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Updated on Tuesday, July 29 at 08:00 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Macgillivrays Warbler,©David Sibley

29 Jul Green herons & more [Sue Wetmore ]
29 Jul Re: Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay [Bruce MacPherson ]
29 Jul Re: Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay [Allan Strong ]
28 Jul Lagoon Road Shorebirds [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
28 Jul Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay [Bruce MacPherson ]
28 Jul new book from Marzluff [Scott Sainsbury ]
28 Jul Marsh wren adding final touches to nest [Walter Medwid ]
27 Jul Feeding frenzy-Derby [Walter Medwid ]
26 Jul Re: Carolina Wrens [David Hoag ]
26 Jul BITTERNS - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 26, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
26 Jul Prairie warblers-- Pleasant St. Powerline, Jul 26, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
25 Jul Re: Ground nest with young [Pat Folsom ]
25 Jul Re: Ground nest with young [Willem Leenstra ]
24 Jul Re: Carolina Wrens [Liz Lackey ]
24 Jul Ground nest with young [Charlie La Rosa ]
24 Jul Cota Field Monthly Walk [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
24 Jul Pewee nest [mark paul ]
24 Jul woodcock- Syndicate Rd, Brandon, Jul 24, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
24 Jul Re: Carolina Wrens [Kent McFarland ]
24 Jul Re: Carolina Wrens [Veer Frost ]
24 Jul Re: Carolina Wrens [Kent McFarland ]
24 Jul Peregrines at Rock Point ["Teage O'Connor" ]
24 Jul turkey - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 23, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
23 Jul Hildene List from 7-19 [Randy Schmidt ]
23 Jul South Hero Loons [Roy Zartarian ]
23 Jul crazy crows [Kaye Danforth ]
23 Jul Re: Sand Hill Cranes [Allan Strong ]
23 Jul Re: Sand Hill Cranes [Maeve Kim ]
23 Jul Sand Hill Cranes [Sherry Hovden ]
22 Jul Exploring Knight Island State Park [Wesley Sanders ]
22 Jul Not Birds [Susan Elliott ]
22 Jul Re: Rails [Susan Elliott ]
22 Jul Re: Rails [Susan Elliott ]
22 Jul Rails- Pearl St., Brandon, Jul 2, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
22 Jul Rails [Sue Wetmore ]
21 Jul Mansfield update - juvs make the scene [Chris Rimmer ]
20 Jul Cattle egret at Shelburne Farms [Michele Patenaude ]
20 Jul check those apple trees! [Maeve Kim ]
19 Jul Re: Carolina Wrens [Tim Traver ]
18 Jul Merck Forest and Farmland in Rupert [Martha Pfeiffer ]
18 Jul ospreys- Dead Creek WMA IBA - Brilyea Access, Jul 17, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
18 Jul Nelson's Sp.- Dead Creek WMA IBA--Stone Bridge Dam, Jul 17, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
18 Jul Nelson' Sp. [Sue Wetmore ]
17 Jul Re: tough being a youngster! [Veer Frost ]
17 Jul tough being a youngster! [Ruth ]
16 Jul Bird Walks at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center [Bruce MacPherson ]
16 Jul Re: The Buzz on Winged-Warblers [erny ]
16 Jul rails---West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 16, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
16 Jul The Buzz on Winged-Warblers [Mark LaBarr ]
15 Jul Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
15 Jul bobolinks- Union St Brandon, Jul 15, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
15 Jul Reminder: BioBlitz at the national park [Kent McFarland ]
14 Jul Hooded Warbler's Song [Martha Pfeiffer ]
13 Jul Re: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington! [Ruth ]
14 Jul 2 hooded warblers in Bennington photos and song [Eric Seyferth ]
13 Jul Re: Brewster's Warbler feeding a Brown-headed Cowbird, Swanton, VT - images and video [mark paul ]
13 Jul Shorebird return migration started ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
13 Jul Brewster's Warbler feeding a Brown-headed Cowbird, Swanton, VT - images and video [Robert Salter ]
13 Jul Appreciation [Martha Pfeiffer ]
12 Jul Re: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington! ["Ian A. Worley" ]
12 Jul Re: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington! [Ruth ]
12 Jul Tufted Titmouse [Deenie ]
12 Jul Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington! [Alison Wagner ]
12 Jul West Rutland Marsh - July 12 [Susan Elliott ]
12 Jul pine warbler-- Lake St. Catherine State Park, Jul 12, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
12 Jul Re: Mt. Mansfield [Ruth ]
11 Jul Cattle Egrets at Shelburne Farms [Bruce MacPherson ]
11 Jul Hooded Warbler Bennington [Theresa Armata ]
11 Jul Bcnell's thrush-- Killington Peak, Jul 11, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
11 Jul Re: Mt. Mansfield ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
11 Jul Bobolinks in Central Vermont [John Snell ]
11 Jul Re: Whip-poor-will chorus .... Weybridge [Barbara Brosnan ]
11 Jul Hooded Warblers, anyone? [Alison Wagner ]
11 Jul Whip-poor-will chorus .... Weybridge ["Ian A. Worley" ]
11 Jul 11 Gadwall at Shelburne Bay [Michele Patenaude ]
10 Jul Mt. Mansfield [Chris Rimmer ]

Subject: Green herons & more
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 08:33:28 -0400
Just back from our small cattail marsh on Pearl St where an astounding count
of 10 green heron were seen in trees, perched on stumps, and wading in the 
shallows. One even made a half- hearted dive for a minnow and was successful. 
Overlooking the potential breakfast menu was a Peregrine, a presumed female due 
to size. Wood and mallard ducks were present in number. 

As if that wasn't exciting enough I heard Virginia rail chicks and I made 
similar squeaks. Reward was two chicks and an adult feeding in amongst the 
cattails. 


Sue Wetmore
Brandon

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 08:13:52 -0400
Thanks to Allan and to Ted Murin and Tyler Pockette all of whom concluded that 
the mystery gull is a juvenile Bonaparte's Gull. Great to have experts among us 
who are willing to make the effort to clear up ambiguities like this. 



Maybe we will have a Sabine's in September.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington



-----Original Message-----
From: Allan Strong 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Tue, Jul 29, 2014 8:07 am
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay


Hi Bruce,

I went to SB this morning and am pretty sure I found your bird. I think 
it looks good for a Bonaparte's.  I only saw the bird in flight from a 
distance.  The relatively striking dark collar was the plumage 
characteristic that was the most puzzling, so although the wing markings 
looked good for Bonaparte's (born this summer), it was really trying 
hard to be a kittiwake. There seem to be a few pictures of birds with 
this marking on-line, but none that I could find in general field 
guides.  I know that the early (formative) plumage of Bonaparte's is 
complex, so there might be aspects that aren't well documented.

http://muskegonbirdblog.blogspot.com/2011_09_01_archive.html

Interesting bird!
Allan

On 7/28/2014 6:14 PM, Bruce MacPherson wrote:
> I just left a windy, rainy Shelburne Bay, where I saw what might be a 
juvenile 

Sabine's Gull. This gull resembled a Bonaparte's Gull in size and sported a 
dark 

patch near its eye, but had a gray-tan cap, a tan nape and tan barring on its 
back giving it a distinctive scaly look. The bird never took flight, so I did 
not have the opportunity to observe its wing or tail pattern. When I left the 
Bay a little after 5 P.M. this gull was still perched on the "big rock" apart 
from the usual group of RB Gulls that were loafing at the tip of the rock. I 
watched the suspect gull for about an hour. It spent most of that time swimming 

within 50 feet of the boat access picking food off the surface of the water.
>
>
> Hope a few experts get to see this bird. Confirmation (or not) appreciated.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>

-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
*******************************************************************

 

Subject: Re: Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 08:07:28 -0400
Hi Bruce,

I went to SB this morning and am pretty sure I found your bird. I think 
it looks good for a Bonaparte's.  I only saw the bird in flight from a 
distance.  The relatively striking dark collar was the plumage 
characteristic that was the most puzzling, so although the wing markings 
looked good for Bonaparte's (born this summer), it was really trying 
hard to be a kittiwake. There seem to be a few pictures of birds with 
this marking on-line, but none that I could find in general field 
guides.  I know that the early (formative) plumage of Bonaparte's is 
complex, so there might be aspects that aren't well documented.

http://muskegonbirdblog.blogspot.com/2011_09_01_archive.html

Interesting bird!
Allan

On 7/28/2014 6:14 PM, Bruce MacPherson wrote:
> I just left a windy, rainy Shelburne Bay, where I saw what might be a 
juvenile Sabine's Gull. This gull resembled a Bonaparte's Gull in size and 
sported a dark patch near its eye, but had a gray-tan cap, a tan nape and tan 
barring on its back giving it a distinctive scaly look. The bird never took 
flight, so I did not have the opportunity to observe its wing or tail pattern. 
When I left the Bay a little after 5 P.M. this gull was still perched on the 
"big rock" apart from the usual group of RB Gulls that were loafing at the tip 
of the rock. I watched the suspect gull for about an hour. It spent most of 
that time swimming within 50 feet of the boat access picking food off the 
surface of the water. 

>
>
> Hope a few experts get to see this bird. Confirmation (or not) appreciated.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>

-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
*******************************************************************
Subject: Lagoon Road Shorebirds
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:52:49 -0400
For the first time in a while the Killdeer were not alone at Lagoon Road in
Hinesburg. Also present were 14 Least Sandpiper and one each Semipalmated
Sandpiper and Plover. Many Tree and Barn Swallows as well as a few Cliff
Swallows and one Bank Swallow. Hopefully this rain will improve condition
for incoming migrants.

-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
Starksboro, VT 05487
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Unusual Gull at Shelburne Bay
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:14:11 -0400
I just left a windy, rainy Shelburne Bay, where I saw what might be a juvenile 
Sabine's Gull. This gull resembled a Bonaparte's Gull in size and sported a 
dark patch near its eye, but had a gray-tan cap, a tan nape and tan barring on 
its back giving it a distinctive scaly look. The bird never took flight, so I 
did not have the opportunity to observe its wing or tail pattern. When I left 
the Bay a little after 5 P.M. this gull was still perched on the "big rock" 
apart from the usual group of RB Gulls that were loafing at the tip of the 
rock. I watched the suspect gull for about an hour. It spent most of that time 
swimming within 50 feet of the boat access picking food off the surface of the 
water. 



Hope a few experts get to see this bird. Confirmation (or not) appreciated.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington

Subject: new book from Marzluff
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:25:21 -0400
This sounds interesting.


http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2014/07/28/335142374/where-the-birds-are-is-not-where-youd-think 


One concern I can see right away is that the press may over-simplify what he 
has to say. The fact that more species are easily observed in the suburbs than 
in forests does not mean that forests are not essential for the survival of 
many species. 


I look forward to reading the book to see how Prof. Marzluff positions his 
findings. I'm guessing he makes that point. 


Scott
Moretown
Subject: Marsh wren adding final touches to nest
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 08:41:22 -0400
A very vocal marsh wren was still gathering cattail leaves to line an
elaborate nest located quite close to the Newport-Derby bike path and very
visible. Other marsh wrens calling in the wetland area.
Subject: Feeding frenzy-Derby
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 10:49:36 -0400
The intermittent rains this morning seemed to concentrate good numbers of
warblers that appeared to be in a feeding frenzy. Yellow rumps were all
over the deck planters in search of insects, black and whites grouped in
the neighboring trees, chestnut sides joined the feeding along with
yellows, and a vocal northern waterthrush. The intensity of this feeding
was remarkable to witness. I assume all of this is in prep for the long
distance flights to come.
Two young in the osprey nest are exercising wings lifting their bodies just
above the nest. The adults were vocal as if urging the young to take the
next big step. Always fascinating to witness the changing rhythms in nature
as summer matures.
Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens
From: David Hoag <SR71BLBRD AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 22:50:39 -0400
In a message dated 7/25/2014, lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM  writes:
<< ... I was really surprised to see this bird nesting  here, and am 
curious if this attempt will be successful being so late in the  season. >>

From my notes: 
2013: 24-Aug:  a family group of  7 or 8 Carolina Wrens were in my yard.
2010: a CAROLINA WREN brood of 3 --  presumably the third brood of the year 
-- 
fledged by the second week of  August.  The family stayed nearby throughout 
August.
2009: 05-Sep:   5 nestlings & 2 adults; also 2 immatures foraging in the  
backyard.

Third broods continued ... 
AMERICAN ROBINS are raising a  THIRD brood this year, 
even though their first two nests were  successful.
The nest is on a metal shelf above a utility shed  door.

First nest: 
5-May -- Robin incubating eggs -- re-use of  an old, old nest.
(8-May -- three eggs)
4-June -- three young  fledged.                     

Second nest:
14 June -- Same Robin incubating 3 eggs at 07:30 --  re-use of the same 
nest.
27-June -- two eggs hatched.
08-July -- second of  two young fledged 08:00.  I removed the old egg 
9-July. 

Third  nest:
13-July -- Same Robin incubating 3 eggs at 18:00 -- re-use of the same  
nest.
25-July -- two eggs hatched.
26-July -- third egg  hatched.   

Dave Hoag, Grand Isle
 
Subject: BITTERNS - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 26, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 18:50:53 +0000
Both Bittern species present this morning between 9:00 and 10:00. The Am. 
bittern was standing by the road on Water St thinking it was invisible, the 

Least Bittern fly in front of my car and disappeared into the cattails. A Marsh 
Wren was sunning itself on the boardwalk and performing a variety of 
contorsions 

to get the sun onto its skin. 
  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 2:37:33 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 26, 2014 

West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 26, 2014 9:15 AM - 10:30 AM 
Protocol: Stationary 
23 species 

Canada Goose  1 
American Bittern  1 
Least Bittern  1 
Virginia Rail  1 
Mourning Dove  1 
Eastern Kingbird  1 
Blue Jay  1 
American Crow  8 
Common Raven  1 
Barn Swallow  4 
House Wren  2 
Marsh Wren  3 
Veery  1 
European Starling  23 
Cedar Waxwing  4 
Common Yellowthroat  2 
Yellow Warbler  1 
Song Sparrow  1 
Swamp Sparrow  2 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Red-winged Blackbird  4 
Common Grackle  1 
American Goldfinch  3 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19225600 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Prairie warblers-- Pleasant St. Powerline, Jul 26, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 18:46:51 +0000
Observed the female Prairie Warbler with luscious green larva in beak. A 
recently fledged Towhee shadowed the male. Field Sp. sang as did the Alder 
flycatcher. 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 2:42:55 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Pleasant St. Powerline, Jul 26, 2014 

Pleasant St. Powerline, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 26, 2014 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
0.5 mile(s) 
14 species 

Red-tailed Hawk  1 
Mourning Dove  1 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Alder Flycatcher  4 
Eastern Kingbird  2 
American Robin  4 
Gray Catbird  1 
Common Yellowthroat  6 
Prairie Warbler  2 
Eastern Towhee  3 
Field Sparrow  1     still singing 
Song Sparrow  8 
Northern Cardinal  2 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19225657 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: Ground nest with young
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:59:59 -0400
Have also seen, and almost stepped on, Veery nests on the ground on two
different occasions.


On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 5:58 AM, Willem Leenstra 
wrote:

> I once happened upon  a Veery nest that was on the ground (hardwood forest
> on Texas Hill in Hinesburg).  The literature says that they nest in low
> trees or shrubs but there was no mistaking that this was a Veery on its
> nest under cover of a shrub.
>
> Willem Leenstra
> Hinesburg, VT
>
>
>
> On 7/24/2014 10:05 PM, Charlie La Rosa wrote:
>
>> I nearly stepped on a ground nest today in an open hardwood forest in
>> Washington, VT. A bird flew out from below a Christmas fern at my feet.
>> Thinking it might be an ovenbird, since I had heard one earlier in the day
>> in the vicinity, I pushed the frond aside to find the oven nest. Instead,
>> I
>> found an open nest on the ground with two nestlings. At that point I
>> thought perhaps it was that of a hermit thrush since both birds look
>> similar in size and color when flying quickly away from you in the woods.
>> Any thoughts?
>> Charlie La Rosa
>> Brattleboro, VT
>>
>
Subject: Re: Ground nest with young
From: Willem Leenstra <willem.leenstra AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:58:59 -0400
I once happened upon  a Veery nest that was on the ground (hardwood 
forest on Texas Hill in Hinesburg).  The literature says that they nest 
in low trees or shrubs but there was no mistaking that this was a Veery 
on its nest under cover of a shrub.

Willem Leenstra
Hinesburg, VT


On 7/24/2014 10:05 PM, Charlie La Rosa wrote:
> I nearly stepped on a ground nest today in an open hardwood forest in
> Washington, VT. A bird flew out from below a Christmas fern at my feet.
> Thinking it might be an ovenbird, since I had heard one earlier in the day
> in the vicinity, I pushed the frond aside to find the oven nest. Instead, I
> found an open nest on the ground with two nestlings. At that point I
> thought perhaps it was that of a hermit thrush since both birds look
> similar in size and color when flying quickly away from you in the woods.
> Any thoughts?
> Charlie La Rosa
> Brattleboro, VT
Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 22:09:03 -0400
How timely is this discussion. I reported to ebird yesterday a Carolina Wren 
nest in Waterbury VT. I was really surprised to see this bird nesting here, and 
am curious if this attempt will be successful being so late in the season. 


Liz Lackey
On Jul 24, 2014, at 12:02 PM, Kent McFarland  
wrote: 


> Well, there are a handfull of reports over the years. If you zoom in until
> you get actual points on the map, you can see a few. But indeed, not many.
> Please do add your records when you hear them!
> Kent
> 
> ____________________________
> 
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
> 
> [image: VCE Logo] 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:55 AM, Veer Frost  wrote:
> 
>> ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is
>> everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Kent, does this statistic mean birders in the Kingdom have never reported
>> Carolina Wren on ebird? I am now appropriately guilty about letting
>> gardening overtake ebird reporting. There was a robustly singing Carolina
>> Wren in my treetops last week, from just before sunup for about 20 minutes.
>> Thank you for any clarification!
>> Veer
>> 
>> 
>> ---- On Thu, 24 Jul 2014 06:15:22 -0700 Kent McFarland &
>> lt;kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG> wrote ----
>> 
>> 
>> Hi Tim,
>> There are lots of Carolina Wrens around the Upper Valley and elsewhere now.
>> After a bad winter it sometimes pushed them back, but the return pretty
>> quickly it seems.
>> Here's June and July map for this year (zoom in on VT):
>> 
>> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-151.48701427977863&env.minY=7.37933257959443&env.maxX=-26.154983029778577&env.maxY=54.275155108109125&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=cur 

>> 
>> ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is
>> everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom.
>> 
>> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-76.36440877656253&env.minY=42.57402199592372&env.maxX=-68.53115682343753&env.maxY=45.16335604956164&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=6-7&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=all 

>> 
>> Also, if you check out the account online for the Vermont Breeding Bird
>> Atlas at http://www.vtecostudies.org/vbba/accounts/CARW.html, it shows a
>> massive increase northward since the first atlas. There was a large
>> increase in wrens in the mid 1970s.
>> 
>> Indeed, southern New England is moving north!
>> 
>> Kent
>> 
>> ____________________________
>> 
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>> 
>> [image: VCE Logo] <http://www.vtecostudies.org/>
>> <http://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/>
>> <
>> https://www.facebook.com/pages/Vermont-Center-for-Ecostudies/56930912454>
>> ;
>> <https://twitter.com/VTEcostudies>
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Tim Traver <totraver AT comcast.net>
>> wrote:
>> 
>> > This is the first year in twenty we've had a pair of Carolina Wrens
>> in the
>> > yard during breeding season here in the Upper Valley. 220 Happy Valley
>> > Road, Taftsville. They've been singing (very loudly) beginning at
>> sunrise.
>> > Has anyone else been seeing them on this side of the state?
>> >
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ____________________________________
>> Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
>> 
Subject: Ground nest with young
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 22:05:27 -0400
I nearly stepped on a ground nest today in an open hardwood forest in
Washington, VT. A bird flew out from below a Christmas fern at my feet.
Thinking it might be an ovenbird, since I had heard one earlier in the day
in the vicinity, I pushed the frond aside to find the oven nest. Instead, I
found an open nest on the ground with two nestlings. At that point I
thought perhaps it was that of a hermit thrush since both birds look
similar in size and color when flying quickly away from you in the woods.
Any thoughts?
Charlie La Rosa
Brattleboro, VT
Subject: Cota Field Monthly Walk
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:21:05 -0400
Hello all,

Just a reminder that the monthly monitoring walk at Cota Field will be this
Saturday, 7/26. Please meet at the parking area off of States Prison Hollow
Road at 7:30. Birders and nature lovers of all ages and experiences
welcome. Feel free to email me directly with questions.

-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
Starksboro, VT 05487
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Pewee nest
From: mark paul <mpaul155 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:51:25 -0400
In Hinesburg, up on Lincoln Hill, adults feeding very young nestlings--couldn't 
even see their heads. 

I've read that Pewees are single brooded but there is a lot of late nesting 
data and they sing very late in the year. 

This pair will be busy well into August if they don't lose or abandon the nest.

Mark Paul
Wildlife Videographer
Calakmul Wildlife - YouTube
Birding From Home Birding Videos
Subject: woodcock- Syndicate Rd, Brandon, Jul 24, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:49:24 +0000
Two woodcock were by the road investigating a muddy patch. 
  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2014 3:47:12 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Syndacate Rd, Brandon, Jul 24, 2014 

Syndacate Rd, Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 24, 2014 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
12 species 

American Woodcock  2 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1     observed the bird fly down to the water and splash 
down and return to its perch. 

White-breasted Nuthatch  1 
American Robin  2 
Gray Catbird  1 
Cedar Waxwing  1 
Black-and-white Warbler  1 
American Redstart  1 
Song Sparrow  4 
Northern Cardinal  1 
American Goldfinch  3 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19207474 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:02:38 -0400
Well, there are a handfull of reports over the years. If you zoom in until
you get actual points on the map, you can see a few. But indeed, not many.
Please do add your records when you hear them!
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  





On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:55 AM, Veer Frost  wrote:

> ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is
> everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom.
>
>
>
> Kent, does this statistic mean birders in the Kingdom have never reported
> Carolina Wren on ebird? I am now appropriately guilty about letting
> gardening overtake ebird reporting. There was a robustly singing Carolina
> Wren in my treetops last week, from just before sunup for about 20 minutes.
> Thank you for any clarification!
> Veer
>
>
> ---- On Thu, 24 Jul 2014 06:15:22 -0700 Kent McFarland &
> lt;kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG> wrote ----
>
>
> Hi Tim,
> There are lots of Carolina Wrens around the Upper Valley and elsewhere now.
> After a bad winter it sometimes pushed them back, but the return pretty
> quickly it seems.
> Here's June and July map for this year (zoom in on VT):
>
> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-151.48701427977863&env.minY=7.37933257959443&env.maxX=-26.154983029778577&env.maxY=54.275155108109125&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=cur 

>
> ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is
> everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom.
>
> 
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-76.36440877656253&env.minY=42.57402199592372&env.maxX=-68.53115682343753&env.maxY=45.16335604956164&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=6-7&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=all 

>
> Also, if you check out the account online for the Vermont Breeding Bird
> Atlas at http://www.vtecostudies.org/vbba/accounts/CARW.html, it shows a
> massive increase northward since the first atlas. There was a large
> increase in wrens in the mid 1970s.
>
> Indeed, southern New England is moving north!
>
> Kent
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
>
> [image: VCE Logo] <http://www.vtecostudies.org/>
>  <http://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/>
> <
> https://www.facebook.com/pages/Vermont-Center-for-Ecostudies/56930912454>
> ;
> <https://twitter.com/VTEcostudies>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Tim Traver <totraver AT comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
> > This is the first year in twenty we've had a pair of Carolina Wrens
> in the
> > yard during breeding season here in the Upper Valley. 220 Happy Valley
> > Road, Taftsville. They've been singing (very loudly) beginning at
> sunrise.
> > Has anyone else been seeing them on this side of the state?
> >
>
>
>
> ____________________________________
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
>
Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:55:13 -0700
ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is 
everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom. 



Kent, does this statistic mean birders in the Kingdom have never reported 
Carolina Wren on ebird? I am now appropriately guilty about letting gardening 
overtake ebird reporting. There was a robustly singing Carolina Wren in my 
treetops last week, from just before sunup for about 20 minutes. Thank you for 
any clarification! 

Veer


---- On Thu, 24 Jul 2014 06:15:22 -0700 Kent McFarland 
<kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG> wrote ---- 



Hi Tim, 
There are lots of Carolina Wrens around the Upper Valley and elsewhere now. 
After a bad winter it sometimes pushed them back, but the return pretty 
quickly it seems. 
Here's June and July map for this year (zoom in on VT): 

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-151.48701427977863&env.minY=7.37933257959443&env.maxX=-26.154983029778577&env.maxY=54.275155108109125&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=cur 

 
ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is 
everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-76.36440877656253&env.minY=42.57402199592372&env.maxX=-68.53115682343753&env.maxY=45.16335604956164&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=6-7&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=all 

 
Also, if you check out the account online for the Vermont Breeding Bird 
Atlas at http://www.vtecostudies.org/vbba/accounts/CARW.html, it shows a 
massive increase northward since the first atlas. There was a large 
increase in wrens in the mid 1970s. 
 
Indeed, southern New England is moving north! 
 
Kent 
 
____________________________ 
 
Kent McFarland 
Vermont Center for Ecostudies 
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055 
802.649.1431 x2 
 
[image: VCE Logo] <http://www.vtecostudies.org/> 
 <http://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/> 

<https://www.facebook.com/pages/Vermont-Center-for-Ecostudies/56930912454> 

<https://twitter.com/VTEcostudies> 
 
 
 
On Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Tim Traver <totraver AT comcast.net> wrote: 

 
> This is the first year in twenty we've had a pair of Carolina Wrens in the 

> yard during breeding season here in the Upper Valley. 220 Happy Valley 
> Road, Taftsville. They've been singing (very loudly) beginning at sunrise. 

> Has anyone else been seeing them on this side of the state? 
> 



____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:15:22 -0400
Hi Tim,
There are lots of Carolina Wrens around the Upper Valley and elsewhere now.
After a bad winter it sometimes pushed them back, but the return pretty
quickly it seems.
Here's June and July map for this year (zoom in on VT):

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-151.48701427977863&env.minY=7.37933257959443&env.maxX=-26.154983029778577&env.maxY=54.275155108109125&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=cur 


ANd if you look at all records from all years, you can see that it is
everywhere but the Northeast Kingdom.

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/carwre?neg=true&env.minX=-76.36440877656253&env.minY=42.57402199592372&env.maxX=-68.53115682343753&env.maxY=45.16335604956164&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=6-7&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=all 


Also, if you check out the account online for the Vermont Breeding Bird
Atlas at http://www.vtecostudies.org/vbba/accounts/CARW.html, it shows a
massive increase northward since the first atlas. There was a large
increase in wrens in the mid 1970s.

Indeed, southern New England is moving north!

Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  





On Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 7:36 AM, Tim Traver  wrote:

> This is the first year in twenty we've had a pair of Carolina Wrens in the
> yard during breeding season here in the Upper Valley. 220 Happy Valley
> Road, Taftsville.  They've been singing (very loudly) beginning at sunrise.
> Has anyone else been seeing them on this side of the state?
>
Subject: Peregrines at Rock Point
From: "Teage O'Connor" <badger.meli AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:26:39 -0400
This posting was a follow-up to my earlier posting about peregrines mating
on the ice out at Rock Point. They hatched and successfully fledged two
young. We heard them daily - even watched them hunting and feeding - and
were vocal all around the property. They've since quieted down
significantly and no longer seem to be spending most of their time as a
unit as we now only see them as individuals or occasionally in pairs and
almost always without the young begging.

wildburlington.blogspot.com/2014/07/peregrines-at-rock-point.html


Teage O'Connor
Naturalist Educator
Crow's Path  | CP Blog

Wild Burlington Blog 
Natural History Dictionary 
(802) 860.7284
Subject: turkey - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 23, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:20:41 +0000
A young turkey flew overhead with a great clatter. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2014 8:18:56 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 23, 2014 

Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 23, 2014 6:30 AM - 8:10 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
29 species 

Wild Turkey  1 
Killdeer  1 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2 
Mourning Dove  2 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Hairy Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1 
Great Crested Flycatcher  2 
Eastern Kingbird  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  3 
Blue Jay  5 
American Crow  7 
Black-capped Chickadee  4 
Eastern Bluebird  1 
Hermit Thrush  2 
American Robin  6 
Gray Catbird  6 
Cedar Waxwing  5 
Common Yellowthroat  5 
Eastern Towhee  2 
Field Sparrow  1     still singing 
Song Sparrow  5 
Northern Cardinal  3 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2 
Indigo Bunting  1 
Red-winged Blackbird  2 
Baltimore Oriole  2 
American Goldfinch  3 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19204287 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Hildene List from 7-19
From: Randy Schmidt <randy AT THEVERMONTBIRDPLACE.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:45:40 -0400
A bit tardy with this, but it was a great outing this past Saturday at Hildene 
here in Manchester with abundant parent/juvenile behavior going on. Just about 
every bird we saw had some sort of food it was brining somewhere! Interesting 
to note that we actually saw most of what was reported... not always a given 
for our July walks. 


One other quick highlight was seeing a male Indigo Bunting and a male 
Black-throated Blue Warbler side-by-side on the same branch. We were just 
missing the bluebird and the blue jay for a complete collection! 


Our next walk is Saturday, August 16th at 7a.m. - 

Wood Duck  1
Mourning Dove  6
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  9
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  3
Peregrine Falcon  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Eastern Kingbird 6 One set of parents feeding young down in meadow/wetland 
border 

Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  8
Blue Jay  6
American Crow 8 One family group, one parent brought food, 3 tried going after 
it, it ended up on the ground with a lot of whining. 

Black-capped Chickadee  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  1
Veery  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  9
Gray Catbird  6
Cedar Waxwing  8
Ovenbird  1
Common Yellowthroat  7
Chestnut-sided Warbler  5     Male feeding one fledgling.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  11
Swamp Sparrow  5
Scarlet Tanager  5
Northern Cardinal  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 5 Appear to be young begging for food following parents 

Indigo Bunting 4 One pair of male and female carrying food, could not find nest 

Bobolink  1
Red-winged Blackbird  26
Common Grackle  2
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  6     One pair carrying food in wetland area.
Subject: South Hero Loons
From: Roy Zartarian <royz AT ROYZARTARIAN.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:18:36 -0400
7/23/2014 - Rockwell Bay, Lake Champlain, South Hero - 2 COMMON LOONS feeding 
in the bay and slowly moving south 


Roy Zartarian
visiting Connecticut birder

Sent from my iPad Mini
Subject: crazy crows
From: Kaye Danforth <danforthpainting AT MAC.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:37:28 -0400
Last evening I watched two crows strolling side by side on my  
neighbor's yard when one suddenly flopped over on it's side, legs  
lifted.  The other crow then flopped down, and the two of them spent  
time kicking each other with their feet, like two little kids.  Guess  
you never know what a crow will do.

This morning while having coffee with my husband on the porch, a  
juvenile male black-throated blue warbler landed on the railing in  
front of us.  As our jaws hit the deck, he calmly looked us in the eye  
for what seemed like forever before flying into the nearby lilac.   
What a treat!

Kaye in Hinesburg
Subject: Re: Sand Hill Cranes
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:34:10 -0400
Although it took a little work to piece the story together, we did get 
documentation of nesting at Fairfield Swamp in 2012.

http://www.vtecostudies.org/vbrc/reports.htm
(click on the 2012 Committee Report for details)

Allan

On 7/23/2014 8:19 AM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> Last week I met someone who lives not far from Fairfield Swamp. She said she 
and her husband hear cranes most evenings, from a section of the swamp they 
can't get to with their kayaks. Does anyone know for sure if a pair has nested 
there? 

>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
>
> On Jul 23, 2014, at 7:48 AM, Sherry Hovden wrote:
>
>> Driving down Swamp Rd in Fairfield I saw 2 Sand hill Cranes.

-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
*******************************************************************
Subject: Re: Sand Hill Cranes
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:19:55 -0400
Last week I met someone who lives not far from Fairfield Swamp. She said she 
and her husband hear cranes most evenings, from a section of the swamp they 
can't get to with their kayaks. Does anyone know for sure if a pair has nested 
there? 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center


On Jul 23, 2014, at 7:48 AM, Sherry Hovden wrote:

> Driving down Swamp Rd in Fairfield I saw 2 Sand hill Cranes. 
Subject: Sand Hill Cranes
From: Sherry Hovden <sherry.hovden AT VTMEDNET.ORG>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 07:48:19 -0400
Driving down Swamp Rd in Fairfield I saw 2 Sand hill Cranes. 
Subject: Exploring Knight Island State Park
From: Wesley Sanders <wmsander AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:15:51 -0400
My wife and I recently camped out at Knight Island State Park and, after a 
quick check on ebird, I realized no one had logged any sightings there! Below 
is the list of what we saw (note that I heard the call of the Common Loon out 
on the lake but was not able to confirm a sighting): 


Knight Island State Park, Grand Isle, US-VT
Jul 21, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
16 species (+1 other taxa)

Common Loon  2     Heard out on the lake around 9pm that night.
Spotted Sandpiper  6
gull sp.  18
Belted Kingfisher  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  3
Black-capped Chickadee  6
American Robin  1
Cedar Waxwing  1
Black-and-white Warbler  1
American Redstart  1
Yellow Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  3
White-throated Sparrow  5
Baltimore Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19189887 


The birds hardly seemed bother by us and were keen to perch quite close by 
during our walk. Although Knight Island is tricky to get to (boat access only), 
I highly recommend a tour! 


Wes Sanders


Wesley Sanders, M.A.
Doctoral Student, Clinical Psychology
University of Vermont
Subject: Not Birds
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:33:27 -0700
Well, dumb me just sent this message to VTBird. Since Yahoo is lumping emails, 
I have officially unsigned from VTBird. 


Cool - they are the cutest things. You just want to bring one home.

Yes, the book is ordered. Amazon says it will be delivered tomorrow, but they 
are usually off by a couple days. 


Mothing is awesome this week for National Moth Week, quite the party - I ran 
out of beer and chips last night. 


What are you bringing to Connie's.

D2
Subject: Re: Rails
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:29:55 -0700
Cool - they are the cutest things. You just want to bring one home.

Yes, the book is ordered. Amazon says it will be delivered tomorrow, but they 
are usually off by a couple days. 


Mothing is awesome this week for National Moth Week, quite the party - I ran 
out of beer and chips last night. 


What are you bringing to Connie's.

D2


On Tuesday, July 22, 2014 10:23 AM, Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
 


This morning at the small cattail marsh on Pearl St. I saw newly hatched, and 
cute as ever,Virginia rails(3) scooting about with one adult. The Green Heron 
crowd, 7, was there for breakfast as well. One Great Blue voiced an objection 
to this unruly mob. 


The season has changed and expected species are either gone or silent, signs of 
breeding winding down. 

However a pair of Bluebirds were carrying food into a natural cavity at the 
marsh. Nearby a imm. Bluebird fended for itself. 

Lots of Mallards and Wood ducks too.
By the powerline a buck in velvet made its way from one side to the other. A 
muskrat munched on grass until its myopic eyes finally saw me and it made a 
dash to the water. 

The deer flies convinced me to not venture into the swamp any further.

Go birding!
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Rails
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:30:49 -0700
Apologies for that last ridiculous message intended for Sue Wetmore!


On , Susan Elliott  wrote:
 


Cool - they are the cutest things. You just want to bring one home.

Yes, the book is ordered. Amazon says it will be delivered tomorrow, but they 
are usually off by a couple days. 


Mothing is awesome this week for National Moth Week, quite the party - I ran 
out of beer and chips last night. 


What are you bringing to Connie's.

D2


On Tuesday, July 22, 2014 10:23 AM, Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
 


This morning at the small cattail marsh on Pearl St. I saw newly hatched, and 
cute as ever,Virginia rails(3) scooting about with one adult. The Green Heron 
crowd, 7, was there for breakfast as well. One Great Blue voiced an objection 
to this unruly mob. 


The season has changed and expected species are either gone or silent, signs of 
breeding winding down. 

However a pair of Bluebirds were carrying food into a natural cavity at the 
marsh. Nearby a imm. Bluebird fended for itself. 

Lots of Mallards and Wood ducks too.
By the powerline a buck in velvet made its way from one side to the other. A 
muskrat munched on grass until its myopic eyes finally saw me and it made a 
dash to the water. 

The deer flies convinced me to not venture into the swamp any further.

Go birding!
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Rails- Pearl St., Brandon, Jul 2, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:18:35 +0000
Here is the complete list from this morning's walk. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 3:15:27 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Jul 2, 2014 

Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 2, 2014 6:00 AM - 8:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
3.0 mile(s) 
35 species (+1 other taxa) 

Wood Duck  10 
Mallard  20 
Great Blue Heron  1 
Green Heron  7 
Virginia Rail  4     3 chicks in the company of an adult. 
Mourning Dove  3 
Chimney Swift  5 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1 
Hairy Woodpecker  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1 
Empidonax sp.  1 
Eastern Kingbird  5 
Red-eyed Vireo  5 
Blue Jay  1 
American Crow  10 
Barn Swallow  2 
Black-capped Chickadee  3 
Tufted Titmouse  1 
White-breasted Nuthatch  3 
House Wren  3 
Carolina Wren  1 
Eastern Bluebird  4     birds were carrying in food to natural nest site. 
Veery  1 
American Robin  12 
Gray Catbird  4 
European Starling  11 
Cedar Waxwing  1 
Black-and-white Warbler  1 
Common Yellowthroat  3 
Yellow Warbler  1 
Chipping Sparrow  3 
Song Sparrow  4 
Swamp Sparrow  2 
Northern Cardinal  5 
Red-winged Blackbird  36     many flying overhead. 
American Goldfinch  11 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19188050 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Rails
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:21:52 -0400
This morning at the small cattail marsh on Pearl St. I saw newly hatched, and 
cute as ever,Virginia rails(3) scooting about with one adult. The Green Heron 
crowd, 7, was there for breakfast as well. One Great Blue voiced an objection 
to this unruly mob. 


The season has changed and expected species are either gone or silent, signs of 
breeding winding down. 

However a pair of Bluebirds were carrying food into a natural cavity at the 
marsh. Nearby a imm. Bluebird fended for itself. 

Lots of Mallards and Wood ducks too.
By the powerline a buck in velvet made its way from one side to the other. A 
muskrat munched on grass until its myopic eyes finally saw me and it made a 
dash to the water. 

The deer flies convinced me to not venture into the swamp any further.

Go birding!
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Mansfield update - juvs make the scene
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:13:03 -0400
This is a tardy update from last week's field trip to Mt. Mansfield, so 
I'll keep it brief.  Our Wednesday evening-Thursday morning mist netting 
session was notable for its appearance of the season's first juveniles.  
Among our 45 captures were 12 juveniles of 6 species, 3 of them 
/Catharus/ thrushes - 1 Hermit (a non-local breeder), 1 Swainson's, 2 
Bicknell's.  Overall, we netted and banded the following:

Downy Woodpecker - 1 juvenile (unusual on the ridgeline)
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 1 adult female
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 4 (1 adult, 3 juveniles)
Hermit Thrush - 1 juvenile (probably a first brood disperser)
Bicknell's Thrush - 9 (6 males [3 new], 1 female [retrap from 2013], 2 
juveniles)
Swainson's Thrush - 5 (3 males [2 new], 1 new female, 1 juvenile)
American Robin - 2 (1 adult male, 1 adult female, both new)
Blackpoll Warbler - 5 (4 adult males [3 new], 1 new adult female), no 
geolocators recovered
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 9 (5 adult males [3 new], 4 adult females [3 new])
White-throated Sparrow - 2 (adult males: 1 new, 1 retrap)
Dark-eyed Junco - 5 (1 new adult male, 4 juveniles)

Vocal activity had subsided from last week, but was still fairly 
vigorous.  Three male robins were singing up a storm around the upper 
parking lot, and the female we captured had a fully-developed incubation 
patch, so it appears robins are on second nests.  They may be the only 
regularly double-brooded species at that elevation. All other females 
examined had regressing brood patches.  A number of adults of different 
species were in early stages of flight feather molt, suggesting that the 
breeding season is indeed winding down.  We expect this week's trip - 
our final foray of the season - to feature diminished singing overall, 
but many free-flying juveniles.

A non-avian highlight was the appearance of winged-warbler defectors Ted 
Murin and Amanda Spear, who provided a bounty of bagels, copious banter, 
and some welcome help processing birds.  We're hoping to blanket our 
study site with nets this week and recover at least one more Blackpoll 
geolocator!  Wish us luck...

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Cattle egret at Shelburne Farms
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:29:55 -0400
Yesterday at about 6 pm Mona Bruley and I observed two Cattle Egret in breeding 
plumage at Shelburne Farms by the dairy barn hanging out with the cows. It was 
a life bird for Mona. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085
Subject: check those apple trees!
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:21:02 -0400
Apple trees at this time of year are full of little green caterpillars - and 
full of warblers. Yesterday I watched two apple trees that had at least six 
feeding warblers, including a Black-and-white and a stunning Blackburnian at 
eye level. Over the last three days, the old apple trees in my back yard have 
hosted American Redstarts, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Green, Common 
Yellowthroats and a Northern Parula - the last a first for my yard. I'm 
definitely going to wear binocs as I garden! 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Carolina Wrens
From: Tim Traver <totraver AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 07:36:05 -0400
This is the first year in twenty we've had a pair of Carolina Wrens in the yard 
during breeding season here in the Upper Valley. 220 Happy Valley Road, 
Taftsville. They've been singing (very loudly) beginning at sunrise. Has anyone 
else been seeing them on this side of the state? 

Subject: Merck Forest and Farmland in Rupert
From: Martha Pfeiffer <kmpfeiffer AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 10:49:58 -0700
Merck Forest and Farmland, Rupert VT, Bennington, US-VT
Jul 18, 2014 7:15 AM - 11:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
Comments:  Three miles walking, two miles diving in on road with window down 
listening for bird song..Sunny, calm, 65-70 degrees 


Noticeably absent were some warbler species seen late Spring/early summer.

33 species

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) X
Mourning Dove 1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 6  two separate families
Northern Flicker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Least Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe 1  nest
Blue-headed Vireo 1  singing - and chatting - white spectacles - wing bar
Red-eyed Vireo 9
Blue Jay 1
American Crow 2
Common Raven 1
Barn Swallow 2
Black-capped Chickadee 12
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Hermit Thrush 3
Wood Thrush 3
American Robin 13
Gray Catbird 1
Common Yellowthroat 10  2 families with fledgings; one male carrying food, 
two males singing 

Black-throated Blue Warbler 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Black-throated Green Warbler 1
Eastern Towhee 1  singing
Chipping Sparrow 14
Song Sparrow 6
White-throated Sparrow 2  both singing
Scarlet Tanager 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1  femal
Indigo Bunting 1
Red-winged Blackbird 11
American Goldfinch 2
House Sparrow X

View this checklist online 
athttp://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19134844 



Martha Pfeiffer, Dorset
Subject: ospreys- Dead Creek WMA IBA - Brilyea Access, Jul 17, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:02:57 +0000
Ospreys were present---two adults and a presumed immature that kept calling. 
  
Sue Wetmore and Judy Peterson 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 7:51:07 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Dead Creek WMA IBA - Brilyea Access, Jul 17, 2014 

Dead Creek WMA IBA - Brilyea Access, Addison, US-VT 
Jul 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
28 species 

Mallard  6 
Great Blue Heron  3 
Turkey Vulture  1 
Osprey (American)  3 
Ring-billed Gull  1 
Mourning Dove  1 
Willow Flycatcher  2 
Eastern Kingbird  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  1 
Blue Jay  2 
American Crow  1 
Barn Swallow  6 
Marsh Wren  2 
Wood Thrush  1 
American Robin  1 
Gray Catbird  1 
European Starling  10 
Cedar Waxwing  1 
Common Yellowthroat  1 
American Redstart  1 
Yellow Warbler  2 
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1 
Song Sparrow  13 
Swamp Sparrow  2 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Bobolink  1 
Red-winged Blackbird  12 
American Goldfinch  5 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19132723 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Nelson's Sp.- Dead Creek WMA IBA--Stone Bridge Dam, Jul 17, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:01:33 +0000
This area always has some surprises. 
  
Sue Wetmore and Judy Peterson 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 7:56:10 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Dead Creek WMA IBA--Stone Bridge Dam, Jul 17, 2014 

Dead Creek WMA IBA--Stone Bridge Dam, Addison, US-VT 
Jul 17, 2014 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM 
Protocol: Stationary 
Comments:     this report includes West Road into the Stone Dam. 
13 species 

Osprey (American)  1 
Wilson's Snipe  1 
Caspian Tern  1 
American Kestrel  1 
Peregrine Falcon  1 
Common Raven  15     all were in a field feeding. They all took off and 
returned to another field. 

Common Yellowthroat  1 
Yellow Warbler  1 
Savannah Sparrow  1 
Nelson's Sparrow  1     heard and seen. 
Song Sparrow  8 
Bobolink  8 
Red-winged Blackbird  5 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19132738 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Nelson' Sp.
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 07:05:54 -0400
Yesterday on West Rd into Stone Dam a Nelson's sparrow was heard and seen. This 
was at the T of West Rd and Slang Rd. on the south side of West Rd. 

Also an intriguing glimpse of a possible 
Grasshopper Sp. It was a small short tailed bird that was in the soybean field. 
Disappeared not to be seen again. We thought we had heard a bast song but only 
once. 

Sue Wetmore
Judy Peterson

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Re: tough being a youngster!
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:23:15 -0700
yes! I watched a mother Common Merganser with seven good sized young behind her 
on the river yesterday, this was Passumpsic village falls, at the hydro, the 
kids sailed beautifully across the wide flat plain of water but when mother 
slid over the edge and dipped into white water they formed a scrum of refusal, 
obviously fearful of the drop. She kept going amidst the rocks and when she was 
about ten yards ahead one by one the panicked kids tumbled in ... and were fine 
as far as I could watch them around the river's twist south ... a tough moment 
indeed. 


---- On Thu, 17 Jul 2014 05:58:13 -0700 Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM> 
wrote ---- 



Sat night I watched Kingfisher calling and calling near his hole with a sizable 
fish in his bill. I had hoped to see him swoop in and out, but I couldn't stay 
long enough. I was thinking young should be near to fledging. When I left house 
on Sun a.m I drove by the hole and saw something in the hole... a head? Lo and 
behold, when I got back late pm and looked more closely, I realized a round 
rock almost the size of the opening was blocking the hole. With lots of 
slipping and sliding up a very loose gravel bank, we got the rock removed. I 
hoped the yg were old enough to survive what was probably at least a night and 
day without food... but fate unknown. Parents calling last 3 days but I didn't 
watch hole. Nothing heard today. Oh - the challenges of raising a family! 

 
There are lots of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Bluejays and House Finches hanging 
out at the feeder with catbirds and wrens charging though the bushes. 
Red-bellied female is a daily visitors, but no yg so far. 

 
Ruth Stewart 

E. Dorset, VT 
 
                        


____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: tough being a youngster!
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 08:58:13 -0400
Sat night I watched Kingfisher calling and calling near his hole with a sizable 
fish in his bill. I had hoped to see him swoop in and out, but I couldn't stay 
long enough. I was thinking young should be near to fledging. When I left house 
on Sun a.m I drove by the hole and saw something in the hole... a head? Lo and 
behold, when I got back late pm and looked more closely, I realized a round 
rock almost the size of the opening was blocking the hole. With lots of 
slipping and sliding up a very loose gravel bank, we got the rock removed. I 
hoped the yg were old enough to survive what was probably at least a night and 
day without food... but fate unknown. Parents calling last 3 days but I didn't 
watch hole. Nothing heard today. Oh - the challenges of raising a family! 

 
There are lots of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Bluejays and House Finches hanging 
out at the feeder with catbirds and wrens charging though the bushes. 
Red-bellied female is a daily visitors, but no yg so far. 


Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT

 		 	   		  
Subject: Bird Walks at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 18:26:05 -0400
Date: Saturday, July 19, 2014
Time: 7:30 A.M.
Location: Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Gov. Chittenden Road, Williston, VT
Leaders: Bill Mercia and Bruce MacPherson

Once again this year the GMAS is sponsoring monthly bird walks at the Catamount 

Outdoor Family Center throughout the summer and fall. Over the years we have 
identified over 130 bird species at the COFC, including a variety of waterfowl, 

grassland birds, wood warblers, and flycatchers. The COFC bird checklist is 
available for viewing and download in the Resources section of the GMAS website 

at http://greenmountainaudubon.org .

These walks are free and open to the public. Please register in advance, by 
sending an e-mail to gmas AT greenmountainaudubon.org . If you are a new 
participant, please indicate your level of birding expertise (beginner, 
intermediate, expert). We will meet in the COFC parking lot on Governor 
Chittenden Road at 7:30 A.M. to begin this walk. 

Looking forward to seeing some of you there.

Bruce MacPherson
GMAS



















 
Subject: Re: The Buzz on Winged-Warblers
From: erny <ernestpalola1 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 18:16:29 -0400
tHANK YOU , MARK; anyway I can help with the project?

-----Original Message----- 
From: Mark LaBarr
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2014 3:25 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] The Buzz on Winged-Warblers

Greetings All.
With all the excitement happening at the higher elevations thanks to the 
good work of Chris Rimmer and VCE I thought I would take the time to inform 
you on some of the work happening at the lower end of the elevation 
spectrum. As some of you may know Audubon Vermont has been conducting a 
dedicated survey for Golden-winged and Blue-winged warblers and all the 
winged-warblers in between. The goal of this project is to locate these 
birds and work with landowners to maintain and/or create appropriate habitat 
for these and other shrubland species such as Towhees, Field Sparrows, and 
Prairie Warblers.
>
> Using advanced technology called TedCognition (Ted Murin and google maps, 
> thanks Ted) approximately 130 sites within the southern Champlain Valley 
> (a Golden-winged Warbler Focus Area) were identified as potentially 
> supporting winged-warblers. Some of these early successional shrubland 
> sites Audubon was already aware of due to our work under the VELCO 
> transmission line (more on that to come later) and with landowners we have 
> worked with through Audubon's Champlain Valley Bird Initiative. VT eBird 
> also helped in identifying some sites. Most of these sites had not been 
> visited and were off the beaten path and so landowner permission was 
> necessary. Mailings went out to more than 150 landowners, with 40+ 
> responding positively to our request.
>
> That was the easy part. Anybody who has looked for these birds knows that 
> the preferred habitat is often full of dense vegetation including the 
> natives (dogwood, viburnums, prickly ash, etc) and the non-natives 
> (honeysuckle and buckthorn). Throw in raspberries, poison parsnip and a 
> good smattering of ticks and you can get a sense of what we were up 
> against. Audubon staff (Margaret Fowle and I) Ted, Amanda Spears and a 
> number of other volunteers from Audubon Chapters and the birding community 
> also joined in. One by one we visited the sites to verify if TedCognition 
> truly was the way to go. We were not surprised when we learned it was.
>
> What did we find...more than 200 winged-warbler males in the sites we 
> surveyed with approximately 150 of those birds found in the new, 
> previously un-surveyed locations. The breakdown was roughly 35% 
> Golden-winged, 40% Blue-winged and 25% hybrids. Interestingly the sites 
> surveyed represent only about 40% of the habitat that we identified at the 
> beginning of the project so who knows how many more winged-warblers are 
> out there, and we have not even begun to look in the northern Champlain 
> Valley.
>
> Audubon staff will begin to contact these landowners again and explore 
> opportunities for on the ground management activities. We will head out 
> into the field next summer as well to see how many more wing-warblers are 
> out on those un-surveyed sites in the Valley. We will keep you up to date 
> on our findings and feel free to contribute any of your past and present 
> sightings. Who knows what we might have missed in some tucked away 
> location.

Mark 
Subject: rails---West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 16, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:26:18 +0000
Rails ruled this morning---three Virginia rails plus two teenaged young were 
present. 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2014 3:19:40 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, Jul 16, 2014 

West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 16, 2014 6:15 AM - 8:45 AM 
Protocol: Stationary 
29 species 

Wood Duck  1 
Mallard  5 
Great Blue Heron  1 
Green Heron  1 
Virginia Rail  5 
Wilson's Snipe  1 
Mourning Dove  4 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Alder Flycatcher  1 
Eastern Kingbird  6 
Red-eyed Vireo  1 
Blue Jay  2 
American Crow  1 
Common Raven  1 
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1 
Tree Swallow  9 
Barn Swallow  5 
Marsh Wren  5 
Veery  4 
American Robin  2 
Gray Catbird  3 
European Starling  40 
Common Yellowthroat  4 
Song Sparrow  1 
Swamp Sparrow  6 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Red-winged Blackbird  10 
Common Grackle  8 
American Goldfinch  2 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19118786 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: The Buzz on Winged-Warblers
From: Mark LaBarr <mlabarr AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:25:54 -0400
Greetings All. 
With all the excitement happening at the higher elevations thanks to the good 
work of Chris Rimmer and VCE I thought I would take the time to inform you on 
some of the work happening at the lower end of the elevation spectrum. As some 
of you may know Audubon Vermont has been conducting a dedicated survey for 
Golden-winged and Blue-winged warblers and all the winged-warblers in between. 
The goal of this project is to locate these birds and work with landowners to 
maintain and/or create appropriate habitat for these and other shrubland 
species such as Towhees, Field Sparrows, and Prairie Warblers. 

>
> Using advanced technology called TedCognition (Ted Murin and google maps, 
thanks Ted) approximately 130 sites within the southern Champlain Valley (a 
Golden-winged Warbler Focus Area) were identified as potentially supporting 
winged-warblers. Some of these early successional shrubland sites Audubon was 
already aware of due to our work under the VELCO transmission line (more on 
that to come later) and with landowners we have worked with through Audubon's 
Champlain Valley Bird Initiative. VT eBird also helped in identifying some 
sites. Most of these sites had not been visited and were off the beaten path 
and so landowner permission was necessary. Mailings went out to more than 150 
landowners, with 40+ responding positively to our request. 

>
> That was the easy part. Anybody who has looked for these birds knows that the 
preferred habitat is often full of dense vegetation including the natives 
(dogwood, viburnums, prickly ash, etc) and the non-natives (honeysuckle and 
buckthorn). Throw in raspberries, poison parsnip and a good smattering of ticks 
and you can get a sense of what we were up against. Audubon staff (Margaret 
Fowle and I) Ted, Amanda Spears and a number of other volunteers from Audubon 
Chapters and the birding community also joined in. One by one we visited the 
sites to verify if TedCognition truly was the way to go. We were not surprised 
when we learned it was. 

>
> What did we find...more than 200 winged-warbler males in the sites we 
surveyed with approximately 150 of those birds found in the new, previously 
un-surveyed locations. The breakdown was roughly 35% Golden-winged, 40% 
Blue-winged and 25% hybrids. Interestingly the sites surveyed represent only 
about 40% of the habitat that we identified at the beginning of the project so 
who knows how many more winged-warblers are out there, and we have not even 
begun to look in the northern Champlain Valley. 

>
> Audubon staff will begin to contact these landowners again and explore 
opportunities for on the ground management activities. We will head out into 
the field next summer as well to see how many more wing-warblers are out on 
those un-surveyed sites in the Valley. We will keep you up to date on our 
findings and feel free to contribute any of your past and present sightings. 
Who knows what we might have missed in some tucked away location. 


Mark
Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 23:32:36 -0400
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday July 19, 2014 on the
Maquam/Black Creek Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the parking lot located on
Rte 78 approx 2 ½ miles west of Swanton.  If you have any questions, just
reply to this email.

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 51 months of walks we have observed 133 species.  Hope to see you
there!

--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: bobolinks- Union St Brandon, Jul 15, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:10:11 +0000
Large mixed group of bobolinks were flying about the grasslands. Barn swallows 
were present too and took exceptiom to my walking by and proceeded tp strafe 

me. 
  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2014 3:05:54 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Jul 15, 2014 

Union St Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 15, 2014 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
26 species 

Great Blue Heron  2 
Turkey Vulture  2 
Northern Harrier  1 
Red-tailed Hawk  1     carrying a rodent 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2 
Mourning Dove  4 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1 
Willow Flycatcher  2     calli note. 
Eastern Kingbird  2 
Warbling Vireo  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  1 
Barn Swallow  18     adults were swooping at me. 
House Wren  1 
American Robin  3 
Gray Catbird  1 
Common Yellowthroat  6 
American Redstart  1 
Yellow Warbler  2 
Song Sparrow  3 
Swamp Sparrow  1 
Bobolink  32     females, males, and presumed fledged young flying about the 
field 

Red-winged Blackbird  21 
Common Grackle  2 
American Goldfinch  2 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19109629 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Reminder: BioBlitz at the national park
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 10:59:16 -0400
Part scientific endeavor, part festival, and part education, the BioBlitz
at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park will bring together
leading scientists, naturalists, and community members of all ages to find
and document as many species as possible in one day at the park as part of
the Vermont Atlas of Life. Step outside with us and become part of a
growing network of “citizen scientists”. Curiosity required, no experience
necessary!

Festivities begin at 7am and last until after dusk under the moth lights.
Come at anytime. We’ll be headquartered at the Forest Center building near
route 12.

Check out the schedule and more at

http://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/the-vermont-atlas-of-life-bioblitz-2014/ 


____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  


Subject: Hooded Warbler's Song
From: Martha Pfeiffer <kmpfeiffer AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 07:09:17 -0700
This is from LIFE HISTORIES OF NORTH AMERICAN WOOD WARBLERS by A. Bent

Page 622

"There are two common songs, both uttered on every possible occasion in the 
Spring. the most frequent one is a short one of four syllables,Se-whit, 
se-wheer; the longest song may be rendered, Whee-whee-whee-a-whee, accented 
(over the last two whees). A sharp, very clear-cut chirp is sometimes to be 
heard late in the evening, about dusk." 


"the bird has two songs, each consisting of clear,lively and sprightly notes. 
One song is decidedly longer than the other...it is composed to seven notes, 
quite rapidly given, the last note having a strong rising inflection and often 
ending abruptly" 


 Martha Pfeiffer, Dorset
Subject: Re: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington!
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 21:16:27 -0400
Are the 2010 -11 records in ebird?  I did not come up with them.  r

Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT

 
> Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 20:15:03 -0400
> From: iworley AT UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hoods up:  raining warblers in Bennington!
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> Hi Ruth,
> 
> I believe there are three previous records accepted by the Vermont Bird 
> Records Committee:
> 
> 1980  May  Jericho
> 2010  May  Jericho
> 2011  May  Thetford Center
> 
> Ian
> ========================================
> On 7/12/2014 7:39 PM, Ruth wrote:
> > Welcome to the Hooded Club, Pat and Ali! Are we convinced there are 2 
males? What is the history of HOWA in VT other than the 1980 bird in Jericho 
(ebird) anyway???? 

> >
> > Ruth Stewart
> >
> > E. Dorset, VT
> >
> >   
> >> Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:11:14 -0400
> >> From: alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET
> >> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hoods up:  raining warblers in Bennington!
> >> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> >>
> >> Hi to Birders in Vermont:
> >>
> >> Years ago, when some UVM students and Allan Strong located a Hooded 
Warbler in Jericho Vermont, I was clueless about this list serve and I missed 
seeing the bird by a day...I never forgot this! By using this tool, and reading 
fellow birders contributions, I was led to this coveted prize today. 

> >>
> >> As Pat Folsom often says, timing is everything and today she and I 
lucked out by: 

> >>
> >> 1) a chance-meeting-up with Eric Seyfren who
> >>
> >> 2) escorted us directly to the locations where Hooded Warblers have been 
heard and seen over the past few weeks. 

> >>
> >> We spent a few minutes trying to locate the 3/4 mile bird, which sang 
and moved around its designated territory but eluded our searching. Practicing 
Zen-birding, we let this one go and headed for the 1 mile bird that Eric had 
seen earlier this morning. As we approached the area, Eric led us off the trail 
and down a slight slope through the woods to a small opening with smaller 
vegetation. Within moments, he located the bird and, AH! we all had satisfying 
looks, watching him sing in all his black and yellow glory. We returned to the 
3/4 mile warbler where persistence and patience (excellent qualities for 
successful birding) paid off. Eric and Pat found the second Hooded and helped 
me get on it as well. I am now a proud member of the Hooded Warbler fan club 
and have performed the obligatory life bird boogie. 

> >>
> >> Thanks to everyone that gave suggestions, directions, and shared stories 
of these lovely birds (and incidental wildlife such as very large cats), and 
for Eric for finding the birds in the first place! 

> >>
> >> And a special thank you too, Ernie Buford, for the Vermont Bird list 
serve! 

> >>
> >> Good luck to many more people I hope can join the Hooded Warbler fan club 
as well! 

> >>
> >> Ali
> >> Huntington
> >   		 	   		
 		 	   		  
Subject: 2 hooded warblers in Bennington photos and song
From: Eric Seyferth <seyfren AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 00:45:12 +0000
When I saw the hooded warblers in Bennington on 7/12/14 with Alison Wagner 
and Pat Folsom I recorded the voice of both. It is remarkable to me how 
different they sound from each other and how stereotyped each individual's 
song was over time. It is just amazing to me that two birds rare to Vermont 
ended up setting up territories 1/4 mile apart and have such different 
dialects, perhaps suggesting that they came from different regions. I know 
nothing about the regional variation in hooded warbler song over their usual 
range, however. Below is a link to admittedly poor photos of each bird and 
their song on short video clips. 

  
https://www.flickr.com/photos/125405003 AT N05/sets/72157645622198356/ 


Eric Seyferth 
Subject: Re: Brewster's Warbler feeding a Brown-headed Cowbird, Swanton, VT - images and video
From: mark paul <mpaul155 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:32:57 -0400
Very cool!

On Jul 13, 2014, at 12:39 PM, Robert Salter wrote:

> Ive been lucky seeing winged warblers in my yard this summer. Ive seen this 
Brewsters Warbler over the past few days. This morning I caught some pictures 
and a short video of the warbler feeding a cowbird. 

> Video here:
> http://vimeo.com/100642567
> 
> Bob Salter
> Swanton, VT
> 
Subject: Shorebird return migration started
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 12:42:53 -0400
A flock of 18 least sandpipers at Bratt Retreat Meadows today. All adults.

Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Brewster's Warbler feeding a Brown-headed Cowbird, Swanton, VT - images and video
From: Robert Salter <rsalter_637 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 12:39:17 -0400
Ive been lucky seeing winged warblers in my yard this summer. Ive seen this 
Brewsters Warbler over the past few days. This morning I caught some pictures 
and a short video of the warbler feeding a cowbird. 

Video here:
http://vimeo.com/100642567

Bob Salter
Swanton, VT
Subject: Appreciation
From: Martha Pfeiffer <kmpfeiffer AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 03:51:11 -0700

I heartily agree with Alison Wagner's comments about the value of this List 
serve and 

those who generously contribute to it in so many ways. Thanks to everyone.

 Martha Pfeiffer, Dorset
Subject: Re: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington!
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 20:15:03 -0400
Hi Ruth,

I believe there are three previous records accepted by the Vermont Bird 
Records Committee:

1980  May  Jericho
2010  May  Jericho
2011  May  Thetford Center

Ian
========================================
On 7/12/2014 7:39 PM, Ruth wrote:
> Welcome to the Hooded Club, Pat and Ali! Are we convinced there are 2 males? 
What is the history of HOWA in VT other than the 1980 bird in Jericho (ebird) 
anyway???? 

>
> Ruth Stewart
>
> E. Dorset, VT
>
>   
>> Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:11:14 -0400
>> From: alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hoods up:  raining warblers in Bennington!
>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>>
>> Hi to Birders in Vermont:
>>
>> Years ago, when some UVM students and Allan Strong located a Hooded Warbler 
in Jericho Vermont, I was clueless about this list serve and I missed seeing 
the bird by a day...I never forgot this! By using this tool, and reading fellow 
birders contributions, I was led to this coveted prize today. 

>>
>> As Pat Folsom often says, timing is everything and today she and I lucked 
out by: 

>>
>> 1) a chance-meeting-up with Eric Seyfren who
>>
>> 2) escorted us directly to the locations where Hooded Warblers have been 
heard and seen over the past few weeks. 

>>
>> We spent a few minutes trying to locate the 3/4 mile bird, which sang and 
moved around its designated territory but eluded our searching. Practicing 
Zen-birding, we let this one go and headed for the 1 mile bird that Eric had 
seen earlier this morning. As we approached the area, Eric led us off the trail 
and down a slight slope through the woods to a small opening with smaller 
vegetation. Within moments, he located the bird and, AH! we all had satisfying 
looks, watching him sing in all his black and yellow glory. We returned to the 
3/4 mile warbler where persistence and patience (excellent qualities for 
successful birding) paid off. Eric and Pat found the second Hooded and helped 
me get on it as well. I am now a proud member of the Hooded Warbler fan club 
and have performed the obligatory life bird boogie. 

>>
>> Thanks to everyone that gave suggestions, directions, and shared stories of 
these lovely birds (and incidental wildlife such as very large cats), and for 
Eric for finding the birds in the first place! 

>>
>> And a special thank you too, Ernie Buford, for the Vermont Bird list serve!
>>
>> Good luck to many more people I hope can join the Hooded Warbler fan club as 
well! 

>>
>> Ali
>> Huntington
>   		 	   		
Subject: Re: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington!
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 19:39:36 -0400
Welcome to the Hooded Club, Pat and Ali! Are we convinced there are 2 males? 
What is the history of HOWA in VT other than the 1980 bird in Jericho (ebird) 
anyway???? 


Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT

 
> Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:11:14 -0400
> From: alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hoods up:  raining warblers in Bennington!
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> Hi to Birders in Vermont: 
> 
> Years ago, when some UVM students and Allan Strong located a Hooded Warbler 
in Jericho Vermont, I was clueless about this list serve and I missed seeing 
the bird by a day...I never forgot this! By using this tool, and reading fellow 
birders contributions, I was led to this coveted prize today. 

> 
> As Pat Folsom often says, timing is everything and today she and I lucked 
out by: 

> 
> 1) a chance-meeting-up with Eric Seyfren who 
> 
> 2) escorted us directly to the locations where Hooded Warblers have been 
heard and seen over the past few weeks. 

> 
> We spent a few minutes trying to locate the 3/4 mile bird, which sang and 
moved around its designated territory but eluded our searching. Practicing 
Zen-birding, we let this one go and headed for the 1 mile bird that Eric had 
seen earlier this morning. As we approached the area, Eric led us off the trail 
and down a slight slope through the woods to a small opening with smaller 
vegetation. Within moments, he located the bird and, AH! we all had satisfying 
looks, watching him sing in all his black and yellow glory. We returned to the 
3/4 mile warbler where persistence and patience (excellent qualities for 
successful birding) paid off. Eric and Pat found the second Hooded and helped 
me get on it as well. I am now a proud member of the Hooded Warbler fan club 
and have performed the obligatory life bird boogie. 

> 
> Thanks to everyone that gave suggestions, directions, and shared stories of 
these lovely birds (and incidental wildlife such as very large cats), and for 
Eric for finding the birds in the first place! 

> 
> And a special thank you too, Ernie Buford, for the Vermont Bird list serve!
> 
> Good luck to many more people I hope can join the Hooded Warbler fan club as 
well! 

> 
> Ali
> Huntington
 		 	   		  
Subject: Tufted Titmouse
From: Deenie <vtdeenie AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 18:00:19 -0400
I have them all winter but today at the feeder was a first for many months- and 
not feeding any young that I can see. 


deenie
Shelburne
Subject: Hoods up: raining warblers in Bennington!
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:11:14 -0400
Hi to Birders in Vermont: 

Years ago, when some UVM students and Allan Strong located a Hooded Warbler in 
Jericho Vermont, I was clueless about this list serve and I missed seeing the 
bird by a day...I never forgot this! By using this tool, and reading fellow 
birders contributions, I was led to this coveted prize today. 


As Pat Folsom often says, “timing is everything” and today she and I lucked 
out by: 


1) a chance-meeting-up with Eric Seyfren who 

2) escorted us directly to the locations where Hooded Warblers have been heard 
and seen over the past few weeks. 


We spent a few minutes trying to locate the “3/4 mile” bird, which sang and 
moved around its designated territory but eluded our searching. Practicing 
Zen-birding, we let this one go and headed for the “1 mile” bird that Eric 
had seen earlier this morning. As we approached the area, Eric led us off the 
trail and down a slight slope through the woods to a small opening with smaller 
vegetation. Within moments, he located the bird and, AH! we all had satisfying 
looks, watching him sing in all his black and yellow glory. We returned to the 
“3/4 mile” warbler where persistence and patience (excellent qualities for 
successful birding) paid off. Eric and Pat found the second Hooded and helped 
me get on it as well. I am now a proud member of the Hooded Warbler fan club 
and have performed the obligatory life bird boogie. 


Thanks to everyone that gave suggestions, directions, and shared stories of 
these lovely birds (and incidental wildlife such as very large cats), and for 
Eric for finding the birds in the first place! 


And a special thank you too, Ernie Buford, for the Vermont Bird list serve!

Good luck to many more people I hope can join the Hooded Warbler fan club as 
well! 


Ali
Huntington
Subject: West Rutland Marsh - July 12
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 11:23:08 -0700
Rutland County Audubon completed 13 years of monthly monitoring at West Rutland 
Marsh today. It was a great day at the marsh! You can read about it here: 



http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2014/7/12/west-rutland-marsh-july-monitoring-walk.html 

Subject: pine warbler-- Lake St. Catherine State Park, Jul 12, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 17:11:51 +0000
Today five of us on a bird walk produced the following. A pine warbler sang 
briefly from a pine!  The naturalist there said are loons on the lake. 

 Sue Wetmore 
  
  
  
  
From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 12:34:02 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Lake St. Catherine State Park, Jul 12, 2014 

Lake St. Catherine State Park, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 12, 2014 7:20 AM - 10:20 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
37 species 

Common Merganser  9     all females 
Great Blue Heron  1 
Ring-billed Gull  2 
Mourning Dove  6 
Barred Owl  1     calling 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2 
Hairy Woodpecker  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1 
Eastern Phoebe  3 
Eastern Kingbird  3 
Warbling Vireo  2 
Blue Jay  3 
American Crow  2 
Common Raven  1 
Barn Swallow  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  4 
Tufted Titmouse  6     appeared to be a family group. 
White-breasted Nuthatch  2 
Eastern Bluebird  1 
Veery  1 
American Robin  11 
Gray Catbird  2 
Cedar Waxwing  3 
Common Yellowthroat  5 
American Redstart  3 
Yellow Warbler  1 
Pine Warbler  1 
Chipping Sparrow  3     feeding a juvenile 
Song Sparrow  8 
Northern Cardinal  2 
Indigo Bunting  1 
Common Grackle  12     feeding immature bird 
Brown-headed Cowbird  1     juvenile on its own. 
Baltimore Oriole  2 
American Goldfinch  2 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19078671 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: Mt. Mansfield
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 08:50:20 -0400
As always, thanks for the detailed and interesting acct about "brute 
force biology" at its best!  Regards...

Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT

 
> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 23:25:02 -0400
> From: crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Mt. Mansfield
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> Steve Faccio and I spent Monday evening and Tuesday morning on VCE's Mt. 
> Mansfield ridgeline study site.  It's always hard to believe at this 
> time of year, but our field season is winding down.  Our primary 
> objective for this trip was to retrieve a geolocator from a banded male 
> Blackpoll Warbler that has been taunting us around the parking lot, 
> singing at close range with the geolocator stalk visibly protruding from 
> his back feathers.  We arrived just after thunderstorms had swept across 
> the mountain, which remained cloaked in clouds throughout the evening.  
> Fortunately, additional rains held off for the most part, so we were 
> able to set and open ~20 mist nets.  Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH) put on a 
> strong vocal show, calling and singing more vigorously than during our 
> visits of the past two weeks.  This is typical behavior for early July, 
> likely indicating that young have hatched in most nests.  We netted 4 
> birds, one of which was new for the year.
> 
> The weather broke overnight, and we were treated to a spectacular 
> sunrise through low-hanging valley clouds.  We had nets open by 4:30 am, 
> and the dawn chorus was robust.  We  applied our unique brand of "brute 
> force biology" (i.e., sheer persistence and dumb luck), managing to 
> capture our target Blackpoll in mid-morning and removing his 
> geolocator.  The bird was in great shape, though likely glad to shed his 
> 0.6-gram backpack.  We have now recovered 3 of these light-gathering 
> devices, and our colleague Bill Deluca at UMass has done some 
> preliminary analyses of the data each geolocator gathered during the 
> past 12 months.   Results are coarse, and many additional hours of 
> deciphering and interpretation will be required, but the broad pattern 
> points to an overwater southward flight from the New England coast, with 
> possible stops in the Great Antilles, and landfall in Venezuela, where 
> the birds overwintered.  Spring migration appears to follow a route 
> through the Caribbean, then to Florida and along the coast to 
> Mansfield.  Don't bet the house on any of this, but the early results 
> are intriguing.
> 
> Activity in our mist nets was steady through the morning, and we ended 
> up with 35 captures, 15 of which were BITH, including a male banded in 
> mid-September 2011 as a young-of-the-year and recaptured in June of both 
> 2012 and 2013.  We've now captured 43 individual BITH so far this season 
> - 28 males and 15 females, 27 new birds and 16 returns from previous 
> years.  By comparison, we captured a total of 37 BITH in 2013 (23 new 
> and 14 returns).  Interestingly, of the 28 newly-banded BITH this 
> season, 22 (79%) are yearlings.  We believe that disruption of the 
> historically biennial fir-spruce cone cycle, which is tracked by red 
> squirrels and other avian nest predators, may be largely responsible for 
> the current relatively high numbers of BITH and other open-cup nesting 
> birds.  This is the third consecutive summer following a low cone crop, 
> and we had not seen or heard a single squirrel on Mansfield until Steve 
> spied one on the Amherst Trail on Tuesday.  Low squirrel populations 
> typically mean good nesting success, so we presume many BITH have been 
> produced during the past two summers, and will again be this year - thus 
> the relatively high numbers of yearling recruits.
> 
> We've also netted relatively high numbers of Swainson's Thrush (SWTH) 
> and Blackpoll Warbler (BLPW) on Mansfield so far this season.  In fact, 
> we've crushed our previous record for SWTH (12 in 2012), with 16 already 
> captured (15 new, 1 banded in 2013), including 3 females in breeding 
> condition.  BLPW captures already number 28 (23 new, 5 returns), with 7 
> females so far netted (we caught only 4 females and 24 males in 2013).
> 
> Other birds of interest on the ridgeline included a Red-eyed Vireo 
> singing briefly around the parking lot, a female Hermit Thrush (probably 
> a failed breeder or a bird that successfully fledged a first brood and 
> didn't attempt #2), and an Ovenbird.  The raven family from Smuggler's 
> Notch entertained us with vocal and aerial antics through much of the 
> morning.
> 
> We'll be back on Mansfield twice more this month, and again in 
> mid-September, hoping to recover 1 or 2 additional geolocators and hit 
> the half-century mark for BITH captures.
> 
> Chris
> 
> -- 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> P.O. Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
> www.vtecostudies.org
 		 	   		  
Subject: Cattle Egrets at Shelburne Farms
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 18:06:52 -0400
I made my annual visit to Shelburne Farms in search of Cattle Egrets this 
afternoon. Found two of them perched on fence posts near the cow barn patiently 
waiting for the cows to emerge. I also spotted a handsome male Scarlet Tanager 
while walking through the Whimsey Meadows. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Hooded Warbler Bennington
From: Theresa Armata <tarmat AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 17:00:53 -0400
The Hooded Warbler is still singing lustily in Bennington.
I both saw and heard him both walking up the trail at 10:10 and then returning 
( I had gone on to the top: the light beacon) at 11 AM. 

 He was just beyond the orange tape in a nice slightly open regenerating spot . 
Gave me good looks, (sorry I just have a point and shoot camera). 

I watched for a bit ... thinking that maybe there was female around... but none 
was seen. 


Terri Armata Bennington.
Subject: Bcnell's thrush-- Killington Peak, Jul 11, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 18:28:35 +0000
A ride up the gondola at Killington was grand with vews at the topthat were 
limitless. As impressive was the thrush which I found along the trail below 

the gondola docking station. Call notes were been produced. 
  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, July 11, 2014 2:25:58 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Killington Peak, Jul 11, 2014 

Killington Peak, Rutland, US-VT 
Jul 11, 2014 10:15 AM - 12:00 PM 
Protocol: Stationary 
9 species 

Blue Jay  1 
Common Raven  1 
Winter Wren  2 
Bicknell's Thrush  2     heard and seen. 
Swainson's Thrush  2 
American Robin  1 
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  1 
White-throated Sparrow  3 
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19071121 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: Mt. Mansfield
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 10:12:57 -0400
Fascinating report!  Please keep us updated as the geolocator data is refined.

Scott


Quoting Chris Rimmer :

> Steve Faccio and I spent Monday evening and Tuesday morning on VCE's  
> Mt. Mansfield ridgeline study site.  It's always hard to believe at  
> this time of year, but our field season is winding down.  Our  
> primary objective for this trip was to retrieve a geolocator from a  
> banded male Blackpoll Warbler that has been taunting us around the  
> parking lot, singing at close range with the geolocator stalk  
> visibly protruding from his back feathers.  We arrived just after  
> thunderstorms had swept across the mountain, which remained cloaked  
> in clouds throughout the evening.  Fortunately, additional rains  
> held off for the most part, so we were able to set and open ~20 mist  
> nets.  Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH) put on a strong vocal show,  
> calling and singing more vigorously than during our visits of the  
> past two weeks.  This is typical behavior for early July, likely  
> indicating that young have hatched in most nests.  We netted 4  
> birds, one of which was new for the year.
>
> The weather broke overnight, and we were treated to a spectacular  
> sunrise through low-hanging valley clouds.  We had nets open by 4:30  
> am, and the dawn chorus was robust.  We  applied our unique brand of  
> "brute force biology" (i.e., sheer persistence and dumb luck),  
> managing to capture our target Blackpoll in mid-morning and removing  
> his geolocator.  The bird was in great shape, though likely glad to  
> shed his 0.6-gram backpack.  We have now recovered 3 of these  
> light-gathering devices, and our colleague Bill Deluca at UMass has  
> done some preliminary analyses of the data each geolocator gathered  
> during the past 12 months.   Results are coarse, and many additional  
> hours of deciphering and interpretation will be required, but the  
> broad pattern points to an overwater southward flight from the New  
> England coast, with possible stops in the Great Antilles, and  
> landfall in Venezuela, where the birds overwintered.  Spring  
> migration appears to follow a route through the Caribbean, then to  
> Florida and along the coast to Mansfield.  Don't bet the house on  
> any of this, but the early results are intriguing.
>
> Activity in our mist nets was steady through the morning, and we  
> ended up with 35 captures, 15 of which were BITH, including a male  
> banded in mid-September 2011 as a young-of-the-year and recaptured  
> in June of both 2012 and 2013.  We've now captured 43 individual  
> BITH so far this season - 28 males and 15 females, 27 new birds and  
> 16 returns from previous years.  By comparison, we captured a total  
> of 37 BITH in 2013 (23 new and 14 returns).  Interestingly, of the  
> 28 newly-banded BITH this season, 22 (79%) are yearlings.  We  
> believe that disruption of the historically biennial fir-spruce cone  
> cycle, which is tracked by red squirrels and other avian nest  
> predators, may be largely responsible for the current relatively  
> high numbers of BITH and other open-cup nesting birds.  This is the  
> third consecutive summer following a low cone crop, and we had not  
> seen or heard a single squirrel on Mansfield until Steve spied one  
> on the Amherst Trail on Tuesday.  Low squirrel populations typically  
> mean good nesting success, so we presume many BITH have been  
> produced during the past two summers, and will again be this year -  
> thus the relatively high numbers of yearling recruits.
>
> We've also netted relatively high numbers of Swainson's Thrush  
> (SWTH) and Blackpoll Warbler (BLPW) on Mansfield so far this season.  
>  In fact, we've crushed our previous record for SWTH (12 in 2012),  
> with 16 already captured (15 new, 1 banded in 2013), including 3  
> females in breeding condition.  BLPW captures already number 28 (23  
> new, 5 returns), with 7 females so far netted (we caught only 4  
> females and 24 males in 2013).
>
> Other birds of interest on the ridgeline included a Red-eyed Vireo  
> singing briefly around the parking lot, a female Hermit Thrush  
> (probably a failed breeder or a bird that successfully fledged a  
> first brood and didn't attempt #2), and an Ovenbird.  The raven  
> family from Smuggler's Notch entertained us with vocal and aerial  
> antics through much of the morning.
>
> We'll be back on Mansfield twice more this month, and again in  
> mid-September, hoping to recover 1 or 2 additional geolocators and  
> hit the half-century mark for BITH captures.
>
> Chris
>
> -- 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> P.O. Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
> www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Bobolinks in Central Vermont
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 07:31:23 -0400
Lovely views of at least two pair of Bobolinks and several young in an unmowed 
field just east of Maple Corners. Although I dont think this particular spot 
is in the Bobolink project, it made me proud to have supported their work in 
other fields, especially when I later came upon fields that had been mowednot 
even for hay but just to be mowed. 




John Snell
Montpelier
Subject: Re: Whip-poor-will chorus .... Weybridge
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 07:21:42 -0400
Wonderful sighting and description. Thanks. Perhaps we will see if it continues 
this evening. 


Barbara Brosnan 
Weybridge

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 11, 2014, at 5:01 AM, "Ian A. Worley"  wrote:
> 
> To listen for Whip-poor-wills last evening, as twilight began to fade and 
with a brilliant, nearly-full moon rising low to the southeast, I parked the 
car at the normal location on quiet Snake Mountain Road, 0.4 miles north of 
Forrest Road where the recent Cerulean Warbler had quieted for the night ... it 
being just past 9:00 pm. 

> 
> As I stepped out on to the dirt road a Whip-poor-will landed on the 
hard-packed gravel less than a car's length from me. As I watched it, it began 
to occasionally make soft, musical "cluck" notes ... usually two at a time 
about a second apart. This continued for perhaps eight minutes as the twilight 
blue of the northern sky slowly darkened. A couple of times the bird moved a 
foot or so, but not further away. 

> 
> Soon another Whip-poor-will began to sing from a typical location up the 
wooded slope on this eastern side of Snake Mountain. It was then joined by a 
third bird from another common singing site north along the road near a 
solitary home and workshop. Within half a minute another song rang from a 
hedgerow between newly hayed fields stretching eastward from the road. ....... 
As the chorus continued with three singers and the bird by me in the road 
clucking bass, my company flew up and made a foraging flight amid the roadside 
lightning bugs. It settled out of sight in front of me at the road's edge, then 
made two more foraging sallies. 

> 
> Moonlight having replaced twilight, I retreated home with the choristers 
still in full voice .... all in song. 

> 
> -----------------
> This is the first time in the last five years, since the birds have 
reoccupied this location from the 1970's, that there have been recorded more 
than two individuals. 

> 
> Ian
Subject: Hooded Warblers, anyone?
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 06:49:51 -0400
Good morning fellow VT birders,

Well, all these intriguing reports about the Hooded Warbler(s) is finally 
getting to me....I am seriously considering an early morning drive down 
tomorrow. I’d like to know, aside from all the success stories, has anyone 
dipped? If the bird hasn’t been seen/reported since Wednesday, I’d 
reconsider the drive. Also, it seems the pins are located on Pucker Hill Road 
as well as Whipstock Road....any more details, to help lure me south, would be 
appreciated! 


Thanks!

Alison Wagner
Huntington
Subject: Whip-poor-will chorus .... Weybridge
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 05:01:02 -0400
To listen for Whip-poor-wills last evening, as twilight began to fade 
and with a brilliant, nearly-full moon rising low to the southeast, I 
parked the car at the normal location on quiet Snake Mountain Road, 0.4 
miles north of Forrest Road where the recent Cerulean Warbler had 
quieted for the night ... it being just past 9:00 pm.

As I stepped out on to the dirt road a Whip-poor-will landed on the 
hard-packed gravel less than a car's length from me.  As I watched it, 
it began to occasionally make soft, musical "cluck" notes ... usually 
two at a time about a second apart.  This continued for perhaps eight 
minutes as the twilight blue of the northern sky slowly darkened.  A 
couple of times the bird moved a foot or so, but not further away.

Soon another Whip-poor-will began to sing from a typical location up the 
wooded slope on this eastern side of Snake Mountain.  It was then joined 
by a third bird from another common singing site north along the road 
near a solitary home and workshop.  Within half a minute another song 
rang from a hedgerow between newly hayed fields stretching eastward from 
the road.  ....... As the chorus continued with three singers and the 
bird by me in the road clucking bass, my company flew up and made a 
foraging flight amid the roadside lightning bugs.  It settled out of 
sight in front of me at the road's edge, then made two more foraging 
sallies.

Moonlight having replaced twilight, I retreated home with the choristers 
still in full voice .... all in song.

-----------------
This is the first time in the last five years, since the birds have 
reoccupied this location from the 1970's, that there have been recorded 
more than two individuals.

Ian
Subject: 11 Gadwall at Shelburne Bay
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 02:51:28 -0400
> Today Mona Bruley and I observed 11 Gadwall at Shelburne Bay. None were in 
breeding male plumage; all were in a drabber plumage more typical of juveniles, 
females or males in basic plumage. White speculums were seen on most of the 
birds. Two were swimming beside each other and bobbing their heads in unison, a 
courtship behavior of Gadwall. 

>  
> There were also two mallards in the Bay as well as several other species.
>  
> Yesterday I observed 10 Common Mergansers in Shelburne Bay : one female and 9 
large chicks. 

> 
> 
> Michele Patenaude
> 172 Woodbury Road
> Burlington, VT 05408
> 802-862-4085
> 
Subject: Mt. Mansfield
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 23:25:02 -0400
Steve Faccio and I spent Monday evening and Tuesday morning on VCE's Mt. 
Mansfield ridgeline study site.  It's always hard to believe at this 
time of year, but our field season is winding down.  Our primary 
objective for this trip was to retrieve a geolocator from a banded male 
Blackpoll Warbler that has been taunting us around the parking lot, 
singing at close range with the geolocator stalk visibly protruding from 
his back feathers.  We arrived just after thunderstorms had swept across 
the mountain, which remained cloaked in clouds throughout the evening.  
Fortunately, additional rains held off for the most part, so we were 
able to set and open ~20 mist nets.  Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH) put on a 
strong vocal show, calling and singing more vigorously than during our 
visits of the past two weeks.  This is typical behavior for early July, 
likely indicating that young have hatched in most nests.  We netted 4 
birds, one of which was new for the year.

The weather broke overnight, and we were treated to a spectacular 
sunrise through low-hanging valley clouds.  We had nets open by 4:30 am, 
and the dawn chorus was robust.  We  applied our unique brand of "brute 
force biology" (i.e., sheer persistence and dumb luck), managing to 
capture our target Blackpoll in mid-morning and removing his 
geolocator.  The bird was in great shape, though likely glad to shed his 
0.6-gram backpack.  We have now recovered 3 of these light-gathering 
devices, and our colleague Bill Deluca at UMass has done some 
preliminary analyses of the data each geolocator gathered during the 
past 12 months.   Results are coarse, and many additional hours of 
deciphering and interpretation will be required, but the broad pattern 
points to an overwater southward flight from the New England coast, with 
possible stops in the Great Antilles, and landfall in Venezuela, where 
the birds overwintered.  Spring migration appears to follow a route 
through the Caribbean, then to Florida and along the coast to 
Mansfield.  Don't bet the house on any of this, but the early results 
are intriguing.

Activity in our mist nets was steady through the morning, and we ended 
up with 35 captures, 15 of which were BITH, including a male banded in 
mid-September 2011 as a young-of-the-year and recaptured in June of both 
2012 and 2013.  We've now captured 43 individual BITH so far this season 
- 28 males and 15 females, 27 new birds and 16 returns from previous 
years.  By comparison, we captured a total of 37 BITH in 2013 (23 new 
and 14 returns).  Interestingly, of the 28 newly-banded BITH this 
season, 22 (79%) are yearlings.  We believe that disruption of the 
historically biennial fir-spruce cone cycle, which is tracked by red 
squirrels and other avian nest predators, may be largely responsible for 
the current relatively high numbers of BITH and other open-cup nesting 
birds.  This is the third consecutive summer following a low cone crop, 
and we had not seen or heard a single squirrel on Mansfield until Steve 
spied one on the Amherst Trail on Tuesday.  Low squirrel populations 
typically mean good nesting success, so we presume many BITH have been 
produced during the past two summers, and will again be this year - thus 
the relatively high numbers of yearling recruits.

We've also netted relatively high numbers of Swainson's Thrush (SWTH) 
and Blackpoll Warbler (BLPW) on Mansfield so far this season.  In fact, 
we've crushed our previous record for SWTH (12 in 2012), with 16 already 
captured (15 new, 1 banded in 2013), including 3 females in breeding 
condition.  BLPW captures already number 28 (23 new, 5 returns), with 7 
females so far netted (we caught only 4 females and 24 males in 2013).

Other birds of interest on the ridgeline included a Red-eyed Vireo 
singing briefly around the parking lot, a female Hermit Thrush (probably 
a failed breeder or a bird that successfully fledged a first brood and 
didn't attempt #2), and an Ovenbird.  The raven family from Smuggler's 
Notch entertained us with vocal and aerial antics through much of the 
morning.

We'll be back on Mansfield twice more this month, and again in 
mid-September, hoping to recover 1 or 2 additional geolocators and hit 
the half-century mark for BITH captures.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org