Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Vermont Birds

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Sunday, March 8 at 12:11 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Red-breasted Merganser,©Julie Zickefoose

7 Mar Bohemian Waxwings in St. Albans [Ken Copenhaver ]
7 Mar Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz [Bruce MacPherson ]
6 Mar march madness [Scott Sainsbury ]
6 Mar Re: VTBIRD Digest - 4 Mar 2015 to 5 Mar 2015 (#2015-62) [Blake Allison ]
5 Mar gift-bringing crows [Eric Wood ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [Walter Ellison ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [Liz Lackey ]
5 Mar Evening Grosbeaks [Mundi Smithers ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel & Gull [tfberriman ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [Kaye Danforth ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [eve ticknor ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [Ron Payne ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [Liz Lackey ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [tfberriman ]
5 Mar Re: Weasel and gull [Jane Stein ]
5 Mar Weasel and gull [tfberriman ]
5 Mar Boheminas [Pieter van Loon ]
5 Mar Middlebury eagle ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo - some numbers [Sarah Fellows ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo - some numbers [Liz Lackey ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo - some numbers [Jane Stein ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Chip Darmstadt ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Geoffrey Gardner ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Leslie Nulty ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Geoffrey Gardner ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Chip Darmstadt ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Miriam Lawrence ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Scott Sainsbury ]
4 Mar Re: Weasel photo [Linda Gionti ]
3 Mar Crow [Patti Haynes ]
3 Mar Weasel photo ["Teage O'Connor" ]
1 Mar NEK Report: Moose Bog, Shrike, Black-backed woodpeckers [tfberriman ]
1 Mar Fwd: [Patti Haynes ]
1 Mar Re: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier [Larry Clarfeld ]
1 Mar Open water and birds on Lake Champlain [Bob Dill ]
1 Mar Re: Waterfowl --- Otter Creek falls and dams [Liz Lackey ]
28 Feb Waterfowl --- Otter Creek falls and dams ["Ian A. Worley" ]
28 Feb Re: Eastern Addison Co - 2/28 [Jane Stein ]
28 Feb Eastern Addison Co - 2/28 [Donald Jones ]
28 Feb Waxwings in Grand Isle [Bruce MacPherson ]
28 Feb Re: Snowy owl [Kent McFarland ]
28 Feb Re: Snowy owl [JoAnne Russo ]
28 Feb Re: Snowy owl [Diana ]
27 Feb Snowy owl [Kent McFarland ]
27 Feb Re: Waxwing breath [Isis Erb ]
27 Feb Waxwing breath [Ken Copenhaver ]
27 Feb Re: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier ["CAMERON O'CONNOR" ]
27 Feb Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier [Larry Clarfeld ]
27 Feb Re: Lone Female Red Crossbill [Patti Haynes ]
27 Feb Lone Female Red Crossbill [Remy Lary ]
26 Feb Fwd: Barred Owl visitor [cynthia crawford ]
26 Feb Dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk and White-winged Crossbill [Tyler Pockette ]
26 Feb Waxwings [Kim Sargeant ]
25 Feb Re: Finally, Bohemians! [Martha McClintock ]
26 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Joyce Werntgen ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Susan Fogleman ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Lynette Reep ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Karen Uhlendorf ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Karen Uhlendorf ]
25 Feb Fwd: Waxwing video [Susan Fogleman ]
25 Feb Finally, Bohemians! [Miriam Lawrence ]
25 Feb Re: NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins [Scott Sainsbury ]
25 Feb NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins [tfberriman ]
24 Feb Re: Keep your chins up [Barbara Brosnan ]
24 Feb Re: creeper [Joyce Werntgen ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
24 Feb Keep your chins up [Jim Phillips ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
24 Feb South Burlington Bohemians ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
24 Feb creeper [Maeve Kim ]
24 Feb Bohemians [Linda Gionti ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Horace Shaw ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
23 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Susan Werntgen ]
23 Feb Re: Snowy Owl in Hyde Park still there [Karen Uhlendorf ]

Subject: Bohemian Waxwings in St. Albans
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 23:38:59 -0500
Early this afternoon at the St. Albans Price Chopper parking lot, I saw the
largest flock of waxwings I've ever seen--a conservative estimate of about
600.  They were swarming in clouds and streams like starlings.  When a few
hundred of them descended on the crabapple trees along the entrance road,
every one I could see clearly was Bohemian, and when they flew overhead I
could hear only Bohemians.  Amazing!

The other amazing (sad?) thing was all the people driving past who were
apparently not even noticing this spectacle!

--Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 10:36:32 -0500
Hello VTBirders-
             
            
            
It's March. Time to start thinking about Rusty Blackbirds and the Spring 
Migration Blitz. Last year the International Rusty Blackbird Working Group was 
formed to gather data about Rusty Blackbirds in migration. Specifically, the 
idea of the project is to encourage birders to look for Rusty Blackbirds during 
Vermont's target dates and enter your observations into VT eBird. In 2014 over 
4000 birders nationally entered 13400 checklists with Rusty Blackbird sightings 
during the migration period. 



This year the study will be repeated with an emphasis on revisiting last year's 
hotspots as well as visiting other promising habitats. Vermont's target dates 
are March 15-April 30 



            
You can help by birding in likely Rusty Blackbird habitat and reporting your 
observations to VT eBird. Note that there is a drop down menu with an option 
for entering your sightings under the category of Rusty Blackbird Spring 
Migration Blitz. When you reach the Date and Effort page, choose Other to 
select this option on the menu. However, all Rusty Blackbird reports will be 
captured in the study regardless of which option you choose at the time of data 
entry. 



Last year the peak of the migration season occurred between April 20-April 29. 
On April 22, for example, 225 Rusties were reported along the Mac's Bend Trail 
at the Missisquoi NWR. At this point there have been no Rusty Blackbird reports 
in VT eBird in 2015, but there have been numerous sightings of Rusties in 
Connecticut, southern New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The Rusties are 
coming! 

            
             
            
            
 Judith Scarl from VCE is the project leader for the International Rusty 
Blackbird Working Group. Judith asked me to coordinate the project in Vermont 
this year. For more information about the Blitz you can go to the GMAS website, 
the VT eBird Home page, or the International Rusty Blackbird Working Group 
website at: 

            
             
            
            
             http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz            
            
             
            
            
 Thanks for your support of this important conservation project.            
            
             
            
            
 Bruce MacPherson
GMAS
           
         
        
      
     
   
 
Subject: march madness
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 14:32:14 -0500
For those fascinated by woodpeckers vs. weasels (minks?), NPR offered this up 
this morning. 



http://www.npr.org/2015/03/06/391015323/could-a-quokka-beat-a-numbat-oddsmakers-say-yes 


Scott 
Moretown
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 4 Mar 2015 to 5 Mar 2015 (#2015-62)
From: Blake Allison <blake_allison AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 05:07:34 +0000
Weathersfield "snowy" still on site Thursday.
Blake Allkison

Lyme, NH 03768-3322

"Hope" is the thing with feathers -
Emily Dickinson
 

 On Friday, March 6, 2015 12:01 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

   

 There are 14 messages totaling 460 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Middlebury eagle
  2. Boheminas
  3. Weasel and gull (9)
  4. Weasel & Gull
  5. Evening Grosbeaks
  6. gift-bringing crows

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:17:45 +0000
From:    "Peterson, Bruce B." 
Subject: Middlebury eagle

South Street extension, 3:30 this afternoon, about 1/2 mile beyond Porter 
Hospital (exactly the same spot as the dark-phase red-tail last week) an adult 
eagle perched in one of the tallest trees next to the road.  Interestingly 
there was a beautiful dark-phase rough-leg (not a typo, rough-leg this time) 
about 1/2 mile further south on a power pole (in a further coincidence, the 
same pole that had a snowy owl earlier in the winter).  Bruce Peterson 


------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:47:36 -0500
From:    Pieter van Loon 
Subject: Boheminas

At around 3:15 this afternoon there were 74 bohemian waxwings gorging on 
cherries in the center of Marlboro on South Road. 

Pieter van Loon
Marlboro

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:53:49 -0500
From:    tfberriman 
Subject: Weasel and gull

One more link for what weasels can do: 

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=819459764803053&set=vb.231295150286187&
type=2&theater 

 

Tom

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:21:15 -0500
From:    Jane Stein 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

Wow.  That's a little scary.

Jane


On 3/5/2015 4:53 PM, tfberriman wrote:
> One more link for what weasels can do:
>
>
>
>
>  &type=2&theater>
> https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=819459764803053&set=vb.231295150286187&
> type=2&theater
>
>
>
> Tom
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5645 / Virus Database: 4284/9100 - Release Date: 02/12/15
> Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:21:40 -0500
From:    tfberriman 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
an extended period before the gull manages to escape.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408

 

(For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)

 

 

Tom

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:57:16 -0500
From:    Liz Lackey 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
Just wondering.
Liz lackey
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> 
> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
> 
> 
> 
> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
> 
> 
> 
> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Tom

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:59:48 -0500
From:    Ron Payne 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

I agree. 

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:57:16 -0500, Liz Lackey 
 wrote:
Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?
> Just wondering. 
> Liz lackey
> > On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> > > I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook 
> sometimes won't
> > share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the 
> water for
> > an extended period before the gull manages to escape. 
> > > > > https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
> > > > > (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem 
> viewing.)
> > > > > > > Tom
>
>

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:02:31 -0500
From:    eve ticknor 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

Right colour and size as a mink.
On 2015-03-05, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:

> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
> Just wondering.
> Liz lackey
>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
>> 
>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Tom
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

"We find beauty not in the thing itself, but in the pattern of shadows, the 
light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates."  J. Tanazaki 


------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:03:52 -0500
From:    Kaye Danforth 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

I was wondering that too.... 
Lately I'd been pondering whether an ermine that's been lurking around my 
feeders might go for bigger game than just the resident mice and voles.  After 
all these videos, I'm keeping my sheltie inside! 

Kaye in Hinesburg
 
On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:

> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
> Just wondering.
> Liz lackey
>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
>> 
>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Tom

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:16:36 -0500
From:    tfberriman 
Subject: Re: Weasel & Gull

The 'professor of Biology' that posted the video calls it a weasel. I
believe the video is from South America or Spain?? But maybe there they
refer to Mink as weasels or maybe it is a larger weasel species.

 

Tom

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:31:45 -0500
From:    Mundi Smithers 
Subject: Evening Grosbeaks

Apparently there is a flock of Evening Grosbeaks coming sporadically to a 
feeder in Shaftsbury.  Does anyone know more about this? 


Mundi
North Pownal


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of 
morality by religion. 

Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:32:08 -0500
From:    Liz Lackey 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

A mink killed our female goose earlier this winter.  If my husband hadn’t 
come upon the scene, I never would have believed a mink could take down this 
large of an animal. 

I do enjoy watching them (mink) hunting along the edges of rivers and lakes 
when I am out birding.  

Liz Lackey


> On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:03 PM, Kaye Danforth  wrote:
> 
> I was wondering that too.... 
> Lately I'd been pondering whether an ermine that's been lurking around my 
feeders might go for bigger game than just the resident mice and voles.  After 
all these videos, I'm keeping my sheltie inside! 

> Kaye in Hinesburg
> 
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:
> 
>> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
>> Just wondering.
>> Liz lackey
>>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
>>> 
>>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes 
won't 

>>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water 
for 

>>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Tom

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:48:58 -0500
From:    Walter Ellison 
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull

Hi All,

Note that the people in the boat are speaking English in an American
accent. It's anybody's guess where the original video came from, but it's
very likely a re-post of a found object. The animal is almost certainly a
mink given the gull is a Herring Gull which would dwarf a long-tailed or
short-tailed weasel and mink are far more adept in the water than
terrestrial weasel species.

Good Birding,

Walter Ellison

Chestertown, MD (formerly White River Jct., VT)

On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 6:32 PM, Liz Lackey  wrote:

> A mink killed our female goose earlier this winter.  If my husband hadn’t
> come upon the scene, I never would have believed a mink could take down
> this large of an animal.
> I do enjoy watching them (mink) hunting along the edges of rivers and
> lakes when I am out birding.
> Liz Lackey
>
>
> > On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:03 PM, Kaye Danforth 
> wrote:
> >
> > I was wondering that too....
> > Lately I'd been pondering whether an ermine that's been lurking around
> my feeders might go for bigger game than just the resident mice and voles.
> After all these videos, I'm keeping my sheltie inside!
> > Kaye in Hinesburg
> >
> > On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:
> >
> >> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?
> >> Just wondering.
> >> Liz lackey
> >>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes
> won't
> >>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the
> water for
> >>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Tom
>



-- 
Observing Nature is like unwrapping a big pile of presents every time you
take a walk

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 5 Mar 2015 22:00:44 -0500
From:    Eric Wood 
Subject: gift-bringing crows

On the BBC website, there is a story of a girl in Seattle who puts out peanuts 
for the crows, and they in return bring shiny little objects to her.  Quite a 
little story! 

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026

-Eric

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 4 Mar 2015 to 5 Mar 2015 (#2015-62)
**********************************************************


Subject: gift-bringing crows
From: Eric Wood <ericw5 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 22:00:44 -0500
On the BBC website, there is a story of a girl in Seattle who puts out peanuts 
for the crows, and they in return bring shiny little objects to her. Quite a 
little story! 

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026

-Eric
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: Walter Ellison <rossgull61 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:48:58 -0500
Hi All,

Note that the people in the boat are speaking English in an American
accent. It's anybody's guess where the original video came from, but it's
very likely a re-post of a found object. The animal is almost certainly a
mink given the gull is a Herring Gull which would dwarf a long-tailed or
short-tailed weasel and mink are far more adept in the water than
terrestrial weasel species.

Good Birding,

Walter Ellison

Chestertown, MD (formerly White River Jct., VT)

On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 6:32 PM, Liz Lackey  wrote:

> A mink killed our female goose earlier this winter.  If my husband hadn’t
> come upon the scene, I never would have believed a mink could take down
> this large of an animal.
> I do enjoy watching them (mink) hunting along the edges of rivers and
> lakes when I am out birding.
> Liz Lackey
>
>
> > On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:03 PM, Kaye Danforth 
> wrote:
> >
> > I was wondering that too....
> > Lately I'd been pondering whether an ermine that's been lurking around
> my feeders might go for bigger game than just the resident mice and voles.
> After all these videos, I'm keeping my sheltie inside!
> > Kaye in Hinesburg
> >
> > On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:
> >
> >> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?
> >> Just wondering.
> >> Liz lackey
> >>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes
> won't
> >>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the
> water for
> >>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Tom
>



-- 
Observing Nature is like unwrapping a big pile of presents every time you
take a walk
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:32:08 -0500
A mink killed our female goose earlier this winter. If my husband hadn’t come 
upon the scene, I never would have believed a mink could take down this large 
of an animal. 

I do enjoy watching them (mink) hunting along the edges of rivers and lakes 
when I am out birding. 

Liz Lackey


> On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:03 PM, Kaye Danforth  wrote:
> 
> I was wondering that too.... 
> Lately I'd been pondering whether an ermine that's been lurking around my 
feeders might go for bigger game than just the resident mice and voles. After 
all these videos, I'm keeping my sheltie inside! 

> Kaye in Hinesburg
> 
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:
> 
>> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
>> Just wondering.
>> Liz lackey
>>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
>>> 
>>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes 
won't 

>>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water 
for 

>>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Tom
Subject: Evening Grosbeaks
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:31:45 -0500
Apparently there is a flock of Evening Grosbeaks coming sporadically to a 
feeder in Shaftsbury. Does anyone know more about this? 


Mundi
North Pownal


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of 
morality by religion. 

Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
Subject: Re: Weasel & Gull
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:16:36 -0500
The 'professor of Biology' that posted the video calls it a weasel. I
believe the video is from South America or Spain?? But maybe there they
refer to Mink as weasels or maybe it is a larger weasel species.

 

Tom
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: Kaye Danforth <danforthpainting AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:03:52 -0500
I was wondering that too.... 
Lately I'd been pondering whether an ermine that's been lurking around my 
feeders might go for bigger game than just the resident mice and voles. After 
all these videos, I'm keeping my sheltie inside! 

Kaye in Hinesburg
 
On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:

> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
> Just wondering.
> Liz lackey
>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
>> 
>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Tom
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: eve ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:02:31 -0500
Right colour and size as a mink.
On 2015-03-05, at 5:57 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:

> Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
> Just wondering.
> Liz lackey
>> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
>> 
>> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
>> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
>> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Tom
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

"We find beauty not in the thing itself, but in the pattern of shadows, the 
light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates." J. Tanazaki 

Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:59:48 -0500
I agree. 

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:57:16 -0500, Liz Lackey 
 wrote:
Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?
> Just wondering. 
> Liz lackey
> > On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> > > I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook 
> sometimes won't
> > share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the 
> water for
> > an extended period before the gull manages to escape. 
> > > > > https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
> > > > > (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem 
> viewing.)
> > > > > > > Tom
>
>
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:57:16 -0500
Am thinking it may be a mink attacking the gull?  
Just wondering.
Liz lackey
> On Mar 5, 2015, at 5:21 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> 
> I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
> share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
> an extended period before the gull manages to escape.
> 
> 
> 
> https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408
> 
> 
> 
> (For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Tom
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:21:40 -0500
I'll try one more link, unfortunately it looks like Facebook sometimes won't
share the videos. But the video shows Weasel attacking Gull in the water for
an extended period before the gull manages to escape.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/NEK-Audubon/166466131408

 

(For those that are NEK Audubon fans it should be no problem viewing.)

 

 

Tom
Subject: Re: Weasel and gull
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:21:15 -0500
Wow.  That's a little scary.

Jane


On 3/5/2015 4:53 PM, tfberriman wrote:
> One more link for what weasels can do:
>
>
>
>
>  &type=2&theater>
> https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=819459764803053&set=vb.231295150286187&
> type=2&theater
>
>
>
> Tom
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5645 / Virus Database: 4284/9100 - Release Date: 02/12/15
> Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>
Subject: Weasel and gull
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:53:49 -0500
One more link for what weasels can do: 

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=819459764803053&set=vb.231295150286187&
type=2&theater 

 

Tom
Subject: Boheminas
From: Pieter van Loon <boydenvl AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:47:36 -0500
At around 3:15 this afternoon there were 74 bohemian waxwings gorging on 
cherries in the center of Marlboro on South Road. 

Pieter van Loon
Marlboro
Subject: Middlebury eagle
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:17:45 +0000
South Street extension, 3:30 this afternoon, about 1/2 mile beyond Porter 
Hospital (exactly the same spot as the dark-phase red-tail last week) an adult 
eagle perched in one of the tallest trees next to the road. Interestingly there 
was a beautiful dark-phase rough-leg (not a typo, rough-leg this time) about 
1/2 mile further south on a power pole (in a further coincidence, the same pole 
that had a snowy owl earlier in the winter). Bruce Peterson 

Subject: Re: Weasel photo - some numbers
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:49:17 -0500
The description of the scene by the photographer made it seem like the 
woodpecker took off but not for long and landed near him. maybe it could not 
fly with the weasel on its back and it is a good thing it landed near the 
people and the weasel ran off. 


sally fellows
williston

> On Mar 4, 2015, at 12:02 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> This is surely a Least Weasel-- called plain "weasel" in the U.K. presumably 
because they don't have the larger weasel species we have in North America. 
It's a critter we also have here and one of which I once actually saw. (They're 
so reclusive, I didn't even know there was such a thing despite years of 
wandering in natural places, until I saw the tiny creature very clearly a 
couple years ago.) 

> 
> The U.K. also has what they call stoats, which are the same as weasels but 
slightly larger and with a black tip to the tail. I can't see that in the 
photo, so I'm assuming the British ID of this as a weasel and not a stoat is 
correct. 

> 
> There are a bunch of different subspecies and sizes of Least Weasels around 
the world, but they're all pretty small. The North American one I saw is about 
the same size as your basic microtus, which is the L. Weasel's main prey, I was 
amazed to learn. 

> 
> The Green Woodpecker in the video is a little smaller but a little heavier 
than our Flicker, if I'm reading the info I turned up on Google correctly. It's 
8 to 10 inches long (Flicker is 11 to 14) and weighs 6 to 8 ounces. 

> 
> Here's the amazing part to me. The Least Weasel subspecies in the U.K. weighs 
2 to 4.5 ounces (males are bigger than females) and at 7 to 8.5 inches body 
length is only slightly smaller than the woodpecker. 

> 
> So even if it's the larger male U.K. Least Weasel in the picture, it still 
weighs a good bit less and is basically the same length as the woodpecker. 
Looks to me like the weasel in the pic is shorter than the bird, so it may well 
be the smaller and lighter female. 

> 
> I've been wandering this morning in the jungles of U.K. Web sites, some with 
obvious typos (one says weight ranges from 2 to 4.5 ounces with an average of 7 
ounces!), subspecies and grams-to-ounces conversions until my eyes have 
crossed. So I may somehow have gotten this wrong because the much lighter 
weight seems nearly impossible for a critter thinner but still almost the same 
body length as a bird that's half feathers. But there's that picture of the 
woodpecker flying away with a weasel on its back. 

> 
> So if I got this right, we're looking at a 2 to 4.5-ounce critter considering 
a 6-8 ounce bird as big or bigger than itself as a possible meal, and a 
woodpecker than can, in fact, conceivably fly off in a panic with it on its 
back. 

> 
> Btw, U.K. Web sites say the Green Woodpecker eats a lot of ants, so it does, 
like our Flicker, spend a fair amount of time on the ground. 

> 
> Jane
> Shoreham
Subject: Re: Weasel photo - some numbers
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:40:49 -0500
I am assuming the bird didnt fly far once the weasel jumped aboard. I also 
assume the pair was not too far off the ground when the photo was taken. 

Liz Lackey
Stowe
> On Mar 4, 2015, at 12:02 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> This is surely a Least Weasel-- called plain "weasel" in the U.K. presumably 
because they don't have the larger weasel species we have in North America. 
It's a critter we also have here and one of which I once actually saw. (They're 
so reclusive, I didn't even know there was such a thing despite years of 
wandering in natural places, until I saw the tiny creature very clearly a 
couple years ago.) 

> 
> The U.K. also has what they call stoats, which are the same as weasels but 
slightly larger and with a black tip to the tail. I can't see that in the 
photo, so I'm assuming the British ID of this as a weasel and not a stoat is 
correct. 

> 
> There are a bunch of different subspecies and sizes of Least Weasels around 
the world, but they're all pretty small. The North American one I saw is about 
the same size as your basic microtus, which is the L. Weasel's main prey, I was 
amazed to learn. 

> 
> The Green Woodpecker in the video is a little smaller but a little heavier 
than our Flicker, if I'm reading the info I turned up on Google correctly. It's 
8 to 10 inches long (Flicker is 11 to 14) and weighs 6 to 8 ounces. 

> 
> Here's the amazing part to me. The Least Weasel subspecies in the U.K. weighs 
2 to 4.5 ounces (males are bigger than females) and at 7 to 8.5 inches body 
length is only slightly smaller than the woodpecker. 

> 
> So even if it's the larger male U.K. Least Weasel in the picture, it still 
weighs a good bit less and is basically the same length as the woodpecker. 
Looks to me like the weasel in the pic is shorter than the bird, so it may well 
be the smaller and lighter female. 

> 
> I've been wandering this morning in the jungles of U.K. Web sites, some with 
obvious typos (one says weight ranges from 2 to 4.5 ounces with an average of 7 
ounces!), subspecies and grams-to-ounces conversions until my eyes have 
crossed. So I may somehow have gotten this wrong because the much lighter 
weight seems nearly impossible for a critter thinner but still almost the same 
body length as a bird that's half feathers. But there's that picture of the 
woodpecker flying away with a weasel on its back. 

> 
> So if I got this right, we're looking at a 2 to 4.5-ounce critter considering 
a 6-8 ounce bird as big or bigger than itself as a possible meal, and a 
woodpecker than can, in fact, conceivably fly off in a panic with it on its 
back. 

> 
> Btw, U.K. Web sites say the Green Woodpecker eats a lot of ants, so it does, 
like our Flicker, spend a fair amount of time on the ground. 

> 
> Jane
> Shoreham
Subject: Re: Weasel photo - some numbers
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 12:02:16 -0500
This is surely a Least Weasel-- called plain "weasel" in the U.K. 
presumably because they don't have the larger weasel species we have in 
North America.  It's a critter we also have here and one of which I once 
actually saw.  (They're so reclusive, I didn't even know there was such 
a thing despite years of wandering in natural places, until I saw the 
tiny creature very clearly a couple years ago.)

The U.K. also has what they call stoats, which are the same as weasels 
but slightly larger and with a black tip to the tail.  I can't see that 
in the photo, so I'm assuming the British ID of this as a weasel and not 
a stoat is correct.

There are a bunch of different subspecies and sizes of Least Weasels 
around the world, but they're all pretty small.  The North American one 
I saw is about the same size as your basic microtus, which is the L. 
Weasel's main prey, I was amazed to learn.

The Green Woodpecker in the video is a little smaller but a little 
heavier than our Flicker, if I'm reading the info I turned up on Google 
correctly.  It's 8 to 10 inches long (Flicker is 11 to 14) and weighs 6 
to 8 ounces.

Here's the amazing part to me.  The Least Weasel subspecies in the U.K. 
weighs 2 to 4.5 ounces (males are bigger than females) and at 7 to 8.5 
inches body length is only slightly smaller than the woodpecker.

So even if it's the larger male U.K. Least Weasel in the picture, it 
still weighs a good bit less and is basically the same length as the 
woodpecker. Looks to me like the weasel in the pic is shorter than the 
bird, so it may well be the smaller and lighter female.

I've been wandering this morning in the jungles of U.K. Web sites, some 
with obvious typos (one says weight ranges from 2 to 4.5 ounces with an 
average of 7 ounces!), subspecies and grams-to-ounces conversions until 
my eyes have crossed.  So I may somehow have gotten this wrong because 
the much lighter weight seems nearly impossible for a critter thinner 
but still almost the same body length as a bird that's half feathers. 
But there's that picture of the woodpecker flying away with a weasel on 
its back.

So if I got this right, we're looking at a 2 to 4.5-ounce critter 
considering a 6-8 ounce bird as big or bigger than itself as a possible 
meal, and a woodpecker than can, in fact, conceivably fly off in a panic 
with it on its back.

Btw, U.K. Web sites say the Green Woodpecker eats a lot of ants, so it 
does, like our Flicker, spend a fair amount of time on the ground.

Jane
Shoreham
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Chip Darmstadt <Chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:38:02 -0500
Go back to the original link Geoff - someone really did photoshop Putin riding 
on the back of the weasel/woodpecker, complete with reins! 

Cheers, Chip

Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Geoffrey Gardner
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 11:12 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo

Okay, okay. Uncle!

I think I’m convinced. Green woodpeckers are the largest of the three 
woodpeckers that breed in Britain, and they’re ground feeders, especially 
fond of ants. They spend lots of time hanging out on anthills. See: 

http://www.rspb.org.uk/discoverandenjoynature/discoverandlearn/birdguide/nam
e/g/greenwoodpecker/

The BBC story Leslie Nulty refers to --http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446--
includes this:

> Wildlife presenter Steve Backshall agrees that while highly unusual it 
> is not totally unheard of and has "no reason to doubt" the photo.
> He compared the woodpecker to other animals like leaf cutter ants and 
> rhino beetles, which can carry 850 times their body weight.
> He said: "The weasel is pretty fascinating as well. It can kill things 
> much bigger than itself, so it's an impressive little creature when 
> you think about its size.”

And in the same story, another wildlife expert says, "A female weasel weighs 
less than a Mars Bar . . . " 

But I still like the tale Chris Darmstadt told.
GG


From:  Leslie Nulty 
Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Date:  Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:41 AM
To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo

This was carried on BBC news. The photos were taken in a park in London.
They reported that UK green woodpeckers are ground feeders and the weasel took 
advantage of that. Eventually the woodpecker was able to shake off the weasel. 


On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 10:37 AM, Geoffrey Gardner < 
geoffrey323 AT myfairpoint.net> wrote: 


>  I think Chris D.¹s got it!
> 
>  Thinking of Annie Dillard¹s little piece, do woodpeckers ever walk 
> around  on  the ground as eagles do? And do weasels climb trees as 
> squirrels do? Where  exactly were these two --bird and mammal-- in 
> relation to one another when  the weasel mounted the woodpecker?  
> Mammal and bird . . . Consider the  relative sizes of these two 
> creatures as shown, then hold in mind what you  know about the 
> relative weights of mammals and birds. Could the woodpecker  really 
> take to the air with a weasel on its back? Or was the woodpecker  
> already in the air when the weasel hopped aboard? But that goes back 
> to the  first question about the relative locations of our two animal 
> friends when  it all began.
> 
>  Photography is magic. What you can see if you look really hard is a 
> tiny  Putin clinging to the woodpecker, and mostly hidden in its 
> feathers, and a  somewhat shrunken weasel grasping the bold leader by 
> his shoulders. Look hard. You¹ll see it. If you don¹t, look again. Keep 
looking till you do. 

> 
>  Geoffrey Gardner
>  West Fairlee
> 
>  From:  Chip Darmstadt 
>  Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
>  Date:  Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:07 AM
>  To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
>  Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo
> 
>  What about that photo of Putin riding on the back of the weasel?!
> 
>  Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
>  North Branch Nature Center
>  (802) 229-6206
> 
>  www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> 
>  -----Original Message-----
>  From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Miriam  
> Lawrence
>  Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:37 AM
>  To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>  Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo
> 
>  Photo is definitely real, has been verified by multiple media outlets 
> and  even Snopes.  There are actually additional photos that show the 
> event
>  unfolding:
>  https://twitter.com/TheBirdist/status/572543209617928192/photo/1
> 
>  Miriam Lawrence
>  Monkton
> 
> 
> 
>  On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Scott Sainsbury <  
> scott AT beaconassociates.com>
>  wrote:
> 
>>  >  I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer.
>>  >  Apparently, the weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to 
>> kill  >  it, but the bird managed to shake it off and escape.  I 
>> thought  >  probably it was photoshopped ‹ but reportedly, it was real.
>>  >
>>  >  Scott
>>  >  Moretown
>>  >
>>  >
> 



--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Geoffrey Gardner <geoffrey323 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 11:12:03 -0500
Okay, okay. Uncle!

I think I’m convinced. Green woodpeckers are the largest of the three
woodpeckers that breed in Britain, and they’re ground feeders, especially
fond of ants. They spend lots of time hanging out on anthills. See:
http://www.rspb.org.uk/discoverandenjoynature/discoverandlearn/birdguide/nam
e/g/greenwoodpecker/

The BBC story Leslie Nulty refers to --http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31711446--
includes this:

> Wildlife presenter Steve Backshall agrees that while highly unusual it is not
> totally unheard of and has "no reason to doubt" the photo.
> He compared the woodpecker to other animals like leaf cutter ants and rhino
> beetles, which can carry 850 times their body weight.
> He said: "The weasel is pretty fascinating as well. It can kill things much
> bigger than itself, so it's an impressive little creature when you think 
about 

> its size.”

And in the same story, another wildlife expert says, "A female weasel weighs
less than a Mars Bar . . . "
But I still like the tale Chris Darmstadt told.
GG


From:  Leslie Nulty 
Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Date:  Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:41 AM
To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo

This was carried on BBC news. The photos were taken in a park in London.
They reported that UK green woodpeckers are ground feeders and the weasel
took advantage of that.  Eventually the woodpecker was able to shake off
the weasel.

On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 10:37 AM, Geoffrey Gardner <
geoffrey323 AT myfairpoint.net> wrote:

>  I think Chris D.¹s got it!
> 
>  Thinking of Annie Dillard¹s little piece, do woodpeckers ever walk around
>  on
>  the ground as eagles do? And do weasels climb trees as squirrels do? Where
>  exactly were these two --bird and mammal-- in relation to one another when
>  the weasel mounted the woodpecker?  Mammal and bird . . . Consider the
>  relative sizes of these two creatures as shown, then hold in mind what you
>  know about the relative weights of mammals and birds. Could the woodpecker
>  really take to the air with a weasel on its back? Or was the woodpecker
>  already in the air when the weasel hopped aboard? But that goes back to the
>  first question about the relative locations of our two animal friends when
>  it all began.
> 
>  Photography is magic. What you can see if you look really hard is a tiny
>  Putin clinging to the woodpecker, and mostly hidden in its feathers, and a
>  somewhat shrunken weasel grasping the bold leader by his shoulders. Look
>  hard. You¹ll see it. If you don¹t, look again. Keep looking till you do.
> 
>  Geoffrey Gardner
>  West Fairlee
> 
>  From:  Chip Darmstadt 
>  Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
>  Date:  Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:07 AM
>  To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
>  Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo
> 
>  What about that photo of Putin riding on the back of the weasel?!
> 
>  Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
>  North Branch Nature Center
>  (802) 229-6206
> 
>  www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> 
>  -----Original Message-----
>  From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Miriam
>  Lawrence
>  Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:37 AM
>  To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>  Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo
> 
>  Photo is definitely real, has been verified by multiple media outlets and
>  even Snopes.  There are actually additional photos that show the event
>  unfolding:
>  https://twitter.com/TheBirdist/status/572543209617928192/photo/1
> 
>  Miriam Lawrence
>  Monkton
> 
> 
> 
>  On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Scott Sainsbury <
>  scott AT beaconassociates.com>
>  wrote:
> 
>>  >  I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer.
>>  >  Apparently, the weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to kill
>>  >  it, but the bird managed to shake it off and escape.  I thought
>>  >  probably it was photoshopped ‹ but reportedly, it was real.
>>  >
>>  >  Scott
>>  >  Moretown
>>  >
>>  >
> 



-- 
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:41:13 -0500
This was carried on BBC news. The photos were taken in a park in London.
They reported that UK green woodpeckers are ground feeders and the weasel
took advantage of that.  Eventually the woodpecker was able to shake off
the weasel.

On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 10:37 AM, Geoffrey Gardner <
geoffrey323 AT myfairpoint.net> wrote:

> I think Chris D.¹s got it!
>
> Thinking of Annie Dillard¹s little piece, do woodpeckers ever walk around
> on
> the ground as eagles do? And do weasels climb trees as squirrels do? Where
> exactly were these two --bird and mammal-- in relation to one another when
> the weasel mounted the woodpecker?  Mamma and bird . . . Consider the
> relative sizes of these two creatures as shown, then hold in mind what you
> know about the relative weights of mammals and birds. Could the woodpecker
> really take to the air with a weasel on its back? Or was the woodpecker
> already in the air when the weasel hopped aboard? But that goes back to the
> first question about the relative locations of our two animal friends when
> it all began.
>
> Photography is magic. What you can see if you look really hard is a tiny
> Putin clinging to the woodpecker, and mostly hidden in its feathers, and a
> somewhat shrunken weasel grasping the bold leader by his shoulders. Look
> hard. You¹ll see it. If you don¹t, look again. Keep looking till you do.
>
> Geoffrey Gardner
> West Fairlee
>
> From:  Chip Darmstadt 
> Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
> Date:  Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:07 AM
> To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
> Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo
>
> What about that photo of Putin riding on the back of the weasel?!
>
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> North Branch Nature Center
> (802) 229-6206
>
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Miriam
> Lawrence
> Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:37 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo
>
> Photo is definitely real, has been verified by multiple media outlets and
> even Snopes.  There are actually additional photos that show the event
> unfolding:
> https://twitter.com/TheBirdist/status/572543209617928192/photo/1
>
> Miriam Lawrence
> Monkton
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Scott Sainsbury <
> scott AT beaconassociates.com>
> wrote:
>
> >  I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer.
> >  Apparently, the weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to kill
> >  it, but the bird managed to shake it off and escape.  I thought
> >  probably it was photoshopped ‹ but reportedly, it was real.
> >
> >  Scott
> >  Moretown
> >
> >
>



-- 
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Geoffrey Gardner <geoffrey323 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:37:55 -0500
I think Chris D.s got it!

Thinking of Annie Dillards little piece, do woodpeckers ever walk around on
the ground as eagles do? And do weasels climb trees as squirrels do? Where
exactly were these two --bird and mammal-- in relation to one another when
the weasel mounted the woodpecker?  Mamma and bird . . . Consider the
relative sizes of these two creatures as shown, then hold in mind what you
know about the relative weights of mammals and birds. Could the woodpecker
really take to the air with a weasel on its back? Or was the woodpecker
already in the air when the weasel hopped aboard? But that goes back to the
first question about the relative locations of our two animal friends when
it all began.

Photography is magic. What you can see if you look really hard is a tiny
Putin clinging to the woodpecker, and mostly hidden in its feathers, and a
somewhat shrunken weasel grasping the bold leader by his shoulders. Look
hard. Youll see it. If you dont, look again. Keep looking till you do.

Geoffrey Gardner
West Fairlee

From:  Chip Darmstadt 
Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Date:  Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 10:07 AM
To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo

What about that photo of Putin riding on the back of the weasel?!

Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Miriam
Lawrence
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:37 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo

Photo is definitely real, has been verified by multiple media outlets and
even Snopes.  There are actually additional photos that show the event
unfolding: https://twitter.com/TheBirdist/status/572543209617928192/photo/1

Miriam Lawrence
Monkton



On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Scott Sainsbury 
wrote:

>  I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer.
>  Apparently, the weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to kill
>  it, but the bird managed to shake it off and escape.  I thought
>  probably it was photoshopped  but reportedly, it was real.
> 
>  Scott
>  Moretown
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Chip Darmstadt <Chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:07:26 -0500
What about that photo of Putin riding on the back of the weasel?! 

Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Miriam Lawrence
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:37 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Weasel photo

Photo is definitely real, has been verified by multiple media outlets and even 
Snopes. There are actually additional photos that show the event 

unfolding: https://twitter.com/TheBirdist/status/572543209617928192/photo/1

Miriam Lawrence
Monkton



On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Scott Sainsbury 
wrote:

> I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer.
> Apparently, the weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to kill 
> it, but the bird managed to shake it off and escape.  I thought 
> probably it was photoshopped — but reportedly, it was real.
>
> Scott
> Moretown
>
>
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:36:33 -0500
Photo is definitely real, has been verified by multiple media outlets and
even Snopes.  There are actually additional photos that show the event
unfolding: https://twitter.com/TheBirdist/status/572543209617928192/photo/1

Miriam Lawrence
Monkton



On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 9:17 AM, Scott Sainsbury 
wrote:

> I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer.
> Apparently, the weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to kill it,
> but the bird managed to shake it off and escape.  I thought probably it was
> photoshopped — but reportedly, it was real.
>
> Scott
> Moretown
>
>
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:17:03 -0500
I read a report from someone who interviewed the photographer. Apparently, the 
weasel had jumped the woodpecker, attempting to kill it, but the bird managed 
to shake it off and escape. I thought probably it was photoshopped — but 
reportedly, it was real. 


Scott
Moretown



> On Mar 4, 2015, at 9:10 AM, Linda Gionti  wrote:
> 
> Wow, that's an incredible photo. And thanks for reminding me of Annie 
Dillard's piece. It's been many years since I read that, and it's just as 
mind-blowing to read it again. - Linda 

> 
> Linda Gionti
> Huntington, VT
> 
> 
> On Mar 3, 2015, at 6:44 AM, Teage O'Connor wrote:
> 
>> I was just forwarded this photo
>> 
. 

>> Pretty wild.
>> 
>> Reminded me of Annie Dillard's piece, *Living Like Weasels*:
>> http://www.courses.vcu.edu/ENG200-lad/dillard.htm
>> 
>> Teage O'Connor
>> Naturalist Educator
>> Crow's Path  | CP Blog
>> 
>> Wild Burlington Blog 
>> (802) 557-7127
> 
Subject: Re: Weasel photo
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 09:10:34 -0500
Wow, that's an incredible photo. And thanks for reminding me of Annie Dillard's 
piece. It's been many years since I read that, and it's just as mind-blowing to 
read it again. - Linda 


Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT


On Mar 3, 2015, at 6:44 AM, Teage O'Connor wrote:

> I was just forwarded this photo
> 
. 

> Pretty wild.
> 
> Reminded me of Annie Dillard's piece, *Living Like Weasels*:
> http://www.courses.vcu.edu/ENG200-lad/dillard.htm
> 
> Teage O'Connor
> Naturalist Educator
> Crow's Path  | CP Blog
> 
> Wild Burlington Blog 
> (802) 557-7127
Subject: Crow
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 16:26:54 -0500
I have been hearing the gutteral calls of Ravens on and off all winter, but 
since yesterday a crow has returned to Moretown Village. It has been announcing 
its presence in the large and very tall Sugar Maple in my neighbor's yard. One, 
quite possibly the same individual, did the same thing last year around this 
time, so I presume they are establishing their territory. 


Despite Frozen February, spring is coming!

Patti Haynes, sent from my iPod
Moretown
Subject: Weasel photo
From: "Teage O'Connor" <badger.meli AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 06:44:15 -0500
I was just forwarded this photo

. 

Pretty wild.

Reminded me of Annie Dillard's piece, *Living Like Weasels*:
http://www.courses.vcu.edu/ENG200-lad/dillard.htm

Teage O'Connor
Naturalist Educator
Crow's Path  | CP Blog

Wild Burlington Blog 
(802) 557-7127
Subject: NEK Report: Moose Bog, Shrike, Black-backed woodpeckers
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:40:25 -0500
4 of us snow shoed the Moose Bog Trail this morning and found 6 species.
Wonderful conditions and accommodating birds.

 

Moose Bog, Wenlock WMA, Essex, US-VT

Mar 1, 2015 9:00 AM - 12:33 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.0 mile(s)

6 species

 

Black-backed Woodpecker  4

Pileated Woodpecker  1

Northern Shrike  1     visual and vocalizations

Gray Jay  5

Common Raven  1

Black-capped Chickadee  6

 

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Fwd:
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 09:24:43 -0500
*Just read this on Bird Studies Canada and thought  VT birders might find
it of interest.*

The new documentary *SongbirdSOS*, narrated by David Suzuki, features
research on key threats causing migratory songbird declines in North
America. Canadian scientists Dr. Christy Morrissey (University of
Saskatchewan), Dr. Erin Bayne (University of Alberta), and Dr. Bridget
Stutchbury (York University, author of *Silence of the Songbirds*) are
among the experts who share insights about the stunning variety of
human-made perils birds face – and what people can do to protect birds and
the health of the planet.
   *SongbirdSOS* will air on CBC’s *The Nature of Things
* on Thursday, March
19. Bird Studies Canada is the proud Canadian Outreach Partner for this
film, in collaboration with SongbirdSOS Productions and Films a Cinq. Visit
the *SongbirdSOS website * to learn more about the
film, the outreach campaign, and *The Messenger*, an extraordinary feature
documentary that will be ready for release across Canada this spring.
Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 08:57:51 -0500
Hi Cameron,

North Branch Nature Center birding events for this spring are posted below
(and can be found at: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/nbncbirds.html

Cheers,
Larry

*Lake Champlain Waterfowl Watch*

Saturday, April 11, 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Fee: $25 members, $30 nonmembers
As winter transitions into spring, thousands of geese and ducks fly along
Lake Champlain as they |migrate north. We’ll spend the day visiting
waterfowl hotspots in search of migrating ducks and other water loving
birds.  Call to us register and learn about carpooling options.

*Woodcock Watch*
Wednesday, April 22, 7:30 p.m.
Fee: $5 members, $10 nonmembers
It’s spring and love is in the air - literally! We’ll listen and watch for
the dramatic courtship flight of the American Woodcock, a sandpiper which
nests along the North Branch. With luck, we may also be serenaded by
Wilson’s Snipe and we’re sure to hear a chorus of Spring Peepers.

*Spring Migration Bird Walks*
Fridays, April 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 7:00 - 8:30 a.m.
Fee: $10, free for members
Explore NBNC for spring migrants, such as warblers, vireos, thrushes and
waterfowl.  Learn birding basics, expand your birding ear and discover more
about the birds that inhabit the fields and forests of NBNC. These walks
are led by our teacher naturalist staff and are a great way to meet other
local birders!

*Birding Cape May*
May 7-11, 2015
Fee: $680 members, $730 nonmembers
Last year's innagural adult trip to Cape May was a smashing success, with
13 participants and 159 species of birds! We are proud to offer this trip
again.Learn more .

*BirdFest*
Saturday, May 30, 7:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
NBNC's 4th annual BirdFest will feature bird walks, talks, demonstrations,
kid's activity tent, carving demos, drawing and photography contest, and
much more! For more info, visit:
http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdfest.html

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 5:16 PM, CAMERON O'CONNOR 
wrote:

> thanks for info... so sorry to hear you won't be around as much - any
> birding classes/activities coming up?
>
> On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 4:18 PM, Larry Clarfeld 
> wrote:
>
> > Hi VTBirders,
> >
> > About 150+ Bohemian Waxwings just now in Montpelier at the intersection
> of
> > Elm St. X Pearl St.
> >
> > Good Birding,
> > Larry
> >
> > *Birding Cape May*
> > May 7-11, 2015
> > Experience spring migration at its best! For over a decade, NBNC has
> taken
> > teen groups to Cape May for the World Series of Birding, and now, we
> offer
> > adults the opportunity to visit what is widely considered the 'top
> birding
> > destination in the East.'
> >
> > Learn more at: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/capemay.html
> >
> > --
> > Larry Clarfeld
> > Environmental Educator
> > Youth Birding Coordinator
> >
> > North Branch Nature Center
> > 713 Elm St.
> > Montpelier, VT 05602
> >
> > www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> > (802) 229-6206
> > larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> >
>



-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Open water and birds on Lake Champlain
From: Bob Dill <rdill AT BURLINGTONTELECOM.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:39:52 -0500
I crossed on the Platsburg-Grand Isle ferry yesterday, thinking that 
there might the be the duck extravaganza that we had last year in the 
Charlotte ferry lane.  The only true open water was on the east end and 
it had just a few ducks in it (mostly Mergansers).  The wind was from 
the south east.  Most of the ferry lane was full of ice rubble. We have 
been skating on the'last ice to freeze' off Shelburne and Apple Tree 
Point (Burlington)for for over two weeks. Soon after the last ice came 
in we did see occasional ducks on the ice near the Four Brothers islands 
but we have not seen them since. There is no open water but there are 
occasional small (few 10's of feet) goose roosting areas.   The pressure 
ridges are intermittently wet but do not seem to be attracting birds.  
The Charlotte-Essex ferry lake froze over when they stopped running a 
couple weeks ago.

Bob
Subject: Re: Waterfowl --- Otter Creek falls and dams
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:16:29 -0500
Thanks Ian and Ron,
I had been wondering about the other spots of open turbulent water along Otter 
Creek, since I rarely see waterfowl below Vergennes Falls. 

Good “cold winter” information.
Liz Lackey

> On Feb 28, 2015, at 8:53 PM, Ian A. Worley  wrote:
> 
> Otter Creek begins its northward path to Lake Champlain on the western slopes 
of Mt. Tabor in Peru 

> (Bennington County). From Rutland to Lake Champlain at Fort Cassin in 
Ferrisburgh it meanders through lowlands and wetlands 74 river miles, and 
descends 412 feet ... with most of the descent at eight falls and dams (and one 
minor dam). 

> 
> The turbulence of water at the base of the falls and dams creates small 
pockets of ice free water even in years with long periods of below freezing and 
frigid temperatures such we have had for all of 2015 so far, which seems like 
forever. Ron Payne and I spent today inventorying these micro water patches for 
overwintering waterfowl; patches obviously significant for the survival of 
these birds. With forecasted temperatures in the 40's midweek coming up, there 
will begin the dramatic changes in river ice, open water, and current. So we 
wanted to get as late a picture of the winter survivalists as we could. 

> 
> Beginning at Vergennes Falls we moved upstream to the small dam along Dorr 
Road just below River Street in Rutland (near the College of St. Joseph). We 
did not check out possible open water at the bottom of the river's narrow gorge 
about half a mile north of the Belden Dam. 

> 
> Six of the locations had waterfowl, including six species.  Overall we saw:
> 
> Mallard    91
> Common Goldeneye    61
> Common Merganser    8
> Canada Goose    5
> Black Duck 3
> Hooded Merganser    1
> 
> Total:  169 overwintering birds
> ..................................................
> 
> Birds per site:
> 
> Vergennes Falls:
> Open water; no waterfowl.
> 
> Weybridge Dam (Twin Bridges):
> Common Goldeneye    5
> 
> Huntington Falls, Weybridge:
> No open water.
> 
> Belden Falls, New Haven:
> Black Duck    2
> Common Merganser    4
> Common Goldeneye    51
> 
> Middlebury Lower Project (Lower Falls at Pulp Mill Covered Bridge):
> Hooded Merganser    1
> 
> Middlebury Falls (below falls):
> Canada Goose    5
> Common Merganser  2
> Common Goldeneye    2
> 
> Middlebury Falls (above falls at Cross Road Bridge):
> Common Merganser    1
> Common Goldeneye    3
> 
> Sutherland Falls (Proctor):
> Open water; no waterfowl.
> 
> Center Rutland Falls:
> Open water; no waterfowl.
> 
> Dorr Road (Rutland):
> Black Duck 1
> Mallard 91
> Common Merganser 1
> 
> Ian
Subject: Waterfowl --- Otter Creek falls and dams
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:53:15 -0500
Otter Creek begins its northward path to Lake Champlain on the western 
slopes of Mt. Tabor in Peru
(Bennington County).  From Rutland to Lake Champlain at Fort Cassin in 
Ferrisburgh it meanders through lowlands and wetlands 74 river miles, 
and descends 412 feet ... with most of the descent at eight falls and 
dams (and one minor dam).

The turbulence of water at the base of the falls and dams creates small 
pockets of ice free water even in years with long periods of below 
freezing and frigid temperatures such we have had for all of 2015 so 
far, which seems like forever.  Ron Payne and I spent today inventorying 
these micro water patches for overwintering waterfowl; patches obviously 
significant for the survival of these birds.  With forecasted 
temperatures in the 40's midweek coming up, there will begin the 
dramatic changes in river ice, open water, and current. So we wanted to 
get as late a picture of the winter survivalists as we could.

Beginning at Vergennes Falls we moved upstream to the small dam along 
Dorr Road just below River Street in Rutland (near the College of St. 
Joseph).  We did not check out possible open water at the bottom of the 
river's narrow gorge about half a mile north of the Belden Dam.

Six of the locations had waterfowl, including six species.  Overall we saw:

Mallard    91
Common Goldeneye    61
Common Merganser    8
Canada Goose    5
Black Duck 3
Hooded Merganser    1

Total:  169 overwintering birds
  ..................................................

Birds per site:

Vergennes Falls:
Open water; no waterfowl.

Weybridge Dam (Twin Bridges):
Common Goldeneye    5

Huntington Falls, Weybridge:
No open water.

Belden Falls, New Haven:
Black Duck    2
Common Merganser    4
Common Goldeneye    51

Middlebury Lower Project (Lower Falls at Pulp Mill Covered Bridge):
Hooded Merganser    1

Middlebury Falls (below falls):
Canada Goose    5
Common Merganser  2
Common Goldeneye    2

Middlebury Falls (above falls at Cross Road Bridge):
Common Merganser    1
Common Goldeneye    3

Sutherland Falls (Proctor):
Open water; no waterfowl.

Center Rutland Falls:
Open water; no waterfowl.

Dorr Road (Rutland):
Black Duck 1
Mallard 91
Common Merganser 1

Ian
Subject: Re: Eastern Addison Co - 2/28
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:43:51 -0500
What's "CFA"?

Sounds like a great day!

Jane


On 2/28/2015 6:36 PM, Donald Jones wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Fellow Middlebury student Fitz Bowen and I enjoyed a superb morning of
> birding on this beautiful late winter (am I too optimistic to say it might
> have felt like early spring?) day. The birds were definitely characteristic
> of the initial sub-zero temperature when we left campus at 7:30, as a large
> flock of waxwings feeding on South Main Street distracted us before we
> could even get out of town. In addition to the decidedly wintry ratio of
> about 75 Bohemians to 5 Cedars, a small flock of Common Redpolls perched
> nearby and a handful of Pine Siskins also put in an appearance.
>
> Along the Lincoln/Ripton Road up in the Greens, we were lucky enough to
> spot a Barred Owl perched alongside the road in great light, which opened
> one eye but obligingly sat still as we watched and took pictures for ten
> minutes. Great looks at more Common Redpolls and a Pileated Woodpecker also
> enlivened this stretch.
>
> In Lincoln, I had my first Vermont Northern Shrike perched along East River
> Road. After a whole winter of looking, I'm realizing that they're tougher
> to find than you might think!
>
>  From there, we headed more or less directly back to Middlebury, where the
> highlight of my day awaited: a massive flock, between 350 and 400 strong,
> of Bohemian Waxwings. I followed them around campus, multiple times coming
> within 15 feet of dozens at a time as they fed in various fruiting
> crabapples. Standing surrounded by the gently purring flock of beautiful
> birds from somewhere deep in the far northern boreal forest, all of whom
> were utterly unconcerned with my presence, was a reminder of why I truly
> love birding. Late this afternoon, I couldn't resist going back for one
> last look. I found the entire swarm sitting in the top of an oak adjacent
> the CFA parking lot, making forays in groups of 50 and 75 to gobble down
> the quickly dwindling supply of crabapples. I don't know how soon this
> flock will depart on their wonderful journey or where they'll next stop,
> but I will remember them for a long time to come.
>
> Don Jones
> Middlebury, VT / Laramie, WY
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5645 / Virus Database: 4284/9100 - Release Date: 02/12/15
> Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>
Subject: Eastern Addison Co - 2/28
From: Donald Jones <dwilbertjones AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 18:36:48 -0500
Hi all,

Fellow Middlebury student Fitz Bowen and I enjoyed a superb morning of
birding on this beautiful late winter (am I too optimistic to say it might
have felt like early spring?) day. The birds were definitely characteristic
of the initial sub-zero temperature when we left campus at 7:30, as a large
flock of waxwings feeding on South Main Street distracted us before we
could even get out of town. In addition to the decidedly wintry ratio of
about 75 Bohemians to 5 Cedars, a small flock of Common Redpolls perched
nearby and a handful of Pine Siskins also put in an appearance.

Along the Lincoln/Ripton Road up in the Greens, we were lucky enough to
spot a Barred Owl perched alongside the road in great light, which opened
one eye but obligingly sat still as we watched and took pictures for ten
minutes. Great looks at more Common Redpolls and a Pileated Woodpecker also
enlivened this stretch.

In Lincoln, I had my first Vermont Northern Shrike perched along East River
Road. After a whole winter of looking, I'm realizing that they're tougher
to find than you might think!

From there, we headed more or less directly back to Middlebury, where the
highlight of my day awaited: a massive flock, between 350 and 400 strong,
of Bohemian Waxwings. I followed them around campus, multiple times coming
within 15 feet of dozens at a time as they fed in various fruiting
crabapples. Standing surrounded by the gently purring flock of beautiful
birds from somewhere deep in the far northern boreal forest, all of whom
were utterly unconcerned with my presence, was a reminder of why I truly
love birding. Late this afternoon, I couldn't resist going back for one
last look. I found the entire swarm sitting in the top of an oak adjacent
the CFA parking lot, making forays in groups of 50 and 75 to gobble down
the quickly dwindling supply of crabapples. I don't know how soon this
flock will depart on their wonderful journey or where they'll next stop,
but I will remember them for a long time to come.

Don Jones
Middlebury, VT / Laramie, WY
Subject: Waxwings in Grand Isle
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:02:57 -0500
This afternoon I spotted still another flock of waxwings on route 314 in Grand 
Isle near the continuation of West Shore Road. There were about 100 all told 
with a ratio of Bohemians:Cedars of about 8:1. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Re: Snowy owl
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:16:26 -0500
Hi,
A lot of people are asking me where the owl is. It was posted to the list
serve a few days ago. But, you can visit this VT eBird map. If you want
Google to give you exact directions, click on any dot then on Checklist
then map and you will be able to tell Google to give directions from
anyplace.


http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/snoowl1?neg=true&env.minX=-72.50462571304979&env.minY=43.34105143223757&env.maxX=-72.42051163834276&env.maxY=43.37805701346626&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=range&byr=2015&eyr=2015 


The owl sits on the north end peak of the roof of the barn. It is a very
white adult. Please stay on road and be respectful of owl and landowner.
Enjoy
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


  




On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 11:20 AM, Diana  wrote:

> Weathersfield, VT?  Where is the usual barn spot?
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kent McFarland" <
> kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
> To: 
> Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 7:49 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy owl
>
>
>  snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
>> both watched the sun set tonight.
>> Kent
>>
>>
>> --
>> ____________________________
>>
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>>
>> 
>>  
>> > >
>> 
>>
>>
Subject: Re: Snowy owl
From: JoAnne Russo <sukirusso AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:30:07 -0500
Across the street from the main buildings. Easy to locate.

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 28, 2015, at 11:20 AM, Diana  wrote:
> 
> Weathersfield, VT?  Where is the usual barn spot?
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kent McFarland" 
 

> To: 
> Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 7:49 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy owl
> 
> 
>> snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
>> both watched the sun set tonight.
>> Kent
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> ____________________________
>> 
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: Snowy owl
From: Diana <dlee3 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:20:57 -0500
Weathersfield, VT?  Where is the usual barn spot?


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Kent McFarland" 
To: 
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 7:49 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy owl


> snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
> both watched the sun set tonight.
> Kent
>
>
> -- 
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
>
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Snowy owl
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:49:33 -0500
snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
both watched the sun set tonight.
Kent


-- 
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


  


Subject: Re: Waxwing breath
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:30:39 -0500
I've been trying to capture their exhalations in a photo to no avail. I
noticed it for the first time this winter myself. Pretty interesting to
watch. 😀
Isis Erb

On Friday, February 27, 2015, Ken Copenhaver  wrote:

> For the past several days a mixed flock of Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings has
> been feasting on several large crabapple trees just outside the building
> where I work in Georgia.  Flocks have ranged from 40 to 150 (approx)
> birds.  The trees are on the east side of the building, right up against
> some windows for really close views.  At 7:30 this morning at about -15
> degrees, viewing them through the windows and toward the sun, I could
> actually see wisps of vapor from their breath!  I don't recall ever
> observing a bird's breath before.  Pretty amazing!
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
Subject: Waxwing breath
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:27:41 -0500
For the past several days a mixed flock of Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings has
been feasting on several large crabapple trees just outside the building
where I work in Georgia.  Flocks have ranged from 40 to 150 (approx)
birds.  The trees are on the east side of the building, right up against
some windows for really close views.  At 7:30 this morning at about -15
degrees, viewing them through the windows and toward the sun, I could
actually see wisps of vapor from their breath!  I don't recall ever
observing a bird's breath before.  Pretty amazing!

--Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier
From: "CAMERON O'CONNOR" <cameron103 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:16:07 -0500
thanks for info... so sorry to hear you won't be around as much - any
birding classes/activities coming up?

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 4:18 PM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:

> Hi VTBirders,
>
> About 150+ Bohemian Waxwings just now in Montpelier at the intersection of
> Elm St. X Pearl St.
>
> Good Birding,
> Larry
>
> *Birding Cape May*
> May 7-11, 2015
> Experience spring migration at its best! For over a decade, NBNC has taken
> teen groups to Cape May for the World Series of Birding, and now, we offer
> adults the opportunity to visit what is widely considered the 'top birding
> destination in the East.'
>
> Learn more at: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/capemay.html
>
> --
> Larry Clarfeld
> Environmental Educator
> Youth Birding Coordinator
>
> North Branch Nature Center
> 713 Elm St.
> Montpelier, VT 05602
>
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> (802) 229-6206
> larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
Subject: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:18:46 -0500
Hi VTBirders,

About 150+ Bohemian Waxwings just now in Montpelier at the intersection of
Elm St. X Pearl St.

Good Birding,
Larry

*Birding Cape May*
May 7-11, 2015
Experience spring migration at its best! For over a decade, NBNC has taken
teen groups to Cape May for the World Series of Birding, and now, we offer
adults the opportunity to visit what is widely considered the 'top birding
destination in the East.'

Learn more at: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/capemay.html

-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Re: Lone Female Red Crossbill
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:44:31 -0500
Were you at home in Rochester Remy?

Patti Haynes, sent from my iPod

On Feb 27, 2015, at 1:27 PM, Remy Lary  wrote:

> - spotted her among a flock of Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted
> Nuthatches, clinging on a batch of cones near the top of the pine.
Subject: Lone Female Red Crossbill
From: Remy Lary <remy.avesart AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:27:40 -0800
- spotted her among a flock of Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted
Nuthatches, clinging on a batch of cones near the top of the pine.
Subject: Fwd: Barred Owl visitor
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 21:15:55 -0500
Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: cynthia crawford 
Date: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 5:07 PM
Subject: Barred Owl visitor
To: Upper Valley Birders 


 Had some great views today of a Barred owl that my daughter spotted. It is
still here, waiting on a branch close to the ground up i the woods where a
red squirrel disappeared in a hole. We saw it make several (unsuccessful)
attempts to catch red squirrels.

Photos here:

http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?p=989

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk and White-winged Crossbill
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:39:02 -0500
Hi all,

Bruce's dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk was still present today on South St.
Extension in Middlebury. This morning it was perched in a large oak tree
that overlooks the field at the top of a hill.

Yesterday while ice fishing on Lake Dunmore in Salisbury, I had a single
White-winged Crossbill flyover. At first I just passed its chit chit calls
off as a redpoll, but then it went into a full trill song as it passed
directly overhead. Funny enough, I had a solo Red Crossbill flyover the
same spot nearly a month ago while ice fishing. It hasn't been much of a
year for crossbills, but it just goes to show that it doesn't hurt to keep
your ears tuned when you're outdoors!

Happy birding,
Tyler Pockette
Subject: Waxwings
From: Kim Sargeant <grammiekims AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:24:28 -0500
Lots and lots of them around the State House in Montpelier this morning and
noon.
Subject: Re: Finally, Bohemians!
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 20:56:23 -0500
Bill and I found a flock of 50 Bohemians on Old Stage Road in Westford.
They were feeding on wild apples and buckthorn berries in between trips to
the road (for grit?)  We watched them for twenty minutes or so.

Martha
Westford

On Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 2:01 PM, Miriam Lawrence 
wrote:

> Large flock (50-60 at least) just blew through and briefly worked the trees
> around the United Church of Hinesburg parking lot, Hinesburg.  Gone as
> quickly as they arrived, sad to say.
>
> --
> Miriam Lawrence
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 00:24:52 +0000
loved it......thank you so much!!
Joyce Werntgen
 

 On Wednesday, February 25, 2015 4:49 PM, Karen Uhlendorf  wrote: 

   

 Oops! Sorry all, I meant to send this to a friend not on this list.
Karen

On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:

> Susan,
> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>
> Karen
>
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>
>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian  
>> Waxwings might find this short video by
>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>>
>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>>
>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>>
>>
>> regards,
>> Susan Fogleman



Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:24:05 -0500
Same thing, Karen.

enjoy!

Susan
On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:

> Susan,
> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
> 
> Karen
> 
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
> 
>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian Waxwings 
might find this short video by 

>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>> 
>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>> 
>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>> 
>> 
>> regards,
>> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Lynette Reep <lreep AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:22:03 -0500
I'm glad you did! Lovely video.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:49 PM, Karen Uhlendorf  wrote:
> 
> Oops! Sorry all, I meant to send this to a friend not on this list.
> Karen
> 
>> On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:
>> 
>> Susan,
>> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>> 
>> Karen
>> 
>>> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>>> 
>>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian Waxwings 
might find this short video by 

>>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>>> 
>>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>>> 
>>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>>> 
>>> 
>>> regards,
>>> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Karen Uhlendorf <ku AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:49:44 -0500
Oops! Sorry all, I meant to send this to a friend not on this list.
Karen

On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:

> Susan,
> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>
> Karen
>
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>
>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian  
>> Waxwings might find this short video by
>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>>
>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>>
>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>>
>>
>> regards,
>> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Karen Uhlendorf <ku AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:43:37 -0500
Susan,
A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U

Karen

On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:

> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian  
> Waxwings might find this short video by
> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>
>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>
>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>
>
> regards,
> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:13:16 -0500
Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian Waxwings 
might find this short video by 

Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:

>  video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>  
> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U


regards,
Susan Fogleman
Subject: Finally, Bohemians!
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:01:10 -0500
Large flock (50-60 at least) just blew through and briefly worked the trees
around the United Church of Hinesburg parking lot, Hinesburg.  Gone as
quickly as they arrived, sad to say.

-- 
Miriam Lawrence
Subject: Re: NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 10:18:16 -0500
Wow Tom.  You have your own North Woods aviary!

Scott


> On Feb 25, 2015, at 10:15 AM, tfberriman  wrote:
> 
> Scattering a few hundred Redpolls and Grosbeaks( mixed flock) an adult
> Northern Goshawk visited the feeders. Shortly after 10 Pine Siskins arrived.
> 
> 
> 
> Tom
> 
Subject: NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 10:15:19 -0500
Scattering a few hundred Redpolls and Grosbeaks( mixed flock) an adult
Northern Goshawk visited the feeders. Shortly after 10 Pine Siskins arrived.

 

Tom
Subject: Re: Keep your chins up
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 16:31:31 -0500
Thanks!
Barbara Brosnan
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jim Phillips
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2015 10:43 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Keep your chins up

Here's something to give you a little boost after waking up (again) to
sub-zero temperatures.

http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html

Hang in there,
Jim
Subject: Re: creeper
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 14:48:47 -0500
There was a Brown Creeper here in Montpelier working up and down in my backyard 
trees and I appreciated his enthusiasm and energy on such scold, cold day. 


Joyce

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 24, 2015, at 8:55 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
> This morning as I stepped out to get the newspaper, I heard the sweet early 
spring noise of a Brown Creeper. The temperature was just a little above -20, 
so I hoped the little bird would leave the tree trunk and move to one of the 
suet feeders to restock its fat resources - but I haven’t seen it on the 
feeders yet. 

> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:45:41 -0500
Thanks again for all the help in identifying these beautiful birds. I'm 
learning a lot! 


Joyce

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 24, 2015, at 10:39 AM, Peterson, Bruce B.  
wrote: 

> 
> Something in us wants to look for special field marks when sometimes simpler
> characteristics are more telling.  Bohemian waxwings are gray.  Cedars are
> brown.  Much easier than sorting out wingtips and white spots if you can't
> see the undertail coverts.  Bruce Peterson
> 
> 
>> On 2/23/15 4:00 PM, "Joyce Werntgen"  wrote:
>> 
>> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
>> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings? They come in such a huge flock and fly back and 

>> forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to
>> tell who's who?
>> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
Subject: Keep your chins up
From: Jim Phillips <jim AT THEPHILLIPS.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:42:33 -0500
Here's something to give you a little boost after waking up (again) to 
sub-zero temperatures.

http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html

Hang in there,
Jim
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 15:39:12 +0000
Something in us wants to look for special field marks when sometimes simpler
characteristics are more telling.  Bohemian waxwings are gray.  Cedars are
brown.  Much easier than sorting out wingtips and white spots if you can't
see the undertail coverts.  Bruce Peterson


On 2/23/15 4:00 PM, "Joyce Werntgen"  wrote:

> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings? They come in such a huge flock and fly back and
> forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to
> tell who's who?
> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
Subject: South Burlington Bohemians
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 09:43:07 -0500
A busy flock of 80-100 Bohemian Waxwings descended on my neighbor's  
crab-apple tree this morning, here for 20 min or so, and then gone.

Scott
South Burlington
Subject: creeper
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 08:55:52 -0500
This morning as I stepped out to get the newspaper, I heard the sweet early 
spring noise of a Brown Creeper. The temperature was just a little above -20, 
so I hoped the little bird would leave the tree trunk and move to one of the 
suet feeders to restock its fat resources - but I havent seen it on the 
feeders yet. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Bohemians
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 08:28:53 -0500
Stepping out to the birdfeeder this morning I heard a twittering, and found 15 
bohemians fluffed up against the cold. Then they mobbed a crabapple where the 
light was better, affording me one decent picture before my hands froze. I 
often have cedar waxwings here, but I'm not sure I've ever had bohemians here 
before. Totally made my morning. 


Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Horace Shaw <horaceshaw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 07:58:02 -0500
Ditto!  Very interesting and helpful essay Larry!

Thanks, Horace
in Winooski

On Monday, February 23, 2015, Susan Werntgen  wrote:

> Thanks Larry!
>
> What a well written and informative article!   It helps those of us who
> are eager, but have much to learn.  You covered many interesting points
> with much enthusiasm for these beautiful northern visitors.  I learned a
> lot.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Susan
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Feb 23, 2015, at 4:05 PM, Larry Clarfeld  > wrote:
> >
> > Hi Joyce,
> >
> > There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:
> >
> 
http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

> > (you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).
> >
> > Good birding,
> > Larry
> >
> >> On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  > wrote:
> >>
> >> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between
> the
> >> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly
> back
> >> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult
> for
> >> me to tell who's who?
> >> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Larry Clarfeld
> > Environmental Educator
> > Youth Birding Coordinator
> >
> > North Branch Nature Center
> > 713 Elm St.
> > Montpelier, VT 05602
> >
> > www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> > (802) 229-6206
> > larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 00:56:55 +0000
Thank you for the clues Jane.......I'm looking forward to a bit more keen 
observation the next time (hope it's soon) that the Waxwings show up. 

Joyce
 

 On Monday, February 23, 2015 4:41 PM, Jane Stein  
wrote: 

   

 It's actually easier, I've found, to identify Bohemians in a mixed flock 
because they really stand out side by side with Cedars-- they're 
noticeably bulkier, grayer, and have, um, an "attitude" of regality 
their Cedar cousins lack.  Sorry, I know that's anthropomorphic, but 
it's the impression they give, whatever the reason for it.  Maybe it's 
the proportions, maybe the posture, don't know.

Anytime I see an individual or a small flock of just one kind, I have 
more trouble. Then when I see them together, I'm astounded that I had 
any trouble at all because they seem so distinctive.

Also, a large flock of Bohemians really purrs or buzzes loudly.  It's a 
fantastic sound, lower pitched and with more tone to it than the Cedars' 
wispy, breathy call.  I have a slight hearing impairment that makes very 
high-pitched calls difficult to hear unless I'm right on top of them 
(can't hear Blackpoll warblers at all from more than a couple of feet 
and Bay-Breasted never), but I can hear the Bohemians from a good little 
distance very well.

Hope that helps.



On 2/23/2015 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen wrote:
> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the 
Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back and 
forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to 
tell who's who? 

> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
>



Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 00:54:44 +0000
Thanks very much Larry, much appreciated.
Joyce
 

 On Monday, February 23, 2015 4:05 PM, Larry Clarfeld  
wrote: 

   

 Hi Joyce,

There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:

http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

(you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).

Good birding,
Larry

On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:

> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back
> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for
> me to tell who's who?
> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
>



-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org



Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Susan Werntgen <swerntgen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:46:04 -0500
Thanks Larry!

What a well written and informative article! It helps those of us who are 
eager, but have much to learn. You covered many interesting points with much 
enthusiasm for these beautiful northern visitors. I learned a lot. 


Thanks!

Susan

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 23, 2015, at 4:05 PM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
> 
> Hi Joyce,
> 
> There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:
> 
http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

> (you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).
> 
> Good birding,
> Larry
> 
>> On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:
>> 
>> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
>> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back
>> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for
>> me to tell who's who?
>> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Larry Clarfeld
> Environmental Educator
> Youth Birding Coordinator
> 
> North Branch Nature Center
> 713 Elm St.
> Montpelier, VT 05602
> 
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> (802) 229-6206
> larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl in Hyde Park still there
From: Karen Uhlendorf <ku AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:39:29 -0500
Yes, I saw the Hyde Park snowy again yesterday around 11:00 a.m. Same  
place, on the small shed in the middle of the pasture. If not there,  
look on the roof of the white storage building behind the brown house  
(not as visible). It was perched there on Saturday.
Karen

On Feb 20, 2015, at 6:50 PM, kcaterer . wrote:

> Is the snowy owl still in Hyde Park?
>
> On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 10:20 AM, Karen Uhlendorf   
> wrote:
>
>> The snowy owl that has been previously reported in Hyde Park along  
>> west
>> side of Rt. 100 about 0.7 mi. north of the roundabout near Lanphear  
>> Farm
>> was out in the sunshine this morning about 10:10 a.m. sitting on  
>> the small
>> wooden shed out in the middle of the pasture between the house and  
>> large
>> barn. Beautiful bird!
>> Karen Uhlendorf
>>
>
>
>
> -- 
> "Wherever you go, go with all your heart."  Confucius