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Updated on Friday, July 29 at 06:57 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Himalayan Monal,©Tony Disley

29 Jul Osprey, Herons, turtles and snakes [JJ Allen ]
28 Jul White-rumped, pectoral sandpipers- Panton [Tyler Pockette ]
28 Jul Warbler activity [Walter Medwid ]
27 Jul Re: Towhee etc. [Jan Miles ]
27 Jul Re: Towhee etc. [Sue ]
27 Jul Re: Towhee etc. [Jan Miles ]
27 Jul Re: Towhee etc. [Jan Miles ]
27 Jul Towhee etc. [Sue ]
27 Jul - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 27, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
27 Jul - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 27, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
26 Jul Burlington Backyard Surprise [Ann Curran ]
25 Jul Belated Mansfield update [Chris Rimmer ]
25 Jul Egret Shelburne Bay, Jul 25, 2016 [Sue ]
25 Jul Bluebirds and chickadees [Julie Filiberti ]
25 Jul mystery pigeon/dove revisited [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jul Re: help needed with sound [Susan Fogleman ]
24 Jul Shelburne Farms [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jul Re: help needed with sound [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jul Re: help needed with sound [Tyler Pockette ]
24 Jul Re: help needed with sound [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jul Re: help needed with sound [Susan Fogleman ]
24 Jul Re: help needed with sound - YES ECDO! [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jul help needed with sound [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jul Bobolinks!Union St Brandon, Jul 24, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
24 Jul Re: Gray Catbird [Justin Lawson ]
24 Jul Re: Gray Catbird [Brennan Michaels ]
24 Jul Gray Catbird [Becky Giroux ]
24 Jul hummers everywhere [Maeve Kim ]
23 Jul Red bellied woodpeckers [carolclyde ]
23 Jul Re: Evening grosbeaks visit [betty jillson ]
22 Jul Whimbrel? [Michele Patenaude ]
21 Jul Thrushes Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 21, 2016 [Sue ]
20 Jul Loons [Sue ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Eric Hynes ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Kent McFarland ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Kent McFarland ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Kent McFarland ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Ruth ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Roo Slagle ]
20 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
20 Jul Little Blue Heron at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
20 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Michele Patenaude ]
20 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Liz ]
20 Jul Evening grosbeaks visit [Michael MacCaskey ]
20 Jul Little Blue Heron or Snowy Egret at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
19 Jul Tool for following rare birds on eBird using cell phone [Steve Mirick ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Nancy Goodrich ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Gary Chapin ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Tyler Pockette ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Taj Schottland ]
19 Jul Re: SHOREBIRDS!Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Jul 19, 2016 [Marcy Blauvelt ]
19 Jul SHOREBIRDS!Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Jul 19, 2016 [Sue ]
19 Jul Button Bay State Park, Jul 19, 2016 [Sue ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Topofvt ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Isis Erb ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Tyler Pockette ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Jim Mead ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Isis Erb ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Isis Erb ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Jim Mead ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Tyler Pockette ]
19 Jul Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum [Bruce MacPherson ]
18 Jul Shorebirds, Ferrisburgh [Ron Payne ]
18 Jul Whimbrel - Shelburne Farms [Taj Schottland ]
17 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Jul 16, 2016 [Fred Bates ]
16 Jul Re: Mansfield update [Becky Giroux ]
16 Jul Glen Lake - Castleton (206 acres), Jul 16, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
16 Jul Re: anyone want birding magazines? [Martha McClintock ]
16 Jul anyone want birding magazines? [Maeve Kim ]
16 Jul Mansfield update [Chris Rimmer ]
15 Jul Re: hummingbird with wire or something attached [Maeve Kim ]
15 Jul Re: hummingbird with wire or something attached [hilke breder ]
15 Jul hummingbird with wire or something attached [Maeve Kim ]
15 Jul Loons Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Jul 15, 2016 [Sue ]
14 Jul Bird memory [John Snell ]

Subject: Osprey, Herons, turtles and snakes
From: JJ Allen <jjapple88 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 07:55:32 -0400
Osprey family still in residence at Kingsland Bay along with Great Egret, 
Black-crowned Night Heron, Great Blue, a very large Painted Turtle and a large 
beautiful Northern Water Snake (completely harmless for those who don’t 
know). Also a fair number or Common Terns. 

Subject: White-rumped, pectoral sandpipers- Panton
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 19:56:41 -0400
Tonight there were plenty of shorebirds at the confluence of Dead Creek and
Otter Creek in Panton. About 50 least sandpipers, 10 semipalmated
sandpipers, about a dozen killdeer and a few spotted sandpipers. There were
also 5 white-rumped sandpipers and a lone pectoral sandpiper. Looks like
shorebird migration is on! Time to go check your favorite shorebird
hotspots.
Subject: Warbler activity
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 18:53:30 -0400
With hot, humid conditions and storms passing thru, there was lots of
warbler activity in the trees around our home this pm..chestnut sided,
redstarts and yellow rumps very actively feeding and calling. From Derby.
Subject: Re: Towhee etc.
From: Jan Miles <jancmiles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 19:19:17 -0400
Thanks, yes.   
The Yellow Eyed Junco.  You're good!
I went with VENT for 178 species, 65 of which were new to me.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 7:03 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> I have seen them in Arizona too! The towhees in Florida have yellow eyes.
> Sue Wetmore 
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 6:56 PM, Jan Miles  wrote:
>> 
>> Hi Sue,
>> I'm a follower in Montpelier who just had the opportunity to observe the 
Spotted Towhee in AZ. Any day with a Towhee is a good day! 

>> Jan
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 3:24 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>> 
>>> The silence of a hot summer's day was broken by a towhee's 
>>> Invitation to drink tea, which I hoped was iced. Hermit thrush's ethereal 
song floated thru the woods much to my delight. As I passed the spot of wood 
pewee I whistled its plaintive song and was answered and visited by the 
diminutive flycatcher. Finally red-eyed vireos joined in but half-heartedly. 

>>> The heat and humidity has all fatigued.
>>> Sue Wetmore
>>> Brandon
>>> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Towhee etc.
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 19:03:54 -0400
I have seen them in Arizona too! The towhees in Florida have yellow eyes.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 6:56 PM, Jan Miles  wrote:
> 
> Hi Sue,
> I'm a follower in Montpelier who just had the opportunity to observe the 
Spotted Towhee in AZ. Any day with a Towhee is a good day! 

> Jan
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 3:24 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>> 
>> The silence of a hot summer's day was broken by a towhee's 
>> Invitation to drink tea, which I hoped was iced. Hermit thrush's ethereal 
song floated thru the woods much to my delight. As I passed the spot of wood 
pewee I whistled its plaintive song and was answered and visited by the 
diminutive flycatcher. Finally red-eyed vireos joined in but half-heartedly. 

>> The heat and humidity has all fatigued.
>> Sue Wetmore
>> Brandon
>> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Towhee etc.
From: Jan Miles <jancmiles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 18:57:37 -0400
And, the Western Wood Pewee...

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 3:24 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> The silence of a hot summer's day was broken by a towhee's 
> Invitation to drink tea, which I hoped was iced. Hermit thrush's ethereal 
song floated thru the woods much to my delight. As I passed the spot of wood 
pewee I whistled its plaintive song and was answered and visited by the 
diminutive flycatcher. Finally red-eyed vireos joined in but half-heartedly. 

> The heat and humidity has all fatigued.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Towhee etc.
From: Jan Miles <jancmiles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 18:56:02 -0400
Hi Sue,
I'm a follower in Montpelier who just had the opportunity to observe the 
Spotted Towhee in AZ. Any day with a Towhee is a good day! 

Jan

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 3:24 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> The silence of a hot summer's day was broken by a towhee's 
> Invitation to drink tea, which I hoped was iced. Hermit thrush's ethereal 
song floated thru the woods much to my delight. As I passed the spot of wood 
pewee I whistled its plaintive song and was answered and visited by the 
diminutive flycatcher. Finally red-eyed vireos joined in but half-heartedly. 

> The heat and humidity has all fatigued.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Towhee etc.
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 15:24:31 -0400
The silence of a hot summer's day was broken by a towhee's 
Invitation to drink tea, which I hoped was iced. Hermit thrush's ethereal song 
floated thru the woods much to my delight. As I passed the spot of wood pewee I 
whistled its plaintive song and was answered and visited by the diminutive 
flycatcher. Finally red-eyed vireos joined in but half-heartedly. 

The heat and humidity has all fatigued.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon
Sent from my iPod
Subject: - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 27, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 17:02:05 +0000
Things are quiet at the W. Rutland Marsh this morning. Water levels are 
extremely low. 

Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 12:38:54 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 27, 2016 

West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jul 27, 2016 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
0.25 mile(s) 
16 species 

Wood Duck 1 
Mallard 1 
Mourning Dove 2 
Alder Flycatcher 3 still singing. 
American Crow 2 
Black-capped Chickadee 2 
Tufted Titmouse 2 
Marsh Wren 2 
Gray Catbird 2 
Cedar Waxwing 4 
Song Sparrow 1 
Swamp Sparrow 4 
Northern Cardinal 2 
Red-winged Blackbird 5 
Common Grackle 1 
American Goldfinch 2 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30869803 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 27, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:52:49 +0000
Rather quiet at the W.Rutland marsh this morning. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 12:36:33 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 27, 2016 

West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jul 27, 2016 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
0.25 mile(s) 
16 species 

Wood Duck 1 
Mallard 1 
Mourning Dove 2 
Alder Flycatcher 3 still singing. 
American Crow 2 
Black-capped Chickadee 2 
Tufted Titmouse 2 
Marsh Wren 2 
Gray Catbird 2 
Cedar Waxwing 4 
Song Sparrow 1 
Swamp Sparrow 4 
Northern Cardinal 2 
Red-winged Blackbird 5 
Common Grackle 1 
American Goldfinch 2 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30869803 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Burlington Backyard Surprise
From: Ann Curran <acurran802 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 08:14:57 -0400
To our surprise and joy, a Brown Thrasher has been hanging around for a few 
days. Two young Cardinals appeared yesterday. 


Ann and Fred Curran
Subject: Belated Mansfield update
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 22:12:47 -0400
This is a very late update on VCE's Mt. Mansfield field trip last
Wed-Thurs, our penultimate weekly visit there. Vocalizing was much reduced
from a week earlier, and activity in our 25 mist nets fell off a bit,
despite an influx of both local and non-local juvenile birds. Many adults
are now in early stages of flight feather molt, and they will soon stop
moving much, skulking through the few weeks when their flight abilities are
hampered from the demands of molt.

Our 49 mist net captures included:

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  1 adult
Black-capped Chickadee  1 juvenile
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2 juveniles (first appearance of the species this
year)
Bicknell's Thrush  6 (1 new and 1 repeat female, one male banded in 2014, 3
juveniles)
Swainson's Thrush  2 adult males
American Robin  1 adult male
Ovenbird  2 (1 adult in heavy flight feather molt, 1 immature)
Blackpoll Warbler  7 (2 new males, 3 juveniles, 2 within-season recaptures)
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 immature female
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  7 (5 new adult males, 1 repeat female, 1
juvenile)
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  12 (4 adults, 8 juveniles)
White-throated Sparrow  6 (4 new adult males, 1 repeat male, 1 juvenile)
Song Sparrow  1 juvenile (our first-ever summer capture on the mountain)

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30850387

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Egret Shelburne Bay, Jul 25, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 19:25:18 -0400
A Great Egret still in nuptial plumage was seen preening.
An Osprey needs to be added to this list.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: July 25, 2016 at 7:23:20 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Shelburne Bay, Jul 25, 2016
> 
> Shelburne Bay, Chittenden, Vermont, US
> Jul 25, 2016 1:00 PM - 1:20 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 7 species
> 
> Canada Goose  65
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Great Egret  1
> Killdeer  15
> Ring-billed Gull  5
> Caspian Tern  3
> Song Sparrow  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30849128
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Bluebirds and chickadees
From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 15:44:14 -0400
This happened twice in my yard today. I was out in the garden and heard the 
chickadees making a ruckus up in the trees. Without my bins :( , I walked 
around a bit to see if I could spot what was up. I spotted what I thought was a 
bluebird at the top of one of the dead trees where the noises were coming from. 
I might add that I've never had a bluebird in my yard before. I didn't see any 
hawks or anything else that would cause such a commotion. Things eventually 
quieted down and we all resumed our activities. Later, I was on my porch when I 
heard another group of chickadees carrying on. This time with my bins I looked 
around. Again I spotted, not one, but two bluebirds in the trees. While I was 
watching I saw the chickadees basically chase the male out of the yard. I 
looked around online and saw that there is some competition between the species 
over nesting cavities, but that was not the case in my yard. I'm wondering if 
anyone might have ever seen this behavior or might have! 

  a clue as to why the bluebirds' presence upset the chickadees so much. 

Sent from my iPad
Subject: mystery pigeon/dove revisited
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 10:57:12 -0400
I’ve now listened to a wide assortment of sounds, looking for the match for the 
one I listened to for several minutes yesterday at Shelburne Farms. (One 
problem is holding onto the memory while I hear other noises!) What about a 
Band-tailed Pigeon? That’s a species that would be much more likely than a 
Eurasian Collared Dove to sing from the top of a tree (which is where the sound 
seemed to be coming from) - and I photographed one in Vermont in June 2015. 
Maybe “my” Jericho bird is now hanging out in Shelburne. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: help needed with sound
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 20:03:05 -0400
Uh, oh!


Susan Fogleman
Campton NH
sfogleman AT roadrunner.com


On Jul 24, 2016, at 2:34 PM, Maeve Kim wrote:

> I checked xeno-canto (my go-to site for sound also) - and I’m pretty much 
convinced that I listened to a Eurasian Collared Dove this morning. 

> 
> Maeve Kim
> 
> 
> On Jul 24, 2016, at 1:59 PM, Susan Fogleman  wrote:
> 
>> Hi, Maeve,
>> 
>> Barred Owls sometimes do "sit around in daytime and make loud cooing 
noises." I have had 'conversations' with them many times. Last summer there 
were a couple of fledgling Barred Owls hanging out in the woods near our house 
that vocalized quite frequently during the day using soft "coo" type sounds. 

>> 
>> However, I'm [worriedly] wondering if you may have heard the vanguard of the 
dastardly invader: Eurasian Collared Dove. That species is spreading rapidly 
across the country, and it's only a matter of time before they are all over New 
England. Six years ago I was blown away seeing them in Montana and Idaho. Until 
then I hadn't realized they'd spread so far north. 

>> 
>> Have you checked xeno-canto for comparisons to what you heard? I highly 
recommend that site. 

>> 
>> 
>> Susan Fogleman
>> Campton NH
>> sfogleman AT roadrunner.com
>> 
>> On Jul 24, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Maeve Kim wrote:
>> 
>>> This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne Farms 
(between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning Dove’s call 
but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about a second, with 
a little over a second between calls - for many minutes. OOOOoooOOO over and 
over again - about forty times. I thought of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing 
noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are both Barred Owls and Great Horned 
Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known either species to sit around in 
daytime and make loud cooing noises. 

>>> 
>>> Any other ideas? 
>>> 
>>> Maeve Kim
>>> Jericho Center
Subject: Shelburne Farms
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 19:40:26 -0400
I forgot to remind everyone before that Shelburne Farms is welcoming but it’s 
not wide-open. If anyone goes to listen or look for a possible Eurasian 
Collared Dove near the Market Garden, or with the pigeons at the dairy barn, 
please go in the visitor center first and pay the small fee (unless you’re a 
member, of course). You can also get free day passes at most libraries. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: help needed with sound
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 14:58:40 -0400
Good point, Tyler. Because the trails wind and wander, I felt that I’d come a 
long way from the barns, but actually the location was close to the Market 
Garden (where there are chickens and other farm animals) and not all that far 
from the dairy barn. 


Maeve Kim


On Jul 24, 2016, at 2:51 PM, Tyler Pockette  wrote:

> Hi all,
> 
> Should anyone go to Shelburne Farms in search of Maeve's possible Eurasian
> Collared Dove, it wouldn't hurt to search the barns and cattle feeding
> areas in addition to the location she mentioned. Eurasian Collared Doves
> (in my experience) typically aren't found in forested areas and instead
> prefer more open areas, especially suburban type habitats, but I suspect
> the best locations to find a EUCD at Shelburne Farms would near the barns.
> Their habitat preference is pretty similar to that of a Rock Pigeon so I
> wouldn't expect to be finding one in a forest.
> 
> Good luck! And as always, report any findings!
> 
> -Tyler Pockette
> 
> On Sun, Jul 24, 2016 at 2:34 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
>> I checked xeno-canto (my go-to site for sound also) - and I’m pretty much
>> convinced that I listened to a Eurasian Collared Dove this morning.
>> 
>> Maeve Kim
>> 
>> 
>> On Jul 24, 2016, at 1:59 PM, Susan Fogleman 
>> wrote:
>> 
>>> Hi, Maeve,
>>> 
>>> Barred Owls sometimes do "sit around in daytime and make loud cooing
>> noises."  I have had 'conversations' with them many times.  Last summer
>> there were a couple of fledgling Barred Owls hanging out in the woods near
>> our house that vocalized quite frequently during the day using soft "coo"
>> type sounds.
>>> 
>>> However, I'm [worriedly] wondering if you may have heard the vanguard of
>> the dastardly invader: Eurasian Collared Dove.  That species is spreading
>> rapidly across the country, and it's only a matter of time before they are
>> all over New England.  Six years ago I was blown away seeing them in
>> Montana and Idaho.  Until then I hadn't realized they'd spread so far north.
>>> 
>>> Have you checked xeno-canto for comparisons to what you heard?  I highly
>> recommend that site.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Susan Fogleman
>>> Campton NH
>>> sfogleman AT roadrunner.com
>>> 
>>> On Jul 24, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Maeve Kim wrote:
>>> 
>>>> This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne
>> Farms (between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning
>> Dove’s call but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about
>> a second, with a little over a second between calls - for many minutes.
>> OOOOoooOOO over and over again - about forty times. I thought of the
>> Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are
>> both Barred Owls and Great Horned Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known
>> either species to sit around in daytime and make loud cooing noises.
>>>> 
>>>> Any other ideas?
>>>> 
>>>> Maeve Kim
>>>> Jericho Center
>> 
Subject: Re: help needed with sound
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 14:51:58 -0400
Hi all,

Should anyone go to Shelburne Farms in search of Maeve's possible Eurasian
Collared Dove, it wouldn't hurt to search the barns and cattle feeding
areas in addition to the location she mentioned. Eurasian Collared Doves
(in my experience) typically aren't found in forested areas and instead
prefer more open areas, especially suburban type habitats, but I suspect
the best locations to find a EUCD at Shelburne Farms would near the barns.
Their habitat preference is pretty similar to that of a Rock Pigeon so I
wouldn't expect to be finding one in a forest.

Good luck! And as always, report any findings!

-Tyler Pockette

On Sun, Jul 24, 2016 at 2:34 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> I checked xeno-canto (my go-to site for sound also) - and I’m pretty much
> convinced that I listened to a Eurasian Collared Dove this morning.
>
> Maeve Kim
>
>
> On Jul 24, 2016, at 1:59 PM, Susan Fogleman 
> wrote:
>
> > Hi, Maeve,
> >
> > Barred Owls sometimes do "sit around in daytime and make loud cooing
> noises."  I have had 'conversations' with them many times.  Last summer
> there were a couple of fledgling Barred Owls hanging out in the woods near
> our house that vocalized quite frequently during the day using soft "coo"
> type sounds.
> >
> > However, I'm [worriedly] wondering if you may have heard the vanguard of
> the dastardly invader: Eurasian Collared Dove.  That species is spreading
> rapidly across the country, and it's only a matter of time before they are
> all over New England.  Six years ago I was blown away seeing them in
> Montana and Idaho.  Until then I hadn't realized they'd spread so far north.
> >
> > Have you checked xeno-canto for comparisons to what you heard?  I highly
> recommend that site.
> >
> >
> > Susan Fogleman
> > Campton NH
> > sfogleman AT roadrunner.com
> >
> > On Jul 24, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> >
> >> This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne
> Farms (between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning
> Dove’s call but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about
> a second, with a little over a second between calls - for many minutes.
> OOOOoooOOO over and over again - about forty times. I thought of the
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are
> both Barred Owls and Great Horned Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known
> either species to sit around in daytime and make loud cooing noises.
> >>
> >> Any other ideas?
> >>
> >> Maeve Kim
> >> Jericho Center
>
Subject: Re: help needed with sound
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 14:34:53 -0400
I checked xeno-canto (my go-to site for sound also) - and I’m pretty much 
convinced that I listened to a Eurasian Collared Dove this morning. 


Maeve Kim


On Jul 24, 2016, at 1:59 PM, Susan Fogleman  wrote:

> Hi, Maeve,
> 
> Barred Owls sometimes do "sit around in daytime and make loud cooing noises." 
I have had 'conversations' with them many times. Last summer there were a 
couple of fledgling Barred Owls hanging out in the woods near our house that 
vocalized quite frequently during the day using soft "coo" type sounds. 

> 
> However, I'm [worriedly] wondering if you may have heard the vanguard of the 
dastardly invader: Eurasian Collared Dove. That species is spreading rapidly 
across the country, and it's only a matter of time before they are all over New 
England. Six years ago I was blown away seeing them in Montana and Idaho. Until 
then I hadn't realized they'd spread so far north. 

> 
> Have you checked xeno-canto for comparisons to what you heard? I highly 
recommend that site. 

> 
> 
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
> sfogleman AT roadrunner.com
> 
> On Jul 24, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> 
>> This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne Farms 
(between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning Dove’s call 
but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about a second, with 
a little over a second between calls - for many minutes. OOOOoooOOO over and 
over again - about forty times. I thought of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing 
noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are both Barred Owls and Great Horned 
Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known either species to sit around in 
daytime and make loud cooing noises. 

>> 
>> Any other ideas? 
>> 
>> Maeve Kim
>> Jericho Center
Subject: Re: help needed with sound
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 13:59:19 -0400
Hi, Maeve,

Barred Owls sometimes do "sit around in daytime and make loud cooing noises." I 
have had 'conversations' with them many times. Last summer there were a couple 
of fledgling Barred Owls hanging out in the woods near our house that vocalized 
quite frequently during the day using soft "coo" type sounds. 


However, I'm [worriedly] wondering if you may have heard the vanguard of the 
dastardly invader: Eurasian Collared Dove. That species is spreading rapidly 
across the country, and it's only a matter of time before they are all over New 
England. Six years ago I was blown away seeing them in Montana and Idaho. Until 
then I hadn't realized they'd spread so far north. 


Have you checked xeno-canto for comparisons to what you heard? I highly 
recommend that site. 



Susan Fogleman
Campton NH
sfogleman AT roadrunner.com

On Jul 24, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Maeve Kim wrote:

> This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne Farms 
(between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning Dove’s call 
but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about a second, with 
a little over a second between calls - for many minutes. OOOOoooOOO over and 
over again - about forty times. I thought of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing 
noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are both Barred Owls and Great Horned 
Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known either species to sit around in 
daytime and make loud cooing noises. 

> 
> Any other ideas? 
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: Re: help needed with sound - YES ECDO!
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 13:56:13 -0400
BINGO! I just listened to the first example on the Cornell Lab of Ornithology 
site and it sounds just about perfect. Now I wish I’d done more investigating - 
but I would have had to walk across an area that isn’t open for visitors. I may 
head back tomorrow and try again. 


This species has shown up in Vermont only once before, back in 2009. I’ll 
contact Matt at Shelburne Farms to see if they’ve been introduced - but I 
strongly doubt it. The Farm does a very good job of supporting native habitat 
and native wildlife, rather than importing exotics. 


If anyone else wants to find the same place, you’ll have to walk. The bird was 
in the wooded hills between Lone Tree Hill and the lake. 


Thanks, Carl!

Maeve Kim

On Jul 24, 2016, at 1:43 PM, Carl Runge 
<0000009209546543-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 


> The first time I heard a Eurasian Collared Dove in Georgia, I thought I was 
listening to a Barred Owl until I saw it. Why they would be in Vermont I don't 
know unless someone introduced them at the Farm. 

> Carl
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jul 24, 2016, at 12:49 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
>> 
>> This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne Farms 
(between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning Dove’s call 
but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about a second, with 
a little over a second between calls - for many minutes. OOOOoooOOO over and 
over again - about forty times. I thought of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing 
noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are both Barred Owls and Great Horned 
Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known either species to sit around in 
daytime and make loud cooing noises. 

>> 
>> Any other ideas? 
>> 
>> Maeve Kim
>> Jericho Center
Subject: help needed with sound
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 12:49:51 -0400
This morning a very odd noise was coming from the woods at Shelburne Farms 
(between the Farm Barn and the Coach Barn). It resembled a Mourning Dove’s call 
but was much louder, deeper and raspier. Each call lasted about a second, with 
a little over a second between calls - for many minutes. OOOOoooOOO over and 
over again - about forty times. I thought of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo’s coo-ing 
noise, but it didn’t seem right. There are both Barred Owls and Great Horned 
Owls in those woods, but I’ve never known either species to sit around in 
daytime and make loud cooing noises. 


Any other ideas? 

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Bobolinks!Union St Brandon, Jul 24, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 16:08:25 +0000
While bobolinks flew about in small groups Willow Flycatcher "fitz-bewed" to be 
answered by an Alder who sang "ray-beer". 

Recently fledged common yellowthroats and yellow warblers were curious and were 
followed by anxious parents. A indigo bunting glowed in the morning sun 

while it sang a greeting. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2016 12:02:39 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Jul 24, 2016 

Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jul 24, 2016 7:00 AM - 9:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
39 species 

Canada Goose 2 
Wood Duck 6 
Great Blue Heron 2 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 3 
Mourning Dove 5 
Chimney Swift 1 
Downy Woodpecker 3 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1 
Alder Flycatcher 1 
Willow Flycatcher 1 
Eastern Phoebe 2 
Great Crested Flycatcher 2 
Warbling Vireo 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 2 
Blue Jay 1 
American Crow 1 
Common Raven 1 
Bank Swallow 1 
Barn Swallow 32 
Cliff Swallow 1 
Tufted Titmouse 1 
Veery 2 
American Robin 5 
Gray Catbird 6 
European Starling 9 
Cedar Waxwing 5 
Common Yellowthroat 11 
Yellow Warbler 5 
Chipping Sparrow 1 
Song Sparrow 13 
Swamp Sparrow 1 
Northern Cardinal 5 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 
Indigo Bunting 2 
Bobolink 47 fledglings--males and females all flying about the fields. 
Red-winged Blackbird 18 
Common Grackle 1 
American Goldfinch 15 
House Sparrow 4 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30828311 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Re: Gray Catbird
From: Justin Lawson <justindlawson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 10:52:19 -0400
cowbirds. :)

On Sunday, July 24, 2016, Brennan Michaels  wrote:

> I thought catbirds laid their legs in other birds' nests.
>
> On Sun, Jul 24, 2016 at 10:39 AM, Becky Giroux  > wrote:
>
> > Saturday I spent an hour with my parents on their front porch watching a
> > Catbird feeding its young.  Their nest is in a Weiglea Bush 5' off the
> > ground and next to the sidewalk.   The nest is not readily visible unless
> > really looking for it.  The adult would enter the bush from the south,
> hop
> > from branch to branch up to the nest; it would leave in the same manor.
> It
> > also hung out in the lower branches to watch for insects on the lawn.  It
> > tried many times to grab a moth but never caught it.  Once the bird flew
> > far enough away I ran over to the bush peeked in with bins  saw the two
> > little ones and suddenly the adult was back on the nest.  What a
> > protector.  I departed back to the porch and she (I'm assuming its the
> > female) continued to hunt for insects in the grass.  Really didn't seem
> to
> > be bothered by our sitting on the porch or the occasional passerby.  My
> > husband interrupted our lazy afternoon of bird watching with the
> > announcement that a severe T-storm was brewing up nor!
> >  th and we left ALL our windows open.  We high tailed it home to find 3
> > partially opened windows and not much water indoors but one badly sprung
> > metal bulk head.  The wind must have been fierce!
> >
> > Happy Birding.
> >
> > Becky
> >
>


-- 
Justin Lawson
Worcester, Ma
Subject: Re: Gray Catbird
From: Brennan Michaels <owlhousevt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 10:46:06 -0400
I thought catbirds laid their legs in other birds' nests.

On Sun, Jul 24, 2016 at 10:39 AM, Becky Giroux  wrote:

> Saturday I spent an hour with my parents on their front porch watching a
> Catbird feeding its young.  Their nest is in a Weiglea Bush 5' off the
> ground and next to the sidewalk.   The nest is not readily visible unless
> really looking for it.  The adult would enter the bush from the south, hop
> from branch to branch up to the nest; it would leave in the same manor.  It
> also hung out in the lower branches to watch for insects on the lawn.  It
> tried many times to grab a moth but never caught it.  Once the bird flew
> far enough away I ran over to the bush peeked in with bins  saw the two
> little ones and suddenly the adult was back on the nest.  What a
> protector.  I departed back to the porch and she (I'm assuming its the
> female) continued to hunt for insects in the grass.  Really didn't seem to
> be bothered by our sitting on the porch or the occasional passerby.  My
> husband interrupted our lazy afternoon of bird watching with the
> announcement that a severe T-storm was brewing up nor!
>  th and we left ALL our windows open.  We high tailed it home to find 3
> partially opened windows and not much water indoors but one badly sprung
> metal bulk head.  The wind must have been fierce!
>
> Happy Birding.
>
> Becky
>
Subject: Gray Catbird
From: Becky Giroux <ravenrr AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 10:39:46 -0400
Saturday I spent an hour with my parents on their front porch watching a 
Catbird feeding its young. Their nest is in a Weiglea Bush 5' off the ground 
and next to the sidewalk. The nest is not readily visible unless really looking 
for it. The adult would enter the bush from the south, hop from branch to 
branch up to the nest; it would leave in the same manor. It also hung out in 
the lower branches to watch for insects on the lawn. It tried many times to 
grab a moth but never caught it. Once the bird flew far enough away I ran over 
to the bush peeked in with bins saw the two little ones and suddenly the adult 
was back on the nest. What a protector. I departed back to the porch and she 
(I'm assuming its the female) continued to hunt for insects in the grass. 
Really didn't seem to be bothered by our sitting on the porch or the occasional 
passerby. My husband interrupted our lazy afternoon of bird watching with the 
announcement that a severe T-storm was brewing up nor! 

 th and we left ALL our windows open. We high tailed it home to find 3 
partially opened windows and not much water indoors but one badly sprung metal 
bulk head. The wind must have been fierce! 


Happy Birding.

Becky
Subject: hummers everywhere
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 07:43:52 -0400
The hummingbird young have fledged, and there are suddenly at least five in the 
backyard - swooping, scrapping, going through sugar water like there’s no 
tomorrow. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Red bellied woodpeckers
From: carolclyde <carolclyde AT FAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 12:20:58 -0400
Dad and juvenile red bellied wp in dead tree on Point of Tongue Road 7:15 am. 
 Adult was preening and young one was pecking at branches and flying from one 
branch to another.    A second young one flew into tree for a few seconds 
then flew out of sight.   


Have been seeing a green heron last few days on the Dunes beach and in willow 
and reeds along trail behind the beach. 


Carol/Clyde Yarnell
South Alburgh


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Evening grosbeaks visit
From: betty jillson <bljillson AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 00:21:21 +0000
My sister-in-law Linda Maxham has Evening Grosbeaks coming in to her feeder in 
Bridgewater Corners. 


Betty Jillson


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Michael MacCaskey 
 

Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:13 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Evening grosbeaks visit

For about 15 minutes this morning we enjoyed a family of evening grosbeaks at 
our feeder (black oil sunflower seed). We confirmed two adults, both male and 
female, and two juveniles. Both adults were feeding the juveniles. It is the 
first time in more than 20 years of watching that we've seen evening grosbeaks 
in our garden. We are located in the Burlington's south end, near Pine and 
Birchcliff. 

Subject: Whimbrel?
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2016 12:35:47 -0400
Does anybody know if the Whimbrel is still at Shelburne Museum?

Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085
Subject: Thrushes Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 21, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 11:02:35 -0400
Both hermit and wood thrush greeted me with their ethereal songs while the 
plaintive pewee added to a morning of song. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: July 21, 2016 at 10:37:05 AM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 21, 2016
> 
> Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jul 21, 2016 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 31 species
> 
> Wild Turkey  3
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Red-tailed Hawk  2
> Mourning Dove  4
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
> Eastern Phoebe  4
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  4
> Blue Jay  4
> American Crow  3
> Common Raven  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> House Wren  4
> Veery  1
> Hermit Thrush  2
> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  5
> Gray Catbird  2
> Cedar Waxwing  3
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  3
> Field Sparrow  1
> Eastern Towhee  2
> Scarlet Tanager  2
> Northern Cardinal  3
> Red-winged Blackbird  1
> Baltimore Oriole  1
> House Finch  2
> American Goldfinch  4
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30790095
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Loons
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 16:01:54 -0400
The loons on Silver Lake in Salisbury have two tiny chicks. This morning I 
observed an adult feeding them as they sat happily on the back of the other 
adult. 

Quiet calls by the feeding adult alerted the little fluff balls that dinner was 
being served. 


Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 15:07:39 -0400
Here is Jim's checklist:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30773924


.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes


On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 3:00 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:

> Hi Ruth,
>
> The link is ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts . You may need to highlight the
> link to copy it then paste it in your web browser address bar. When you get
> to the Manage My Alerts page, type Vermont in the box below Rare Bird
> Alerts, then click on the view button. Scroll down until you find Little
> Blue Heron then click on the word-checklist. You should see the photos
> there.
> There is probably an easier way to get there but someone else would have
> to help with that.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Jim Mead
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jul 20, 2016, at 2:47 PM, Ruth  wrote:
> >
> > Where can we see your pictures if we are not subscribed to ebird
> alerts?  GREAT find!
> >
> >
> > Ruth Stewart
> > E. Dorset, VT
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jim Mead <
> jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
> > Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:29 PM
> > To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> > Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
> >
> > The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
> > correcting got me).
> >
> > It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> >
> >> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
> >>
> >> Hello all again,
> >>
> >> The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
> >> Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
> >> lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
> >> a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water
> temperature,
> >> creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
> >> have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an
> all
> >> white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I
> was
> >> only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly.
> That
> >> is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward
> me.
> >> I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting
> closer
> >> and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it
> passed
> >> by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my
> back.
> >> I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird.
> Once
> >> home, I was able to lo!
> >> ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
> >> extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
> >> distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron-
> darkish
> >> gray colored outer primary wingtips.
> >>
> >> Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
> >> look.
> >>
> >> You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
> >> bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> >>
> >> Enjoy Birds,
> >>
> >> Jim Mead
> >>
>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 15:07:10 -0400
Oops. I didn't provide the link...sorry. Here it is I believe.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30773924

Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2



On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 3:04 PM, Kent McFarland  wrote:

> THe fastest way to share photos from your checklist, is to provide the URL
> to the checklist.
> Kent
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
>
> 
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 3:00 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
>
>> Hi Ruth,
>>
>> The link is ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts . You may need to highlight the
>> link to copy it then paste it in your web browser address bar. When you get
>> to the Manage My Alerts page, type Vermont in the box below Rare Bird
>> Alerts, then click on the view button. Scroll down until you find Little
>> Blue Heron then click on the word-checklist. You should see the photos
>> there.
>> There is probably an easier way to get there but someone else would have
>> to help with that.
>>
>> Good luck,
>>
>> Jim Mead
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On Jul 20, 2016, at 2:47 PM, Ruth  wrote:
>> >
>> > Where can we see your pictures if we are not subscribed to ebird
>> alerts?  GREAT find!
>> >
>> >
>> > Ruth Stewart
>> > E. Dorset, VT
>> >
>> >
>> > ________________________________
>> > From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jim Mead <
>> jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
>> > Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:29 PM
>> > To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>> > Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
>> >
>> > The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
>> > correcting got me).
>> >
>> > It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>> >
>> >> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Hello all again,
>> >>
>> >> The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
>> >> Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I
>> was
>> >> lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
>> >> a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water
>> temperature,
>> >> creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared
>> to
>> >> have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an
>> all
>> >> white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron.
>> I was
>> >> only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly.
>> That
>> >> is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward
>> me.
>> >> I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting
>> closer
>> >> and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it
>> passed
>> >> by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my
>> back.
>> >> I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird.
>> Once
>> >> home, I was able to lo!
>> >> ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I
>> was
>> >> extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
>> >> distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron-
>> darkish
>> >> gray colored outer primary wingtips.
>> >>
>> >> Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get
>> a
>> >> look.
>> >>
>> >> You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
>> >> bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>> >>
>> >> Enjoy Birds,
>> >>
>> >> Jim Mead
>> >>
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 15:04:51 -0400
THe fastest way to share photos from your checklist, is to provide the URL
to the checklist.
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2



On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 3:00 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:

> Hi Ruth,
>
> The link is ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts . You may need to highlight the
> link to copy it then paste it in your web browser address bar. When you get
> to the Manage My Alerts page, type Vermont in the box below Rare Bird
> Alerts, then click on the view button. Scroll down until you find Little
> Blue Heron then click on the word-checklist. You should see the photos
> there.
> There is probably an easier way to get there but someone else would have
> to help with that.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Jim Mead
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jul 20, 2016, at 2:47 PM, Ruth  wrote:
> >
> > Where can we see your pictures if we are not subscribed to ebird
> alerts?  GREAT find!
> >
> >
> > Ruth Stewart
> > E. Dorset, VT
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jim Mead <
> jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
> > Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:29 PM
> > To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> > Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
> >
> > The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
> > correcting got me).
> >
> > It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> >
> >> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
> >>
> >> Hello all again,
> >>
> >> The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
> >> Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
> >> lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
> >> a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water
> temperature,
> >> creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
> >> have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an
> all
> >> white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I
> was
> >> only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly.
> That
> >> is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward
> me.
> >> I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting
> closer
> >> and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it
> passed
> >> by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my
> back.
> >> I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird.
> Once
> >> home, I was able to lo!
> >> ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
> >> extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
> >> distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron-
> darkish
> >> gray colored outer primary wingtips.
> >>
> >> Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
> >> look.
> >>
> >> You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
> >> bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> >>
> >> Enjoy Birds,
> >>
> >> Jim Mead
> >>
>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 15:00:58 -0400
Hi Ruth,

The link is ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts . You may need to highlight the link to 
copy it then paste it in your web browser address bar. When you get to the 
Manage My Alerts page, type Vermont in the box below Rare Bird Alerts, then 
click on the view button. Scroll down until you find Little Blue Heron then 
click on the word-checklist. You should see the photos there. 

There is probably an easier way to get there but someone else would have to 
help with that. 


Good luck,

Jim Mead

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 20, 2016, at 2:47 PM, Ruth  wrote:
> 
> Where can we see your pictures if we are not subscribed to ebird alerts? 
GREAT find! 

> 
> 
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jim Mead 
 

> Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:29 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
> 
> The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
> correcting got me).
> 
> It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> 
>> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
>> 
>> Hello all again,
>> 
>> The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
>> Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
>> lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
>> a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water temperature,
>> creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
>> have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an all
>> white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I was
>> only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly. That
>> is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward me.
>> I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting closer
>> and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it passed
>> by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my back.
>> I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird. Once
>> home, I was able to lo!
>> ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
>> extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
>> distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron- darkish
>> gray colored outer primary wingtips.
>> 
>> Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
>> look.
>> 
>> You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
>> bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>> 
>> Enjoy Birds,
>> 
>> Jim Mead
>> 
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 14:53:27 -0400
If folks post images and or sounds with Vermont eBird checklists, you can
see them all by searching on the new tool here:

https://ebird.org/media/vt/catalog?q=Vermont%2C+United+States+(US)&searchField=region&taxonCode=&hotspotCode=®ionCode=US-VT&userId=&_mediaType=on&mediaType=Photo&mediaType=Audio&mediaType=Video&sort=upload_date_desc&view=Gallery&species=®ion=&hotspot=&date.monthRange=M1TO12&date.beginMonth=1&date.endMonth=12&date.yearRange=YALL&date.beginYear=1900&date.endYear=2016&start=0&_=1469040747881 


Best,
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2



On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 2:47 PM, Ruth  wrote:

> Where can we see your pictures if we are not subscribed to ebird alerts?
> GREAT find!
>
>
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jim Mead <
> jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
> Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:29 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
>
> The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
> correcting got me).
>
> It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
>
> > Hello all again,
> >
> > The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
> > Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
> > lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
> > a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water
> temperature,
> > creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
> > have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an
> all
> > white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I
> was
> > only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly.
> That
> > is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward
> me.
> > I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting
> closer
> > and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it
> passed
> > by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my
> back.
> > I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird. Once
> > home, I was able to lo!
> >  ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
> > extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
> > distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron-
> darkish
> > gray colored outer primary wingtips.
> >
> > Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
> > look.
> >
> > You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
> > bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> >
> > Enjoy Birds,
> >
> > Jim Mead
> >
>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 18:47:40 +0000
Where can we see your pictures if we are not subscribed to ebird alerts? GREAT 
find! 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jim Mead 
 

Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 12:29 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Little Blue Heron at Delta Park

The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
correcting got me).

It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts

On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:

> Hello all again,
>
> The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
> Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
> lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
> a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water temperature,
> creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
> have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an all
> white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I was
> only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly. That
> is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward me.
> I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting closer
> and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it passed
> by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my back.
> I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird. Once
> home, I was able to lo!
>  ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
> extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
> distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron- darkish
> gray colored outer primary wingtips.
>
> Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
> look.
>
> You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
> bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Roo Slagle <roospin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 13:46:32 -0400
You GO Jim!!!

On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:29 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:

> The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
> correcting got me).
>
> It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:
>
> > Hello all again,
> >
> > The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
> > Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
> > lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
> > a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water
> temperature,
> > creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
> > have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an
> all
> > white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I
> was
> > only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly.
> That
> > is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward
> me.
> > I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting
> closer
> > and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it
> passed
> > by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my
> back.
> > I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird. Once
> > home, I was able to lo!
> >  ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
> > extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
> > distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron-
> darkish
> > gray colored outer primary wingtips.
> >
> > Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
> > look.
> >
> > You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
> > bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
> >
> > Enjoy Birds,
> >
> > Jim Mead
> >
>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 12:29:09 -0400
The link that I typed in did not have an e at the beginning (self
correcting got me).

It should have been:  ebird.org/ebird/vt/alerts

On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 12:15 PM, Jim Mead  wrote:

> Hello all again,
>
> The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue
> Heron!! I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was
> lucky to spot it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00
> a.m.) the air temperature was quite a bit lower than the water temperature,
> creating a lot of distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to
> have greenish colored legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an all
> white body. My initial thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I was
> only able to look at it for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly. That
> is when I got lucky for a second time, because it flew directly toward me.
> I then turned on my camera and began snapping photos. It was getting closer
> and closer to me and then I got even luckier for a third time as it passed
> by me on my west side, putting it broadside to me with the sun at my back.
> I was able to get not great but certainly decent photos of the bird. Once
> home, I was able to lo!
>  ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was
> extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the
> distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron- darkish
> gray colored outer primary wingtips.
>
> Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a
> look.
>
> You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to
> bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>
Subject: Little Blue Heron at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 12:15:55 -0400
Hello all again,

The juvenile Heron that I saw this morning was definitely a Little Blue Heron!! 
I was very lucky on four accounts with this bird. Firstly, I was lucky to spot 
it on the large bar of sand. However, at that time (6:00 a.m.) the air 
temperature was quite a bit lower than the water temperature, creating a lot of 
distortion between myself and the bird. It appeared to have greenish colored 
legs, a pale colored bill with a dark tip and an all white body. My initial 
thoughts were that it was a Little Blue Heron. I was only able to look at it 
for about 20 seconds before it decided to fly. That is when I got lucky for a 
second time, because it flew directly toward me. I then turned on my camera and 
began snapping photos. It was getting closer and closer to me and then I got 
even luckier for a third time as it passed by me on my west side, putting it 
broadside to me with the sun at my back. I was able to get not great but 
certainly decent photos of the bird. Once home, I was able to lo! 

 ok at my photos on the computer and was delighted to find out that I was 
extremely lucky (now for the fourth time) because the photos showed the 
distinctive/diagnostic field mark for a juvenile Little Blue Heron- darkish 
gray colored outer primary wingtips. 


Perhaps this bird will show itself again nearby so that others can get a look.

You can see my photos that I posted on ebird (if you desire). Go to 
bird.org/ebird/vt/alerts 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 10:15:08 -0400
I was at Shelburn Farms this morning and I did not see the Whimbrel.

Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Jul 19, 2016, at 6:56 PM, Nancy Goodrich  wrote:
> 
> No luck on the Whimbrel at 6:30, but the museum guard pointed out a kildeer
> and one of her 3 chicks in the parking lot at the museum entrance. I showed
> him pictures in my Peterson's and he said he'd keep an eye out.There's
> always something to find if we keep looking., (even in the parking
> lot!)...Nancy Goodrich, Shelburne
> 
> On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 6:00 PM, Gary Chapin 
> wrote:
> 
>> The bird is still present at 6:00 PM.
>> 
>> Gary Chapin
>> Ticonderoga, NY
>> 
>>>> On Jul 19, 2016, at 5:08 PM, Tyler Pockette 
>>> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Whimbrel still present as of 5:08pm. Thanks to everyone who reported
>> today!
>>> 
>>> -Tyler
>>> 
>>>> On Jul 19, 2016 1:23 PM, "Tyler Pockette" 
>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Thanks to all who have provided updates on the Whimbrel. It is very
>>>> helpful to those of us who have to come from a further distance to see a
>>>> bird. Keep them coming!
>>>> 
>>>> Thanks!
>>>> Tyler
>>>> 
>>>>> On Jul 19, 2016 11:42 AM, "Jim Mead"  wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> Hello all,
>>>>> 
>>>>> The Whimbrel is still here at Shelburne Museum where Bruce described
>> the
>>>>> location.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Thanks Bruce,
>>>>> 
>>>>> Enjoy Birds,
>>>>> 
>>>>> Jim Mead
>> 
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Liz <lizl AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 09:20:22 -0400
    
No Whimbrel this AM. There  is a guy  weed wacking in the second field :
Liz Lee


Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Jim Mead  
Date: 7/19/16  12:55 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum 

Hello all again,

For those of you who may not be that familiar with 
The Shelburne Museum, maybe these directions will be
helpful. Coming from the north, head south on Rt. 7. Go 
past the Shelburne Museum and at the stop light, take a
right onto Bostwick Rd. Then take the first right onto a white
colored (limestone) gravel road. The Whimbrel was in the field 
on the left side (west) of that gravel road. Right before I left, the
Whimbrel flew north and touched down in the field just north of 
the first field that it was in. There is a tree line separating the two
fields. 

I hope this is helpful and good luck if you try for it!!

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Evening grosbeaks visit
From: Michael MacCaskey <mike AT MACCASKEY.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 08:13:33 -0400
For about 15 minutes this morning we enjoyed a family of evening grosbeaks at 
our feeder (black oil sunflower seed). We confirmed two adults, both male and 
female, and two juveniles. Both adults were feeding the juveniles. It is the 
first time in more than 20 years of watching that we’ve seen evening 
grosbeaks in our garden. We are located in the Burlington’s south end, near 
Pine and Birchcliff. 


 

 
Subject: Little Blue Heron or Snowy Egret at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 06:24:48 -0400
Hello all,

I just saw a "juvenile" Heron and was able to snap some photos
of it as it was flying toward the north. I am leaning toward Little 
Blue but it could be a Snowy Egret. I need to look at my photos at
home later to determine which one. I saw it on the large bar of sand
out in the mouth of the Winooski. I watched it for about 20 seconds
before it picked up and flew north. It is not here now but it may show
up again. I'll follow up later. . .

Jim Mead
Subject: Tool for following rare birds on eBird using cell phone
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 21:15:15 -0400
I put together a very small web page, hosted by Weebly, for following 
eBird rarities on a cell phone.  It looks OK on my 5.2" Moto X, but may 
not looks as good on some phones.

It uses the BirdTrax code to list rarities.  I know nothing about 
programming!  I've done this also for MA, NH, and ME, but did it for VT 
today:

http://rarebirdsvt.weebly.com/

also, to follow, NH, ME, and MA:

http://rarebirds-nh.weebly.com/

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Nancy Goodrich <nancyg3219 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 18:56:42 -0400
No luck on the Whimbrel at 6:30, but the museum guard pointed out a kildeer
and one of her 3 chicks in the parking lot at the museum entrance. I showed
him pictures in my Peterson's and he said he'd keep an eye out.There's
always something to find if we keep looking., (even in the parking
lot!)...Nancy Goodrich, Shelburne

On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 6:00 PM, Gary Chapin 
wrote:

> The bird is still present at 6:00 PM.
>
> Gary Chapin
> Ticonderoga, NY
>
> > On Jul 19, 2016, at 5:08 PM, Tyler Pockette 
> wrote:
> >
> > Whimbrel still present as of 5:08pm. Thanks to everyone who reported
> today!
> >
> > -Tyler
> >
> >> On Jul 19, 2016 1:23 PM, "Tyler Pockette" 
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Thanks to all who have provided updates on the Whimbrel. It is very
> >> helpful to those of us who have to come from a further distance to see a
> >> bird. Keep them coming!
> >>
> >> Thanks!
> >> Tyler
> >>
> >>> On Jul 19, 2016 11:42 AM, "Jim Mead"  wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Hello all,
> >>>
> >>> The Whimbrel is still here at Shelburne Museum where Bruce described
> the
> >>> location.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks Bruce,
> >>>
> >>> Enjoy Birds,
> >>>
> >>> Jim Mead
> >>
>
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Gary Chapin <gchapin1 AT ROCHESTER.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 18:00:15 -0400
The bird is still present at 6:00 PM. 

Gary Chapin
Ticonderoga, NY

> On Jul 19, 2016, at 5:08 PM, Tyler Pockette  wrote:
> 
> Whimbrel still present as of 5:08pm. Thanks to everyone who reported today!
> 
> -Tyler
> 
>> On Jul 19, 2016 1:23 PM, "Tyler Pockette"  wrote:
>> 
>> Thanks to all who have provided updates on the Whimbrel. It is very
>> helpful to those of us who have to come from a further distance to see a
>> bird. Keep them coming!
>> 
>> Thanks!
>> Tyler
>> 
>>> On Jul 19, 2016 11:42 AM, "Jim Mead"  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hello all,
>>> 
>>> The Whimbrel is still here at Shelburne Museum where Bruce described the
>>> location.
>>> 
>>> Thanks Bruce,
>>> 
>>> Enjoy Birds,
>>> 
>>> Jim Mead
>> 
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 17:08:25 -0400
Whimbrel still present as of 5:08pm. Thanks to everyone who reported today!

-Tyler

On Jul 19, 2016 1:23 PM, "Tyler Pockette"  wrote:

> Thanks to all who have provided updates on the Whimbrel. It is very
> helpful to those of us who have to come from a further distance to see a
> bird. Keep them coming!
>
> Thanks!
> Tyler
>
> On Jul 19, 2016 11:42 AM, "Jim Mead"  wrote:
>
>> Hello all,
>>
>> The Whimbrel is still here at Shelburne Museum where Bruce described the
>> location.
>>
>> Thanks Bruce,
>>
>> Enjoy Birds,
>>
>> Jim Mead
>>
>
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Taj Schottland <tsurfbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 16:03:51 -0400
Still present at 4pm. Thanks to everyone for the continued updates! It's a 
beautiful bird. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2016, at 1:56 PM, Topofvt 
<000000f285df68b6-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 

> 
> Whimbrel just south of gravel road in field on Museum property. 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jul 19, 2016, at 1:36 PM, Isis Erb  wrote:
>> 
>> Unfortunately people walked their dogs in the field directly below the
>> parking area, causing the Whimbrel to fly south - back into the field Jim
>> mentioned (SW side of Cedar trees separating the fields/lawns). Still good
>> looks, but not quite as close. I do hope that folks will give the bird
>> plenty of space for its sake, and hopefully so it will stick around long
>> enough for many folks to see it.
>> 
>> If you try for it, be sure to check all the area lawns/fields for it,
>> 
>> Isis Erb
>> 
>>> On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, Jim Mead  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hello all again,
>>> 
>>> For those of you who may not be that familiar with
>>> The Shelburne Museum, maybe these directions will be
>>> helpful. Coming from the north, head south on Rt. 7. Go
>>> past the Shelburne Museum and at the stop light, take a
>>> right onto Bostwick Rd. Then take the first right onto a white
>>> colored (limestone) gravel road. The Whimbrel was in the field
>>> on the left side (west) of that gravel road. Right before I left, the
>>> Whimbrel flew north and touched down in the field just north of
>>> the first field that it was in. There is a tree line separating the two
>>> fields.
>>> 
>>> I hope this is helpful and good luck if you try for it!!
>>> 
>>> Enjoy Birds,
>>> 
>>> Jim Mead
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Isis Erb
>> Burlington, VT
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: Re: SHOREBIRDS!Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Jul 19, 2016
From: Marcy Blauvelt <mbblauvelt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 15:57:35 -0400
Hopefully next week will be as good!
M


On Jul 19, 2016, at 3:48 PM, Sue wrote:

> The group reported yesterday was still there feeding in the mud flats on the 
east side of Dead Creek. 

> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
>> Date: July 19, 2016 at 3:26:58 PM EDT
>> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> Subject: eBird Report - Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Jul 19, 2016
>> 
>> Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Addison, Vermont, US
>> Jul 19, 2016 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
>> Protocol: Stationary
>> 28 species
>> 
>> Wood Duck  10
>> Turkey Vulture  2
>> Osprey  1
>> Semipalmated Plover  2     birds well seen through spotting scope.
>> Killdeer 19 birds were among the other shorebirds feeding in the mud flats. 

>> Spotted Sandpiper  1
>> Solitary Sandpiper  1
>> Greater Yellowlegs  1
>> Lesser Yellowlegs  1
>> Least Sandpiper 47 birds counted by both of us independently-----well seen 
thru scope. 

>> Semipalmated Sandpiper 3 birds were near least sanpipers for comparision. 
All well seen thru scopes. 

>> Ring-billed Gull  1
>> Mourning Dove  1
>> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
>> Willow Flycatcher  1
>> Eastern Phoebe  1
>> Warbling Vireo (Eastern)  1
>> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
>> Tree Swallow  2
>> Barn Swallow  6
>> Black-capped Chickadee  1
>> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  1
>> American Robin  1
>> Cedar Waxwing  3
>> Northern Cardinal  1
>> Red-winged Blackbird  1
>> Common Grackle  1
>> American Goldfinch  3
>> 
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30764918 

>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: SHOREBIRDS!Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Jul 19, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 15:48:44 -0400
The group reported yesterday was still there feeding in the mud flats on the 
east side of Dead Creek. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: July 19, 2016 at 3:26:58 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Jul 19, 2016
> 
> Dead Creek confluence with Otter Creek, Addison, Vermont, US
> Jul 19, 2016 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 28 species
> 
> Wood Duck  10
> Turkey Vulture  2
> Osprey  1
> Semipalmated Plover  2     birds well seen through spotting scope.
> Killdeer 19 birds were among the other shorebirds feeding in the mud flats. 

> Spotted Sandpiper  1
> Solitary Sandpiper  1
> Greater Yellowlegs  1
> Lesser Yellowlegs  1
> Least Sandpiper 47 birds counted by both of us independently-----well seen 
thru scope. 

> Semipalmated Sandpiper 3 birds were near least sanpipers for comparision. All 
well seen thru scopes. 

> Ring-billed Gull  1
> Mourning Dove  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Willow Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Warbling Vireo (Eastern)  1
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
> Tree Swallow  2
> Barn Swallow  6
> Black-capped Chickadee  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  1
> American Robin  1
> Cedar Waxwing  3
> Northern Cardinal  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  1
> Common Grackle  1
> American Goldfinch  3
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30764918
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Button Bay State Park, Jul 19, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 15:47:03 -0400
Some birds still singing.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: July 19, 2016 at 3:32:35 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Button Bay State Park, Jul 19, 2016
> 
> Button Bay State Park, Addison, Vermont, US
> Jul 19, 2016 10:25 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 28 species
> 
> Canada Goose  42
> Mallard  18
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Ring-billed Gull  8
> Caspian Tern  1
> Mourning Dove  2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  1
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  3
> Black-capped Chickadee  3
> Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  3
> House Wren  1
> American Robin  1
> Cedar Waxwing  3
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Pine Warbler  1
> Song Sparrow  4
> Scarlet Tanager  1
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Red-winged Blackbird  1
> Eastern Meadowlark (Eastern)  1
> American Goldfinch  2
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30764971
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Topofvt <000000f285df68b6-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 13:56:08 -0400
Whimbrel just south of gravel road in field on Museum property. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2016, at 1:36 PM, Isis Erb  wrote:
> 
> Unfortunately people walked their dogs in the field directly below the
> parking area, causing the Whimbrel to fly south - back into the field Jim
> mentioned (SW side of Cedar trees separating the fields/lawns). Still good
> looks, but not quite as close. I do hope that folks will give the bird
> plenty of space for its sake, and hopefully so it will stick around long
> enough for many folks to see it.
> 
> If you try for it, be sure to check all the area lawns/fields for it,
> 
> Isis Erb
> 
>> On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, Jim Mead  wrote:
>> 
>> Hello all again,
>> 
>> For those of you who may not be that familiar with
>> The Shelburne Museum, maybe these directions will be
>> helpful. Coming from the north, head south on Rt. 7. Go
>> past the Shelburne Museum and at the stop light, take a
>> right onto Bostwick Rd. Then take the first right onto a white
>> colored (limestone) gravel road. The Whimbrel was in the field
>> on the left side (west) of that gravel road. Right before I left, the
>> Whimbrel flew north and touched down in the field just north of
>> the first field that it was in. There is a tree line separating the two
>> fields.
>> 
>> I hope this is helpful and good luck if you try for it!!
>> 
>> Enjoy Birds,
>> 
>> Jim Mead
> 
> 
> -- 
> Isis Erb
> Burlington, VT
> 
> Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 13:36:04 -0400
Unfortunately people walked their dogs in the field directly below the
parking area, causing the Whimbrel to fly south - back into the field Jim
mentioned (SW side of Cedar trees separating the fields/lawns). Still good
looks, but not quite as close. I do hope that folks will give the bird
plenty of space for its sake, and hopefully so it will stick around long
enough for many folks to see it.

If you try for it, be sure to check all the area lawns/fields for it,

Isis Erb

On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, Jim Mead  wrote:

> Hello all again,
>
> For those of you who may not be that familiar with
> The Shelburne Museum, maybe these directions will be
> helpful. Coming from the north, head south on Rt. 7. Go
> past the Shelburne Museum and at the stop light, take a
> right onto Bostwick Rd. Then take the first right onto a white
> colored (limestone) gravel road. The Whimbrel was in the field
> on the left side (west) of that gravel road. Right before I left, the
> Whimbrel flew north and touched down in the field just north of
> the first field that it was in. There is a tree line separating the two
> fields.
>
> I hope this is helpful and good luck if you try for it!!
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>


-- 
Isis Erb
Burlington, VT

Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 13:23:21 -0400
Thanks to all who have provided updates on the Whimbrel. It is very helpful
to those of us who have to come from a further distance to see a bird. Keep
them coming!

Thanks!
Tyler

On Jul 19, 2016 11:42 AM, "Jim Mead"  wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> The Whimbrel is still here at Shelburne Museum where Bruce described the
> location.
>
> Thanks Bruce,
>
> Enjoy Birds,
>
> Jim Mead
>
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 12:55:02 -0400
Hello all again,

For those of you who may not be that familiar with 
The Shelburne Museum, maybe these directions will be
helpful. Coming from the north, head south on Rt. 7. Go 
past the Shelburne Museum and at the stop light, take a
right onto Bostwick Rd. Then take the first right onto a white
colored (limestone) gravel road. The Whimbrel was in the field 
on the left side (west) of that gravel road. Right before I left, the
Whimbrel flew north and touched down in the field just north of 
the first field that it was in. There is a tree line separating the two
fields. 

I hope this is helpful and good luck if you try for it!!

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 12:40:17 -0400
Ok, just go into the Shelburne Museum entrance and go to the west edge of
the Passenger Parking section, look down. Whimbrel is in the grass with a
bunch of gulls as of this moment.

Enjoy those birds,
Isis Erb
Jericho, VT

On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, Isis Erb  wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I'm not clear where the concert field is at the Shelburne Museum. I'd
> thought it was seen at Shelburne Farms, which is where I currently am. Any
> directions would be greatly appreciated!
>
> Thanks,
>
> Isis Erb
>
> On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, Bruce MacPherson <
> 00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
> 
> 

> wrote:
>
>> I located the Whimbrel on the grounds of the Shelburne Museum a few
>> minutes ago. It was feeding by itself in the concert field to the south and
>> west of the access road. Thanks to Jack Price for alerting me to the
>> whereabouts of this magnificent bird.
>>
>>
>> Bruce MacPherson
>> South Burlington
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Taj Schottland 
>> To: VTBIRD 
>> Sent: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 9:28 am
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Whimbrel - Shelburne Farms
>>
>> Yesterday an observer reported a Whimbrel feeding in a grassy field at the
>> entrance to Shelburne Farms. Details and photos in the checklist:
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30734766
>>
>> If you go looking for it today, please post positive or negative reports
>> to
>> the VT-Bird email list.
>>
>> Thanks, and good luck!
>>
>> --
>> Taj Schottland
>> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> CELL: 802-258-1200
>> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>>
>
>
> --
> Isis Erb
> Burlington, VT
>
> Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
>


-- 
Isis Erb
Burlington, VT

Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 12:30:51 -0400
Hi All,

I'm not clear where the concert field is at the Shelburne Museum. I'd
thought it was seen at Shelburne Farms, which is where I currently am. Any
directions would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Isis Erb

On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, Bruce MacPherson <
00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> I located the Whimbrel on the grounds of the Shelburne Museum a few
> minutes ago. It was feeding by itself in the concert field to the south and
> west of the access road. Thanks to Jack Price for alerting me to the
> whereabouts of this magnificent bird.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Taj Schottland >
> To: VTBIRD >
> Sent: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 9:28 am
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Whimbrel - Shelburne Farms
>
> Yesterday an observer reported a Whimbrel feeding in a grassy field at the
> entrance to Shelburne Farms. Details and photos in the checklist:
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30734766
>
> If you go looking for it today, please post positive or negative reports to
> the VT-Bird email list.
>
> Thanks, and good luck!
>
> --
> Taj Schottland
> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
> National Wildlife Federation
> CELL: 802-258-1200
> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com 
>


-- 
Isis Erb
Burlington, VT

Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious spelling errors.
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 11:42:09 -0400
Hello all,

The Whimbrel is still here at Shelburne Museum where Bruce described the 
location. 


Thanks Bruce,

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 10:40:00 -0400
Thank you Bruce for the update. Would others be so kind as to post positive
or negative reports if they try for this bird today? Id love to try for it
after work which isnt until 5pm.

Thanks!!
Tyler Pockette

On Jul 19, 2016 10:01 AM, "Bruce MacPherson" <
00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> I located the Whimbrel on the grounds of the Shelburne Museum a few
> minutes ago. It was feeding by itself in the concert field to the south and
> west of the access road. Thanks to Jack Price for alerting me to the
> whereabouts of this magnificent bird.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Taj Schottland 
> To: VTBIRD 
> Sent: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 9:28 am
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Whimbrel - Shelburne Farms
>
> Yesterday an observer reported a Whimbrel feeding in a grassy field at the
> entrance to Shelburne Farms. Details and photos in the checklist:
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30734766
>
> If you go looking for it today, please post positive or negative reports to
> the VT-Bird email list.
>
> Thanks, and good luck!
>
> --
> Taj Schottland
> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
> National Wildlife Federation
> CELL: 802-258-1200
> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>
Subject: Re: Whimbrel - Shelburne Museum
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 10:01:19 -0400
I located the Whimbrel on the grounds of the Shelburne Museum a few minutes 
ago. It was feeding by itself in the concert field to the south and west of the 
access road. Thanks to Jack Price for alerting me to the whereabouts of this 
magnificent bird. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington




-----Original Message-----
From: Taj Schottland 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 9:28 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Whimbrel - Shelburne Farms

Yesterday an observer reported a Whimbrel feeding in a grassy field at the
entrance to Shelburne Farms. Details and photos in the checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30734766

If you go looking for it today, please post positive or negative reports to
the VT-Bird email list.

Thanks, and good luck!

-- 
Taj Schottland
Coastal Adaptation Specialist
National Wildlife Federation
CELL: 802-258-1200
EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
Subject: Shorebirds, Ferrisburgh
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 15:18:21 -0400
Ian Worley gave me a call this afternoon to let me know there were shorebirds 
at the confluence of Dead Creek and the Otter Creek on Basin Harbor Rd. in 
Ferrisburgh. I went to check it out and found 88 Least Sandpipers, 5 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, 9 Killdeer and 1 Semipalmated Plover. Conditions at 
that spot look like they will be good for attracting shorebirds for the rest 
of the summer.  


--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: Whimbrel - Shelburne Farms
From: Taj Schottland <tsurfbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 09:28:44 -0400
Yesterday an observer reported a Whimbrel feeding in a grassy field at the
entrance to Shelburne Farms. Details and photos in the checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30734766

If you go looking for it today, please post positive or negative reports to
the VT-Bird email list.

Thanks, and good luck!

-- 
Taj Schottland
Coastal Adaptation Specialist
National Wildlife Federation
CELL: 802-258-1200
EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Jul 16, 2016
From: Fred Bates <batesx2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 18:47:40 +0000
Hi From Rutland
Yesterday was a great day for the 2016 Loon Watch survey. It was great to hear 
them vocalizing back and forth. 

Fred,Lana and Graham Bates
Rutland


Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Rutland, Vermont, USJul 16, 2016 8:00 AM - 
9:00 AMProtocol: LoonWatch99.0 ac1 species 


Common Loon 5 Initially observed (2) adult loons and (2) juveniles on the south 
end of the pond. A third adult flew in from the south, and approached the two 
adults. Seems like there might have been an altercation. The three adults swam 
away from the juveniles, heading to the north. The juveniles remained close to 
the shore, on the south side. After about twenty minutes, the third adult flew 
off to the north. The two remaining adults returned to the area where the two 
juveniles were, and remained there until we left. 


View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30711174

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Mansfield update
From: Becky Giroux <ravenrr AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 18:46:53 -0400
Thank you for sharing your weekly updates and allowing myself and others to 
"Bird Vicariously" with you. 


Thank you for all you do.


Becky
Subject: Glen Lake - Castleton (206 acres), Jul 16, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 18:12:57 +0000
Three loons, all in adult plumage, at Glen Lake for today's LoonWatch. 
There was still quite a bit of bird song including Louisiana Waterthrush of 
which we saw eight, four pairs at different points around the lake. 


     

Glen Lake - Castleton (206 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
Jul 16, 2016 7:50 AM - 11:35 AM
Protocol: LoonWatch
206.0 ac
Comments:    by kayak
44 species

Mallard  8
Common Loon  3    
Great Blue Heron  3
Turkey Vulture  3
Osprey  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  3
Mourning Dove  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  5
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Blue-headed Vireo  3
Red-eyed Vireo  7
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  4
Common Raven  3
Black-capped Chickadee  10
Tufted Titmouse  1
Red-breasted Nuthatch  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
Brown Creeper  3
Winter Wren  1
Hermit Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  1
Cedar Waxwing  14
Ovenbird  3
Louisiana Waterthrush  8    
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  4
Yellow Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  4
Black-throated Green Warbler  3
Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  2
Swamp Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  3
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  1
American Goldfinch  11

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30707974

Sue and Marv Elliott



Subject: Re: anyone want birding magazines?
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 12:07:55 -0400
As I am a new birder, trying to learn, I would love these and will pass on
to my daughter who is a bio teacher.  Will gladly pick up.
Martha,   Westford
On Jul 16, 2016 10:42 AM, "Maeve Kim"  wrote:

> Does anyone want twenty or so old copies of Birding, the magazine of the
> American Birding Association? They date from 2003-2013 and include features
> about Harlequin Ducks, waterthrushes, Savannah Sparrows, Harlan’s Hawks,
> murrelets, vagrants, waterfowl biology, hummingbirds, kestrels, avian
> behavior, birds and wind farms, hawk watching, and birding in CA, Idaho,
> Alaska, Guatemala and other locations. They’d be great to bring along to
> the family camp for summer reading!
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: anyone want birding magazines?
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 10:41:57 -0400
Does anyone want twenty or so old copies of Birding, the magazine of the 
American Birding Association? They date from 2003-2013 and include features 
about Harlequin Ducks, waterthrushes, Savannah Sparrows, Harlan’s Hawks, 
murrelets, vagrants, waterfowl biology, hummingbirds, kestrels, avian behavior, 
birds and wind farms, hawk watching, and birding in CA, Idaho, Alaska, 
Guatemala and other locations. They’d be great to bring along to the family 
camp for summer reading! 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Mansfield update
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 08:56:59 -0400
Signs of seasonal turnover were evident on Mt. Mansfield this week, as VCE
hit the two-month mark in our 25th consecutive year of studying the
ridgeline’s breeding birds. Free-flying juveniles, molting adults and
non-local dispersers are beginning to supplant the resident breeders in our
mist nets. Hoping to dodge predicted thunderstorms, Jason Hill, Susan
Hindinger, Grace Mitchum, Amber Wolf and I arrived early Wednesday evening.
Temperatures were as warm as they ever get at 3900′ elevation, with the
mercury reading 73 degrees F and the air decidedly muggy, but just short of
stifling, thanks to a steady 10-15 mph west wind.

We set our usual array of 25 mist nets, took in a fine sunset, and were
grateful the t’storms passed north. By nightfall we had captured 10 birds,
including the season’s first juvenile Bicknell’s Thrush (BITH) and
Dark-eyed Junco. The dusk chorus was surprisingly robust, as BITH called
and sang with gusto, complemented by the more subdued songs of Swainson’s
Thrush and the sweet refrains of White-throated Sparrows.

Clouds lowered onto the ridgeline overnight, but temperatures remained
relatively balmy (61F at 4 am). Dawn emerged slowly as we began opening
nets at 0415, but the sluggish avian activity picked up markedly as a
rising sun worked to dispel the sweeping clouds. Banding was steady, and we
accumulated 60 captures by the time nets were down in early afternoon.
Blackpoll Warblers topped the numeric chart, with 17 individuals netted,
including 5 new males, 5 new females, 2 juveniles, and 3 males from
previous years. Surprisingly, none of us heard a single song all day,
evidence that local adults are busy tending their young. Of the 11 adult
Blackpolls we examined carefully for signs of flight feather molt, 8 had
dropped their innermost primaries, signaling the imminent end of breeding
activities and a switch to preparation for the long-distance southward
migration
.
We captured several adults of other species in active primary molt,
including a Black-throated Blue Warbler.

As always at this time of year, our nets yielded a few surprises. Foremost
among them was an adult female Least Flycatcher, the first of this species
we have captured on the ridgeline in 25 years, including the autumns of
1995-97, when we conducted a fall migration banding study

. 

Obligingly, this bird was netted with a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher,
providing a rare opportunity to simultaneously examine these two similar
species. Other captures of non-local birds included a single adult female
Downy Woodpecker and Blackburnian Warbler, and two adult Black-throated
Blue Warblers. While it may not feel like summer is on the wane —and
certainly no one wants to hear it — the birds are telling us that changes
are in store.

Banding totals:
Downy Woodpecker   1 adult female in mid-primary molt
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher   1 adult
Least Flycatcher   1 adult female w/regressing brood patch
Red-breasted Nuthatch   1 juvenile
Bicknell's Thrush   8 (3 new adults, 2 juveniles, 3 within-season
recaptures)
Swainson's Thrush   6 (1 new male, 1 return male, 4 within-season
recaptures)
American Robin   2 free-flying juveniles
Magnolia Warbler   1 adult female
Blackburnian Warbler   1 adult female
Blackpoll Warbler   17 (10 new adults, 2 juveniles, 3 return males, 2
within-season recaptures)
Black-throated Blue Warbler   2 (adult male and female)
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)   7 (4 new adults, 1 juvenile, 2
within-season recaptures)
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)   8 (4 new adults, 1 recently-fledged
juvenile, 3 within-season recaptures)
White-throated Sparrow   5 (1 new female, 1 juvenile, 3 within-season
recaptures)

To see Chuck Gangas's great photos of some of these birds, check out the
VCE blog at
http://vtecostudies.org/blog/seasonal-changes-in-evidence-on-mt-mansfield/


________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Re: hummingbird with wire or something attached
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 19:02:46 -0400
I’m so sorry to hear about your injury. It must have changed your life 
significantly! 


Maeve


On Jul 15, 2016, at 6:25 PM, hilke breder  wrote:

> Thank you so much, Maeve! I hope someone will come up with a solution.
> I have pretty much dropped out of the birding community because of poor
> vision as a result of a head injury.
> Hilke
> 
> On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 5:51 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
>> Hilke Breder just sent me a photo of a hummingbird that’s been visiting a
>> neighbors feeder for a few weeks now, with something attached to one of its
>> feet. The photo is at
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/
>> 
>> 
>> At first, I thought it might be something like fishing line, but when I
>> enlarged the photo the string looks too coarse. Is there any chance that a
>> rehabilitator might try to mist-net the bird? Or would that have to wait
>> until after breeding season, in case it has a nest full of youngsters
>> nearby? Any ideas?
>> 
>> Maeve Kim
>> Jericho Center
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Jul 15, 2016, at 5:37 PM, hilke breder  wrote:
>> 
>>> Hi Maeve,
>>> 
>>> I have been reading your posts on VTBird. A neighbor sent me a photo of
>> a hummingbird at her feeder that's been showing up the past couple of weeks
>> with something hanging off its feet
>> 
Subject: Re: hummingbird with wire or something attached
From: hilke breder <htbreder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 18:25:12 -0400
Thank you so much, Maeve! I hope someone will come up with a solution.
I have pretty much dropped out of the birding community because of poor
vision as a result of a head injury.
Hilke

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 5:51 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> Hilke Breder just sent me a photo of a hummingbird that’s been visiting a
> neighbors feeder for a few weeks now, with something attached to one of its
> feet. The photo is at
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/
>
>
> At first, I thought it might be something like fishing line, but when I
> enlarged the photo the string looks too coarse. Is there any chance that a
> rehabilitator might try to mist-net the bird? Or would that have to wait
> until after breeding season, in case it has a nest full of youngsters
> nearby? Any ideas?
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
>
>
> On Jul 15, 2016, at 5:37 PM, hilke breder  wrote:
>
> > Hi Maeve,
> >
> > I have been reading your posts on VTBird. A neighbor sent me a photo of
> a hummingbird at her feeder that's been showing up the past couple of weeks
> with something hanging off its feet
>
Subject: hummingbird with wire or something attached
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 17:51:16 -0400
Hilke Breder just sent me a photo of a hummingbird that’s been visiting a 
neighbors feeder for a few weeks now, with something attached to one of its 
feet. The photo is at 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/


At first, I thought it might be something like fishing line, but when I 
enlarged the photo the string looks too coarse. Is there any chance that a 
rehabilitator might try to mist-net the bird? Or would that have to wait until 
after breeding season, in case it has a nest full of youngsters nearby? Any 
ideas? 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center



On Jul 15, 2016, at 5:37 PM, hilke breder  wrote:

> Hi Maeve,
> 
> I have been reading your posts on VTBird. A neighbor sent me a photo of a 
hummingbird at her feeder that's been showing up the past couple of weeks with 
something hanging off its feet 

Subject: Loons Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Jul 15, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 16:42:27 -0400
The nest continues to be occupied. Mate seen diving.

Sue and Ryan Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: July 15, 2016 at 4:38:24 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Jul 15, 2016
> 
> Silver Lake - Leicester (101 acres), Addison, Vermont, US
> Jul 15, 2016 9:00 AM - 12:15 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 13 species
> 
> Common Loon  2
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Barred Owl  3     three owls heard calling.
> Eastern Phoebe  4
> Blue-headed Vireo  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  6
> Black-capped Chickadee  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> Winter Wren  1
> Hermit Thrush  1
> American Robin  2
> Cedar Waxwing  5
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30696537
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Bird memory
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 08:04:20 -0400
Fascinating to watch a Goldfinch come to my window feeder yesterday—as many did 
often during the spring—but he found it no longer there—I’d taken it down over 
three weeks ago. Left me wondering how memory serves bird navigation and how 
long their memory of a place lasts. Watching birds raises so many interesting 
questions! 





Still learning to see,

John
802-229-1751

http://www.eyeimagein.com
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com