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Updated on Monday, September 22 at 04:23 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Red-backed Shrike,©Tony Disley

22 Sep Fwd: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015 [eve ticknor ]
22 Sep NNYBirds: Fwd: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015 ["eve ticknor edticknor AT sympatico.ca [Northern_NY_Birds]" ]
22 Sep Broad-winged ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
22 Sep Re: late season Rubythroat [Barbara Shaw ]
22 Sep late season Rubythroat [Veer Frost ]
21 Sep Eastern Bluebirds Galore! [Linda Verchereau Becker ]
21 Sep Hummer [m372 AT aol.com ]
21 Sep goldfinch behavior [Jean Arrowsmith ]
21 Sep Re: Anyone Near Brilyea? [UVM ]
21 Sep Anyone Near Brilyea? [Cathryn Abbott ]
21 Sep Re: Sharp-shinned and a Flicker [David Hoag ]
21 Sep Sharp-shinned and a Flicker [Linda Gionti ]
21 Sep Pipits, Horned Larks, Meadow Larks, Savannah Sparrows, Kestrels - western Addison Co. ["Ian A. Worley" ]
20 Sep Pipits Charlotte Town Beach, Sep 20, 2014 [Sue ]
19 Sep Two nighthawks [Walter Medwid ]
19 Sep Hummer [Sue ]
19 Sep NEK: Victory Blowdown, Merlin, Bald Eagle Boreal birds [tfberriman ]
19 Sep hummer [Sarah Fellows ]
19 Sep Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington [John Snell ]
19 Sep Botswana [John Snell ]
19 Sep Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington [Larry Clarfeld ]
19 Sep Blue Jays on the move - Burlington [Eric Hynes ]
19 Sep Hummers [Ron Payne ]
19 Sep Re: Mansfield wrap-up [Veer Frost ]
18 Sep Mansfield wrap-up [Chris Rimmer ]
18 Sep Mt Philo Sept 18 Hawk/Monarch count [Liz Lackey ]
18 Sep Re: A ___________ of Killdeer [Deborah Benjamin ]
18 Sep A ___________ of Killdeer [Bruce MacPherson ]
18 Sep Creek Road Sedge Wren [Donald Jones ]
18 Sep Fwd: My Independence [Sue ]
18 Sep What is Status of Dead Creek Draw Down [Mike Resch ]
18 Sep Hummers [Richard ]
18 Sep Hummer [Elizabeth Alton ]
18 Sep Re: VTBIRD Digest - 15 Sep 2014 to 17 Sep 2014 (#2014-259) [Elizabeth Alton ]
18 Sep Bird Walk at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center [Bruce MacPherson ]
18 Sep 18Sept early morning hummingbird [Veer Frost ]
17 Sep Hummer [Jim and Chris Runcie ]
15 Sep Re: P.s. From the border in Derby [Jane Stein ]
15 Sep Re: Sedge Wrens Fledged-Creek Rd. Middlebury [Spencer Hardy ]
15 Sep P.s. From the border in Derby [Walter Medwid ]
15 Sep Sedge Wrens Fledged-Creek Rd. Middlebury [David Hof ]
15 Sep RTHummers and Phoebes [Walter Medwid ]
14 Sep Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
14 Sep Re: Mt Philo hawk watch [Jane Stein ]
14 Sep Mt Philo hawk watch [Liz Lackey ]
14 Sep Shelburne Hummers [Nancy Goodrich ]
14 Sep Re: Hummer [Alison Wagner ]
14 Sep Re: Hummer [Richard ]
14 Sep blue jays migrating [Sharon Turner ]
14 Sep NEK Report: Moose Bog & Victory, Bay Breasted, Philadelphia, Wilson's [tfberriman ]
14 Sep Re: Hummer [Veer Frost ]
14 Sep Lone Rock Point in Burlington - Parasitic Jaeger and migrant songbirds [Eric Hynes ]
14 Sep robins [Sharon Turner ]
14 Sep Re: Hummer [Maeve Kim ]
14 Sep Re: Hummer [B&D Naylor ]
14 Sep Sparrows and Warblers in SE Vermont, 9/13 [Mike Resch ]
14 Sep Re: Hummer [Michele Patenaude ]
14 Sep Addison ... American Golden Plovers, Blackpolls, Philadelphia Vireo, Lincoln's Sparrow ["Ian A. Worley" ]
13 Sep Re: Hummer [Joyce Werntgen ]
13 Sep Re: Hummer [Richard ]
13 Sep Re: Hummer [Pat Folsom ]
13 Sep Re: Hummer [Marcia Baker ]
13 Sep Hummer [Sue ]
13 Sep Turkey vulture question ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
13 Sep Brattleboro golden eagle ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
12 Sep Red-necked Phalarope - Dead Creek [David Hof ]
12 Sep Re: Hawk Flight [Peter Riley ]
12 Sep Re: Hawk Flight [Jim Phillips ]
12 Sep Re: Hawk Flight [Bryan Pfeiffer ]
12 Sep Correction to Jim Osborn's name, sorry re:[VTBIRD] N. Wheatear seen this Friday morning from Charlotte Town Beach [Larry Haugh ]
12 Sep N. Wheatear seen this Friday morning from Charlotte Town Beach [Larry Haugh ]
12 Sep Re: VTBIRD Digest - 10 Sep 2014 to 11 Sep 2014 (#2014-254) [Kat ]
11 Sep Going Nuclear for Dragonflies [Bryan Pfeiffer ]
10 Sep One too many Semipalmated Plovers at Delta Park [Bruce MacPherson ]
10 Sep Black-bellied Plover at Delta Park [Bruce MacPherson ]
10 Sep Re: Audubon releases new Birds and climate change report [Scott Sainsbury ]

Subject: Fwd: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
From: eve ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:56:01 -0400
Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jean Iron 
> Date: September 22, 2014 4:30:11 PM EDT
> To: "Ontbirds" 
> Subject: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
> 
> Please find the winter finch forecast in the link below.
> http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/forecast14.htm
> 
> I thank the many people who gathered tree seed information and the birders
> who asked me when the forecast was coming out. You kept me going.
> 
> Ron Pittaway
> Toronto ON
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial 
birding organization. 

> Send bird reports to birdalert AT ontbirds.ca
> For information about ONTBIRDS including how to unsubscribe visit 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdssetup 

> Posting guidelines can be found at 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdsguide 

> 
> 
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY  12996
U S A
res: 518-314-7707
cell: 518-524-7377

"Change how you see, not how you look."

http://aquavisions.me
Subject: NNYBirds: Fwd: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
From: "eve ticknor edticknor AT sympatico.ca [Northern_NY_Birds]" <Northern_NY_Birds@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:56:01 -0400

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jean Iron 
> Date: September 22, 2014 4:30:11 PM EDT
> To: "Ontbirds" 
> Subject: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
> 
> Please find the winter finch forecast in the link below.
> http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/forecast14.htm
> 
> I thank the many people who gathered tree seed information and the birders
> who asked me when the forecast was coming out. You kept me going.
> 
> Ron Pittaway
> Toronto ON
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial 
birding organization. 

> Send bird reports to birdalert AT ontbirds.ca
> For information about ONTBIRDS including how to unsubscribe visit 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdssetup 

> Posting guidelines can be found at 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdsguide 

> 
> 
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY  12996
U S A
res: 518-314-7707
cell: 518-524-7377

"Change how you see, not how you look."

http://aquavisions.me
Subject: Broad-winged
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 13:04:22 -0400
A south-bound Broad-winged Hawk cruised over my north-facing window at  
UVM in Burlington a few minutes ago.  I wonder how many other  
stragglers are taking advantage of last night's cold front passage to  
make their move today.

Scott
Subject: Re: late season Rubythroat
From: Barbara Shaw <babashaw47 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 07:43:24 -0400
In Winooski, hummingbird seen at the Sunset Hyssop moments ago.This is the
first year I've planted one there and saw several hummers having breakfast
this summer while I was having mine. Barbara H Shaw

On Mon, Sep 22, 2014 at 7:25 AM, Veer Frost  wrote:

> Flicked through garden half an hour ago, still dividing time between
> feeder and delphs. This seems very late.
>
> ____________________________________
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
>
Subject: late season Rubythroat
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 04:25:45 -0700
Flicked through garden half an hour ago, still dividing time between feeder and 
delphs. This seems very late. 


____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Eastern Bluebirds Galore!
From: Linda Verchereau Becker <daylilies56 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 19:02:35 -0400
Went to Richford today to walk the Rails to Trails path – what a nice 
surprise of 30 + Eastern Bluebirds. 

They were having a ball catching bugs and enjoying the warm weather – males, 
females and lots of juveniles. 

The trailhead is 1/2 mile taking a right from middle of town. The birds were 
about 2/10 of a mile further in 

from the trailhead.  

Linda Verchereau Becker
Montpelier, VT  
Subject: Hummer
From: m372 AT aol.com <m372@AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:49:56 -0400
Hummer. In South Hero this afternoon.
Marylyn Pillsbury
South Hero
Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone
Subject: goldfinch behavior
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 15:39:31 -0400
Seeing a flock of goldfinches descend on my jerusalem artichokes, I  
watched  them devour the bright yellow petals.  I figured that they  
need the carotene in the petals, but not until spring, when they moult  
into their breeding plumage.  So the carotene must be stored in fat.   
A google search confirms this.  Then my question is:  since carotene  
is found, along with chlorophyll, in plant leaves, why don't the  
finches use this source in the spring when they need it?  Any chemists  
out there?

Jean Arrowsmith
Lincoln
Subject: Re: Anyone Near Brilyea?
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 14:55:50 -0400
I had a voicemail from Ted Murin a while ago that he had a Hudsonian Godwit 
there today. 


Scott

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 21, 2014, at 1:17 PM, Cathryn Abbott  wrote:
> 
> Have just come from Dead Creek Brilyea Access where viewing conditions were 
tough given heat waves and wind. But ... spent some time observing a large 
shorebird that looked quite a bit like a Hudsonian godwit. It had a very long, 
slightly upturned bill, a light supercilium, light underparts, dark legs, and 
black-tipped tail. It was probing mud in a shallow cove on the left side of the 
access road. The cove is in the first opening on the left side of the access 
road. There is an osprey platform behind it, a wood duck box on the right side 
of the cove, and a blue box to the left. Have some distant pictures to download 
and check tonight. If anyone happens to be in the Brilyea area, it would be 
great to have a second opinion. 

> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Cat Abbott
> Dummerston, VT
Subject: Anyone Near Brilyea?
From: Cathryn Abbott <catabbott1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 13:17:37 -0400
Have just come from Dead Creek Brilyea Access where viewing conditions were 
tough given heat waves and wind. But ... spent some time observing a large 
shorebird that looked quite a bit like a Hudsonian godwit. It had a very long, 
slightly upturned bill, a light supercilium, light underparts, dark legs, and 
black-tipped tail. It was probing mud in a shallow cove on the left side of the 
access road. The cove is in the first opening on the left side of the access 
road. There is an osprey platform behind it, a wood duck box on the right side 
of the cove, and a blue box to the left. Have some distant pictures to download 
and check tonight. If anyone happens to be in the Brilyea area, it would be 
great to have a second opinion. 


Thanks!

Cat Abbott
Dummerston, VT
Subject: Re: Sharp-shinned and a Flicker
From: David Hoag <SR71BLBRD AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:30:41 -0400
A week ago I watched  a merlin and two flickers Playing tag 
and king-of-the-perch for nearly 10 minutes.
 
  One or or the other of the two flickers would keep returning
to the same lakeshore tree -- the same exposed dead branch perch 
preferred by the merlin.   There was a lot of squawking going on,
during chases of flicker/merlin/flicker into the surrounding woods, 
but no apparent casualties.
 
Dave Hoag, Grand Isle
Subject: Sharp-shinned and a Flicker
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 08:01:13 -0400
Had just come in from a little birding around the yard when I heard distressed 
shrieking, which did not abate with my movements down the steep bank to the 
creek. Two birds were thrashing around -- one was a Flicker which took the 
opportunity to disentangle itself and fly off. And the other I believe was a 
juvenile Sharp-shinned Hawk, which flew just a little ways off and perched 
where I got a decent look at it. 


Linda Gionti
Huntington
Subject: Pipits, Horned Larks, Meadow Larks, Savannah Sparrows, Kestrels - western Addison Co.
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 06:18:26 -0400
The large, open pastures and cut hayfields of western Addison County 
have attracted several field species of late.

In the last week or so in the area from Route 125 north to Panton Road:

American Pipit
    --- Slang Road, Panton 20th    58   (with Ron Payne)
    --- Jersey Street, Addison 20th    3   (with Ron Payne)
    --- Slang Road,  Panton 18th   19

Savannah Sparrow
    --- Slang Road, Panton 20th    8  (with Ron Payne)

Horned Lark
    --- Slang Road, Panton 15th    3

Eastern Meadowlark
    --- Lemon Fair Road, Weybridge 17th    18

American Kestrel
    --- I've recorded at least one at 16 different locations.

Northern Harrier
    --- Noted by various observers at 11 different locations.

Ian
Subject: Pipits Charlotte Town Beach, Sep 20, 2014
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 16:35:56 -0400
Wind a blowin' and white caps on the water but by the gravel bar saw the 
following. Ted Murin and Scott Morrical kindly pointed out the pipits. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: September 20, 2014 at 4:33:05 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Charlotte Town Beach, Sep 20, 2014
> 
> Charlotte Town Beach, Chittenden, US-VT
> Sep 20, 2014 10:50 AM - 11:05 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 3 species
> 
> Killdeer  9
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> American Pipit  5
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19885750 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Two nighthawks
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:16:00 -0400
Two nighthawks observed for 15 minutes working hard the tops of pine trees
at the edge of the meadow. Very surprised to see them with temps at 46
degrees. First sighting of this species this year. Derby/lake Memphremagog.
Subject: Hummer
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:19:35 -0400
A hummer here at my feeder in Brandon around five this evening. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: NEK: Victory Blowdown, Merlin, Bald Eagle Boreal birds
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:35:02 -0400
Great day to be in Victory procrastinating working on all those fall chores
that need to be done. Just as I was about to start onto the "Blowdown trail"
I heard tapping about 150' up the road. A female Black-backed Woodpecker
lured me off the road and into chest high tickets. (no problem except I was
carrying tripod & scope, backpack, 2 DSLR's and Binoculars) At least I had
Xtra Tuffs on! I lost her (an old sad story) and 45 minutes later finally
made it to a clearing. All the while every time  I looked up 8 or 14 Blue
Jays passed above quietly migrating through. I stopped trying to get a count
after 150. The soft chirps of warblers flew above me but I couldn't decipher
which as I stumbled over fallen trees and stumps. At the clearing I caught
my breath and found good fortune as a male Black-backed flew to a snag about
50' away. For 20 minutes I watched him work setting the scope up on moss
(like a mattress) and tried a few digiscopes.

3 Gray Jays flew in calling and looking for a hand-out. Finally a few
warblers landed in some spruce close enough to identify, 2 Bay-breasted, a
Yellow-rumped, one Black-throated Green. I heard a Merlin but had had enough
bush-whacking to even try to track it down. The delicious aroma of fall was
thick. It was 28 degrees this morning at the house and frost finally!! 

A Winter Wren popped up along with White-throated Sparrows. The Robins were
moving through but what got my attention was a new bird for the Blowdown:
Adult Bald Eagle floating above. Someday I'll actually make of list of the
birds in this 40 acre spot of Victory (but I've become so uninterested in
listing). I love Vermont!

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/

 

Tom Berriman

p.s. on Wednesday at the Blowdown I had a Boreal Chickadee only the third
time at this location in 12 years. On the River Road as I left a Kestrel on
the wire.
Subject: hummer
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:05:36 -0400
A female hummer just visited me and my geraniums and has been in my garden 
foxgloves all week. A jay is busy chattering almost like a parrot, upset with 
the many other jays flying through. 


Sally Fellows
Williston
Subject: Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:39:15 -0400
Sorry for that personal communication to Larry going out to all :-( John

On Sep 19, 2014, at 11:31 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:

> Blue Jays were on the move in Montpelier this morning as well. We had
> around 40 during today's Fall Migration Bird Walk at North Branch Nature
> Center. It is amazing how loose groups can silently flow overhead, like
> someone didn't completely close a giant faucet, and Blue Jays slowly but
> continuously trickle out of it.
> 
> Other highlights from this morning's walk were a smathering of warblers,
> including plenty of Yellow-rumped and Black-throated Greens, and a lone
> Blackpoll mixed in, an Osprey, an American Kestrel, and a sleeping Great
> Blue Heron in the river. We have 2 more fall migration bird walks
> left... Fridays,
> Sept. 26 and Oct. 3, 7:30 - 9 a.m. More info is online at
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org/nbncbirds.html
> 
> Good Birding,
> Larry
> 
> On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:20 AM, Eric Hynes  wrote:
> 
>> Hello Vermont Birders:
>> 
>> I just spent 30 minutes naked eye birding in Battery Park in Burlington.
>> While pushing my daughter on the swings, I counted flock after flock of
>> Blue Jays passing south overhead. One flock had 127 birds in it. I love
>> seeing those low squadrons in early fall.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Eric
>> .....................
>> Eric Hynes
>> Burlington, VT
>> ---------------------
>> Field Guides Birding Tours
>> www.fieldguides.com
>> http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Larry Clarfeld
> Environmental Educator
> Youth Birding Coordinator
> 
> North Branch Nature Center
> 713 Elm St.
> Montpelier, VT 05602
> 
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> (802) 229-6206
> larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Botswana
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:38:19 -0400
Larry,

Looking aheadIm wondering if youd like to have me present another slide show 
next winter, this one about my trip to Botswana, I can make it of particular 
interest to birders (175 new species for me) without it being one bird slide 
after another. Give it some thought and let me know when you make decisions. 





Still learning to see,

John
802-229-1751

http://www.eyeimagein.com
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com
Subject: Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:31:16 -0400
Blue Jays were on the move in Montpelier this morning as well. We had
around 40 during today's Fall Migration Bird Walk at North Branch Nature
Center. It is amazing how loose groups can silently flow overhead, like
someone didn't completely close a giant faucet, and Blue Jays slowly but
continuously trickle out of it.

Other highlights from this morning's walk were a smathering of warblers,
including plenty of Yellow-rumped and Black-throated Greens, and a lone
Blackpoll mixed in, an Osprey, an American Kestrel, and a sleeping Great
Blue Heron in the river. We have 2 more fall migration bird walks
left... Fridays,
Sept. 26 and Oct. 3, 7:30 - 9 a.m. More info is online at
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org/nbncbirds.html

Good Birding,
Larry

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:20 AM, Eric Hynes  wrote:

> Hello Vermont Birders:
>
> I just spent 30 minutes naked eye birding in Battery Park in Burlington.
> While pushing my daughter on the swings, I counted flock after flock of
> Blue Jays passing south overhead. One flock had 127 birds in it. I love
> seeing those low squadrons in early fall.
>
> Cheers,
> Eric
> .....................
> Eric Hynes
> Burlington, VT
> ---------------------
> Field Guides Birding Tours
> www.fieldguides.com
> http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
>



-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:20:09 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

I just spent 30 minutes naked eye birding in Battery Park in Burlington.
While pushing my daughter on the swings, I counted flock after flock of
Blue Jays passing south overhead. One flock had 127 birds in it. I love
seeing those low squadrons in early fall.

Cheers,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Hummers
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:46:30 -0400
One Ruby-throated Hummingbird seen visiting Orange Jewelweed blossoms at Otter 
View Park in Middlebury this morning. 


I also had three Blackpoll Warblers and a Blue-headed Vireo. 

 --
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: Re: Mansfield wrap-up
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 05:10:46 -0700
Thank you, Chris and VCE! we're fortunate indeed to have a glimpse, through 
reports like yours to the listserv, of the life (and song) on that mountaintop. 
We should all be holding our breath for the Bicknells. 



---- On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:53:35 -0700 Chris Rimmer 
<crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG> wrote ---- 



VCE wrapped up its 2014 field season with an overnight visit to our Mt. 
Mansfield ridgeline study site on Tuesday. Arriving at the upper toll 
road parking lot ~5 pm, we were greeted by chilly, damp conditions, but 
also by calling Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH), which annually undergo a 
resurgence of vocal activity in mid-September. We set up 17 mist nets, 
mostly on the Amherst and Lakeview trails, and ran them until dusk. 
BITH calls pierced the skies until darkness fell, and a few birds sang 
briefly. The frequency and vigor of vocalizing was nowhere near that of 
3 months ago, but the chorus was a far cry from the eerily quiet evening 
of our visit in late July. 
 
The ridgeline was still bathed in clouds when we returned at 5:45 am to 
open nets, and temperatures hovered in the raw low 40s F. BITH put on a 
solid dawn chorus, as we heard 16-18 birds total. Swainson's Thrushes 
were nowhere to be seen or heard. Our nets started filling, and by noon 
we had captured 76 birds. Yellow-rumped Warblers were by far the most 
abundant species on the ridgeline, and in our nets, but BITH may have 
been second, judging from both captures and birds heard vocalizing. Of 
the 13 BITH we mist-netted, 5 were recaptures of adult males from June 
and July (one a bird originally banded in 2011). Our total of BITH 
captures for 2014 ended up at 57, possibly a single-season record over 
our 23 years of banding. 
 
Overall diversity on the ridgeline was low, as we identified only 16 
species during the morning, which included 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks and a 
single Peregrine Falcon. One unexpected encounter was of 3 Ruffed 
Grouse flushed at ~3800 ft elevation on Tuesday evening. Surprisingly, 
Black-throated Blue Warblers, which our fall migration banding study in 
the mid-1990s showed to be the most abundant transient species on 
Mansfield, were almost non-existent - we saw and netted only one bird. 
[For a truly scintillating read about our results from that study, check 
out http://www.vtecostudies.org/PDF/WB112.pdf]. 
 
Our combined capture totals for the 16-17th: 
 
Black-capped Chickadee 1 
Bicknell's Thrush 13 (7 immatures, 1 new adult, 5 recaptured adult males) 
Nashville Warbler 1 
Blackpoll Warbler 6 (2 immatures, 4 adults) 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1 imm. female 
Yellow-rumped Warbler 50 (41 immatures, 9 adults) 
White-throated Sparrow 6 (3 immatures, 3 adults) 
Dark-eyed Junco 8 (7 immatures, 1 adult) 
 
A final note: there are very few cones on the balsam fir trees (and we 
saw or heard no red squirrels), so it's likely that squirrel populations 
will again be low in 2015, leading to higher breeding productivity by 
BITH and other open-cup nesting species. The biennial "boom-bust" cycle 
of cone crops, which has been remarkably consistent across the entire 
Northeast for many decades, appears to have broken down in recent 
years. Whether this results from climatic changes and/or other 
environmental factors, and whether the cycle will self-correct or not, 
is unknown. In the short term, the current scarcity of cones in montane 
forests appears to be benefitting BITH, which have shown relatively high 
recruitment of young birds during the past 3 summers, and probably will 
again in 2015. 
 
VCE will be back at it again next June, so stay tuned. 
 
Chris 
 
-- 
Chris Rimmer 
Vermont Center for Ecostudies 
P.O. Box 420 
Norwich, VT 05055 
802-649-1431 ext. 1 
www.vtecostudies.org 




____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Mansfield wrap-up
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:56:37 -0400
VCE wrapped up its 2014 field season with an overnight visit to our Mt. 
Mansfield ridgeline study site on Tuesday.  Arriving at the upper toll 
road parking lot ~5 pm, we were greeted by chilly, damp conditions, but 
also by calling Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH), which annually undergo a 
resurgence of vocal activity in mid-September. We set up 17 mist nets, 
mostly on the Amherst and Lakeview trails, and ran them until dusk.  
BITH calls pierced the skies until darkness fell, and a few birds sang 
briefly.  The frequency and vigor of vocalizing was nowhere near that of 
3 months ago, but the chorus was a far cry from the eerily quiet evening 
of our visit in late July.

The ridgeline was still bathed in clouds when we returned at 5:45 am to 
open nets, and temperatures hovered in the raw low 40s F.  BITH put on a 
solid dawn chorus, as we heard 16-18 birds total. Swainson's Thrushes 
were nowhere to be seen or heard.  Our nets started filling, and by noon 
we had captured 76 birds. Yellow-rumped Warblers were by far the most 
abundant species on the ridgeline, and in our nets, but BITH may have 
been second, judging from both captures and birds heard vocalizing.  Of 
the 13 BITH we mist-netted, 5 were recaptures of adult males from June 
and July (one a bird originally banded in 2011).  Our total of BITH 
captures for 2014 ended up at 57, possibly a single-season record over 
our 23 years of banding.

Overall diversity on the ridgeline was low, as we identified only 16 
species during the morning, which included 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks and a 
single Peregrine Falcon.  One unexpected encounter was of 3 Ruffed 
Grouse flushed at ~3800 ft elevation on Tuesday evening. Surprisingly, 
Black-throated Blue Warblers, which our fall migration banding study in 
the mid-1990s showed to be the most abundant transient species on 
Mansfield, were almost non-existent - we saw and netted only one bird.  
[For a truly scintillating read about our results from that study, check 
out http://www.vtecostudies.org/PDF/WB112.pdf].

Our combined capture totals for the 16-17th:

Black-capped Chickadee    1
Bicknell's Thrush    13 (7 immatures, 1 new adult, 5 recaptured adult males)
Nashville Warbler    1
Blackpoll Warbler    6 (2 immatures, 4 adults)
Black-throated Blue Warbler     1 imm. female
Yellow-rumped Warbler    50 (41 immatures, 9 adults)
White-throated Sparrow    6 (3 immatures, 3 adults)
Dark-eyed Junco     8 (7 immatures, 1 adult)

A final note: there are very few cones on the balsam fir trees (and we 
saw or heard no red squirrels), so it's likely that squirrel populations 
will again be low in 2015, leading to higher breeding productivity by 
BITH and other open-cup nesting species.  The biennial "boom-bust" cycle 
of cone crops, which has been remarkably consistent across the entire 
Northeast for many decades, appears to have broken down in recent 
years.  Whether this results from climatic changes and/or other 
environmental factors, and whether the cycle will self-correct or not, 
is unknown.  In the short term, the current scarcity of cones in montane 
forests appears to be benefitting BITH, which have shown relatively high 
recruitment of young birds during the past 3 summers, and probably will 
again in 2015.

VCE will be back at it again next June, so stay tuned.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Mt Philo Sept 18 Hawk/Monarch count
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:07:16 -0400
11:20a - 3:45pm  North wind till 3pm, then shifted to NW
Broadwings 185
American Kestrel  30
Peregrine 1
Northern Harrier 3
Osprey 3
Sharpies 9
Coopers 1
Bald Eagles 9

Monarchs  85

The kestrel flight was inspiring as well as the monarchs.  

Enjoy migration,

Liz Lackey


   
Subject: Re: A ___________ of Killdeer
From: Deborah Benjamin <dbenjamin AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 20:12:56 -0400
Hello,
   
  I found on iBird Pro app for tablets that a group of killdeer(s) is 
known as a "season" of killdeer(s). 
   
  What a nice "seasonal" experience you had to see 60 at a time. 
   
  Debbie Benjamin,  Eden

On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:16:40 -0400, Bruce MacPherson  wrote:
This afternoon I counted 60 Killdeer in the field at the corner of 
Greenbush Road and Lake St. in Charlotte. We know we have a gaggle of 
geese and a murder of crows, so what do we call a large flock of 
Killdeer. A convocation? a congregation? or just amazing. 
>
>
> Fill in the blank. 
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
>
>
>
>

   
Subject: A ___________ of Killdeer
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:16:40 -0400
This afternoon I counted 60 Killdeer in the field at the corner of Greenbush 
Road and Lake St. in Charlotte. We know we have a gaggle of geese and a murder 
of crows, so what do we call a large flock of Killdeer. A convocation? a 
congregation? or just amazing. 



Fill in the blank.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington



Subject: Creek Road Sedge Wren
From: Donald Jones <dwilbertjones AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:46:26 -0400
Hi All,

I rode my bike out Creek Road before class this morning with the goal of
finding one of the lingering Sedge Wrens, and I'm happy to report that I
was successful! It took more than half an hour of trying but I was able to
get good looks at one individual (aged as immature by the yellow gape David
mentioned), and I may have heard a different bird calling. They are holding
tight in the patch of tall grass where they've been regularly seen, but by
walking around to the north side of this patch one should be able to get
close enough for good views. Also in the area were hoards of Swamp Sparrows
with a few Song thrown in for good measure.

Good birding,
Don Jones
Middlebury, VT / Laramie, WY
Subject: Fwd: My Independence
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 15:54:31 -0400
> Date: September 18, 2014 at 1:53:21 PM 
> Subject: My Independence
> 
> Today a rather cool tour of Mt Indy but Magnolias were moving thru.
> Of interest was the seven Kestrels on the road to the Mount.
> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
>> Date: September 18, 2014 at 1:46:08 PM EDT
>> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> Subject: eBird Report - Mount Independence, Sep 18, 2014
>> 
>> Mount Independence, Addison, US-VT
>> Sep 18, 2014 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 2.0 mile(s)
>> 27 species
>> 
>> Canada Goose  36
>> Wood Duck  8
>> Mallard  5
>> Great Blue Heron  1
>> Bald Eagle  2     2 adults by nest on New York side.
>> Red-tailed Hawk (Eastern) 1 flew up from ground where is had consumed 1/2 of 
a red squirrel. 

>> Ring-billed Gull  5
>> Mourning Dove  1
>> Belted Kingfisher  1
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
>> Downy Woodpecker  1
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2
>> Pileated Woodpecker  1
>> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1     weakly singing partial song
>> Red-eyed Vireo  3
>> Blue Jay  9
>> American Crow  5
>> Common Raven  2
>> Black-capped Chickadee  6
>> White-breasted Nuthatch  3
>> American Robin  1
>> Gray Catbird  2
>> Magnolia Warbler  3
>> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  2
>> White-throated Sparrow  1
>> Northern Cardinal  5
>> American Goldfinch  1
>> 
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19866733 

>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: What is Status of Dead Creek Draw Down
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:38:04 -0400
I'm heading up to NW VT this weekend for the "pelagic trip" and hope to do some 
shorebirding from land as well. What is the status of the drawdown of the Dead 
Creek impoundment? Don't think I've seen any recent posts from there and hoping 
there are still some muddy margins for shorebirds. Dunlin is one of my many 
targets... 


Many thanks -

Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA

Subject: Hummers
From: Richard <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 12:24:00 -0400
Here in Middlebury, I have had Hummers at the feeders every day but 
three.  I panicked last week when
I didn't see any for one day.  But, since then I have had 2-4 hummers 
vying for a chance to feed.  However, I expect
they will disappear till next year after the cold front arrives and puts 
down freezing temperatures.  If I see them this
weekend I'll make a new food batch.

Dick Harlow
Middlebury
Subject: Hummer
From: Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:44:15 -0400
One lone Hummer tanking up at feeder in Milton at 7:00 AM today. Have not
seen any for about 1 week. (Sorry if I double posted. I replied to a VTBIRD
digest and then realized that might not work...) Liz

-- 
Liz Alton:
"Keep a green tree in your heart; perhaps a singing bird will come."
 [image: mail.gif]
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 15 Sep 2014 to 17 Sep 2014 (#2014-259)
From: Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:42:50 -0400
Saw a hummer tanking up at the feeder in Milton 7:00 AM. Have not seen
others for about 1 week.

On Thu, Sep 18, 2014 at 12:01 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <
LISTSERV AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> There is 1 message totaling 11 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Hummer
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:56:32 -0400
> From:    Jim and Chris Runcie 
> Subject: Hummer
>
> Hummer at the petunias today, 11AM in Starksboro. So beautiful here, why
> leave?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 15 Sep 2014 to 17 Sep 2014 (#2014-259)
> *************************************************************
>



-- 
Liz Alton:
"Keep a green tree in your heart; perhaps a singing bird will come."
 [image: mail.gif]
Subject: Bird Walk at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center
From: Bruce MacPherson <BMacPhe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:27:34 -0400
Date: Saturday, September 20, 2014
Time: 7:30 A.M.
Location:  Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Gov. Chittenden Road, 
Williston, VT
Leaders:  Carl Runge, Bruce MacPherson, and Bill Mercia

The next GMAS bird walk at  the Catamount Outdoor Family Center is 
scheduled for Saturday, September 20. We will be walking on the south side of 
the 

property this month. Over the years we  have identified over 130 bird species 
at the COFC, including a variety of  waterfowl, grassland birds, wood 
warblers, and flycatchers. The COFC bird checklist is available for viewing and 

download in the Resources section of the  GMAS website at:

http://greenmountainaudubon.org 

These walks are  free and open to the public. Please register in advance, 
however, by sending  an e-mail to _gmas AT greenmountainaudubon.org_ 
(mailto:gmas AT greenmountainaudubon.org) . If you are a new participant, please 
indicate 

your level of birding expertise  (beginner, intermediate, expert). We will 
meet in the COFC parking lot on  Governor Chittenden Road at 7:30 A.M. to 
begin this walk.

Looking forward  to seeing some of you there.

Bruce MacPherson on behalf of the  GMAS
Subject: 18Sept early morning hummingbird
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 06:29:43 -0700
... still overseeing Tithonia patch from crabapple ... this beats latest 
Rubythroat for me in Passumpsic/NEK by one day. A startling and moving moment 
as it flew out of the 6.30am mist for my orange fleece, so glad I had it on! 
(and a feeder up) 






Veer Frost
Subject: Hummer
From: Jim and Chris Runcie <runcie AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:56:32 -0400
Hummer at the petunias today, 11AM in Starksboro. So beautiful here, why leave?
Subject: Re: P.s. From the border in Derby
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:35:59 -0400
Oh, I sure hope so.  I used to be loaded with them, and haven't seen a 
single one here the last two years, despite having milkweed all over the 
place.



On 9/15/2014 4:05 PM, Walter Medwid wrote:
> A steady trickle of monarchs floated due southwest throughout the day after
> a 32 degree evening. Very encouraging to witness them with all the dire
> reports about the population crash. Hopefully all the milkweed we've
> encouraged has helped make a tiny difference.
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8146 - Release Date: 09/03/14
> Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>
Subject: Re: Sedge Wrens Fledged-Creek Rd. Middlebury
From: Spencer Hardy <curlewsandpiper17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:32:19 -0400
Hi David, 
Nice find! I was down there early in the month and couldn't find them. Could 
you provide me a bit more detail as to where you saw them? Also did you detect 
them from the road or walk into the field. 


Thanks for any suggestions, 
Spencer


On Sep 15, 2014, at 2:20 PM, David Hof wrote:

> I stopped by the Creek Rd. Sedge Wren spot on Saturday morning. The sedge 
wrens were still there, and it appeared like they successfully fledged a brood. 
I first heard call notes of a sedge wren along the far side of the field. It 
eventually popped up, and appeared to be an adult. It was richly buffy on the 
underparts. Later while passing by the tall grass area, I again heard sedge 
wren call notes, and soon saw 3 sedge wrens all visible at once, at least two 
of which were juveniles. The juveniles were rather adult-like but still had 
slight but visible gapes, and were much drabber with less distinct supercilium 
and less buff coloration on the underparts compared to the previous bird I saw. 
The third bird I didn't get quite as good of a look at, and it was difficult to 
say whether it was a juvenile or adult. I possibly heard call notes from a 4th 
bird nearby, but I was not certain it wasn't one of the 3. Nevertheless, there 
were at least 4, if not 5 sedge wrens incl! 

 ud!
> ing juveniles, so it seems like the nesting attempt was a success!
> 
> Nice work to those of you that confirmed nesting activities back in August! 
> 
> ~David Hof
Subject: P.s. From the border in Derby
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:05:33 -0400
A steady trickle of monarchs floated due southwest throughout the day after
a 32 degree evening. Very encouraging to witness them with all the dire
reports about the population crash. Hopefully all the milkweed we've
encouraged has helped make a tiny difference.
Subject: Sedge Wrens Fledged-Creek Rd. Middlebury
From: David Hof <davehof2002 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:20:57 -0400
I stopped by the Creek Rd. Sedge Wren spot on Saturday morning. The sedge wrens 
were still there, and it appeared like they successfully fledged a brood. I 
first heard call notes of a sedge wren along the far side of the field. It 
eventually popped up, and appeared to be an adult. It was richly buffy on the 
underparts. Later while passing by the tall grass area, I again heard sedge 
wren call notes, and soon saw 3 sedge wrens all visible at once, at least two 
of which were juveniles. The juveniles were rather adult-like but still had 
slight but visible gapes, and were much drabber with less distinct supercilium 
and less buff coloration on the underparts compared to the previous bird I saw. 
The third bird I didn't get quite as good of a look at, and it was difficult to 
say whether it was a juvenile or adult. I possibly heard call notes from a 4th 
bird nearby, but I was not certain it wasn't one of the 3. Nevertheless, there 
were at least 4, if not 5 sedge wrens includ! 

 ing juveniles, so it seems like the nesting attempt was a success!

Nice work to those of you that confirmed nesting activities back in August! 

~David Hof
Subject: RTHummers and Phoebes
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 09:59:52 -0400
RTHs still at feeder, phoebes working the sunny spots for insects on this
chilly morn near the border-Derby-Lake Memphremagog.
Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 22:48:30 -0400
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday September 20, 2014 on
the Stephen Young Marsh Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the parking lot on Tabor
Rd, about 1 mile south of the refuge Visitor Center and across the road
from the marsh.  If you have any questions, just reply to this email.

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 53 months of walks we have observed 134 species.  Hope to see you
there!

--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: Re: Mt Philo hawk watch
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 22:07:50 -0400
FYI for those who follow these things, there was major hawk movement all 
across the northeast today, through Pennsylvania and even NJ. 
(www.hawkcount.org)



On 9/14/2014 8:52 PM, Liz Lackey wrote:
> Ted Murin, Jim Osborn and I spent the day on Mt Philo.
> Our totals include:
>
> Broadwings  356
> Osprey  10
> Bald Eagle 10
> Northern Harrier 2
> Coopers Hawk 1
> Sharpie  8
> Unidentified falcon 1
> Unidentified buteo 1
>
> Monarchs  2
>
> I spent the morning watching for hawks from the north meadow on Philo. I saw 
61 Broadwings while those on top of the mountain saw 6. 

> Later in the day I returned to the north meadow, after spending midday at the 
summit with Jim and Ted. I saw very few broad wings at this time and had to 
leave at 4pm. 

> The summit watchers had a late flight after 4pm. One kettle had 89 birds in 
it. 

>
>
> There were nice mixed flocks of warblers, tanagers, flycatchers, and sparrows 
along the trails and overgrown meadows. 

>
>
>
> Liz Lackey
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8146 - Release Date: 09/03/14
> Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>
Subject: Mt Philo hawk watch
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:52:23 -0400
Ted Murin, Jim Osborn and I spent the day on Mt Philo.  
Our totals include:

Broadwings  356
Osprey  10
Bald Eagle 10
Northern Harrier 2
Coopers Hawk 1
Sharpie  8
Unidentified falcon 1
Unidentified buteo 1

Monarchs  2

I spent the morning watching for hawks from the north meadow on Philo. I saw 61 
Broadwings while those on top of the mountain saw 6. 

Later in the day I returned to the north meadow, after spending midday at the 
summit with Jim and Ted. I saw very few broad wings at this time and had to 
leave at 4pm. 

The summit watchers had a late flight after 4pm. One kettle had 89 birds in it. 



There were nice mixed flocks of warblers, tanagers, flycatchers, and sparrows 
along the trails and overgrown meadows. 




Liz Lackey
Subject: Shelburne Hummers
From: Nancy Goodrich <nancyg3219 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 19:36:57 -0400
All week one relentless hummer busily fed at my deck feeder, and this
afternoon a second showed up to join it; I needed to refill the feeder and
they continued to chase one another and feed until twenty minutes ago, when
 darkness fell. My latest record for hummingbirds was Sept 19; we'll see
what this year's last visit is.
Nancy Goodrich, Shelburne
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 18:08:15 -0400
Hummers still visiting feeders daily in Huntington as well.

Ali

-----Original Message----- 
From: Richard
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 5:29 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer

Had one hummer today.  Will keep the feeders up or until nothing seen for
a week!

Dick Harlow
Middlebury



On 9/14/14, 9:49, B&D Naylor wrote:
> 43 here in at 1400 feet in Calais this morning and the hummers are still
> hanging around or passing through
>
> On Sunday, September 14, 2014, Michele Patenaude  
> wrote:
>
>> I haven't had one in two weeks. I miss them too.
>>
>> Michele Patenaude
>> 172 Woodbury Road
>> Burlington, VT 05408
>> 802-862-4085
>>
>>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:32 PM, Joyce Werntgen > > wrote:
>>> Gone from my feeder in Montpelier.....I'll miss them......til next year.
>>>
>>> Joyce
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:17 PM, Richard > > wrote:
>>>> This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.
>>>>
>>>> Dick Harlow
>>>> Middlebury
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
>>>>> Me too.
>>>>> Pat in Waitsfield
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> > wrote:
>>>>>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
>>>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>>>> Brandon
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>>>
>
> --
> 
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Richard <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 17:29:10 -0400
Had one hummer today.  Will keep the feeders up or until nothing seen for
a week!

Dick Harlow
Middlebury



On 9/14/14, 9:49, B&D Naylor wrote:
> 43 here in at 1400 feet in Calais this morning and the hummers are still
> hanging around or passing through
>
> On Sunday, September 14, 2014, Michele Patenaude  wrote:
>
>> I haven't had one in two weeks. I miss them too.
>>
>> Michele Patenaude
>> 172 Woodbury Road
>> Burlington, VT 05408
>> 802-862-4085
>>
>>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:32 PM, Joyce Werntgen > > wrote:
>>> Gone from my feeder in Montpelier.....I'll miss them......til next year.
>>>
>>> Joyce
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:17 PM, Richard > > wrote:
>>>> This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.
>>>>
>>>> Dick Harlow
>>>> Middlebury
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
>>>>> Me too.
>>>>> Pat in Waitsfield
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> > wrote:
>>>>>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
>>>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>>>> Brandon
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>>>
>
> --
>
Subject: blue jays migrating
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner AT SWITCHED.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 16:25:23 -0400
In danby I am seeing more than average blue jays, and also more redtails.


Sharon Turner
sharxxturner AT switched.com


Subject: NEK Report: Moose Bog & Victory, Bay Breasted, Philadelphia, Wilson's
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 15:50:45 -0400
Great week-end of birding in the Kingdom starting with the Mad Birders at
Victory yesterday. High-lights include:

4 Black-backed Woodpeckers 

 4 Gray Jays

3 Lincoln Sparrows

Wilson's warbler

Large numbers of Robins, White-throated sparrows, Flickers and Blue Jays.

 

Today, birding with Dave Govatski and Brad Nickeljohn of Alaska we found
along  the North Branch Trail on Rt. 105 (Conte Refuge)the  list below as
well as list for the Moose Bog Trail.

 

 

North Branch Trail, Conte Wildlife Refuge, Essex, US-VT Sep 14, 2014 11:30
AM - 2:00 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.5 mile(s)

25 species (+1 other taxa)

 

Downy Woodpecker  1

Hairy Woodpecker  1

Northern Flicker  1

Empidonax sp.  1

Blue-headed Vireo  4

Philadelphia Vireo  1

Red-eyed Vireo  8

Blue Jay  2

Black-capped Chickadee  16

Red-breasted Nuthatch  5

Brown Creeper  1

Golden-crowned Kinglet  2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2

Hermit Thrush  2

American Robin  1

Black-and-white Warbler  1

Nashville Warbler  2

Common Yellowthroat  1

Magnolia Warbler  1

Bay-breasted Warbler  2

Chestnut-sided Warbler  1

Blackpoll Warbler  1

Black-throated Blue Warbler  2

Black-throated Green Warbler  1

White-throated Sparrow  2

Dark-eyed Junco  4

Moose Bog Trail, Essex, US-VT

Sep 14, 2014 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Protocol: Traveling

3.0 mile(s)

22 species

 

Moose Bog Trail:

Canada Goose  3

Hairy Woodpecker  1

Black-backed Woodpecker  1

Northern Flicker  1

Blue-headed Vireo  2

Gray Jay  5

Blue Jay  2

Common Raven  1

Black-capped Chickadee  9

Boreal Chickadee  1

Red-breasted Nuthatch  2

Brown Creeper  2

Golden-crowned Kinglet  4

Hermit Thrush  3

Cedar Waxwing  5

Bay-breasted Warbler  1

Blackpoll Warbler  1

Black-throated Blue Warbler  1

Pine Warbler  1

Yellow-rumped Warbler  3

White-throated Sparrow  4

Dark-eyed Junco  12

 

Tom Berriman

 

 
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 09:56:46 -0700
Rubythroat just arrived, first in two days. Whoever said keep feeders filled is 
right! 



 
 
-- 



____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Lone Rock Point in Burlington - Parasitic Jaeger and migrant songbirds
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 12:33:55 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

Ali Wagner and I birded Lone Rock Point in Burlington the last two
mornings.

A dedicated lake watch from the cliff top this morning from 7-830 a.m.
produced over 3000 Double-crested Cormorants (going north?) and two
immature Parasitic Jaegers (one intermediate and one dark morph). Both
Parasitic Jaegers lived up to their name as they relentlessly pursued
Ring-billed Gulls.

We caught up to mixed flocks that held some noteworthy migrant songbirds
both mornings. Best sites were the garden opposite the parking area, the
forest edge near the bridge over the bikeway, and the meadow surrounded by
the forest on the way out to the point. We had about a dozen warbler
species both mornings. Highlights included:

1 Merlin
1 Carolina Wren
2 Wilson's Warblers
2 Lincoln's Sparrows
1 Philadelphia Vireo
1 Tennessee Warbler

Good birding,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: robins
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner AT SWITCHED.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 11:52:56 -0400
A friend in Texas saw Robins in the yard 6 weeks earlier than usual. Is this 
perhaps a signal for a long hard winter in the north? 



Sharon Turner
sharxxturner AT switched.com

Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 11:43:00 -0400
Hummers (I think two different individuals, but I'm not sure) have been at the 
feeders almost constantly yesterday afternoon until dark and this morning. I 
think they're stocking up! 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center


On Sep 14, 2014, at 9:49 AM, B&D Naylor wrote:

> 43 here in at 1400 feet in Calais this morning and the hummers are still
> hanging around or passing through
> 
> On Sunday, September 14, 2014, Michele Patenaude  wrote:
> 
>> I haven't had one in two weeks. I miss them too.
>> 
>> Michele Patenaude
>> 172 Woodbury Road
>> Burlington, VT 05408
>> 802-862-4085
>> 
>>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:32 PM, Joyce Werntgen > > wrote:
>>> 
>>> Gone from my feeder in Montpelier.....I'll miss them......til next year.
>>> 
>>> Joyce
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>>>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:17 PM, Richard > > wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.
>>>> 
>>>> Dick Harlow
>>>> Middlebury
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>>> On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
>>>>> Me too.
>>>>> Pat in Waitsfield
>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> > wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
>>>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>>>> Brandon
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>>>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> --
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: B&D Naylor <bdnaylor60 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 09:49:36 -0400
43 here in at 1400 feet in Calais this morning and the hummers are still
hanging around or passing through

On Sunday, September 14, 2014, Michele Patenaude  wrote:

> I haven't had one in two weeks. I miss them too.
>
> Michele Patenaude
> 172 Woodbury Road
> Burlington, VT 05408
> 802-862-4085
>
> > On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:32 PM, Joyce Werntgen  > wrote:
> >
> > Gone from my feeder in Montpelier.....I'll miss them......til next year.
> >
> > Joyce
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:17 PM, Richard  > wrote:
> >>
> >> This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.
> >>
> >> Dick Harlow
> >> Middlebury
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>> On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
> >>> Me too.
> >>> Pat in Waitsfield
> >>>
> >>>> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net
> > wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
> >>>> Sue Wetmore
> >>>> Brandon
> >>>>
> >>>> Sent from my iPod
> >>>>
>


--
Subject: Sparrows and Warblers in SE Vermont, 9/13
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 06:33:14 -0400
Spent 4 hours birding my favorite migrant spots in Brattleboro and Vernon on 
the morning of 9/13. Good numbers of sparrows at Retreat Meadows, but slow most 
everywhere else, including only 5 warbler species. Highlights - 


Retreat Meadows, Brattleboro - goldenrod/aster field close to the water 
treatment plant along Route 30 - 

Song Sparrows - estimated 70 especially from the southern part of the field.
Lincoln's Sparrow - 3
Wilson's Warbler - 1
Philadelphia Vireo - 1
Bobolink - 4

Power Substation, Vernon -
Yellow Warbler - 5 - not only is it getting late for these guys, but they were 
all foraging together in one hedgerow 

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1
Bobolink - 2

Stebbins Rd Stump Dump, Vernon -
Nighthawk - flushed from the top of the dump


Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA

Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 01:29:28 -0400
I haven't had one in two weeks. I miss them too.

Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:32 PM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:
> 
> Gone from my feeder in Montpelier.....I'll miss them......til next year.
> 
> Joyce
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:17 PM, Richard  wrote:
>> 
>> This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.
>> 
>> Dick Harlow
>> Middlebury
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
>>> Me too.
>>> Pat in Waitsfield
>>> 
>>>> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
>>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>> Brandon
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>> 
Subject: Addison ... American Golden Plovers, Blackpolls, Philadelphia Vireo, Lincoln's Sparrow
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 00:46:41 -0400
Yesterday, Saturday the 13th, Spencer Hardy, Don Jones and I birded 
along the Whitney Creek Trail, at the Champlain Bridge, and along the 
west trail at Brilyea Access ... all in Addison.   At Brilyea we teamed 
up with Jim Mead and Gary Chapin.  Although the landscapes were not 
teaming with birds on the cloudy, cold, calm morning, we did find a 
couple of warbler swarms and a few shorebirds.

Highlights of the day were at Brilyea --- an overflight by two American 
Golden Plovers, a mob of 60 crows in the top of a tall oak hassling a 
target we could not discover, a Scarlet Tanager male in full breeding 
plumage at this late date (in the company of two additional tanagers), a 
couple of Blackpoll Warblers, and a Philadelphia Warbler.  There was 
also a Lincoln's Sparrow at Whitney Creek.

During a quiet time for shorebirds at Brilyea, we were treated to a 
display by a couple of Great Blue Herons on the proper way to catch, 
skewer, kill, and swallow good-sized bullheads.  An adult and a 
youngster also had a brief tte--tte with arched, out-stretched wings 
and bills pointed skyward.

Checklists from Whitney Creek Trail and Brilyea are below.

Ian
--------------------------
Brilyea Access, Addison, US-VT
Sep 13, 2014 10:27 AM - 1:14 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.7 mile(s)
Comments:     Spencer Hardy, Don Jones, Gary Chapin, Jim Mead, Ian 
Worley.  West trail.
51 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  47
Wood Duck  8
Mallard  3
Blue-winged Teal  11
Green-winged Teal  27
Great Blue Heron  18
Osprey  1
Northern Harrier  1
Bald Eagle  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
American Golden-Plover  2     Flyby, then over flew right overhead. Good 
visual of birds including distinctive supercillium.  Flight call 
characteristic of species.
Semipalmated Plover  4
Killdeer  1
Spotted Sandpiper  4
Greater Yellowlegs  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  20
Least Sandpiper  2
Pectoral Sandpiper  2
peep sp.  5
Ring-billed Gull  3
Mourning Dove  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Peregrine Falcon  1     Perched in dead tree overlooking mud flats and 
shallows.
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Eastern Phoebe  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  7
American Crow  66     An estimated 60 crows were mobbing the top of a 
large oak in the woods beyond the last dam along the west trail. Never 
could discern who they were hassling.
Common Raven  2
Tree Swallow  4
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
Red-breasted Nuthatch  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  5
Cedar Waxwing  8
Common Yellowthroat  2
Magnolia Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  2
warbler sp.  1
Song Sparrow  1
Swamp Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  3
Red-winged Blackbird  13
Common Grackle  25
American Goldfinch  5
View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19825030
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Whitney Creek/Hospital Creek WMA, Addison, US-VT
Sep 13, 2014 7:29 AM - 9:18 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Spencer Hardy, Don Jones, Ian Worley.  Whitney Creek Trail.
29 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  22
Mallard  1
Osprey  2
Ring-billed Gull  1
Mourning Dove  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  4
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Empidonax sp.  1
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  7
American Crow  3
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
American Robin  11
Gray Catbird  6
European Starling  3
Cedar Waxwing  10
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  2
Magnolia Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
warbler sp.  2
Song Sparrow  3
Lincoln's Sparrow  1     Active in shrub by trail.  Well delineated and 
colored chest. Perky crown.
White-throated Sparrow  1
Red-winged Blackbird  1
American Goldfinch  11

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19822777
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:32:03 -0400
Gone from my feeder in Montpelier.....I'll miss them......til next year.

Joyce

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:17 PM, Richard  wrote:
> 
> This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.
> 
> Dick Harlow
> Middlebury
> 
> 
> 
>> On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
>> Me too.
>> Pat in Waitsfield
>> 
>>> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>>> 
>>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
>>> Sue Wetmore
>>> Brandon
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>> 
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Richard <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:17:43 -0400
This is my first day without one. We'll see about tomorrow.

Dick Harlow
Middlebury



On 9/13/14, 21:44, Pat Folsom wrote:
> Me too.
> Pat in Waitsfield
>
> On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
>> Sue Wetmore
>> Brandon
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:44:33 -0400
Me too.
Pat in Waitsfield

On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:

> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
Subject: Re: Hummer
From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 18:36:44 -0400
As do I, in Brownsville. Just cleaned and filled the feeders once again. It's a 
long, long trip. 


Marcia

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 13, 2014, at 6:35 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
> 
> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Hummer
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 18:35:17 -0400
I still have at least one hummer at my feeders.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Turkey vulture question
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 17:58:09 +0000
When I moved to Vermont in 1962, turkey vultures were non-existent. At least I 
never saw one for many years until a few appeared around Snake Mountain. Now 
they are everywhere. Ive seen them every month of the year. Yesterday on South 
Street Extension in Middlebury, I counted 53 in one circling flock. Does anyone 
have any data on their expansion in the state? Bruce Peterson 

Subject: Brattleboro golden eagle
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 12:28:25 -0400
Adult golden eagle circling low over Retreat Meadows lagoon this morning.

Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope - Dead Creek
From: David Hof <davehof2002 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 20:50:57 -0400
A red-necked phalarope was at Brilyea access this afternoon, probably the same 
one reported by Gary Chapin on Sept 8th. Also present were 5 pectoral 
sandpipers, a stilt sandpiper, and a white-rumped sandpiper See below for the 
complete list. 


David Hof

> 
> Dead Creek WMA IBA--Brilyea Access, Addison, US-VT
> Sep 12, 2014 2:37 PM - 6:17 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> Comments:     Birded mostly along West trail
> 39 species
> 
> Canada Goose  13
> Wood Duck  4
> Mallard  6
> Blue-winged Teal  5
> Green-winged Teal  82     exact count in one scan; likely more
> Great Blue Heron  9
> Turkey Vulture  2
> Bald Eagle  1
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> Semipalmated Plover  3
> Spotted Sandpiper  3
> Solitary Sandpiper  1
> Lesser Yellowlegs  48     exact count in one scan; likely more
> Stilt Sandpiper 1 long yellow legs and long somewhat decurved bill; foraging 
behavior dowitcher-like 

> Least Sandpiper  6
> White-rumped Sandpiper  1
> Pectoral Sandpiper  5
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  2
> Red-necked Phalarope 1 juvenile; observed for much of time I was there and at 
relatively close range (<20m) through spotting scope. Swimming in circles 
while feeding typical of phalaropes; underparts mostly bright whitish; 
upperparts boldly striped w/ dark stripe extending from head down back of neck; 
dark mask extending from rear of eye on otherwise bright white face and dark 
cap; bill very thin and "needlelike". 

> Ring-billed Gull  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  2
> Merlin  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Blue Jay  4
> American Crow  2
> Common Raven  2
> Barn Swallow  14
> Black-capped Chickadee  7
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Gray Catbird  2
> Cedar Waxwing  3
> Common Yellowthroat  2
> Magnolia Warbler  1
> Song Sparrow  2
> Swamp Sparrow  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  250
> American Goldfinch  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19813064 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Hawk Flight
From: Peter Riley <priley55 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 18:14:46 -0400
The total today on Mt. Philo was 502 with 471 of those being Broadwings. The 
rest were Osprey, Sharpies, Kestrals, Bald Eagles, Redtails and one N. Harrier. 


> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:32:08 -0400
> From: jim AT THEPHILLIPS.COM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hawk Flight
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> There were almost 300 hawks spotted at Mt. Philo today by 1:30.  I 
> expect there were more seen later.
> 
> 
> On 9/12/2014 3:39 PM, Bryan Pfeiffer wrote:
> > Hi Karl,
> >
> > This time of year, when the winds blow from the north (and sometimes 
> > even when they don't), you'll find lots of hawkwatchers on Mt. Philo 
> > in Charlotte and on Putney Mountain. I suspect it will be busy up high 
> > on Sunday.
> >
> > For beginners seeking wisdom on hawkwatching: 
> > http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2013/09/13/hawkwatching-confidential/
> >
> > Best,
> > Bryan Pfeiffer
> >
> >> Date: Fri Sep 12 2014 5:32 am
> >> From: karl.fetter AT gmail.com
> >> Where can I find information on the hawk flight? Are people meeting 
> >> on Saturday too?
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Karl Fetter
> >>
> >
> >
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Hawk Flight
From: Jim Phillips <jim AT THEPHILLIPS.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:32:08 -0400
There were almost 300 hawks spotted at Mt. Philo today by 1:30.  I 
expect there were more seen later.


On 9/12/2014 3:39 PM, Bryan Pfeiffer wrote:
> Hi Karl,
>
> This time of year, when the winds blow from the north (and sometimes 
> even when they don't), you'll find lots of hawkwatchers on Mt. Philo 
> in Charlotte and on Putney Mountain. I suspect it will be busy up high 
> on Sunday.
>
> For beginners seeking wisdom on hawkwatching: 
> http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2013/09/13/hawkwatching-confidential/
>
> Best,
> Bryan Pfeiffer
>
>> Date: Fri Sep 12 2014 5:32 am
>> From: karl.fetter AT gmail.com
>> Where can I find information on the hawk flight? Are people meeting 
>> on Saturday too?
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>>
>>
>> Karl Fetter
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: Hawk Flight
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan AT BRYANPFEIFFER.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 15:39:50 -0400
Hi Karl,

This time of year, when the winds blow from the north (and sometimes 
even when they don't), you'll find lots of hawkwatchers on Mt. Philo in 
Charlotte and on Putney Mountain. I suspect it will be busy up high on 
Sunday.

For beginners seeking wisdom on hawkwatching: 
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2013/09/13/hawkwatching-confidential/

Best,
Bryan Pfeiffer

> Date: Fri Sep 12 2014 5:32 am
> From: karl.fetter AT gmail.com
> Where can I find information on the hawk flight? Are people meeting on 
Saturday too? 

>
>
>
> Thanks
>
>
>
> Karl Fetter
>


-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
Subject: Correction to Jim Osborn's name, sorry re:[VTBIRD] N. Wheatear seen this Friday morning from Charlotte Town Beach
From: Larry Haugh <larry.haugh AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:06:27 -0400
Apologies to Jim, for my quick sending, without proofing:  the correct 
spelling is Jim Osborn


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: 	[VTBIRD] N. Wheatear seen this Friday morning from Charlotte 
Town Beach
Date: 	Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:56:03 -0400
From: 	Larry Haugh 
Reply-To: 	Vermont Birds 
Organization: 	University of Vermont
To: 	VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU



Just to let you know that Jim Osborn saw a Northern Wheatear from the
Charlotte Town Beach early this morning (about 6:45 am).
He watched it for some minutes in the ground area to the north of the
bench area, close to the concrete pier extending in to the lake.
It apparently went around that point area to the north.
Others who looked after that this morning have not seen it again.
Keep your eyes open elsewhere as well of course!
Good migration and vagrant birding,
Larry Haugh
Shelburne, VT
Subject: N. Wheatear seen this Friday morning from Charlotte Town Beach
From: Larry Haugh <larry.haugh AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:56:03 -0400
Just to let you know that Jim Osborne saw a Northern Wheatear from the 
Charlotte Town Beach early this morning (about 6:45 am).
He watched it for some minutes in the ground area to the north of the 
bench area, close to the concrete pier extending in to the lake.
It apparently went around that point area to the north.
Others who looked after that this morning have not seen it again.
Keep your eyes open elsewhere as well of course!
Good migration and vagrant birding,
Larry Haugh
Shelburne, VT
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 10 Sep 2014 to 11 Sep 2014 (#2014-254)
From: Kat <karl.fetter AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 06:31:36 -0400
Where can I find information on the hawk flight? Are people meeting on Saturday 
too? 


Thanks

Karl Fetter

-----Original Message-----
From: "VTBIRD automatic digest system" 
Sent: ‎9/‎12/‎2014 12:01 AM
To: "VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU" 
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 10 Sep 2014 to 11 Sep 2014 (#2014-254)

There is 1 message totaling 21 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Going Nuclear for Dragonflies

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 11 Sep 2014 19:49:13 -0400
From:    Bryan Pfeiffer 
Subject: Going Nuclear for Dragonflies

Greetings, VTBIRDers:

For those of you heading out for the hawk flight on Friday, here's an 
explanation of how we can track dragonfly migration as well:
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2014/09/11/the-nuclear-option-for-dragonflies/

Best,
Bryan Pfeiffer
-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 10 Sep 2014 to 11 Sep 2014 (#2014-254)
*************************************************************
Subject: Going Nuclear for Dragonflies
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan AT BRYANPFEIFFER.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 19:49:13 -0400
Greetings, VTBIRDers:

For those of you heading out for the hawk flight on Friday, here's an 
explanation of how we can track dragonfly migration as well:
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2014/09/11/the-nuclear-option-for-dragonflies/

Best,
Bryan Pfeiffer
-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
Subject: One too many Semipalmated Plovers at Delta Park
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 19:35:46 -0400
Whoops! Make that a Semipalmated Sandpiper foraging on the beach in the last 
sentence of my post. 



My bad.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington


A Black-bellied Plover replaced the Red Knot on the sandbar south of Delta Park 
this afternoon. This plover was the only shorebird that I could see on the bar 
amid the expected gulls and a flock of Canada Geese. A Merlin was patrolling 
the shoreline along with two Belted Kingfishers, two GB Herons, and a Great 
Egret. Two Semipalmated Plovers and a Semipalmated Plover were seen foraging on 
the beach, as well. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington


Subject: Black-bellied Plover at Delta Park
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 18:57:07 -0400
A Black-bellied Plover replaced the Red Knot on the sandbar south of Delta Park 
this afternoon. This plover was the only shorebird that I could see on the bar 
amid the expected gulls and a flock of Canada Geese. A Merlin was patrolling 
the shoreline along with two Belted Kingfishers, two GB Herons, and a Great 
Egret. Two Semipalmated Plovers and a Semipalmated Plover were seen foraging on 
the beach, as well. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington

Subject: Re: Audubon releases new Birds and climate change report
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 13:23:33 -0400
Great Jim!
Thanks for sharing, and for all you do.
Scott Sainsbury
Moretown


On Sep 9, 2014, at 10:37 AM, Jim Shallow  wrote:

> The Audubon Birds and Climate Change Report is a first-of-its-kind study that 
predicts how climate change could affect the ranges of 588 North American 
birds. A product of seven years of research, the report calls upon three 
decades of citizen-scientist observations from the 

> Audubon Christmas Bird Count and the North American Breeding Bird Survey to 
define the ideal climatic range for each bird speciesthe range of 
temperatures, precipitation, and seasonal changes each needs to survive. Then, 
Audubon scientists mapped where each birds ideal climate range might be found 
in the future as the climate changes. The results: Nearly half of the bird 
species in the continental U.S. and Canada are seriously threatened by 2080, 
and without action, many are at risk of extinction. Here in Vermont, 140 
species are threatened by climate change. These include our state bird the 
Hermit Thrush, the Black-throated Blue Warbler and the Common Loon. To view 
interactive future range maps for the 314 most at-risk species, visit 
audubon.org/climate. Thank you to all who have participated in Christmas Bird 
Counts and Breeding Bird Surveys for gathering the data that made this study 
possible! 

> -jim
>