1:30 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 4 species
> 
> Mallard  29
> Wild Turkey  38
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Great Egret  3
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31482026
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Hummers etc.
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 16:21:25 -0400
In Arizona Gila Woodpeckers love hummingbird feeders.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Feisty Hummer
From: stowelulu <stowelulu AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 09:50:56 -0400
A few years ago my husband was doing a corridor monitoring for the GMC when he 
heard a familiar sound up above him. When he looked up, there was a Hummer 
harassing a Porcupine! He surmised that the Porky was a bit too close to the 
hummer's nest. Those bitty birds will take on anyone and anything. 


Charlotte 
Stowe Hollow

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 7, 2016, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

> 
> There are 8 messages totaling 250 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Hummingbirds (2)
>  2. Rudy Turnstone Yes (Sandbar Causeway)
>  3. hummer behavior
>  4. Young Hummingbirds (3)
>  5. Possible American three Toed
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 07:39:41 -0400
> From:    Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
> Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
> 
> It is GORGET, once again auto- correct changed it!
> Ive since turn it off.
> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 3:58 PM, Jean Harrison  wrote:
>> 
>> EDU
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 09:29:20 -0400
> From:    Isis Erb 
> Subject: Rudy Turnstone Yes (Sandbar Causeway)
> 
> As of this message the Rudy Turnstone is still here. The American Golden
> Plover was but flew to the east - may return later.
> 
> Good luck if you try!
> 
> Isis Erb
> 
> 
> -- 
> Isis Erb
> Jericho, VT
> 
> Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 11:34:30 -0400
> From:    Jean Arrowsmith 
> Subject: hummer behavior
> 
> Then there was my friend who had too much red lipstick on once, to the 
perplexity of a hummer. 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 11:57:44 -0400
> From:    Veer Frost 
> Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
> 
> Me, too, infuriating.And pale version of Warbling Vireo song this
> morning, also Eastern Peewee still in occasional heartbreak mode.
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic
> Sent using Hushmail
> 
> On September 6, 2016 at 7:40 AM, "Sue"  wrote:It is GORGET, once again
> auto- correct changed it!
> Ive since turn it off.
> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 13:17:40 -0400
> From:    Carole Babyak 
> Subject: Young Hummingbirds
> 
> A few summers ago, late August I watched for a few days/before sunset, 2 
Immature Hummers who couldn't feed at the feeder because of 

> 
> a territorial male who kept chasing them away. I had 2 feeders (out of sight 
from each other) but just watched the one. One of the immatures 

> 
> went to the feeder and was chased by the male to the back of the house. The 
remaining immature went to the feeder to feed. This happened 

> 
> for about 1/2 hour until it became too dark. I had binoculars but couldn't 
distinguish between the immatures, otherwise they both had what looked 

> 
> like clear throats - no hint of an necklace like outline indicating a male. 
Don't want to say this was a plan but it sure looked like it, one kept 

> 
> the male busy while the other got a drink. Then in September they were gone, 
other Hummers came to feeders & flowers (jewelweed) but 

> 
> the 2 creative Immatures were gone, seemed very quiet. And my Hummers have 
chased Chickadees too, but the Chickadees were also getting a drink 

> 
> at the feeder.            amazing
> 
> Carole Babyak
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 14:08:04 -0400
> From:    Jane Stein 
> Subject: Re: Young Hummingbirds
> 
> Great story.
> 
> Did you say the chickadees were getting a drink at the feeder?  Did you 
> see how they were reaching through those tiny ports to do that?
> 
> If chickadees are known to do this (I've never seen it myself), it would 
> perhaps explain the hummers' apparent antipathy for them in particular.
> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
>> On 9/6/2016 1:17 PM, Carole Babyak wrote:
>> A few summers ago, late August I watched for a few days/before sunset, 2 
Immature Hummers who couldn't feed at the feeder because of 

>> 
>> a territorial male who kept chasing them away. I had 2 feeders (out of sight 
from each other) but just watched the one. One of the immatures 

>> 
>> went to the feeder and was chased by the male to the back of the house. The 
remaining immature went to the feeder to feed. This happened 

>> 
>> for about 1/2 hour until it became too dark. I had binoculars but couldn't 
distinguish between the immatures, otherwise they both had what looked 

>> 
>> like clear throats - no hint of an necklace like outline indicating a male. 
Don't want to say this was a plan but it sure looked like it, one kept 

>> 
>> the male busy while the other got a drink. Then in September they were gone, 
other Hummers came to feeders & flowers (jewelweed) but 

>> 
>> the 2 creative Immatures were gone, seemed very quiet. And my Hummers have 
chased Chickadees too, but the Chickadees were also getting a drink 

>> 
>> at the feeder.            amazing
>> 
>> Carole Babyak
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:16:26 -0400
> From:    Thomas Berriman 
> Subject: Possible American three Toed
> 
> On my way down from the summit of Mt. Manadnock at 3,000' elevation I heard
> the soft clicking of a Black-backed Woodpecker. Normally I wouldn't
> bushwhack after one in that dense habitat but since it was so high up the
> Mt. wanted to get a documentation photo for the report. 200' feet off the
> trail instead of the Black-backed,  I found what may have been a Three Toed
> (poor documentation photos with ebird report) It flew off before I had a
> whole lot of time with it but I heard it pecking another 150' away so
> bushwhacked towards the sound only to be disappointed the pecking was from a
> male Black-backed (the one I heard calling no doubt) But this other
> woodpecker I had first seen flew by as I was looking at the Black-backed.
> Both woodpeckers were pecking maybe 60' apart but it was so obstructed with
> fallen trees by the time I could work my way to the sound it was quiet. I
> hung out for another 20 minutes and nothing moved. I did manage to get a
> photo of each bird, not a good photo. Any opinions would be welcome. By the
> time I found my way back to the trail I heard pecking again but this was a
> female Hairy woodpecker and was nothing remotely like the 2 in the bush.
> 
> 
> 
> I ran into 3 Bay-breasted also on the trail and had very good looks at them
> as I phished they were very curious and hung out for a few minutes. Climbing
> the fire tower, for once I had the upper hand on Boreal Chickadees. They
> were below me and I got good looks at them from above.
> 
> 
> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/view/checklist/S31452693 
> 
> 
> 
> Tom Berriman
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:27:02 -0400
> From:    Eve Ticknor 
> Subject: Re: Young Hummingbirds
> 
> I live on the NY side. I have 4 hummer feeders that hand off my porch, near 
the driveway. I have seen a few chases lately, but the juvenile that comes all 
the time checks everything out in case it is also a flower. The most 
interesting was a week or 2 ago when I watched it going all around my car, a 
Mazda Tribute which happens to be red! 

> 
> I also had an earlier visit by a male Downy Woodpecker who visited 2 of my 
feeders, perhaps getting a bit of nectar with his tongue. He was doing this for 
5 - 10 minutes. 

> 
> Eve
> 
>> On Sep 6, 2016, at 2:08 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>> 
>> Great story.
>> 
>> Did you say the chickadees were getting a drink at the feeder? Did you see 
how they were reaching through those tiny ports to do that? 

>> 
>> If chickadees are known to do this (I've never seen it myself), it would 
perhaps explain the hummers' apparent antipathy for them in particular. 

>> 
>> Jane
>> (Shoreham)
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On 9/6/2016 1:17 PM, Carole Babyak wrote:
>>> A few summers ago, late August I watched for a few days/before sunset, 2 
Immature Hummers who couldn't feed at the feeder because of 

>>> 
>>> a territorial male who kept chasing them away. I had 2 feeders (out of 
sight from each other) but just watched the one. One of the immatures 

>>> 
>>> went to the feeder and was chased by the male to the back of the house. The 
remaining immature went to the feeder to feed. This happened 

>>> 
>>> for about 1/2 hour until it became too dark. I had binoculars but couldn't 
distinguish between the immatures, otherwise they both had what looked 

>>> 
>>> like clear throats - no hint of an necklace like outline indicating a male. 
Don't want to say this was a plan but it sure looked like it, one kept 

>>> 
>>> the male busy while the other got a drink. Then in September they were 
gone, other Hummers came to feeders & flowers (jewelweed) but 

>>> 
>>> the 2 creative Immatures were gone, seemed very quiet. And my Hummers have 
chased Chickadees too, but the Chickadees were also getting a drink 

>>> 
>>> at the feeder.            amazing
>>> 
>>> Carole Babyak
> 
> Eve Ticknor
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
> Canada
> res: 613-925-5528
> cell: 613-859-9545
> 
> The Blue Nest
> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
> U S A
> res: 518-963-7404
> cell: 518-524-7377
> 
> http://aquavisions.me
> 
> If you go as far as you can see, you will then see enough to go even farther.
>    - John Wooden
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 5 Sep 2016 to 6 Sep 2016 (#2016-237)
> ***********************************************************
Subject: Re: Young Hummingbirds
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:27:02 -0400
I live on the NY side. I have 4 hummer feeders that hand off my porch, near the 
driveway. I have seen a few chases lately, but the juvenile that comes all the 
time checks everything out in case it is also a flower. The most interesting 
was a week or 2 ago when I watched it going all around my car, a Mazda Tribute 
which happens to be red! 


I also had an earlier visit by a male Downy Woodpecker who visited 2 of my 
feeders, perhaps getting a bit of nectar with his tongue. He was doing this for 
5 - 10 minutes. 


Eve

> On Sep 6, 2016, at 2:08 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> Great story.
> 
> Did you say the chickadees were getting a drink at the feeder? Did you see 
how they were reaching through those tiny ports to do that? 

> 
> If chickadees are known to do this (I've never seen it myself), it would 
perhaps explain the hummers' apparent antipathy for them in particular. 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
> On 9/6/2016 1:17 PM, Carole Babyak wrote:
>> A few summers ago, late August I watched for a few days/before sunset, 2 
Immature Hummers who couldn't feed at the feeder because of 

>> 
>> a territorial male who kept chasing them away. I had 2 feeders (out of sight 
from each other) but just watched the one. One of the immatures 

>> 
>> went to the feeder and was chased by the male to the back of the house. The 
remaining immature went to the feeder to feed. This happened 

>> 
>> for about 1/2 hour until it became too dark. I had binoculars but couldn't 
distinguish between the immatures, otherwise they both had what looked 

>> 
>> like clear throats - no hint of an necklace like outline indicating a male. 
Don't want to say this was a plan but it sure looked like it, one kept 

>> 
>> the male busy while the other got a drink. Then in September they were gone, 
other Hummers came to feeders & flowers (jewelweed) but 

>> 
>> the 2 creative Immatures were gone, seemed very quiet. And my Hummers have 
chased Chickadees too, but the Chickadees were also getting a drink 

>> 
>> at the feeder.            amazing
>> 
>> Carole Babyak
>> 

Eve Ticknor
Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

If you go as far as you can see, you will then see enough to go even farther.
    - John Wooden
Subject: Possible American three Toed
From: Thomas Berriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:16:26 -0400
On my way down from the summit of Mt. Manadnock at 3,000' elevation I heard
the soft clicking of a Black-backed Woodpecker. Normally I wouldn't
bushwhack after one in that dense habitat but since it was so high up the
Mt. wanted to get a documentation photo for the report. 200' feet off the
trail instead of the Black-backed,  I found what may have been a Three Toed
(poor documentation photos with ebird report) It flew off before I had a
whole lot of time with it but I heard it pecking another 150' away so
bushwhacked towards the sound only to be disappointed the pecking was from a
male Black-backed (the one I heard calling no doubt) But this other
woodpecker I had first seen flew by as I was looking at the Black-backed.
Both woodpeckers were pecking maybe 60' apart but it was so obstructed with
fallen trees by the time I could work my way to the sound it was quiet. I
hung out for another 20 minutes and nothing moved. I did manage to get a
photo of each bird, not a good photo. Any opinions would be welcome. By the
time I found my way back to the trail I heard pecking again but this was a
female Hairy woodpecker and was nothing remotely like the 2 in the bush.

 

I ran into 3 Bay-breasted also on the trail and had very good looks at them
as I phished they were very curious and hung out for a few minutes. Climbing
the fire tower, for once I had the upper hand on Boreal Chickadees. They
were below me and I got good looks at them from above.

 

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/view/checklist/S31452693 

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Re: Young Hummingbirds
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 14:08:04 -0400
Great story.

Did you say the chickadees were getting a drink at the feeder?  Did you 
see how they were reaching through those tiny ports to do that?

If chickadees are known to do this (I've never seen it myself), it would 
perhaps explain the hummers' apparent antipathy for them in particular.

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 9/6/2016 1:17 PM, Carole Babyak wrote:
> A few summers ago, late August I watched for a few days/before sunset, 2 
Immature Hummers who couldn't feed at the feeder because of 

>
> a territorial male who kept chasing them away. I had 2 feeders (out of sight 
from each other) but just watched the one. One of the immatures 

>
> went to the feeder and was chased by the male to the back of the house. The 
remaining immature went to the feeder to feed. This happened 

>
> for about 1/2 hour until it became too dark. I had binoculars but couldn't 
distinguish between the immatures, otherwise they both had what looked 

>
> like clear throats - no hint of an necklace like outline indicating a male. 
Don't want to say this was a plan but it sure looked like it, one kept 

>
> the male busy while the other got a drink. Then in September they were gone, 
other Hummers came to feeders & flowers (jewelweed) but 

>
> the 2 creative Immatures were gone, seemed very quiet. And my Hummers have 
chased Chickadees too, but the Chickadees were also getting a drink 

>
> at the feeder.            amazing
>
> Carole Babyak
>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 11:57:44 -0400
Me, too, infuriating.And pale version of Warbling Vireo song this
morning, also Eastern Peewee still in occasional heartbreak mode.
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
 Sent using Hushmail

On September 6, 2016 at 7:40 AM, "Sue"  wrote:It is GORGET, once again
auto- correct changed it!
Ive since turn it off.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: hummer behavior
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 11:34:30 -0400
Then there was my friend who had too much red lipstick on once, to the 
perplexity of a hummer. 

Subject: Rudy Turnstone Yes (Sandbar Causeway)
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 09:29:20 -0400
As of this message the Rudy Turnstone is still here. The American Golden
Plover was but flew to the east - may return later.

Good luck if you try!

Isis Erb


-- 
Isis Erb
Jericho, VT

Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 07:39:41 -0400
It is GORGET, once again auto- correct changed it!
Ive since turn it off.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Sep 5, 2016, at 3:58 PM, Jean Harrison  wrote:
> 
> EDU
Subject: Re: BCNH family
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 18:13:05 -0400
I can only picture it. Wonderful thought, and you get to keep it. Lucky
you!!!
Charlie La Rosa
Brattleboro

On Mon, Sep 5, 2016 at 4:23 PM, Barbara Brosnan  wrote:

> Picture yourself looking through your binoculars and finding at the top of
> a
> dead tree a Great Egret against a perfectly blue sky.  Below that egret in
> the same tree you then notice an adult Black-crowned Night-heron.  One
> branch to the right perches a juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron.  While
> you
> are still looking at this view, 2 more juvenile BCNHs fly in from a tree to
> the right and land, and then a Great Blue Heron cuts across the bottom of
> your view from left to right.  Unseen but known to you, another adult BCNH
> is in a leafy tree directly behind this tableau.
>
>
>
> This was our all-at-once view when we were canoeing on Little Otter Creek
> late morning on Labor day.  All this as we held our binoculars and our
> breath.  Too bad it wasn't a camera.  A video camera.  Other interesting
> birds on the trip included an American Bittern, a Solitary Sandpiper,
> Harriers and Marsh Wrens.
>
>
>
> Enjoy fall birding!
>
> Barbara Brosnan & John Chamberlain
>
> Weybridge
>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 17:05:37 -0400
My favorite Hummer oddity-- late one summer, I was sitting on my bed on 
second floor and reading when I realized there was a (presumably young) 
hummer hovering persistently an inch or two from the window next to the 
bed.  It kept hanging there and gazing intently in the window for 
several minutes, and I finally realized it must have been mesmerized by 
the expanse of bright red comforter on the bed.

I also have a friend who used to have an Irish setter with a very 
reddish coat and she said the dog was tormented every summer for a week 
or two when the young hummers fledged.

Jane
Shoreham


On 9/5/2016 4:51 PM, John Snell wrote:
> I saw a hummer actually trying to feed on the crest of a pileated. Just 
hovering and dipping in! 

>
> My best,
> John
> Montpelier
> Www.stilllearingtosee.com
>
>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 4:46 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>
>> I saw that once, too. The Pileated was banging away on the side of a house 
down the road, something I've never seen before, and the hummingbird was 
relentlessly dive-bombing its head. The Pileated didn't seem to notice. With 
that big red splotch on the Pileated's head, I wasn't sure whether the Hummer 
was trying to find the flower or was just harassing the Pileated for the hell 
of it. (No feeder at that house.) 

>>
>> I was on my way to the general store, and mentioned what I'd seen to the 
store owner, who said he'd just seen the same thing the other day in a spot 
down the road. 

>>
>> Jane
>> (Shoreham)
>>
>>
>>
>>> On 9/5/2016 4:29 PM, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
>>> I witnessed a male hummingbird attack a Pileated Woodpecker once while we
>>> were hiking on Snake Mountain. We couldn't believe it, but that little bird 

>>> harassed that giant woodpecker and, you guessed it, that little hummer won!
>>> The woodpecker took off for parts unknown.
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jane Stein
>>> Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 4:15 PM
>>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummingbirds
>>>
>>> Oh, good!  I was about to go Google that, thinking it was some arcane
>>> ornithological thing I'd never heard before!
>>>
>>> That's not something I ever remember seeing. I'll keep an eye out. Thanks! 

>>>
>>> Jane
>>>
>>>
>>>> On 9/5/2016 3:04 PM, Sue wrote:
>>>> That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>
>>>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on
>>> forget area with males more heavily streaked .
>>>>> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
>>>>>
>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out
>>> for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and
>>> start raising holy hell.  Can't tell about the adult females.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females?  I've
>>> never been able to figure it out.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Jane
>>>>>> (Shoreham)
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>>>>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a
>>>>>>> black-capped chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and
>>>>>>> aggressive, also pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each
>>>>>>> other and at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>>>>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>>>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>>>>> Brandon
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 16:51:22 -0400
I saw a hummer actually trying to feed on the crest of a pileated. Just 
hovering and dipping in! 


My best,
John
Montpelier 
Www.stilllearingtosee.com

> On Sep 5, 2016, at 4:46 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> I saw that once, too. The Pileated was banging away on the side of a house 
down the road, something I've never seen before, and the hummingbird was 
relentlessly dive-bombing its head. The Pileated didn't seem to notice. With 
that big red splotch on the Pileated's head, I wasn't sure whether the Hummer 
was trying to find the flower or was just harassing the Pileated for the hell 
of it. (No feeder at that house.) 

> 
> I was on my way to the general store, and mentioned what I'd seen to the 
store owner, who said he'd just seen the same thing the other day in a spot 
down the road. 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
>> On 9/5/2016 4:29 PM, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
>> I witnessed a male hummingbird attack a Pileated Woodpecker once while we
>> were hiking on Snake Mountain.  We couldn't believe it, but that little bird
>> harassed that giant woodpecker and, you guessed it, that little hummer won!
>> The woodpecker took off for parts unknown.
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jane Stein
>> Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 4:15 PM
>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummingbirds
>> 
>> Oh, good!  I was about to go Google that, thinking it was some arcane
>> ornithological thing I'd never heard before!
>> 
>> That's not something I ever remember seeing.  I'll keep an eye out.  Thanks!
>> 
>> Jane
>> 
>> 
>>> On 9/5/2016 3:04 PM, Sue wrote:
>>> That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>> 
>>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on
>> forget area with males more heavily streaked .
>>>> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>> 
>>>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out
>> for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and
>> start raising holy hell.  Can't tell about the adult females.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females?  I've
>> never been able to figure it out.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Jane
>>>>> (Shoreham)
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>>>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a
>>>>>> black-capped chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and
>>>>>> aggressive, also pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each
>>>>>> other and at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>>>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>>>> Brandon
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>> 
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 16:46:07 -0400
I saw that once, too.  The Pileated was banging away on the side of a 
house down the road, something I've never seen before, and the 
hummingbird was relentlessly dive-bombing its head.  The Pileated didn't 
seem to notice.  With that big red splotch on the Pileated's head, I 
wasn't sure whether the Hummer was trying to find the flower or was just 
harassing the Pileated for the hell of it. (No feeder at that house.)

I was on my way to the general store, and mentioned what I'd seen to the 
store owner, who said he'd just seen the same thing the other day in a 
spot down the road.

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 9/5/2016 4:29 PM, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
> I witnessed a male hummingbird attack a Pileated Woodpecker once while we
> were hiking on Snake Mountain.  We couldn't believe it, but that little bird
> harassed that giant woodpecker and, you guessed it, that little hummer won!
> The woodpecker took off for parts unknown.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jane Stein
> Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 4:15 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummingbirds
>
> Oh, good!  I was about to go Google that, thinking it was some arcane
> ornithological thing I'd never heard before!
>
> That's not something I ever remember seeing.  I'll keep an eye out.  Thanks!
>
> Jane
>
>
> On 9/5/2016 3:04 PM, Sue wrote:
>> That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>>
>>> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on
> forget area with males more heavily streaked .
>>> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>>>
>>>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out
> for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and
> start raising holy hell.  Can't tell about the adult females.
>>>>
>>>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females?  I've
> never been able to figure it out.
>>>>
>>>> Jane
>>>> (Shoreham)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a
>>>>> black-capped chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and
>>>>> aggressive, also pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>>>>
>>>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each
>>>>> other and at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>>> Brandon
>>>>>
>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 16:29:33 -0400
I witnessed a male hummingbird attack a Pileated Woodpecker once while we
were hiking on Snake Mountain.  We couldn't believe it, but that little bird
harassed that giant woodpecker and, you guessed it, that little hummer won!
The woodpecker took off for parts unknown.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jane Stein
Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 4:15 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummingbirds

Oh, good!  I was about to go Google that, thinking it was some arcane
ornithological thing I'd never heard before!

That's not something I ever remember seeing.  I'll keep an eye out.  Thanks!

Jane


On 9/5/2016 3:04 PM, Sue wrote:
> That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>
>> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on
forget area with males more heavily streaked .
>> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>>
>>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out
for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and
start raising holy hell.  Can't tell about the adult females.
>>>
>>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females?  I've
never been able to figure it out.
>>>
>>> Jane
>>> (Shoreham)
>>>
>>>
>>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a 
>>>> black-capped chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and 
>>>> aggressive, also pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>>>
>>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each 
>>>> other and at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>> Brandon
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>
>
Subject: BCNH family
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 16:23:03 -0400
Picture yourself looking through your binoculars and finding at the top of a
dead tree a Great Egret against a perfectly blue sky.  Below that egret in
the same tree you then notice an adult Black-crowned Night-heron.  One
branch to the right perches a juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron.  While you
are still looking at this view, 2 more juvenile BCNHs fly in from a tree to
the right and land, and then a Great Blue Heron cuts across the bottom of
your view from left to right.  Unseen but known to you, another adult BCNH
is in a leafy tree directly behind this tableau. 

 

This was our all-at-once view when we were canoeing on Little Otter Creek
late morning on Labor day.  All this as we held our binoculars and our
breath.  Too bad it wasn't a camera.  A video camera.  Other interesting
birds on the trip included an American Bittern, a Solitary Sandpiper,
Harriers and Marsh Wrens.

 

Enjoy fall birding!

Barbara Brosnan & John Chamberlain

Weybridge   
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 16:15:10 -0400
Oh, good!  I was about to go Google that, thinking it was some arcane 
ornithological thing I'd never heard before!

That's not something I ever remember seeing.  I'll keep an eye out.  Thanks!

Jane


On 9/5/2016 3:04 PM, Sue wrote:
> That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>
>> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on forget 
area with males more heavily streaked . 

>> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>>
>>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out 
for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and 
start raising holy hell. Can't tell about the adult females. 

>>>
>>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females? I've 
never been able to figure it out. 

>>>
>>> Jane
>>> (Shoreham)
>>>
>>>
>>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a black-capped
>>>> chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and aggressive, also
>>>> pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>>>
>>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each other and
>>>> at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>> Brandon
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>
>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Jean Harrison <seajean AT CRUZIO.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 15:58:42 -0400
What's the "forget area"?  :>)

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Sue
Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 3:04 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummingbirds

That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!

Sent from my iPod

> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on
forget area with males more heavily streaked .
> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>> 
>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out
for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and
start raising holy hell.  Can't tell about the adult females.
>> 
>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females?  I've
never been able to figure it out.
>> 
>> Jane
>> (Shoreham)
>> 
>> 
>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a 
>>> black-capped chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and 
>>> aggressive, also pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>> 
>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each 
>>> other and at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>> Sue Wetmore
>>> Brandon
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>> 
Subject: Re: Ruddy Turnstone continues at Sandbar Causeway
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 15:55:26 -0400
I call that “County Hedging”, Jim.

I recall an early January morning a few years ago when the whole idea of County 
Counts was just beginning. Patty Haynes, Pat Folsom, Ali Wagner and I drove 
over the gap from Middlebury back to Rochester because there’s stretch up 
there where three or four counties are crossed. We drove and watched the map. 
And drove and watched for birds. And drove and drove and drove some more. 
Nothing. Totally blanked on what was to be the great year-starting county coup. 


Then…there it was. A bird. It darted across the road in front of us. Brakes 
slammed. Tires skidded. Doors flew open in the middle of the road. Voices 
yelled, “Get that f——ing bird!!!” 


We did. It has to have been the greatest single Blue Jay ever recorded in 
Vermont. No one could really figure out what county we were really in. I think 
that bird was marked in at least 12 of them. :) 


County Hedging.  It’s a great adventure sport!

Scott
Moretown



> On Sep 5, 2016, at 8:59 AM, Jim Mead  wrote:
> 
> Hello all,
> 
> I was at the Sandbar Causeway this morning and did see the continuing (today 
is the 3rd day it has been there) Ruddy Turnstone. I also saw 9 other shorebird 
species: Semipalmated Plover-24, Killdeer- 2, Sanderling-1, Least Sandpiper-23, 
White-rumped Sandpiper-2, Pectoral Sandpiper-5, Semipalmated sandpiper-4, 
Greater Yellowlegs-11 & Lesser Yellowlegs-10. I was on Rte. 2 and drove past 
the Sandbar State Park while heading east. I then pulled over & parked in the 
large parking area on the left side of the road. From there I walked further 
east toward South Hero about .3 of a mile, until I reached the bridge. That is 
also where the border between Chittenden and Grand Isle Counties meet. In other 
words you can get all of the birds seen from that location in both counties at 
the same time. The shorebirds are on a mudflat area on the left or south side 
of the bridge. My complete list is on eBird. 

> 
> Good luck if you try for it and/or them.
> 
> Enjoy Birds,
> 
> Jim mead
> 
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 15:04:28 -0400
That is unmarked throats ---- spell correct at work!

Sent from my iPod

> On Sep 5, 2016, at 2:04 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on forget 
area with males more heavily streaked . 

> The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>> 
>> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out for 
more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and start 
raising holy hell. Can't tell about the adult females. 

>> 
>> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females? I've never 
been able to figure it out. 

>> 
>> Jane
>> (Shoreham)
>> 
>> 
>>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a black-capped
>>> chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and aggressive, also
>>> pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>>> 
>>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each other and
>>> at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>>> Sue Wetmore
>>> Brandon
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>> 
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 14:04:30 -0400
Adult females have an unarmed throat . Immatures have the markings on forget 
area with males more heavily streaked . 

The Peterson Hummingbird field guide is my source.

Sent from my iPod

> On Sep 5, 2016, at 1:58 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out for 
more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge and start 
raising holy hell. Can't tell about the adult females. 

> 
> Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females? I've never 
been able to figure it out. 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
>> On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
>> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a black-capped
>> chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and aggressive, also
>> pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>> 
>> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>> 
>> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each other and
>> at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
>> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
>> Sue Wetmore
>> Brandon
>> 
>> Sent from my iPod
>> 
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 13:58:11 -0400
In my experience, any adult males that are still around usually book out 
for more peaceful feeding grounds once those obstreperous young fledge 
and start raising holy hell.  Can't tell about the adult females.

Do you know of a way to tell immature hummers from adult females?  I've 
never been able to figure it out.

Jane
(Shoreham)


On 9/5/2016 1:42 PM, Eugenia Cooke wrote:
> We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a black-capped
> chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and aggressive, also
> pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.
>
> On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>
> Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each other and
> at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
> I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
Subject: Indigo buntings Brandon Pearl St, Sep 3, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 13:55:51 -0400
Yesterday's early walk had bird activity.
The buntings were agitated and using there call note.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: September 5, 2016 at 1:46:07 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, Sep 3, 2016
> 
> Brandon Pearl St, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Sep 3, 2016 7:00 AM - 9:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.3 mile(s)
> 35 species
> 
> Wood Duck  17
> Mallard  6
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Osprey  1
> Mourning Dove  15
> Barred Owl  1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Hairy Woodpecker  3
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Phoebe  7
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1     doing a "weeet" call note
> Red-eyed Vireo  2     one was begging food from the other
> Blue Jay  11
> American Crow  7
> Common Raven  1
> Black-capped Chickadee  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  3
> House Wren  1
> Eastern Bluebird  1
> American Robin  10
> Gray Catbird  4
> European Starling  27
> Cedar Waxwing  1
> Common Yellowthroat  4
> Black-throated Green Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  4
> Song Sparrow  4
> Swamp Sparrow  1
> Northern Cardinal  1
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
> Indigo Bunting  3     one transitioning male plus 2 immatures.
> American Goldfinch  10
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31433567
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 10:42:28 -0700
We've watched an  immature hummingbird relentlessly chasing a black-capped
chickadee for the past 15 minutes or so. Very bold and aggressive, also
pursued a goldfinch for a few minutes.

On Sep 5, 2016 1:35 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:

Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each other and
at on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out.
I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Hummingbirds
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 13:34:54 -0400
Hummingbirds have been having wars here in my yard. Chasing each other and at 
on point one hovered in front of me just checking me out. 

I believe only immatures are left as I've not seen any adults.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod