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Updated on Friday, September 4 at 03:16 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Yellow-headed Blackbird

4 Sep Y.T. Vireo - Union St Brandon, Sep 4, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
4 Sep Re: Ospreys still in nest [Alice Grau ]
4 Sep Ospreys still in nest [Walter Medwid ]
3 Sep squirrel-bird? [Scott Sainsbury ]
3 Sep PS re Band-tailed Pigeon [Maeve Kim ]
3 Sep Re: DCWMA [Sue ]
3 Sep NEK report-September woods not silent [rstymeist Bob Stymeist Arlington ]
3 Sep Re: DCWMA [Denis Poley ]
2 Sep Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [Maeve Kim ]
2 Sep Re: Pigeon with bands [sarah rosedahl ]
1 Sep Pigeon with bands [Laura Tobin ]
1 Sep DCWMA [Sue ]
1 Sep Yellow-Cr Night Heron Continues, 8/31 [Mike Resch ]
31 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Donald Clark ]
31 Aug Re: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison [Pat Folsom ]
31 Aug Re: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison [Jim Mead ]
31 Aug Re: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison [Alison Wagner ]
31 Aug Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison [Jim Mead ]
31 Aug Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [Kim Likakis ]
31 Aug Baird's Sandpiper in St. Albans [Bruce MacPherson ]
31 Aug Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [Sue ]
31 Aug Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [UVM ]
31 Aug Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [Bob Crowley ]
31 Aug Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [Maeve Kim ]
31 Aug Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT? [UVM ]
31 Aug Re: Dead Creek [Martha McClintock ]
31 Aug band-tailed pigeon in VT? [Maeve Kim ]
31 Aug Green Herons- Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 30, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
31 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Kaye Danforth ]
31 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Donald Clark ]
31 Aug Least Bittern -- NOT [Michele Patenaude ]
30 Aug Yellow-Cr N Heron Updates? [Mike Resch ]
30 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Pat Folsom ]
30 Aug Re: Peewee [Scott Stoner ]
30 Aug Re: Peewee [Ron Payne ]
30 Aug Re: Peewee [Sue ]
30 Aug Re: Peewee [Sarah Fellows ]
30 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Donald Clark ]
30 Aug Re: Dead Creek [Isis Erb ]
30 Aug Dead Creek [Martha McClintock ]
30 Aug NEK: Pipeline West, Victory [tfberriman ]
30 Aug Re: Stilt Sandpiper on Brilyea Rd. in Addison [Alison Wagner ]
29 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Charlie La Rosa ]
29 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Donald Clark ]
29 Aug Re: Common nighthawks in Williston, now [Zac Cota ]
29 Aug Common nighthawks in Williston, now [Larry Clarfeld ]
29 Aug Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Bomoseen/Hubbardton Marshes IBA, Aug 28, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
29 Aug Lincoln's Sp. Union St Brandon, Aug 29, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
29 Aug Sparrows [Sue ]
29 Aug Re: Don't cross a mother hummingbird [Jane Stein ]
29 Aug Stilt Sandpiper on Brilyea Rd. in Addison [Jim Mead ]
29 Aug Don't cross a mother hummingbird [Veer Frost ]
29 Aug Colchester Mystery Birds [Ann Curran ]
29 Aug Peewee [Kathy Leonard ]
29 Aug Eastern woods peewee calling [Kathy Leonard ]
29 Aug Re: help with safe coopers id [Veer Frost ]
29 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [suki russo ]
28 Aug Black vultures [Sue ]
28 Aug Re: help with safe coopers id [Jane Stein ]
28 Aug help with eBird hotspot correction [Kent McFarland ]
28 Aug Re: help with safe coopers id [Kent McFarland ]
28 Aug help with safe coopers id [Veer Frost ]
28 Aug Nix gwfg [Eugenia Cooke ]
28 Aug Greater white-fronted goose [Eugenia Cooke ]
27 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Donald Clark ]
27 Aug Vermont eBird update [Kent McFarland ]
27 Aug Re: troublesome cat [Jonathan Comeau ]
26 Aug Delta Park in Colchester [Michele Patenaude ]
26 Aug Shorebirds [Sue ]
26 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Donald Clark ]
26 Aug Re: Merlin chases Osprey [Jane Stein ]
26 Aug Re: troublesome cat [Clay & Gail ]
26 Aug Re: Merlin chases Osprey ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
26 Aug Re: troublesome cat [Michele Patenaude ]
26 Aug Re: troublesome cat [Jane Stein ]
26 Aug Re: troublesome cat [Linnea Garrepy ]

Subject: Y.T. Vireo - Union St Brandon, Sep 4, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 20:11:34 +0000
A singing yellow throated vireo was a surprise. Lots of nice orb spider webs. 
  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, September 4, 2015 3:56:12 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Sep 4, 2015 

Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Sep 4, 2015 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
0.5 mile(s) 
25 species 

Canada Goose  4 
Wood Duck  6 
Great Blue Heron  2 
Red-shouldered Hawk  1 
Red-tailed Hawk  1 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  17 
Mourning Dove  1 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Northern Flicker  1 
Eastern Phoebe  2 
Yellow-throated Vireo  1     singing 
Blue Jay  6 
American Crow  15 
Common Raven  3 
White-breasted Nuthatch  2 
Gray Catbird  2 
European Starling  6 
Cedar Waxwing  3 
Common Yellowthroat  2 
Magnolia Warbler  1 
Song Sparrow  1 
Lincoln's Sparrow  1 
Swamp Sparrow  1 
American Goldfinch  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24887730 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Re: Ospreys still in nest
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 13:26:29 -0400
I noticed two in/around the nest at Crown Point NY (just across Champlain 
Bridge)8/31. At one point one seemed to have a fish, I wondered if the parent 
was showing the youngster how to catch it. Alice 


> Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 10:23:10 -0400
> From: wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Ospreys still in nest
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> This morning two ospreys were still on the nest and vocalizing. I believe
> they have been making flights in the immediate area around the nest over
> the last couple of weeks. It seems late for the young to be attached to the
> nesting site. Are there other ospreys still using their nest elsewhere in
> the state? From Derby/Lake Memphremagog
 		 	   		  
Subject: Ospreys still in nest
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 10:23:10 -0400
This morning two ospreys were still on the nest and vocalizing. I believe
they have been making flights in the immediate area around the nest over
the last couple of weeks. It seems late for the young to be attached to the
nesting site. Are there other ospreys still using their nest elsewhere in
the state? From Derby/Lake Memphremagog
Subject: squirrel-bird?
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 13:42:54 -0400
http://www.npr.org/2015/09/03/434400838/warning-calls-decoded-squirrels-take-up-bird-alarms-to-foil-the-enemy 


Scott Sainsbury
Beacon Associates

802-496-9393
802-249-0525 (mobile)
www.beaconassociates.com
Mailing Address
P.O. 1660
Waitsfield, VT.  05673
Delivery Address
75 Bridge Road
Moretown, VT.  05660
Subject: PS re Band-tailed Pigeon
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 08:08:11 -0400
Heres an answer from pigeon racer and breeder Gary Reid, whom I contacted to 
see if the bird could have been one of his.: 


Hi Maeve,

First off, except for one swallow (a type of fancy pigeon). all my birds are 
racing homers. If you saw a Band-tailed Pigeon, it would be what is called an 
"accidental". It would not be banded, and you should put it on your life-list 
of birds seen, if you keep one. I have heard that the Eurasian Collared Dove is 
now in the United States, and spreading, though I have not heard of it being 
seen here yet. 


Secondly, I want to thank you for contacting me. I do have birds go missing 
from time to time; so do other pigeon fanciers. It is my goal to recover any 
lost birds, whether mine or someone else's, and get them to where they belong, 
or to a good home. 


A. Gary Reid

This is exciting!

Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
Subject: Re: DCWMA
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 07:35:43 -0400
It was a stilt sandpiper--- my error in not specifying that.
Had it been the other i would have so noted .
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

> On Sep 3, 2015, at 6:20 AM, Denis Poley  wrote:
> 
> I find the report of a stilt at Farrell access incredible.
> I've never heard of a Stilt in Vermont and I've never seen one north of 
Delaware. 

> Could the observer have mistaken a Black-crowned Night-heron for a 
Black-necked Stilt? 

> 
> Denis Poley,
> Richmond, VT
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Sep 1, 2015, at 7:30 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>> 
>> At Farrell Access yesterday a STILT was seen near the ponds---- seen while 
looking down at edges. 

>> At Stone Mill Dam a Bald Eagle chased a Merlin until the Merlin dropped its 
prey. The Eagle promptly ceased pursuit and went for the dropped prey. 

>> An adult Peregrine was also seen as well as several Kestrels.
>> 
>> Sue Wetmore reporting for Betty Jilson
>> 
>> Sent from my iPod
>> 
Subject: NEK report-September woods not silent
From: rstymeist Bob Stymeist Arlington <rstymeist AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 06:27:02 -0500
 Vermont birders:
September in our "patch" of the Northeast Kingdom is quite different from the 
breeding season, our road Wood Warbler Way no longer is bustling with song, 
though the Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireos never seem to stop.On Wednesday 
morning all was quiet, we stopped to hear a few chickadees, I spished, red nuts 
joined in, spished some more and then the first of twelve wood warbler species 
began arriving. Interesting was that our most common breeding birds were not 
among them- Ovenbird, Redstart and Black-throated Blue. 

Today, we had a Yellow Warbler and three Blackpolls- birds that don't breed 
here, and in addition a Cape May Warbler, always a great bird in Vermont. 
Others were: 4 Black-throated Green, 3 Yellow-rumped,3 Yellowthroats, 3 
Magnolia, 2 Black and white, 2 Blackburnian, a Nashville, Chestnut-sided and a 
Parula. To top it off later we added a Bay-breasted Warbler among a group of 
migrants. In addition to the warblers, we noted 5 Red-eyed, 3 Blue-headed and a 
first property bird- two Philadelphia Vireos. 


If you spish- they will come!

Bob Stymeist and Martha Steele
 Westmore VT
Arlington MA


 
 
 
Subject: Re: DCWMA
From: Denis Poley <poleys AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 06:20:55 -0400
I find the report of a stilt at Farrell access incredible.
I've never heard of a Stilt in Vermont and I've never seen one north of 
Delaware. 

Could the observer have mistaken a Black-crowned Night-heron for a Black-necked 
Stilt? 


Denis Poley,
Richmond, VT

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2015, at 7:30 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> At Farrell Access yesterday a STILT was seen near the ponds---- seen while 
looking down at edges. 

> At Stone Mill Dam a Bald Eagle chased a Merlin until the Merlin dropped its 
prey. The Eagle promptly ceased pursuit and went for the dropped prey. 

> An adult Peregrine was also seen as well as several Kestrels.
> 
> Sue Wetmore reporting for Betty Jilson
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 08:53:47 -0400
After reading Sarah Rosedahls post about local pigeon keepers, I wrote Gary 
Reid to ask if the Band-tailed Pigeon photographed in Jericho Center back in 
June could be one of his - or if he knows anyone else who might have this 
species. Ive submitted a Rare Bird Documentation, and information about the 
birds possible non-wild status would be important. 


Thanks for all the on-list and off-list interest in this bird!

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center


On Aug 31, 2015, at 7:55 PM, Kim Likakis  wrote:

> 100% Band-tailed Pigeon.... wonder if it was banded.
> 
> On Mon, Aug 31, 2015 at 6:03 PM, UVM  wrote:
> 
>> Agree!
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On Aug 31, 2015, at 5:14 PM, Bob Crowley  wrote:
>>> 
>>> That is a beautiful photo of a Band-tailed Pigeon in my opinion.
>>> 
>>> Bob Crowley
>>> Chatham, NH
>>> 
>>>> On 8/31/2015 3:39 PM, Marve Kim wrote:
>>>> Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd
>> visitor to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock
>> Pigeon (feral). However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few
>> Band-tailed Pigeons - and my visitor looks just like them. The size and
>> shape is right, the dark eye, the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill
>> with the black tip, the yellow feet and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked
>> closely at the tail because I wasnt thinking of a possible Band-tailed.
>>>> 
>>>> Theres a photo at
>>>> 
>>>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/
>>>> 
>>>> Id love to know what others think!
>>>> 
>>>> Maeve Kim
>>>> Jericho Center
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Bob Crowley
>>> Chatham. NH
>> 
Subject: Re: Pigeon with bands
From: sarah rosedahl <srosedahl AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 01:18:40 +0000
I found one two years ago and Gary Reid graylake232 AT yahoo.com, who is apigeon 
keeper in the Burlington area, rescued her and found out where shecame 
from. Sarah Rosedahl 

srosedahl AT yahoo.com
www.srosedahl.com

      From: Laura Tobin 
 To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2015 8:19 PM
 Subject: [VTBIRD] Pigeon with bands
   
Hello Everyone -

A family in the Lyndonville area found a pigeon with bands -no numbers or
markings on the bands.  They are looking to reunite the bird with the owner
-if you have information that could be helpful they have asked that you
email Stephanie at: stephc23 AT gmail.com.  Thanks!

Laura Tobin
St. Johnsbury



Subject: Pigeon with bands
From: Laura Tobin <bloodrootdesignsvt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 20:19:20 -0400
Hello Everyone -

A family in the Lyndonville area found a pigeon with bands -no numbers or
markings on the bands.  They are looking to reunite the bird with the owner
-if you have information that could be helpful they have asked that you
email Stephanie at: stephc23 AT gmail.com.  Thanks!

Laura Tobin
St. Johnsbury
Subject: DCWMA
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 19:30:33 -0400
At Farrell Access yesterday a STILT was seen near the ponds---- seen while 
looking down at edges. 

At Stone Mill Dam a Bald Eagle chased a Merlin until the Merlin dropped its 
prey. The Eagle promptly ceased pursuit and went for the dropped prey. 

An adult Peregrine was also seen as well as several Kestrels.

Sue Wetmore reporting for Betty Jilson

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Yellow-Cr Night Heron Continues, 8/31
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 05:27:19 -0400
I was able to see the Yellow-Crowned Night Heron at Bomoseen State Park on the 
evening of 8/31, at 9:15 PM. It was feeding in the marsh behind the dumpsters, 
at the first opening as you head up the trail from the dumpsters toward the 
lake. At that time of night, a flashlight was necessary. 


I also heard that the bird was seen on the lawn near the entrance/guard house 
just past midnight in the early morning hours of 8/31. 



Mike Resch
www.statebiring.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 22:18:38 -0400
Quite a change from last night with only 77 today bringing the season’s count 
total to 3341. Wind from the WNW may have pushed them off to the east. It was 
another fun year but time to move on to hawks & other migrants. 


Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 22:17:28 -0400
We all know Ali has obsessive compulsive birding disorder - she'll be there at 
5:15 for sure!! I saw 20 at Belen Marsh in NM yesterday - enjoy! 


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Mead" 
To: "VT Bird" 
Sent: Monday, August 31, 2015 8:10:57 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison

I hope you try for them!!
Good luck if you can. 

Jim

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2015, at 10:03 PM, Alison Wagner  wrote:
> 
> no, wait....I could go tomorrow morning, arriving at 5:15, and get to work by 
7:45! I must be NUTS!!! 

> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Jim Mead
> Sent: Monday, August 31, 2015 9:41 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> I went to the Brilyea access Rd. off of Rte. 17, pulled over at the first 
pull off on left and scanned for shorebirds. There were only a few peeps. I 
then drove to the first parking lot on the right, parked and walked out to the 
end of the trail (I call this the west trail) that starts at the orange colored 
iron gate. David Hof was already there and had been looking at a few shorebirds 
but had seen nothing out of the ordinary- yet. I set up next to him and began 
looking at the birds. We were standing on the trail directly where there is a 
body of water on both sides (of the trail). We were looking all the way across 
the water toward the south. The activity suddenly increased as some more birds 
began appearing out in the open. A small group of Lesser Yellowlegs stopped in 
and I said to David, "Look carefully for a Stilt Sandpiper because it is common 
for them to be seen with Lesser Yellowlegs". I then spotted a bird with a dark 
brownish colored cap. It's head was down so my! 

  f!
> irst thought was Stilt Sandpiper. Then it lifted its' head and offered me a 
profile view and that's when I saw that it had a white face and that's when I 
said to myself, "Is that a Wilson's Phalarope"? I was pretty certain that it 
was but did not want to say anything out loud until I was sure. I then looked 
at a few photos of one on my iBird app and confirmed my ID. Then I said, "Dave 
do you see that shorebird to the right of a Mallard"? He responded, "Yes, I am 
looking at it now and have been looking at it for awhile". I then said, " 
That's a Wilson's Phalarope"!! We were both quite excited to see this rare bird 
in VT and then looked it over very carefully. After a bit, I tried to call 
someone but did not have a good signal. I then tried to post it to this website 
but did not have any service out there. We found this bird at 5:46 p.m. We then 
walked back and forth along that part of the trail trying to get a better 
viewing spot but ended up back where we were. I found the! 

  !
> Phalarope again but to my to my surprise, found that it was standing next to 
a second Wilson's Phalarope. I then said, "Dave, there are now two Wilson's 
Phalaropes"!! We both became a bit more excited after seeing two of them. Dave 
and I met each other for the first time this evening a what an incredible 
birding experience to share during our first occasion to bird together. What a 
rare treat it was and we hope others who try, will also be able to see these 
birds. They are both juveniles. 

> 
> Enjoy Birds,
> 
> Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 22:10:57 -0400
I hope you try for them!!
Good luck if you can. 

Jim

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2015, at 10:03 PM, Alison Wagner  wrote:
> 
> no, wait....I could go tomorrow morning, arriving at 5:15, and get to work by 
7:45! I must be NUTS!!! 

> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Jim Mead
> Sent: Monday, August 31, 2015 9:41 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> I went to the Brilyea access Rd. off of Rte. 17, pulled over at the first 
pull off on left and scanned for shorebirds. There were only a few peeps. I 
then drove to the first parking lot on the right, parked and walked out to the 
end of the trail (I call this the west trail) that starts at the orange colored 
iron gate. David Hof was already there and had been looking at a few shorebirds 
but had seen nothing out of the ordinary- yet. I set up next to him and began 
looking at the birds. We were standing on the trail directly where there is a 
body of water on both sides (of the trail). We were looking all the way across 
the water toward the south. The activity suddenly increased as some more birds 
began appearing out in the open. A small group of Lesser Yellowlegs stopped in 
and I said to David, "Look carefully for a Stilt Sandpiper because it is common 
for them to be seen with Lesser Yellowlegs". I then spotted a bird with a dark 
brownish colored cap. It's head was down so my! 

  f!
> irst thought was Stilt Sandpiper. Then it lifted its' head and offered me a 
profile view and that's when I saw that it had a white face and that's when I 
said to myself, "Is that a Wilson's Phalarope"? I was pretty certain that it 
was but did not want to say anything out loud until I was sure. I then looked 
at a few photos of one on my iBird app and confirmed my ID. Then I said, "Dave 
do you see that shorebird to the right of a Mallard"? He responded, "Yes, I am 
looking at it now and have been looking at it for awhile". I then said, " 
That's a Wilson's Phalarope"!! We were both quite excited to see this rare bird 
in VT and then looked it over very carefully. After a bit, I tried to call 
someone but did not have a good signal. I then tried to post it to this website 
but did not have any service out there. We found this bird at 5:46 p.m. We then 
walked back and forth along that part of the trail trying to get a better 
viewing spot but ended up back where we were. I found the! 

  !
> Phalarope again but to my to my surprise, found that it was standing next to 
a second Wilson's Phalarope. I then said, "Dave, there are now two Wilson's 
Phalaropes"!! We both became a bit more excited after seeing two of them. Dave 
and I met each other for the first time this evening a what an incredible 
birding experience to share during our first occasion to bird together. What a 
rare treat it was and we hope others who try, will also be able to see these 
birds. They are both juveniles. 

> 
> Enjoy Birds,
> 
> Jim Mead 
Subject: Re: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 22:03:07 -0400
no, wait....I could go tomorrow morning, arriving at 5:15, and get to work 
by 7:45!  I must be NUTS!!!

-----Original Message----- 
From: Jim Mead
Sent: Monday, August 31, 2015 9:41 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison

Hi all,

I went to the Brilyea access Rd. off of Rte. 17, pulled over at the first 
pull off on left and scanned for shorebirds. There were only a few peeps. I 
then drove to the first parking lot on the right, parked and walked out to 
the end of the trail (I call this the west trail) that starts at the orange 
colored iron gate. David Hof was already there and had been looking at a few 
shorebirds but had seen nothing out of the ordinary- yet. I set up next to 
him and began looking at the birds. We were standing on the trail directly 
where there is a body of water on both sides (of the trail). We were looking 
all the way across the water toward the south. The activity suddenly 
increased as some more birds began appearing out in the open. A small group 
of Lesser Yellowlegs stopped in and I said to David, "Look carefully for a 
Stilt Sandpiper because it is common for them to be seen with Lesser 
Yellowlegs". I then spotted a bird with a dark brownish colored cap. It's 
head was down so my f!
irst thought was Stilt Sandpiper. Then it lifted its' head and offered me a 
profile view and that's when I saw that it had a white face and that's when 
I said to myself, "Is that a Wilson's Phalarope"? I was pretty certain that 
it was but did not want to say anything out loud until I was sure. I then 
looked at a few photos of one on my iBird app and confirmed my ID. Then I 
said, "Dave do you see that shorebird to the right of a Mallard"? He 
responded, "Yes, I am looking at it now and have been looking at it for 
awhile". I then said, " That's a Wilson's Phalarope"!! We were both quite 
excited to see this rare bird in VT and then looked it over very carefully. 
After a bit, I tried to call someone but did not have a good signal. I then 
tried to post it to this website but did not have any service out there. We 
found this bird at 5:46 p.m. We then walked back and forth along that part 
of the trail trying to get a better viewing spot but ended up back where we 
were. I found the !
Phalarope again but to my to my surprise, found that it was standing next to 
a second Wilson's Phalarope. I then said, "Dave, there are now two Wilson's 
Phalaropes"!! We both became a bit more excited after seeing two of them. 
Dave and I met each other for the first time this evening a what an 
incredible birding experience to share during our first occasion to bird 
together. What a rare treat it was and we hope others who try, will also be 
able to see these birds. They are both juveniles.

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead 
Subject: Wilson's Phalarope (2 of them) at DCWMA in Addison
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 21:41:04 -0400
Hi all,

I went to the Brilyea access Rd. off of Rte. 17, pulled over at the first pull 
off on left and scanned for shorebirds. There were only a few peeps. I then 
drove to the first parking lot on the right, parked and walked out to the end 
of the trail (I call this the west trail) that starts at the orange colored 
iron gate. David Hof was already there and had been looking at a few shorebirds 
but had seen nothing out of the ordinary- yet. I set up next to him and began 
looking at the birds. We were standing on the trail directly where there is a 
body of water on both sides (of the trail). We were looking all the way across 
the water toward the south. The activity suddenly increased as some more birds 
began appearing out in the open. A small group of Lesser Yellowlegs stopped in 
and I said to David, "Look carefully for a Stilt Sandpiper because it is common 
for them to be seen with Lesser Yellowlegs". I then spotted a bird with a dark 
brownish colored cap. It's head was down so my f! 

 irst thought was Stilt Sandpiper. Then it lifted its' head and offered me a 
profile view and that's when I saw that it had a white face and that's when I 
said to myself, "Is that a Wilson's Phalarope"? I was pretty certain that it 
was but did not want to say anything out loud until I was sure. I then looked 
at a few photos of one on my iBird app and confirmed my ID. Then I said, "Dave 
do you see that shorebird to the right of a Mallard"? He responded, "Yes, I am 
looking at it now and have been looking at it for awhile". I then said, " 
That's a Wilson's Phalarope"!! We were both quite excited to see this rare bird 
in VT and then looked it over very carefully. After a bit, I tried to call 
someone but did not have a good signal. I then tried to post it to this website 
but did not have any service out there. We found this bird at 5:46 p.m. We then 
walked back and forth along that part of the trail trying to get a better 
viewing spot but ended up back where we were. I found the ! 

 Phalarope again but to my to my surprise, found that it was standing next to a 
second Wilson's Phalarope. I then said, "Dave, there are now two Wilson's 
Phalaropes"!! We both became a bit more excited after seeing two of them. Dave 
and I met each other for the first time this evening a what an incredible 
birding experience to share during our first occasion to bird together. What a 
rare treat it was and we hope others who try, will also be able to see these 
birds. They are both juveniles. 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: Kim Likakis <kim.likakis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 19:55:33 -0400
100% Band-tailed Pigeon.... wonder if it was banded.

On Mon, Aug 31, 2015 at 6:03 PM, UVM  wrote:

> Agree!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 31, 2015, at 5:14 PM, Bob Crowley  wrote:
> >
> > That is a beautiful photo of a Band-tailed Pigeon in my opinion.
> >
> > Bob Crowley
> > Chatham, NH
> >
> >> On 8/31/2015 3:39 PM, Marve Kim wrote:
> >> Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd
> visitor to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock
> Pigeon (feral). However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few
> Band-tailed Pigeons - and my visitor looks just like them. The size and
> shape is right, the dark eye, the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill
> with the black tip, the yellow feet and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked
> closely at the tail because I wasn’t thinking of a possible Band-tailed.
> >>
> >> There’s a photo at
> >>
> >>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/
> >>
> >> I’d love to know what others think!
> >>
> >> Maeve Kim
> >> Jericho Center
> >
> > --
> > Bob Crowley
> > Chatham. NH
>
Subject: Baird's Sandpiper in St. Albans
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 19:12:12 -0400
I got a good look at a Baird's Sandpiper at the St. Albans Town Beach this 
afternoon. The only other shorebird there was a Spotted Sandpiper. Still there 
is some decent habitat, so it would be worthwhile checking the beach 
periodically while the shorebirds are passing through. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 19:06:54 -0400
Looks like the one I saw in Madera Canyon.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

> On Aug 31, 2015, at 6:03 PM, UVM  wrote:
> 
> Agree!
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 31, 2015, at 5:14 PM, Bob Crowley  wrote:
>> 
>> That is a beautiful photo of a Band-tailed Pigeon in my opinion.
>> 
>> Bob Crowley
>> Chatham, NH
>> 
>>> On 8/31/2015 3:39 PM, Marve Kim wrote:
>>> Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd 
visitor to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock Pigeon 
(feral). However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few Band-tailed 
Pigeons - and my visitor looks just like them. The size and shape is right, the 
dark eye, the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill with the black tip, the 
yellow feet and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked closely at the tail because 
I wasn’t thinking of a possible Band-tailed. 

>>> 
>>> There’s a photo at
>>> 
>>> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/ 

>>> 
>>> I’d love to know what others think!
>>> 
>>> Maeve Kim
>>> Jericho Center
>> 
>> -- 
>> Bob Crowley
>> Chatham. NH
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 18:03:55 -0400
Agree!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2015, at 5:14 PM, Bob Crowley  wrote:
> 
> That is a beautiful photo of a Band-tailed Pigeon in my opinion.
> 
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
> 
>> On 8/31/2015 3:39 PM, Marve Kim wrote:
>> Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd 
visitor to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock Pigeon 
(feral). However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few Band-tailed 
Pigeons - and my visitor looks just like them. The size and shape is right, the 
dark eye, the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill with the black tip, the 
yellow feet and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked closely at the tail because 
I wasn’t thinking of a possible Band-tailed. 

>> 
>> There’s a photo at
>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/
>> 
>> I’d love to know what others think!
>> 
>> Maeve Kim
>> Jericho Center
> 
> -- 
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham. NH
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: Bob Crowley <crbob AT FAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 17:14:07 -0400
That is a beautiful photo of a Band-tailed Pigeon in my opinion.

Bob Crowley
Chatham, NH

On 8/31/2015 3:39 PM, Marve Kim wrote:
> Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd visitor 
to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock Pigeon (feral). 
However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few Band-tailed Pigeons - 
and my visitor looks just like them. The size and shape is right, the dark eye, 
the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill with the black tip, the yellow feet 
and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked closely at the tail because I wasnt 
thinking of a possible Band-tailed. 

>
> Theres a photo at
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/
>
> Id love to know what others think!
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center

-- 
Bob Crowley
Chatham. NH
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 16:53:31 -0400
To Scott and other birders - I think it was a one-day wonder. I very rarely get 
any kind of pigeon at my feeders. However, I have to admit, with a lot of 
chagrin, that I didnt keep a lookout for it, which was very dumb. I knew it 
was unusual at the time, immediately thought ooo, maybe a Eurasian Collared 
Dove!, checked the book and then shrugged and walked away from the window - 
without taking more photos, without getting other birders to take a look! I 
actually submitted the photo to e-bird as a feral pigeon. - The lesson has been 
learned: if I see something that sets my antennae quivering, I should follow 
through (even if I end up feeling foolish about asking for help with something 
that turns out to be a garden-variety pigeon). 



Maeve


On Aug 31, 2015, at 3:59 PM, UVM  wrote:

> Maeve,
> 
> Fascinating, wow! There are accepted records from Mass., Maine and perhaps 
other NE states from the same time of year. Was it a 1-day visitor? 

> 
> Scott Morrical
Subject: Re: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:59:24 -0400
Maeve,

Fascinating, wow! There are accepted records from Mass., Maine and perhaps 
other NE states from the same time of year. Was it a 1-day visitor? 


Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2015, at 3:39 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
> Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd visitor 
to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock Pigeon (feral). 
However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few Band-tailed Pigeons - 
and my visitor looks just like them. The size and shape is right, the dark eye, 
the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill with the black tip, the yellow feet 
and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked closely at the tail because I wasn’t 
thinking of a possible Band-tailed. 

> 
> There’s a photo at 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/
> 
> I’d love to know what others think!
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Dead Creek
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:49:03 -0400
Thanks, Isis.   I put the pictures on Flickr and the ID was confirmed.  I
do like shorebirds and kayaks because of the way the birds will come to
you.  We paddled into a likely side channel, put the paddles away and got
the lunch out.  As we sat and relaxed, birds flew in and got closer and
closer as they ate, ignoring us. Especially like the bathing and
preening...up close.

Martha

On Sun, Aug 30, 2015 at 8:33 PM, Isis Erb  wrote:

> Sounds wonderful. Thanks so much for sharing your photos (beautiful)! I
> know they're certainly useful to me, as a newbie struggling with shorebird
> identification.
>
> Isis
> Burlington / Jericho
> Birding everywhere I'm able 😊
>
> On Sunday, August 30, 2015, Martha McClintock 
> wrote:
>
> > Enjoyed a leisurely kayak along Dead Creek (except for the sore arms from
> > paddling through mud!)  Not a huge number of shorebirds but the peregrine
> > falcon that flew over and the harriers that patrolled the shoreline might
> > have something to do with that.
> >
> > Saw several groups of birds, mostly lesser and greater yellowlegs,
> > conveniently feeding together so I could clearly see the difference.
> There
> > were a small number of Least Sandpipers, two Solitary and one Spotted
> > Sandpipers.
> >
> > I think I saw one pectoral sandpiper (
> >
> >
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20830064560/in/dateposted-public/
> > )
> > and one young stilt sandpiper  (
> >
> >
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20397082663/in/dateposted-public/
> > )
> > and side by side for size comparison (
> >
> >
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20830246008/in/dateposted-public/
> > )
> >
> > I would appreciate confirmation or correction.  Thanks.
> >
> > Martha McClintock
> > (usually birding in) Westford
> >
>
Subject: band-tailed pigeon in VT?
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:39:57 -0400
Hello, fellow birders - Back on June 2, I saw and photographed an odd visitor 
to my feeders. I convinced myself it was just an unusual Rock Pigeon (feral). 
However, I just returned from Oregon where I saw a few Band-tailed Pigeons - 
and my visitor looks just like them. The size and shape is right, the dark eye, 
the white mark on the nape, the yellow bill with the black tip, the yellow feet 
and legs. Unfortunately, I never looked closely at the tail because I wasnt 
thinking of a possible Band-tailed. 


Theres a photo at 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264 AT N05/18425997702/in/dateposted-public/

Id love to know what others think!

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Green Herons- Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 30, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 17:45:49 +0000
The usual large group of green heron at the small marsh on Pearl St. is a mix 
of adults and immatures. 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Monday, August 31, 2015 1:42:11 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 30, 2015 

Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Aug 30, 2015 7:15 AM - 9:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.3 mile(s) 
33 species 

Wood Duck  24 
American Black Duck  3 
Mallard  9 
Great Blue Heron  4 
Green Heron  7     a mix of adult and immature herons, typical of this spot. 
Breeds locally near this marsh. 

Mourning Dove  5 
Chimney Swift  1 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4     male feeding juvenile. 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Hairy Woodpecker  1 
Pileated Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Phoebe  4 
Eastern Kingbird  4 
Red-eyed Vireo  5 
Blue Jay  8 
American Crow  11 
Black-capped Chickadee  1 
White-breasted Nuthatch  2 
American Robin  26 
Gray Catbird  5 
European Starling  5 
Cedar Waxwing  6 
Common Yellowthroat  5 
American Redstart  1 
Chipping Sparrow  1 
Song Sparrow  1 
Swamp Sparrow  1 
Scarlet Tanager  1 
Northern Cardinal  3 
Red-winged Blackbird  7 
American Goldfinch  11 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24837126 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Kaye Danforth <danforthpainting AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 08:25:16 -0400
While enjoying a glass of wine Saturday evening, my husband and I saw 5 
Nighthawks fly overhead. A first for us here and a new one for the yard list! 


Kaye in Hinesburg

On Aug 31, 2015, at 7:45 AM, Donald Clark wrote:

> Pat, I would say its about average for the count.
> 
> Don
> 
>> On Aug 30, 2015, at 10:12 PM, Pat Folsom  wrote:
>> 
>> Don - How does the total for this year compare with recent years? It seems 
high to me, but I'm happy to see even one! 

>> Thanks,
>> Pat
>> 
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Don Clark" 
>> To: "VT Bird" 
>> Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2015 6:37:16 PM
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>> 
>> The first flying ant hatch this evening brought with it the highest count of 
the season with 948 birds.The largest groups of 346 & 228 were all over the 
sky. An impressive site. Hoping my final day tomorrow will be equally 
productive. The total for the season stands at 3,264 birds. 

>> 
>> Don Clark
>> Grafton
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 07:45:18 -0400
Pat, I would say it’s about average for the count.

Don

> On Aug 30, 2015, at 10:12 PM, Pat Folsom  wrote:
> 
> Don - How does the total for this year compare with recent years? It seems 
high to me, but I'm happy to see even one! 

> Thanks,
> Pat
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Don Clark" 
> To: "VT Bird" 
> Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2015 6:37:16 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
> 
> The first flying ant hatch this evening brought with it the highest count of 
the season with 948 birds.The largest groups of 346 & 228 were all over the 
sky. An impressive site. Hoping my final day tomorrow will be equally 
productive. The total for the season stands at 3,264 birds. 

> 
> Don Clark
> Grafton
Subject: Least Bittern -- NOT
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 00:12:35 -0400
Tonight I am eating crow and humble pie. The Least Bittern I reported today
at the Tracey Road Pond in South Hero was actually a Green Heron. Thanks to
Jared Katz for correcting my ID. I now realize that the Least Bittern I
reported from Delta Park last week was also a Green Heron. I fell victim to
the "size illusion"  blunder. Mea Culpa. 

 

Michele Patenaude

172 Woodbury Road

Burlington, VT 05408

802-862-4085

 
Subject: Yellow-Cr N Heron Updates?
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 22:24:59 -0400
Has anyone gone to Bomoseen State Park to look for the Yellow-crowned Night 
Heron recently? The last sighting listed on e-Bird was on the 28th. I'm 
thinking of heading there some time this week to give it a try. 


Thanks -

Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 22:12:47 -0400
Don - How does the total for this year compare with recent years? It seems high 
to me, but I'm happy to see even one! 

Thanks,
Pat

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Clark" 
To: "VT Bird" 
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2015 6:37:16 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

The first flying ant hatch this evening brought with it the highest count of 
the season with 948 birds.The largest groups of 346 & 228 were all over the 
sky. An impressive site. Hoping my final day tomorrow will be equally 
productive. The total for the season stands at 3,264 birds. 


Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Peewee
From: Scott Stoner <scottjstoner AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 21:34:09 -0400
We've been hearing them in several backyards in the Albany NY area too.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Ron Payne  wrote:

>In my experience, it is not at all strange for them to be singing this
>time of year. 
>
>--
>Ron Payne
>Middlebury, VT
>
>On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 21:18:23 -0400, Sue  wrote:
>
>       Perhaps young of the year practicing their songs?
>Sue Wetmore
>
>Sent from my iPod
>
>> On Aug 30, 2015, at 8:45 PM, Sarah Fellows  wrote:
>>
>> We have 2maybe 3 REALLY vocal peewees that are nonstop in a full
>> daily contest for at least the last two weeks.What is up???
>>
>> Sally Fellows
>> Williston, Vermont
>>
>>> On Aug 29, 2015, at 7:48 AM, Kathy Leonard  wrote:
>>>
>>> Sorry... I forgot to add that I write from Randolph Center.
Subject: Re: Peewee
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 21:29:44 -0400
In my experience, it is not at all strange for them to be singing this
time of year. 

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Sun, 30 Aug 2015 21:18:23 -0400, Sue  wrote:

       Perhaps young of the year practicing their songs?
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Aug 30, 2015, at 8:45 PM, Sarah Fellows  wrote:
>
> We have 2maybe 3 REALLY vocal peewees that are nonstop in a full
> daily contest for at least the last two weeks.What is up???
>
> Sally Fellows
> Williston, Vermont
>
>> On Aug 29, 2015, at 7:48 AM, Kathy Leonard  wrote:
>>
>> Sorry... I forgot to add that I write from Randolph Center.
Subject: Re: Peewee
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 21:18:23 -0400
Perhaps young of the year practicing their songs?
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

> On Aug 30, 2015, at 8:45 PM, Sarah Fellows  wrote:
> 
> We have 2maybe 3 REALLY vocal peewees that are nonstop in a full daily 
contest for at least the last two weeks.What is up??? 

> 
> Sally Fellows
> Williston, Vermont
> 
>> On Aug 29, 2015, at 7:48 AM, Kathy Leonard  wrote:
>> 
>> Sorry... I forgot to add that I write from Randolph Center.
Subject: Re: Peewee
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 20:45:38 -0400
We have 2maybe 3 REALLY vocal peewees that are nonstop in a full daily contest 
for at least the last two weeks.What is up??? 


Sally Fellows
Williston, Vermont

> On Aug 29, 2015, at 7:48 AM, Kathy Leonard  wrote:
> 
> Sorry... I forgot to add that I write from Randolph Center.
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 20:37:16 -0400
The first flying ant hatch this evening brought with it the highest count of 
the season with 948 birds.The largest groups of 346 & 228 were all over the 
sky. An impressive site. Hoping my final day tomorrow will be equally 
productive. The total for the season stands at 3,264 birds. 


Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Dead Creek
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 20:33:11 -0400
Sounds wonderful. Thanks so much for sharing your photos (beautiful)! I
know they're certainly useful to me, as a newbie struggling with shorebird
identification.

Isis
Burlington / Jericho
Birding everywhere I'm able 😊

On Sunday, August 30, 2015, Martha McClintock 
wrote:

> Enjoyed a leisurely kayak along Dead Creek (except for the sore arms from
> paddling through mud!)  Not a huge number of shorebirds but the peregrine
> falcon that flew over and the harriers that patrolled the shoreline might
> have something to do with that.
>
> Saw several groups of birds, mostly lesser and greater yellowlegs,
> conveniently feeding together so I could clearly see the difference.  There
> were a small number of Least Sandpipers, two Solitary and one Spotted
> Sandpipers.
>
> I think I saw one pectoral sandpiper (
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20830064560/in/dateposted-public/
> )
> and one young stilt sandpiper  (
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20397082663/in/dateposted-public/
> )
> and side by side for size comparison (
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20830246008/in/dateposted-public/
> )
>
> I would appreciate confirmation or correction.  Thanks.
>
> Martha McClintock
> (usually birding in) Westford
>
Subject: Dead Creek
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 20:27:40 -0400
Enjoyed a leisurely kayak along Dead Creek (except for the sore arms from
paddling through mud!)  Not a huge number of shorebirds but the peregrine
falcon that flew over and the harriers that patrolled the shoreline might
have something to do with that.

Saw several groups of birds, mostly lesser and greater yellowlegs,
conveniently feeding together so I could clearly see the difference.  There
were a small number of Least Sandpipers, two Solitary and one Spotted
Sandpipers.

I think I saw one pectoral sandpiper (
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20830064560/in/dateposted-public/)
and one young stilt sandpiper  (
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20397082663/in/dateposted-public/)
and side by side for size comparison (
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/20830246008/in/dateposted-public/
)

I would appreciate confirmation or correction.  Thanks.

Martha McClintock
(usually birding in) Westford
Subject: NEK: Pipeline West, Victory
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 16:56:27 -0400
Spent the morning along the Pipeline-west out at Victory WMA. I don't spend
as much time along this birding local in Victory as other places out there
but doesn't mean it isn't worth checking out from time to time. The pipeline
west is accessed by  a road/trail on the left side of road just before the
concrete bridge over the Moose River 3.2 miles north of Damon's Crossing. At
this point on the Portland Pipeline you at mile 118 (just look right
eastward to the orange marker numbered 118 on the other side of Victory
road)  or exactly at the half way point between Montreal and Portland ,
Maine. If you look westward with your binoculars you will see an orange
marker 1 mile away, with 119 on it. The marker 119 is about half way up the
hill leading into deciduous Victory forest and I usually stop about 200
yards before the 119 marker.  There is a trail on either side of the
pipeline there, the remains of the old railroad bed. Go left and you'll wind
up at Damon's Crossing (if you're lucky, lots of blow downs) 

I barely got 200 yards onto the pipeline and a Black-backed called and then
flew over from one side to the other. A Red Crossbill circled, landed on a
Balsam Fir for 10 seconds and was gone.  There is a wooden Snow mobile
bridge with ponds on the right. I turned and caught sight of a mink for 3
seconds scoot along a fallen tree in the pond and then it was gone. I could
hear a Pileated in the distance and shortly it flew into that opening the
pipeline provides, saw me and made a 90 degree turn and was gone, 6 seconds
of viewing.  I was thinking about the randomness of birding a sound there, a
glimpse here when a Sharp-shinned Hawk flew out of the woods about 30' above
me and perched in a near-by snag. 5 seconds later if darted through the
greenery and was gone.

 

About 50' ahead of me on the pipeline a black bird foraged in the grasses, a
Rusty Blackbird, I digiscoped a few shots, moved closer and it was gone.
Golden-crowned Kinglets, Red breasted Nuthatch, Black capped Chickadees were
plentiful. The Blue Jays continually noisy. Something buzzed just inches by
my ear, a Ruby throated Hummingbird liked the color of my hat. As I walked
the wind changed slightly, now from the west. Good, they won't smell me
coming. As I got to the top of a small rise a coyote sniffed the trail 40'
away. I almost never get to walk up on this mammal (maybe that's a good
thing for both of us) I set up my tripod and one small sound caused him to
turn and see me. Not too alarmed he bounded off down the trail and was gone.
7 seconds of viewing.

At Damon's Crossing 3 White-winged Crossbills and a female purple finch. The
Purple finch perched with a bright reddish male White-winged. Maybe she
thought it was a male purple finch. They seemed to get along anyways.

 

The leaves are changing, again.

 

Victory Basin WMA IBA--Pipeline west of River Road, Essex, Vermont, US Aug
30, 2015 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Protocol: Traveling

2.0 mile(s)

25 species

 

Sharp-shinned Hawk  1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1

Belted Kingfisher  1

Hairy Woodpecker  1

Black-backed Woodpecker  2

Northern Flicker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  3

Blue-headed Vireo  2

Blue Jay  5

American Crow  2

Black-capped Chickadee  8

Red-breasted Nuthatch  5

Winter Wren  1

Golden-crowned Kinglet  4

Hermit Thrush  1

Cedar Waxwing  X

Common Yellowthroat  X

Magnolia Warbler  1

Yellow-rumped Warbler  3

White-throated Sparrow  2

Song Sparrow  2

Rusty Blackbird  1

Purple Finch  1

Red Crossbill  1

American Goldfinch  3

 

Tom berriman

 
Subject: Re: Stilt Sandpiper on Brilyea Rd. in Addison
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 04:46:51 -0400
And later that same day (4:55),

Same assortment of sandpipers in the area Jim described...including the 
Stilt.  I watched for over an hour, while the Merlin still made at least 3 
passes through.  The shorebirds seemed to be on high alert, always a step 
ahead.  Around 6 pm, however, I heard an unusual sound coming from a 
Red-winged Blackbird.  I looked up in time to see the Merlin fly off with 
its meal...

Ali
Huntington

-----Original Message----- 
From: Jim Mead
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2015 11:53 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Stilt Sandpiper on Brilyea Rd. in Addison

Hi all,

I tried to post this earlier but did not
have a good signal when I pressed send.
I'm trying a second time now. I found a
juvenile Stilt Sandpiper on the east shore
across the water from the first pull off on
the left. It was with many other peeps, a
few Semipalmated Plovers and both Yellowlegs.
A Merlin buzzed the group and sent all of
the birds elsewhere. They will likely return.

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead 
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 23:19:16 -0400
Sorry to be slow with this. Friday evening, while selling tickets at the
BUHS football game in Brattleboro, I counted approximately 100. There was a
long line for tickets, so I could only count occasionally. Thus, I assume
there were more birds.
Charlie La Rosa
Brattleboro

On Sat, Aug 29, 2015 at 8:42 PM, Donald Clark  wrote:

> This evening we tallied 175 birds. From the reports it sound like most of
> today’s movement was East of us with one location reporting over 1,000.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton
>
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 20:42:28 -0400
This evening we tallied 175 birds. From the reports it sound like most of 
today’s movement was East of us with one location reporting over 1,000. 


Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Common nighthawks in Williston, now
From: Zac Cota <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 18:41:29 -0400
Right now at Cota Field watching a hummingbird frantically chasing after 8 
Nighthawks putting on an amazing aerial display. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2015, at 5:43 PM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
> 
> Hi folks, 
> 
> Three common nighthawks cruising in the vicinity of Pioneer Drive in 
Williston, active since about 5:15 PM. If you find yourself spending this 
beautiful Saturday near the big box stores in Tafts corners, look up! 

> 
> Cheers,
> Larry
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Common nighthawks in Williston, now
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 17:43:55 -0400
Hi folks, 

Three common nighthawks cruising in the vicinity of Pioneer Drive in Williston, 
active since about 5:15 PM. If you find yourself spending this beautiful 
Saturday near the big box stores in Tafts corners, look up! 


Cheers,
Larry

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Lake Bomoseen/Hubbardton Marshes IBA, Aug 28, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 17:20:53 +0000
Not a lot of birds but Black Vulture was nice. 
Wetmore & Elliotts 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, August 28, 2015 3:15:43 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Lake Bomoseen/Hubbardton Marshes IBA, Aug 28, 2015 

Lake Bomoseen/Hubbardton Marshes IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Aug 28, 2015 9:10 AM - 12:30 PM 
Protocol: Traveling 
0.75 mile(s) 
Comments:     by kayak 
26 species 

Wood Duck  20 
American Black Duck  3 
Mallard  9 
Great Blue Heron  11     large area with suitable habitat; seen at close 
range and some photographed 

Black Vulture  2     tailess appearance; light color at ends of wings; wing 
tipped forward appearance 

Turkey Vulture  16 
Osprey  1 
Red-shouldered Hawk  1 
Semipalmated Plover  3 
Ring-billed Gull  2 
Belted Kingfisher  2 
Pileated Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3 
Eastern Phoebe  5     one group of four 
Warbling Vireo  3 
Red-eyed Vireo  2 
Blue Jay  3 
American Crow  1 
Tree Swallow  9 
Barn Swallow  2 
Black-capped Chickadee  2 
White-breasted Nuthatch  2 
Gray Catbird  1 
Cedar Waxwing  6 
Northern Cardinal  1 
American Goldfinch  4 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24791357 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Lincoln's Sp. Union St Brandon, Aug 29, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 17:18:57 +0000
Fall is definitely in the air. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2015 1:09:25 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Aug 29, 2015 

Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Aug 29, 2015 7:45 AM - 9:55 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.2 mile(s) 
32 species 

Wood Duck  1 
Mallard  3 
Great Blue Heron  1 
Turkey Vulture  1 
Red-tailed Hawk  1 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  7 
Mourning Dove  2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Hairy Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Phoebe  5 
Eastern Kingbird  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  2 
Blue Jay  2 
Common Raven  5     family group vocalizing with a variety of noises. 
Black-capped Chickadee  2 
Tufted Titmouse  2 
White-breasted Nuthatch  2 
House Wren  2 
Veery  2     calling 
American Robin  1 
Gray Catbird  3 
European Starling  21 
Cedar Waxwing  6 
Common Yellowthroat  5 
Song Sparrow  5 
Lincoln's Sparrow  2 
Swamp Sparrow  1 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Baltimore Oriole  2 
American Goldfinch  3 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24801418 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Sparrows
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 12:55:38 -0400
Lincoln's sparrows, (two )were seen this morning along Union St. The Raven 
family was vocalizing with a variety of croaks, gurgles"gronking"calls 

that was quite amusing. Two also investigated a roosting turkey vulture.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Don't cross a mother hummingbird
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 12:04:40 -0400
Or perhaps only a recent fledgling would waste the energy?


On 8/29/2015 11:18 AM, Veer Frost wrote:
> A downy woodpecker must have inadvertently annoyed the Rubythroat female 
piloting what I assume was a fledgling around some zinnias and got chased 1/4ac 
into, and right up, the big boxelder. amazing. She hovered as if daring it to 
reappear before returning. Surely only a young downy would put up with that?? 

> ________________________________
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Stilt Sandpiper on Brilyea Rd. in Addison
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 11:53:10 -0400
Hi all,

I tried to post this earlier but did not
have a good signal when I pressed send. 
I'm trying a second time now. I found a
juvenile Stilt Sandpiper on the east shore
across the water from the first pull off on
the left. It was with many other peeps, a
few Semipalmated Plovers and both Yellowlegs. 
A Merlin buzzed the group and sent all of
the birds elsewhere. They will likely return. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Don't cross a mother hummingbird
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 11:18:15 -0400
A downy woodpecker must have inadvertently annoyed the Rubythroat female 
piloting what I assume was a fledgling around some zinnias and got chased 1/4ac 
into, and right up, the big boxelder. amazing. She hovered as if daring it to 
reappear before returning. Surely only a young downy would put up with that?? 

________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Colchester Mystery Birds
From: Ann Curran <acurran802 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 10:07:32 -0400
Friday evening shortly after 7 p.m., I was at the stoplight on Rte 15 at
the west entrance to Fort Ethan Allen, which is across from the Woodside
nature area. I noticed five or six birds circling and flapping high over
the road that seemed to be hawking insects. They were medium-sized with
pointed wings and longish tails.

They flew off before I could get good looks, but I'm wondering if they
could have been Common Nighthawks on their way to Westminster Station.

Ann Curran
Subject: Peewee
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 07:48:40 -0400
Sorry... I forgot to add that I write from Randolph Center.
Subject: Eastern woods peewee calling
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 07:47:53 -0400
Our woods and yard are pretty quiet other than raucus jays, etc. right now, but 
we have what seems to be a lone eastern woods peewee that calls a single, 
upward call throughout the day... been doing so for several days now. 


It seems right that the last bird to arrive here in the spring is the last one 
still calling as we approach September. 

But I'm curious as to the call's purpose... has anyone here noticed this?
Subject: Re: help with safe coopers id
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 07:13:16 -0400
Thank you for this detailed info! I feel confident this is adult coopers. May I 
add pbase (site where I get most bird id photos) to your list.Veer 


---- On Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:07:12 -0400 Jane Stein 
<jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET> wrote ---- 


Plumage you describe is adult Cooper or Sharpie, definitely not either 
immature or adult Goshawk. Immature accipiters can be hard to sort out, 
but you've got an adult there from your description of the breast markings. 
 
A couple of finer points on accipiter ID-- 
 
Be wary of the eyestripe thing as a field mark because it does vary, and 
isn't always obvious in the field. It's vivid with an adult Gos, but 
you're not going to confuse a well-seen adult Gos with anything else anyway. 
 
Sharpie versus Cooper is most easily determined by the tail feathers in 
flight overhead and usually also on a perched bird if the tail is 
relaxed and the feathers settled into place. With a Sharpie, all the 
tail feathers are the same length, which makes the tail tip look 
straight across. On a Coop, the outer tail feathers on either side are 
noticeably shorter than the rest, making the tail look rounded. But 
again, it can be a little hard to tell if the tail feathers haven't settled. 
 
(The white band at the tip of the tail is much bigger in a Cooper's in 
spring plumage, but not a reliable field mark as the year goes on and 
the feather tips wear down.) 
 
Be a little wary about gauging size in a lone bird. Female Sharpies are 
nearly the same size as male Cooper's, and a bird by itself without 
something to compare it to can seem bigger or smaller than it really is, 
especially if it's a species you haven't had a lot of experience with. 
 
Also, don't put too much emphasis on precise color, since that 
impression can change with lighting conditions. The horizontal stripes 
on an adult Coop/Sharpie can be a really vivid pinkish orange in some 
light, duller and less vivid in other circumstances. The key, as you 
saw, is whether you've got abundant fine horizontal lines across the 
breast, or blobby vertical markings. 
 
Last point. Look at lots of pictures, but do not rely on a Google image 
search because a fair number of those pix were misidentified/mislabled 
by whoever took them. Stick to good bird Web sites like Cornell, 
Audubon and for raptors, the many hawkwatch and raptor preservation 
organizations. 
 
Sharpie versus Cooper is often a matter of considering multiple field 
marks. There are also differences in the head and nape of the neck that 
are often hard or impossible to see in the field, but you might want to 
look those up to add to your mental data base for futures. Otherwise, 
that tail tip is diagnostic for C versus S of any age if you can see it 
well. (Immature Gos can also be best distinguished from the others by 
the tail, a distinct zig-zag pattern of striping, but as with all things 
tail-related, it depends heavily on whether the feathers on the bird 
you're looking at are relaxed and settled.) 
 
Sounds pretty safe to me if you're really certain of the size. Also, 
although anything is possible once migration gets underway, odds 
generally favor Cooper over Sharpie because they're more abundant in 
most of Vermont and/or more comfortable around human habitation so more 
likely to be seen. 
 
Jane 
 
 
 
On 8/28/2015 11:40 AM, Veer Frost wrote: 
> If the following doesn't constitute a safe identification measure, I won't 
add to ebird. This morning a Coopers hawk flew directly across rte5, in front 
of me (walking) and into scrub to my left, very easy to get glasses on and 
stayed put for a nice preening moment. I assumed this was a juvenile but 
everything I've looked at for confirmation shows vertical type of (drip) 
spotting on breast , and pretty dark brown, on the juvenile, while my bird had 
the classic horizontal, lighter (tan-mauve) dashes I'm seeing on adults. Also, 
this was a BIG bird, thus a female (another assumption). Utterly relaxed. 

> 
> I would be grateful if anyone can confirm or correct my id ... (due 
diligence: Goshawk eliminated by eye stripe lack, Sharpie by size, and by no 
means a Buteo shape/tail). Thank you! Veer 

> 
> ____________________________________ 
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic 
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: suki russo <sukirusso AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 00:05:46 +0000
a nice flock of 32 nighthawks at the end of this pretty-close-to full moon 
evening, gave me a total of 117 for the night! 

 JoAnne Russo
Saxtons River, VT
Subject: Black vultures
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 15:20:18 -0400
A pleasant morning paddling the north end of Lake Bomoseen . A large kettle of 
turkey vultures had 2 black in the mix. 

Sue Wetmore, Sue & Marv Elliott.

Sent from my iPod


> 
> Lake Bomoseen/Hubbardton Marshes IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 28, 2015 9:10 AM - 12:30 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.75 mile(s)
> Comments:     by kayak
> 26 species
> 
> Wood Duck  20
> American Black Duck  3
> Mallard  9
> Great Blue Heron 11 large area with suitable habitat; seen at close range and 
some photographed 

> Black Vulture 2 tailess appearance; light color at ends of wings; wing tipped 
forward appearance 

> Turkey Vulture  16
> Osprey  1
> Red-shouldered Hawk  1
> Semipalmated Plover  3
> Ring-billed Gull  2
> Belted Kingfisher  2
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
> Eastern Phoebe  5     one group of four
> Warbling Vireo  3
> Red-eyed Vireo  2
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  1
> Tree Swallow  9
> Barn Swallow  2
> Black-capped Chickadee  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Gray Catbird  1
> Cedar Waxwing  6
> Northern Cardinal  1
> American Goldfinch  4
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24791357 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: help with safe coopers id
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:07:12 -0400
Plumage you describe is adult Cooper or Sharpie, definitely not either 
immature or adult Goshawk.  Immature accipiters can be hard to sort out, 
but you've got an adult there from your description of the breast markings.

A couple of finer points on accipiter ID--

Be wary of the eyestripe thing as a field mark because it does vary, and 
isn't always obvious in the field.  It's vivid with an adult Gos, but 
you're not going to confuse a well-seen adult Gos with anything else anyway.

Sharpie versus Cooper is most easily determined by the tail feathers in 
flight overhead and usually also on a perched bird if the tail is 
relaxed and the feathers settled into place.  With a Sharpie, all the 
tail feathers are the same length, which makes the tail tip look 
straight across.  On a Coop, the outer tail feathers on either side are 
noticeably shorter than the rest, making the tail look rounded. But 
again, it can be a little hard to tell if the tail feathers haven't settled.

(The white band at the tip of the tail is much bigger in a Cooper's in 
spring plumage, but not a reliable field mark as the year goes on and 
the feather tips wear down.)

Be a little wary about gauging size in a lone bird.  Female Sharpies are 
nearly the same size as male Cooper's, and a bird by itself without 
something to compare it to can seem bigger or smaller than it really is, 
especially if it's a species you haven't had a lot of experience with.

Also, don't put too much emphasis on precise color, since that 
impression can change with lighting conditions.  The horizontal stripes 
on an adult Coop/Sharpie can be a really vivid pinkish orange in some 
light, duller and less vivid in other circumstances. The key, as you 
saw, is whether you've got abundant fine horizontal lines across the 
breast, or blobby vertical markings.

Last point.  Look at lots of pictures, but do not rely on a Google image 
search because a fair number of those pix were misidentified/mislabled 
by whoever took them.  Stick to good bird Web sites like Cornell, 
Audubon and for raptors, the many hawkwatch and raptor preservation 
organizations.

Sharpie versus Cooper is often a matter of considering multiple field 
marks.  There are also differences in the head and nape of the neck that 
are often hard or impossible to see in the field, but you might want to 
look those up to add to your mental data base for futures.  Otherwise, 
that tail tip is diagnostic for C versus S of any age if you can see it 
well. (Immature Gos can also be best distinguished from the others by 
the tail, a distinct zig-zag pattern of striping, but as with all things 
tail-related, it depends heavily on whether the feathers on the bird 
you're looking at are relaxed and settled.)

Sounds pretty safe to me if you're really certain of the size. Also, 
although anything is possible once migration gets underway, odds 
generally favor Cooper over Sharpie because they're more abundant in 
most of Vermont and/or more comfortable around human habitation so more 
likely to be seen.

Jane



On 8/28/2015 11:40 AM, Veer Frost wrote:
> If the following doesn't constitute a safe identification measure, I won't 
add to ebird. This morning a Coopers hawk flew directly across rte5, in front 
of me (walking) and into scrub to my left, very easy to get glasses on and 
stayed put for a nice preening moment. I assumed this was a juvenile but 
everything I've looked at for confirmation shows vertical type of (drip) 
spotting on breast , and pretty dark brown, on the juvenile, while my bird had 
the classic horizontal, lighter (tan-mauve) dashes I'm seeing on adults. Also, 
this was a BIG bird, thus a female (another assumption). Utterly relaxed. 

>
> I would be grateful if anyone can confirm or correct my id ... (due 
diligence: Goshawk eliminated by eye stripe lack, Sharpie by size, and by no 
means a Buteo shape/tail). Thank you! Veer 

>
> ____________________________________
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: help with eBird hotspot correction
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 11:51:51 -0400
I am correcting the location of a hotspot that was pointed out to me on
Vermont eBird. Does anyone know where Hickory Pond is in Westminster? It is
small, 16 acres. If you do, please send me coordinates or a map or
description direct to my email. Thanks!
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


Subject: Re: help with safe coopers id
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 11:49:42 -0400
A side note about eBird...
Remember that in eBird you can add some of these difficult IDs by putting
it in as Cooper/Sharp or on migration an example might be
Bicknell/Gray-cheek. When you get to step 3 in submitting a checklist,
click on show rarities or click on add species and type in Cooper and you
will see Sharp-shinned/Cooper's Hawk Accipiter striatus/cooperii. There are
many other examples of these. This allows you to record them and have a
complete checklist but retain your uncertainty for future users of the
data.

Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2





On Fri, Aug 28, 2015 at 11:40 AM, Veer Frost  wrote:

> If the following doesn't constitute a safe identification measure, I won't
> add to ebird. This morning a Coopers hawk flew directly across rte5, in
> front of me (walking) and into scrub to my left, very easy to get glasses
> on and stayed put for a nice preening moment.  I assumed this was a
> juvenile but everything I've looked at for confirmation shows vertical type
> of (drip) spotting on breast , and pretty dark brown, on the juvenile,
> while my bird had the classic horizontal, lighter (tan-mauve) dashes I'm
> seeing on adults. Also, this was a BIG bird, thus a female (another
> assumption).  Utterly relaxed.
>
> I would be grateful if anyone can confirm or correct my id ... (due
> diligence: Goshawk eliminated by eye stripe lack, Sharpie by size, and by
> no means a Buteo shape/tail). Thank you! Veer
>
> ____________________________________
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic
>
Subject: help with safe coopers id
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 11:40:25 -0400
If the following doesn't constitute a safe identification measure, I won't add 
to ebird. This morning a Coopers hawk flew directly across rte5, in front of me 
(walking) and into scrub to my left, very easy to get glasses on and stayed put 
for a nice preening moment. I assumed this was a juvenile but everything I've 
looked at for confirmation shows vertical type of (drip) spotting on breast , 
and pretty dark brown, on the juvenile, while my bird had the classic 
horizontal, lighter (tan-mauve) dashes I'm seeing on adults. Also, this was a 
BIG bird, thus a female (another assumption). Utterly relaxed. 


I would be grateful if anyone can confirm or correct my id ... (due diligence: 
Goshawk eliminated by eye stripe lack, Sharpie by size, and by no means a Buteo 
shape/tail). Thank you! Veer 


____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Nix gwfg
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 07:54:52 -0700
Hmmmm, size and red eyes indicate this was a domestic goose. Pretty
exciting mistake!
Subject: Greater white-fronted goose
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 07:03:48 -0700
Pretty sure we have an immature gwfg  among a small flock of Canada geese,
Calvary Cemetery Rutland, near bank of creek sw edge of Cemetery.
Distinctive orange bill, legs, feet; lacks white feather ring at base of
bill. Here now. Will post cellphone pic later.
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 20:59:51 -0400
A disappointing low count of 25 birds tonight with even more observers than 
usual. Not sure what was holding them back. 


Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Vermont eBird update
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 19:01:51 -0400
A lot of exciting developments have happened recently with eBIrd and the
Vermont eBird portal, a project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, and we wanted
to share those with you, as well as express our gratitude and appreciation
for all that you Vermont eBirders have helped bring to life. We hope this
overview provides a picture of the current direction of eBird, while also
highlighting some features and details about eBird that you might not have
known before.

Read the article at http://vtecostudies.org/blog/vermont-ebird-update/

Thanks!
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


Subject: Re: troublesome cat
From: Jonathan Comeau <harrier22 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 11:46:49 +0000
Thank you for all the suggestions! I greatly appreciate it!
 
Jonathan

On Wed, 26 Aug 2015 12:53:18 +0000, Jonathan Comeau  wrote:

       Greetings,

Lately we have been having trouble with a cat hunting in our yard. I
was wondering if anyone here has a good solution for keeping cats away
from feeder or out of the yard. Thanks!

Jonathan Comeau
Subject: Delta Park in Colchester
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 23:45:40 -0400
I sat in Delta Park in Colchester this evening  from 5 to 7 pm  in the
northwestern part of the park on the mudflat. I was looking  for shorebirds
as that spot has been good for them lately. But there were none, not even a
killdeer.  It was quiet until a flock of approximately 35 Purple Martins
flew high over the park calling and feeding and heading south. However, the
prize was a Least Bittern.  It was a small bittern, blue- jay size,  with a
long, yellow bill, big yellow feet, and a dark cap. A Mohawk of light down
feathers stuck out of the top of its head  and its wing coverts were
scalloped and had dark brown tips.  I think it was a molting juvenile or
adult. It had a pale, yellow eye, a dark cap and a dark back with a white
line along  the shoulder area. The front of its throat had dark vertical
lines. It was close, about 30 feet away,  and I watched it for five to 10
minutes as it came out of the grasses and ever-so-slowly stalked and caught
a small fish in a shallow pool. Then it walked back into the grasses with
the fish and was gone.  

 

Except for the birds and the insects and the clouds, I had the place to
myself.

 

Michele Patenaude

172 Woodbury Road

Burlington, VT 05408

802-862-4085

 
Subject: Shorebirds
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 20:37:22 -0400
The Elliotts and I found the water at Dead Creek still high but did see the 
following. 

On our way to there we had a peregrine, red-tails and harriers.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: August 26, 2015 at 8:33:03 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Dead Creek WMA IBA - Brilyea Access, Aug 26, 2015
> 
> Dead Creek WMA IBA - Brilyea Access, Addison, Vermont, US
> Aug 26, 2015 10:45 AM - 12:40 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> 23 species
> 
> Wood Duck  5
> American Black Duck  2
> Mallard  18
> Great Blue Heron  4
> Northern Harrier  1
> Semipalmated Plover  3
> Semipalmated Sandpiper 19 smaller than nearby Semipalmated Plover, behavior: 
walking rapidly in mud and pecking; white in wing seen in flight 

> Ring-billed Gull  3
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  4
> American Crow  1
> Tree Swallow  18
> Black-capped Chickadee  7
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Gray Catbird  1
> Cedar Waxwing  2
> Song Sparrow  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  16
> Baltimore Oriole  3
> American Goldfinch  2
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24771135 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 20:14:47 -0400
336 passed by this evening for a total of 1,999 so far for the season.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Merlin chases Osprey
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 18:35:17 -0400
A very cool thing to see.  I wish I'd been there.  One of the things I 
love about birding, and critters generally, is there are no absolute 
rules on behavior, only overall tendencies, and you can see something 
surprising and unpredictable on any given day outdoors.

Jane


On 8/26/2015 1:03 PM, Scott W. Morrical wrote:
> Jane,
>
> No, they were moving too fast and I was without optics other than my 
> eyeballs.  The Merlin was vocalizing a lot, too.  Definitely a chaotic 
> scene!
>
> Scott
>
Subject: Re: troublesome cat
From: Clay & Gail <clay.gailvt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:52:58 -0400
A small Pomeranian on a long leash works real well in Montpelier! 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 26, 2015, at 10:16 AM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> Hi, Jonathan--
> 
> Here's the thing. Think like a cat. They're stealth hunters, so they 
generally use shady and/or somewhat concealed places they can lurk unnoticed 
before making a sudden leap from above, or a short fast, low-to-the-ground run. 
You can't really keep cats away from a birdy area, so the trick is to make sure 
the birds see and/'or hear one coming in time to get away. Make it hard for the 
cat, and it will eventually give up. They don't tolerate repeated frustration 
well. 

> 
> 1. Keep an eye out for places the cat is launching its attempts from, and 
locate or move your feeder to a place out in the open where it's harder for a 
cat to make a stealthy rush or leap from a few feet away. 

> 
> 2. Look around carefully and block off areas the cat can use as a launching 
pad. I have a small (non-functional) pump house in just the wrong place, about 
10 feet from my feeder pole, and I've put those long, narrow plastic 
windowboxes along the half-height side wall nearest the feeder area. A cat can 
get up on those windowboxes from the side, but they can't leap off of one 
without kicking it off, disrupting their balance and generally causing a 
commotion. A particular cat won't do this more than once or twice, so you don't 
have to worry about cleaning up the mess time after time after time. 

> 
> 3. At ground level, look for and block off places a cat can lurk before 
making a short, fast run at a bird on the ground-- under the porch or deck, 
concealed in a patch of weeds or even a perennial border. Anything you can do 
to hinder a cat's low-to-the-ground fast sneak will help. I put up some 
inexpensive decorative low wire fencing used for flowerbed borders, and it 
works like a charm. A cat has to jump over it to make its run, and the sudden 
movement alerts the birds to flee. 

> 
> 4. If you have a platform feeder, make sure it's high enough up that a cat 
has to put some effort to leaping up onto it. Mine is pole-mounted about 4 feet 
high-- piece of cake for a cat to reach the edge of, but not in good enough 
balance to immediately nab a bird, and the abrupt motion flushes the birds. 

> 
> Birdbaths-- I have one that's made of molded plastic that looks like a 
decent, if not overly artistic, poured concrete birdbath. The beauty of it is 
that it's so lightweight, it tips right over on any cat that tries to get up on 
it and delivers a nasty cold soaking. A cat will only do that once! But 
anything that's not so heavy or so firmly fixed to the ground that it won't 
lurch a bit under the sudden weight of a cat will do. The main thing is that a 
cat can't land on it without it tipping him/herself off-balance. 

> 
> I've done this in two different homes, and I've found that a cat will give up 
after a while when it finds it has very little success at catching anything and 
go elsewhere for entertainment. They can watch, but they can't actually hunt 
successfully. 

> 
> Good luck,
> 
> Jane
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On 8/26/2015 8:53 AM, Jonathan Comeau wrote:
>> Greetings,
>> 
>> Lately we have been having trouble with a cat hunting in our yard. I was 
wondering if anyone here has a good solution for keeping cats away from feeder 
or out of the yard. Thanks! 

>> 
>> Jonathan Comeau
> 
Subject: Re: Merlin chases Osprey
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 13:03:47 -0400
Jane,

No, they were moving too fast and I was without optics other than my  
eyeballs.  The Merlin was vocalizing a lot, too.  Definitely a chaotic  
scene!

Scott

-- 
Scott W. Morrical, Ph.D.
Professor of Biochemistry
University of Vermont College of Medicine
Burlington, VT  05405
802-656-8260 (voice)
802-656-8220 (fax)




Quoting H Nicolay :

> Well, these posts sure lifted my spirits up. This summer I released a
> Merlin I raised from a fluffy white thing and once released, didn't come
> back. I have heard the term pugnacious for these small falcons.  I now feel
> a bit more confident that my little guy might be doing OK out there.
> Helena, NorthStream Wildlife Rescue.
> On Aug 25, 2015 7:20 PM, "Jane Stein"  wrote:
>
>> Well, that's when your resolve not to anthropomorphize starts to weaken
>> and the word "play" creeps into your mind.  Could you tell if either the
>> Merlin or the swallows were immatures?
>>
>> I once got to watch a Red-Tail, a Goshawk and a Sharp-Shin, all immatures
>> from nests around the mountain I was on for a hawkwatch interact for
>> extended periods of time day after day after day for more than a week--
>> diving on and around each other.  OK, they were practicing their skills,
>> ho-hum, but it sure looked like fun.
>>
>> Jane
>>
>>
>> On 8/25/2015 7:12 PM, UVM wrote:
>>
>>> Meanwhile on Saturday morning at the Burlington waterfront I watched a
>>> Merlin alternately chasing than being chased by a pair of Barn Swallows! Go
>>> figure.
>>>
>>> Scott Morrical
>>> South Burlington
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Aug 25, 2015, at 5:57 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Great story!  What a wonderful thing to get to see.
>>>>
>>>> The rule of thumb in hawkwatching, thanks to Pete Dunne, is that if a
>>>> small falcon you can't identify for sure buzzes by and doesn't  
>>>> take a swipe
>>>> at any other hawk in the vicinity, it's not a merlin.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 8/25/2015 5:19 PM, Walter Medwid wrote:
>>>>> This morning while walking along a beach on Lake Memphremagog, I
>>>>> witnessed
>>>>> an osprey cruising just above the water and a few yards behind was a
>>>>> merlin
>>>>> in rapid pursuit. The next few minutes had the birds in a series of fast
>>>>> dives and rolls with full fanning of wings and tails in this brief
>>>>> drama.
>>>>> Merlins had nested in the vicinity as had the osprey.  I had binocs and
>>>>> could see the action at close range. Simply spectacular to see the bird
>>>>> movements, the tricks the osprey used to keep the Merlin on its toes
>>>>> (wings) and the incredible agility the falcon has to bank, brake and
>>>>> step
>>>>> on the gas.  Good start to the day! From Derby.
>>>>>
>>>>
Subject: Re: troublesome cat
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 12:45:01 -0400
I've heard there is a motion-activated garden hose that is effective.

Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Aug 26, 2015, at 10:42 AM, Linnea Garrepy  wrote:
> 
> Or be like me. Adopt it and keep it inside. 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Aug 26, 2015, at 10:24 AM, Richard  wrote:
>> 
>> Since you do not suggest the cat is a neighbors cat, take pictures before 
and after you set a havahart Trap, then take the cat to a vet or put an ad in 
the paper with its picture or let the Vet take care of the cat. Just my 2 
cents. 

>> 
>> Dick Harlow
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On 8/26/15 08:53, Jonathan Comeau wrote:
>>> Greetings,
>>> 
>>> Lately we have been having trouble with a cat hunting in our yard. I was 
wondering if anyone here has a good solution for keeping cats away from feeder 
or out of the yard. Thanks! 

>>> 
>>> Jonathan Comeau
>>> 
Subject: Re: troublesome cat
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 10:45:34 -0400
Sure!

Jane


On 8/26/2015 10:21 AM, Miriam Lawrence wrote:
> Jane,
>
> This is fabulous, well-thought-out strategic advice that is practically
> military in its precision. I love it!
>
> Would it be all right with you if I posted this to my personal Facebook
> page (with attribution, of course!) for friends and others to use?
>
> --Miriam Lawrence, Monkton
>
> On Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 10:16 AM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>
>> Hi, Jonathan--
>>
>> Here's the thing.  Think like a cat.  They're stealth hunters, so they
>> generally use shady and/or somewhat concealed places they can lurk
>> unnoticed before making a sudden leap from above, or a short fast,
>> low-to-the-ground run.  You can't really keep cats away from a birdy area,
>> so the trick is to make sure the birds see and/'or hear one coming in time
>> to get away.  Make it hard for the cat, and it will eventually give up.
>> They don't tolerate repeated frustration well.
>>
>> 1. Keep an eye out for places the cat is launching its attempts from, and
>> locate or move your feeder to a place out in the open where it's harder for
>> a cat to make a stealthy rush or leap from a few feet away.
>>
>> 2. Look around carefully and block off areas the cat can use as a
>> launching pad.  I have a small (non-functional) pump house in just the
>> wrong place, about 10 feet from my feeder pole, and I've put those long,
>> narrow plastic windowboxes along the half-height side wall nearest the
>> feeder area.  A cat can get up on those windowboxes from the side, but they
>> can't leap off of one without kicking it off, disrupting their balance and
>> generally causing a commotion. A particular cat won't do this more than
>> once or twice, so you don't have to worry about cleaning up the mess time
>> after time after time.
>>
>> 3. At ground level, look for and block off places a cat can lurk before
>> making a short, fast run at a bird on the ground-- under the porch or deck,
>> concealed in a patch of weeds or even a perennial border.  Anything you can
>> do to hinder a cat's low-to-the-ground fast sneak will help.  I put up some
>> inexpensive decorative low wire fencing used for flowerbed borders, and it
>> works like a charm.  A cat has to jump over it to make its run, and the
>> sudden movement alerts the birds to flee.
>>
>> 4.  If you have a platform feeder, make sure it's high enough up that a
>> cat has to put some effort to leaping up onto it.  Mine is pole-mounted
>> about 4 feet high-- piece of cake for a cat to reach the edge of, but not
>> in good enough balance to immediately nab a bird, and the abrupt motion
>> flushes the birds.
>>
>> Birdbaths-- I have one that's made of molded plastic that looks like a
>> decent, if not overly artistic, poured concrete birdbath.  The beauty of it
>> is that it's so lightweight, it tips right over on any cat that tries to
>> get up on it and delivers a nasty cold soaking.  A cat will only do that
>> once!  But anything that's not so heavy or so firmly fixed to the ground
>> that it won't lurch a bit under the sudden weight of a cat will do.  The
>> main thing is that a cat can't land on it without it tipping him/herself
>> off-balance.
>>
>> I've done this in two different homes, and I've found that a cat will give
>> up after a while when it finds it has very little success at catching
>> anything and go elsewhere for entertainment.  They can watch, but they
>> can't actually hunt successfully.
>>
>> Good luck,
>>
>> Jane
>>
>>
Subject: Re: troublesome cat
From: Linnea Garrepy <mwtic AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 10:42:43 -0400
Or be like me. Adopt it and keep it inside. 



> On Aug 26, 2015, at 10:24 AM, Richard  wrote:
> 
> Since you do not suggest the cat is a neighbors cat, take pictures before and 
after you set a havahart Trap, then take the cat to a vet or put an ad in the 
paper with its picture or let the Vet take care of the cat. Just my 2 cents. 

> 
> Dick Harlow
> 
> 
> 
>> On 8/26/15 08:53, Jonathan Comeau wrote:
>> Greetings,
>> 
>> Lately we have been having trouble with a cat hunting in our yard. I was 
wondering if anyone here has a good solution for keeping cats away from feeder 
or out of the yard. Thanks! 

>> 
>> Jonathan Comeau
>>