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Updated on Saturday, October 25 at 02:08 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Scaled Quail,©David Sibley

25 Oct Golden Eagle ["Flewelling, Joel" ]
25 Oct No Common Eiders so far [Eric Hynes ]
25 Oct Evening grosbeaks! [Marcia Baker ]
25 Oct Ross's Goose in Addison [Jim Mead ]
24 Oct Common Eiders at Lake Bomoseen [Fred and Chris Pratt ]
24 Oct Eider [Sue ]
24 Oct Dead Creek Brilyea Golden Eagle [Charles Harcourt ]
24 Oct Black-bellied Plover at Shelburne Bay [Bruce MacPherson ]
23 Oct Retraction: Bunting, not Longspur [UVM ]
23 Oct Lapland Longspur, Essex [UVM ]
23 Oct Grackles [Sue ]
23 Oct longtailed duck- Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Oct 23, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
23 Oct Scoteriffic [David Johnston ]
23 Oct Kent Pond amended [Susan Elliott ]
23 Oct Fw: Long-tailed Duck and Scoters - Kent Pond, Killington [Susan Elliott ]
23 Oct Re: A flight to remember [Ruth ]
23 Oct Re: A flight to remember [Kent McFarland ]
22 Oct A flight to remember [Chris Rimmer ]
22 Oct Migration today in Stowe [Liz Lackey ]
21 Oct Tree sparrows have arrived [Veer Frost ]
21 Oct NEK Red-bellied Woodpecker [Bill & Jeanne Prue ]
21 Oct White-eyed vireo on NH side of CT ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
21 Oct Lynx to Loons: Celebration of the 40th Anniversary of the Endangered Species Act [Allan Strong ]
20 Oct Dunlinfest and Hudsonian Godwit in Highgate Springs [Eric Hynes ]
20 Oct Re: Bob Spear [Evergreen Erb ]
20 Oct Re: Bob Spear ["paulagills tds.net" ]
20 Oct Bob Spear [Bryan Pfeiffer ]
20 Oct Book [Sue ]
20 Oct Dark-eyed juncos [Kim Sargeant ]
19 Oct CBC dates? [Eric Cannizzaro ]
19 Oct Missisquoi shorebirds questions [Eric Hynes ]
19 Oct Bob Spear 1920-2014 [E Talmage ]
18 Oct Re: Shelburne Bay [Patti Haynes ]
18 Oct Shelburne Bay [Michele Patenaude ]
18 Oct The Snow Goose Scoop [Bryan Pfeiffer ]
18 Oct parking and scoping at Shipyard Road/Dead Creek [Liz Lackey ]
18 Oct Vernon pipits, warblers, lapspur, etc ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
18 Oct Who cooks for you? [Ruth ]
17 Oct Re: Night hawk migration [Jean Harrison ]
17 Oct Re: Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler ["Nancy A. Brown" ]
17 Oct Re: Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler [Fred and Chris Pratt ]
17 Oct dickcissel- Maple St, Brandon, Oct 17, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
17 Oct Fw: eBird Report - Catamount Family Center, Oct 17, 2014 [Carl Runge ]
17 Oct Rarity!!!! [Sue ]
16 Oct Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler [Chris Rimmer ]
16 Oct juncos [Ruth ]
16 Oct Carolina Wren [Veer Frost ]
15 Oct Phoebe, ladybugs, harrier, white-crowned sparrow [Walter Medwid ]
15 Oct Re: Night hawk migration [Liz Lackey ]
15 Oct Night hawk migration [Liz Lackey ]
15 Oct Important upgrades in the eBird submission process [Kent McFarland ]
15 Oct Brown Booby, Grand Isle, Oct 15 [David Hoag ]
15 Oct Vesper sparrow at Brattleboro ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
14 Oct snow geese, Addison Goose Viewing Area [Karan Cutler ]
14 Oct Bomoseen State Park 13 October [Marvin Elliott ]
13 Oct Re: Orange-crowned Warbler [Jean Harrison ]
13 Oct Re: VTBIRD Digest - 10 Oct 2014 to 11 Oct 2014 (#2014-281) [Blake Allison ]
13 Oct Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
13 Oct Re: Orange-crowned Warbler [Sue ]
13 Oct Re: Orange-crowned Warbler [Jean Harrison ]
13 Oct Kinglets [Sue ]
13 Oct Evening grosbeaks [Sue ]
13 Oct Eurasian Wigeon? [Maeve Kim ]
13 Oct Orange-crowned Warbler [b flewelling ]
13 Oct Rough-legged Hawk, Randolph [Clifford Seifer ]
13 Oct UNSUBSCRIBE [Mundi Smithers ]
13 Oct Grosbeaks [Sue ]
12 Oct unsubscribe [Ruth ]
12 Oct American Avocet in Highgate [Jim Mead ]
12 Oct Red Crossbill [Michele Patenaude ]
12 Oct first-of-fall juncos back [Veer Frost ]
12 Oct Juncos [Marcia Baker ]
12 Oct Tree sparrow [Sue ]
12 Oct Re: EABLs in the birdbath [Janet Warren ]
11 Oct Whiney Creek WMA [Gary Chapin ]
11 Oct Cackling Goose in Burlington [Jim Mead ]

Subject: Golden Eagle
From: "Flewelling, Joel" <Joel.Flewelling AT STATE.VT.US>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:40:04 +0000
I got to witness a Golden Eagle chase a whitetail fawn through the woods in 
Pawlet, near Haystack Mountain, at about 12:00 If you are in that area, keep 
your eyes out for it. 

Subject: No Common Eiders so far
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:14:59 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

Just an update -- no Common Eider sightings at Lake Bomoseen this morning
as of 0930.

A few WW Scoters and Black Scoters seen as well as single Ruddy Duck,
Red-throated Loon, American Coot, and Red-necked Grebe.

Good birding,
Eric

.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Evening grosbeaks!
From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 09:54:46 -0400
Three male evening grosbeaks in Brownsville just now.

Marcia Baker

Sent from my iPad

> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Ross's Goose in Addison
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 02:10:43 -0400
Hi all,

I was at the Goose Viewing Area on Rte. 17 and was able to pick out an adult 
Ross's Goose in flight. It with only 4 Snow Geese at the time making it quite 
easy to ID. The visibility was quite good and I saw it for about 1 minute. They 
were heading east and touched down joining many other Geese, in the field just 
east of the tree line that borders the Goose Viewing Area. I drove to Gage Rd. 
and could see the group but did not set up my scope because it was raining a 
bit and the wind was blowing toward me (north wind) from there. I saw it at 
4:16 p.m. 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Common Eiders at Lake Bomoseen
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 20:18:09 -0400
Just an additional comment on the Common Eiders at Lake Bomoseen. All three
birds were adult males. Team Pipit found them at about 3:30 in the
afternoon and they were still present about an hour later when we left.
These were the first male Common Eiders we have seen in more than 40 years
of birding in Vermont. Will have to check my records to determine whether
we have seen young or female Common Eiders previously....

Pipit
Subject: Eider
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:15:21 -0400
Three common eider were seen late this afternoon on L Bomoseen south of Crystal 
Beach. They were in a flick of all three scoters ! Red- throated and common 
loons, red-necked grebes were also present. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Dead Creek Brilyea Golden Eagle
From: Charles Harcourt <cfharcourt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:00:45 -0400
Went out to watch the Snow Geese today, which put on quite a show. I
estimated well over 500 birds spiraling in the sky and more on the far pond
from the goose viewing area. The dirt road to Brilyea Access was also very
productive. Juncos, White-crowned Sparrows, Tree Sparrows, and Song
Sparrows were all present. Two Ruby-crowned Kinglets hopped and hid around
a raspberry bush. Mallards and 2 Great Blue Egrets active in the creek.
But the moment of excitement came from what I am 99% sure was a Golden
Eagle. I felt crazy thinking this, but nothing else added up, dark brown
under with lighter wing patches, fanned tail, held wings in a bit of a
v-shape, Following it with binoculars, I ruled out basically everything but
a Juvenile Bald Eagle (but this guy was big!). It soared away towards the
cornfield, but later I heard a loud gull-like call that seemed to match the
Golden's call. Anyone else seen this eagle?

-Charlie Harcourt
Subject: Black-bellied Plover at Shelburne Bay
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 18:26:06 -0400
A strong northwest wind continued to pin down a variety of waterfowl, 
shorebirds, and gulls at Shelburne Bay this afternoon. Among the crowd were a 
Black-bellied Plover and 10 Greater Yellowlegs. Bonaparte Gulls were abundant 
(54), but I was unable to pick out the Little Gull reported a few days ago. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington

Subject: Retraction: Bunting, not Longspur
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 21:37:58 -0400
After further review, this bird was a Snow Bunting, not a Lapland Longspur. 
Sorry for the crossed neurons. 


Scott 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lapland Longspur, Essex
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 19:22:33 -0400
A Lapland Longspur was present this evening (5:00 - 6:00 PM) along the entrance 
road to The Links at Lang Farm in Essex. It was usually sticking to the north 
side of the road, in the gravel areas and between the road and sidewalk. 
Originally with a flock of Dark-eyed Juncos; it was the only bird in sight when 
I departed at 6:00 in the rain and gloom. 


Scott Morrical

South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Grackles
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 16:10:42 -0400
Two large flocks of grackles were seen today---one about 150 strong here in 
Brandon the other near Rutland. Rain didn't seem to be a problem. 

Also seen---- two flocks of turkeys just north of Rutland along with a murder 
of crows. Kent Pond was active with waterfowl. With umbrella deployed I saw 
long tailed duck, black and surf scoters and a loon. Rain was torrential so I 
missed some of the others seen by the Elliotts earlier in the morning. On the 
way home along Rt 7 four deer were feeding in a field. None had umbrellas. 


Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: longtailed duck- Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Oct 23, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 19:37:31 +0000
When the weather is horrible birders in the Rutland area head to Kent Pond in 
Killington. It has 

been the spot for past rarities and today offered the following species. 
However standing in the pouring 

rain with a large umbrella and trying to use my scope was a challenge. 
  
Sue Wetmore 
----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 3:31:11 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Oct 23, 2014 

Kent Pond - Killington (99 acres), Rutland, US-VT 
Oct 23, 2014 11:30 AM - 11:55 AM 
Protocol: Stationary 
Comments:     weather hard rain and cold. 
3 species (+1 other taxa) 

Black Scoter  9 
Surf/Black Scoter  2 
Long-tailed Duck  1 
Common Loon  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20315658 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Scoteriffic
From: David Johnston <dakk21 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:13:01 -0400
The weather cooperated in creating a scoteriffic morning above Vernon Dam with 
a tight raft of 30 Black Scoters and a separate raft of 6 Surf Scoters 
including one adult male. Also present- 1Pied-billed Grebe, 2 D-c Cormorants, 1 
C. Merganser, 2 Black Ducks, 2 Mallards, and 1 R-b Gull. 

Subject: Kent Pond amended
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:49:56 +0000
Make that Surf Scoter on Kent Pond, not white-winged. Slip of the fingers in my 
excitement. 

Canada Goose  30    overhead
Wood Duck  1
American Black Duck  2
Mallard  1
Ring-necked Duck  2
Surf Scoter  2
Long-tailed Duck  1
Hooded Merganser  1
Common Loon  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
American Robin  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  3

Sue Elliott
Subject: Fw: Long-tailed Duck and Scoters - Kent Pond, Killington
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:43:39 +0000
Miserable weather, but a terrific assortment of ducks on Kent Pond this 
morning: 

14 species

Canada Goose  30    overhead
Wood Duck  1
American Black Duck  2
Mallard  1
Ring-necked Duck  2
Surf Scoter  1
White-winged Scoter  2
Long-tailed Duck  1
Hooded Merganser  1
Common Loon  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
American Robin  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  3

http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/kentpond/

Sue Elliott    
Subject: Re: A flight to remember
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:30:19 -0400
I'm so envious!! But living it vicariously is better than not at all! Thanks. 


Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT


> Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:11:48 -0400
> From: crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG
> Subject: [VTBIRD] A flight to remember
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> Several of us, in tow behind Ted Murin and Big Bertha, parked ourselves 
> at the Shelburne Bay access this afternoon and were treated to a 
> spectacle that we may never again experience in our birding lifetimes.  
> The strong northerly winds precipitated a show-stopping southward flight 
> of Turkey Vultures and Red-tailed Hawks.  We arrived at 1 pm and 
> initially focused on lake and shoreline birds, which included a female 
> American Wigeon, 2 Greater Yellowlegs, and a lone Sanderling.  We soon 
> took notice of the impressive flight taking place overhead and began 
> keeping track, which was challenging, as birds were spread far and wide, 
> at varying heights above ground.  Our counts of TVs and Red-tails are 
> definitely lower than actual, probably by 25% or more.  We were jokingly 
> confident that a Golden Eagle would appear (and we may well have missed 
> one), but that hadn't happened by our 4 pm departure, at which point the 
> Red-tail flight had dwindled to a trickle, though vultures were still 
> moving.  We were hardly disappointed overall.
> 
> Ted did some preliminary digging this evening and reports that the 
> previous recorded high count for Red-tailed Hawk in VT is 324 birds on 
> 10/20/91 in White River Junction.  However, he recalls that counts in 
> the 400s or higher may have been recorded from the Champlain Valley some 
> years ago, though these are likely buried in old hawkwatch reports and 
> need to be retrieved.  Whether today's 3-hour count constitutes a new 
> single-day record or not, had we been stationed there from mid-morning 
> onward, there can be no doubt we'd have eclipsed the previous high.
> 
> An immature Little Gull in flight was observed clearly during several 
> minutes over the middle of the bay, in the company of Bonaparte's Gulls.
> 
> A memorable 3 hours of birding, to say the least.  Highlights are below.
> 
> Chris
> 
> Shelburne bay fishing access, Chittenden, US-VT
> Oct 22, 2014 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments: With Ted Murin, Paul Wieczoreck, Ali Wagner and Pat Folsom. Steve 
Antell, Larry Haugh, and Bruce MacPherson present for some of the 3 hours 

> 27 species
> 
> Snow Goose  1     flying east to west over middle of bay
> Canada Goose  85
> American Wigeon  1
> Mallard  65
> Green-winged Teal (American)  10
> White-winged Scoter  97
> Common Merganser  12
> Common Loon  5
> Double-crested Cormorant  4
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Turkey Vulture 354 An absolute minimum count, and we probably missed (or 
failed to count) ~25% of the total number of birds that passed by during our 3 
hours of observation. Most were moving southward over the east shore of bay, 
but some crossed from Red Rocks to Shelburne Point, while others crossed over 
middle of bay itself. An impressive spectacle, to say the least 

> Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 All identified by Ted Murin with the aid of Big Bertha 

> Bald Eagle  3
> Red-tailed Hawk 359 As for Turkey Vulture, this count is undoubtedly low, 
probably by 25% or more of the actual number that passed. Birds passed 
southward at all heights, from 100 feet to >500 feet, from middle of bay to 
nearly out of sight along east shore, in groups that ranged from kettles of >25 
to singles of 2s and 3s. Some were mixed in with vulture flocks. Impossible to 
have accurately counted all birds passing by, and there could well have been 
>500. 

> Greater Yellowlegs  2
> Sanderling  1
> Bonaparte's Gull  35
> Little Gull 1 First identified by Ali Wagner as it flew over middle of bay 
with Bonaparte's Gulls, confirmed by Ted Murin through his Big Bertha scope. 
Notable for smaller size, distinctive dark 'M' wing pattern, lack of white 
patch in outer primaries 

> American Kestrel  3
> American Crow X A prolonged loose stream moving south along east shore of bay 
- concentrated over ~1.5 hours from 1:30-3. There could easily have been 2000 
birds, but 1500 is a minimum estimate. Too diffuse and distant to accurately 
count 

> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20310835 

> 
> -- 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> P.O. Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
> www.vtecostudies.org
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: A flight to remember
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 06:35:17 -0400
A quick look at Vermont eBird high count tool - see

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/sightings?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-VT&continuous=true&listType=high_count 

shows the high count for Red-tailed Hawk was Roy Pilcher at Mt. Philo on
Oct. 19, 1995 with 230.
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  




On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 11:11 PM, Chris Rimmer 
wrote:

> Several of us, in tow behind Ted Murin and Big Bertha, parked ourselves at
> the Shelburne Bay access this afternoon and were treated to a spectacle
> that we may never again experience in our birding lifetimes.  The strong
> northerly winds precipitated a show-stopping southward flight of Turkey
> Vultures and Red-tailed Hawks.  We arrived at 1 pm and initially focused on
> lake and shoreline birds, which included a female American Wigeon, 2
> Greater Yellowlegs, and a lone Sanderling.  We soon took notice of the
> impressive flight taking place overhead and began keeping track, which was
> challenging, as birds were spread far and wide, at varying heights above
> ground.  Our counts of TVs and Red-tails are definitely lower than actual,
> probably by 25% or more.  We were jokingly confident that a Golden Eagle
> would appear (and we may well have missed one), but that hadn't happened by
> our 4 pm departure, at which point the Red-tail flight had dwindled to a
> trickle, though vultures were still moving.  We were hardly disappointed
> overall.
>
> Ted did some preliminary digging this evening and reports that the
> previous recorded high count for Red-tailed Hawk in VT is 324 birds on
> 10/20/91 in White River Junction.  However, he recalls that counts in the
> 400s or higher may have been recorded from the Champlain Valley some years
> ago, though these are likely buried in old hawkwatch reports and need to be
> retrieved.  Whether today's 3-hour count constitutes a new single-day
> record or not, had we been stationed there from mid-morning onward, there
> can be no doubt we'd have eclipsed the previous high.
>
> An immature Little Gull in flight was observed clearly during several
> minutes over the middle of the bay, in the company of Bonaparte's Gulls.
>
> A memorable 3 hours of birding, to say the least.  Highlights are below.
>
> Chris
>
> Shelburne bay fishing access, Chittenden, US-VT
> Oct 22, 2014 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     With Ted Murin, Paul Wieczoreck, Ali Wagner and Pat Folsom.
> Steve Antell, Larry Haugh, and Bruce MacPherson present for some of the 3
> hours
> 27 species
>
> Snow Goose  1     flying east to west over middle of bay
> Canada Goose  85
> American Wigeon  1
> Mallard  65
> Green-winged Teal (American)  10
> White-winged Scoter  97
> Common Merganser  12
> Common Loon  5
> Double-crested Cormorant  4
> Great Blue Heron  2
> Turkey Vulture  354     An absolute minimum count, and we probably missed
> (or failed to count) ~25% of the total number of birds that passed by
> during our 3 hours of observation.  Most were moving southward over the
> east shore of bay, but some crossed from Red Rocks to Shelburne Point,
> while others crossed over middle of bay itself.  An impressive spectacle,
> to say the least
> Sharp-shinned Hawk  3     All identified by Ted Murin with the aid of Big
> Bertha
> Bald Eagle  3
> Red-tailed Hawk  359     As for Turkey Vulture, this count is undoubtedly
> low, probably by 25% or more of the actual number that passed.  Birds
> passed southward at all heights, from 100 feet to >500 feet, from middle of
> bay to nearly out of sight along east shore, in groups that ranged from
> kettles of >25 to singles of 2s and 3s.  Some were mixed in with vulture
> flocks.  Impossible to have accurately counted all birds passing by, and
> there could well have been >500.
> Greater Yellowlegs  2
> Sanderling  1
> Bonaparte's Gull  35
> Little Gull  1     First identified by Ali Wagner as it flew over middle
> of bay with Bonaparte's Gulls, confirmed by Ted Murin through his Big
> Bertha scope.  Notable for smaller size, distinctive dark 'M' wing pattern,
> lack of white patch in outer primaries
> American Kestrel  3
> American Crow  X     A prolonged loose stream moving south along east
> shore of bay - concentrated over ~1.5 hours from 1:30-3.  There could
> easily have been 2000 birds, but 1500 is a minimum estimate.  Too diffuse
> and distant to accurately count
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
> checklist?subID=S20310835
>
> --
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> P.O. Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
> www.vtecostudies.org
>
Subject: A flight to remember
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:11:48 -0400
Several of us, in tow behind Ted Murin and Big Bertha, parked ourselves 
at the Shelburne Bay access this afternoon and were treated to a 
spectacle that we may never again experience in our birding lifetimes.  
The strong northerly winds precipitated a show-stopping southward flight 
of Turkey Vultures and Red-tailed Hawks.  We arrived at 1 pm and 
initially focused on lake and shoreline birds, which included a female 
American Wigeon, 2 Greater Yellowlegs, and a lone Sanderling.  We soon 
took notice of the impressive flight taking place overhead and began 
keeping track, which was challenging, as birds were spread far and wide, 
at varying heights above ground.  Our counts of TVs and Red-tails are 
definitely lower than actual, probably by 25% or more.  We were jokingly 
confident that a Golden Eagle would appear (and we may well have missed 
one), but that hadn't happened by our 4 pm departure, at which point the 
Red-tail flight had dwindled to a trickle, though vultures were still 
moving.  We were hardly disappointed overall.

Ted did some preliminary digging this evening and reports that the 
previous recorded high count for Red-tailed Hawk in VT is 324 birds on 
10/20/91 in White River Junction.  However, he recalls that counts in 
the 400s or higher may have been recorded from the Champlain Valley some 
years ago, though these are likely buried in old hawkwatch reports and 
need to be retrieved.  Whether today's 3-hour count constitutes a new 
single-day record or not, had we been stationed there from mid-morning 
onward, there can be no doubt we'd have eclipsed the previous high.

An immature Little Gull in flight was observed clearly during several 
minutes over the middle of the bay, in the company of Bonaparte's Gulls.

A memorable 3 hours of birding, to say the least.  Highlights are below.

Chris

Shelburne bay fishing access, Chittenden, US-VT
Oct 22, 2014 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: With Ted Murin, Paul Wieczoreck, Ali Wagner and Pat Folsom. Steve 
Antell, Larry Haugh, and Bruce MacPherson present for some of the 3 hours 

27 species

Snow Goose  1     flying east to west over middle of bay
Canada Goose  85
American Wigeon  1
Mallard  65
Green-winged Teal (American)  10
White-winged Scoter  97
Common Merganser  12
Common Loon  5
Double-crested Cormorant  4
Great Blue Heron  2
Turkey Vulture 354 An absolute minimum count, and we probably missed (or failed 
to count) ~25% of the total number of birds that passed by during our 3 hours 
of observation. Most were moving southward over the east shore of bay, but some 
crossed from Red Rocks to Shelburne Point, while others crossed over middle of 
bay itself. An impressive spectacle, to say the least 

Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 All identified by Ted Murin with the aid of Big Bertha 

Bald Eagle  3
Red-tailed Hawk 359 As for Turkey Vulture, this count is undoubtedly low, 
probably by 25% or more of the actual number that passed. Birds passed 
southward at all heights, from 100 feet to >500 feet, from middle of bay to 
nearly out of sight along east shore, in groups that ranged from kettles of >25 
to singles of 2s and 3s. Some were mixed in with vulture flocks. Impossible to 
have accurately counted all birds passing by, and there could well have been 
>500. 

Greater Yellowlegs  2
Sanderling  1
Bonaparte's Gull  35
Little Gull 1 First identified by Ali Wagner as it flew over middle of bay with 
Bonaparte's Gulls, confirmed by Ted Murin through his Big Bertha scope. Notable 
for smaller size, distinctive dark 'M' wing pattern, lack of white patch in 
outer primaries 

American Kestrel  3
American Crow X A prolonged loose stream moving south along east shore of bay - 
concentrated over ~1.5 hours from 1:30-3. There could easily have been 2000 
birds, but 1500 is a minimum estimate. Too diffuse and distant to accurately 
count 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20310835 


-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Migration today in Stowe
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 22:15:16 -0400
The low clouds, spits of rain, and strong N wind allowed for a good migration 
of Red Tail Hawks over Stowe today. 11 birds in 45 minutes seen mid -day, and 
27 birds between 2:30 and 4:30pm. Osprey, Peregrine, No. Harriers, Sharpies and 
Coops were seen as well. And the final push of the day was 3906 American Crows 
streaming down the valley. This aerial river lasted for 20 minutes. 


This past Sunday also had similar weather conditions. In the morning I counted 
18 Red Tails in 45 minutes. 66 Eastern Bluebirds (9 different flocks with the 
largest having 15 birds) and of course scads of Canada Geese skeining overhead 
both days. I havent tallied up those numbers yet. 


I had planned to go to the Champlain Valley to check on waterfowl migration, 
but didnt get past my front step. North wind, low clouds and spits of rain 
this time of year? LOOK UP!!!!! 


I marvel at migration,

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT
Subject: Tree sparrows have arrived
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:33:30 -0700
I counted nine, plus a lone Whitethroat with them, skimming the grasses for 
bugs, this was yesterday in the last sun. 


____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: NEK Red-bellied Woodpecker
From: Bill & Jeanne Prue <wjprue AT JEANNERAECRAFTS.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:42:07 -0400
10/21 Red-bellied woodpecker in our yard, first time ever!

Jeanne & Bill Prue, Newport
Subject: White-eyed vireo on NH side of CT
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:51:11 -0400
For those Windham County birders not too proud to cross the river, there was a 
white-eyed vireo at Hinsdale this morning. It was at the upriver of the two 
parking areas. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Lynx to Loons: Celebration of the 40th Anniversary of the Endangered Species Act
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 08:37:24 -0400
Dear Vermont Birders,

I wanted to spread the word about an all day symposium on Thursday 
celebrating the legacy of the Endangered Species Act and Vermont's 
experience protecting our most vulnerable species.  Apologies for being 
late in sending out a note.

The symposium is next Thursday, the 23rd, from 8:30 to 4:30 at the ECHO 
Center.

Keynote speakers include Joe Roman, Author and Hardy Fellow in 
Conservation Biology, Harvard University and Collin O’Mara, President 
and CEO, National Wildlife Federation—and panels of experts will examine 
the future for conservation biology and discuss the challenges ahead for 
preserving Vermont's natural heritage. Other panelists biologists from 
Vermont Fish and Wildlife, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service as well 
as a number of NGOs.

Perhaps of interest to us in Vermont is Chad Wilsey, who worked on the 
models for Audubon's new climate change assessment.

More details about the conference can be found here:
http://www.anr.state.vt.us/site/html/L2L.htm
This link is to the agenda:
http://www.anr.state.vt.us/site/html/L2Lagenda.htm

Registration is $15, which includes lunch from Sugar Snap.

Additionally, that evening, the Vermont Natural Resources Council will 
be holding their Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival at Main Street Landing.

I hope you can attend what will be an interesting and provocative event.

Allan

-- 
**************************************************
Allan M. Strong
Rubenstein School of Env and Natural Resources
200L Aiken Center
81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
**************************************************
Subject: Dunlinfest and Hudsonian Godwit in Highgate Springs
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:48:20 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

Three cheers to the VT birding community. My request for information was
met with multiple courteous and insightful responses. No surprise there,
but it was truly appreciated.

I launched my canoe this morning at the little access point off Shipyard
Road in Highgate Springs and paddled across Goose Bay to the mouth of Dead
Creek.

All of the shorebirds I could find were concentrated just to the east of
the mouth of the creek. They were mostly roosting on driftwood logs or
standing in the shallows. Considering where in the world I was, it shocked
me to see 106 Dunlin. All the Dunlin I got close enough to scrutinize were
juveniles molting into basic/first winter plumage. Conspicuously larger
among the Dunlin were 16 Black-bellied Plovers. The BBPL also appeared to
be all juveniles. Two White-rumped Sandpipers and a Pectoral Sandpiper
added some diversity.

I was starting to think I was going to dip on both rarities when a
Hudsonian Godwit came flying in high from the west and settled down near
the Dunlin horde.

No sign of the American Avocet during the hour and a half that I was out
there but there is a ton of habitat to the west that I didn't cover.

Other noteworthy species were a Bald Eagle, a Peregrine Falcon with a
shorebird in its talons, and two White-winged Scoters.

A couple FYIs:

1. If you intend to visit the area by boat/canoe/kayak, I recommend
bringing a scope. The area around the mouth is very shallow. Also there are
a bunch of posted signs of no trespassing stuck way out into the lake
(struck me as odd that you could be in a boat on the lake and trespass?) in
this area. The substrate in these shallows was quiet firm. I wish I had my
scope with me so I could stand in boot deep water beyond the posted signs,
with my back to the sun, and study them better. I'm sure I might have
overlooked a few goodies.

2. Be aware that the area immediately to the west, Big Marsh Slough, is a
popular duck hunting spot. The din of shotgun blasts kept me from traveling
up Dead Creek or to the west.

Beautiful morning to be out.

Cheers,
Eric

.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Re: Bob Spear
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:45:02 -0400
Thank you for the lovely tribute to Bob, Bryan. I have known him since the mid 
1970s and he was a mentor and friend. It was from Bob and from Fran Howe that I 
learned the first rudiments of birding. I was fortunate enough to go birding 
bunches of times with Bob, and I always learned so much, and had a great time 
too. He was a one of a kind, and it is truly the end of an era with his 
passing. I will miss seeing him at the museum, but Im so grateful for the 
lasting legacy of his carvings. They are one of Vermonts treasures, and I am 
so glad I was able to be a small part of the beginning of the museum. Warmly, 
Evergreen Erb 

Subject: Re: Bob Spear
From: "paulagills tds.net" <paulagills AT TDS.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:30:13 -0400
Thanks for this. Great job capturing Bob and his artistry.  What a
monumental loss.  I have belonged to the museum for years and taken many
people there who just stand with their mouths open!  Paula

On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 5:03 PM, Bryan Pfeiffer 
wrote:

> Greeting, VTBIRDers:
>
> For those of you who didn't know him, here are some thoughts on Bob Spear,
> who died yesterday but leaves us a legacy of birds and a lesson about a
> life well-lived.
> http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2014/10/20/bob-spear-1920-2014/
>
> Best,
> Bryan Pfeiffer
> --
> bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
> http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
>



-- 
*Birds were the earth's first musicians.*
                                    *Olivier Messiaen*
Subject: Bob Spear
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan AT BRYANPFEIFFER.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:03:02 -0400
Greeting, VTBIRDers:

For those of you who didn't know him, here are some thoughts on Bob 
Spear, who died yesterday but leaves us a legacy of birds and a lesson 
about a life well-lived.
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2014/10/20/bob-spear-1920-2014/

Best,
Bryan Pfeiffer
-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
Subject: Book
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:34:32 -0400
Does anyone have a copy of Henry Potter's fern book? Please answer me off line 
at my email: 

2birdvt AT comcast.net

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Dark-eyed juncos
From: Kim Sargeant <grammiekims AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 12:06:26 -0400
Seen this forenoon working a parking area on Baldwin Street, Montpelier, VT
My first sight of them this season.

Kim Sargeant
Subject: CBC dates?
From: Eric Cannizzaro <oporornis.p AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 14:02:06 -0700
Hi,

I'm wondering if the CBC dates for this year have been decided/ compiled,
and where to find them.

Thanks,

Eric Cannizzaro
Subject: Missisquoi shorebirds questions
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 14:39:37 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

First and foremost, I would love to see a post(s) about any efforts today
to locate the regionally rare shorebirds previously reported up at the
mouth of the Missisquoi River.

I've got several questions about birding the Dead Creek Outlet.

It seems this shorebirding hotspot can best be viewed from Shipyard Road.
My questions are:

1. Is there a canoe access point off Shipyard Road?
2. If no to question 1, where is the best place to launch a canoe to try
for the Hudwit, etc?
3. I finally have a free morning tomorrow and intend to head up there early
with my canoe and return no later than noon. A second (or third I suppose)
able-bodied birder in the canoe would be welcomed. If you are interested in
joining me (leave Burlington at 0600ish), please reply to this email
directly to me (OFF the listserv).

Thanks so much,
Eric

.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Bob Spear 1920-2014
From: E Talmage <bovm_erin AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 13:33:01 -0400
We are saddened to announce that Bob Spear, friend, teacher, carver,
naturalist, father, partner, and so much more, passed away on Sunday,
October 19, 2014, surrounded by family and friends.

We at the Birds of Vermont Museum extend our deep condolences to everyone
who knew him. We are and always will be grateful for all Bob shared with
us: his passion for birds, his gift with wood, his constancy, persistence,
dry humor, and deep knowledge.

We will pass on information about further arrangements when we learn of
them.

You are welcome to call or write to us; we will pass messages to his family
as well. Please stay in touch.

*Erin Talmage*, Executive Director
*Shirley Johnson*, Board of Trustees Chair
and the Museum Staff and Board members

Birds of Vermont Museum
900 Sherman Hollow Road
Huntington, VT 05462
802-434-2167
www.birdsofvermont.org
Subject: Re: Shelburne Bay
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:36:08 -0400
So, in your opinion, what was your 'best' sighting?
I'd go with the Murin ;)

On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 4:33 PM, Michele Patenaude 
wrote:

> A Semipalmated Plover, 19 Pectoral Sandpipers, about 20 Greater
> Yellowlegs, a Ruddy Duck, and Ted Murin were highlights of a wet afternoon
> at Shelburne Bay.
>
> Michele Patenaude
> 172 Woodbury Road
> Burlington, VT 05408
> 802-862-4085
>
Subject: Shelburne Bay
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:33:25 -0400
A Semipalmated Plover, 19 Pectoral Sandpipers, about 20 Greater Yellowlegs, a 
Ruddy Duck, and Ted Murin were highlights of a wet afternoon at Shelburne Bay. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085
Subject: The Snow Goose Scoop
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan AT BRYANPFEIFFER.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:01:00 -0400
Greetings, VTBIRDers:

Meeting all your Greater Snow Goose needs since, well, at least since 2014:
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/the-snow-goose-scoop/

Best,
Bryan Pfeiffer
-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
Subject: parking and scoping at Shipyard Road/Dead Creek
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 13:17:59 -0400
Is it obvious where to park and scope for birds in the Dead Creek area from 
along Shipyard Rd in Highgate? May try to make it up there. 

Thanks,
Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT
Subject: Vernon pipits, warblers, lapspur, etc
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 13:02:57 -0400
This morning at Vernon there were 150 pipits in a flock with one calling 
lapspur flying with them. Also seen were a late yellow warbler, an equally late 
Wilson's, about 30 myrtles, one common yellowthroat, 15-20 eastern palms, a 
couple of catbirds, and a host of song, white-throated, white-crowned, savanna, 
and Lincoln's sparrows. Also around we're about 15 purple finches, an r-c 
kinglet. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Who cooks for you?
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 09:15:44 -0400
> Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 09:11:08 -0400
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, Oct 17, 2014
> 
> My yard birds, Bennington, US-VT
> Oct 17, 2014 6:00 PM
> Protocol: Incidental
> 1 species
> 
> Barred Owl  1     hooting behind house
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20263840 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Night hawk migration
From: Jean Harrison <seajean AT CRUZIO.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 20:21:33 -0700
Awesome.  Thanks, Liz.  Jean Harrison
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Liz Lackey" 
To: 
Sent: Wednesday, October 15, 2014 12:23 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Night hawk migration


> Here is the cut and paste version of the link to watch the nighthawk 
> flight.
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVAgKjc39u4
>
> Liz Lackey
> On Oct 15, 2014, at 10:49 AM, Liz Lackey  wrote:
>
>> I have yet to witness the Nighthawk migration in Vermont.  Stowe just 
>> doesnt seem to be on their route.  However, if you want to watch a video 
>> of their migration, check out the footage of this years passage of these 
>> birds over the Florida Keys Hawk Watch.
>> They recorded 4275 birds on Sept. 10.
>> Enjoy.
>> Liz Lackey
>>
>> 4275 Nighthawks! | Florida Keys Hawkwatch
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5315 / Virus Database: 4181/8393 - Release Date: 10/15/14
> 
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:58:31 -0400
Okay now it is more than a fluke! The Orange -crowned  I saw was right after 
looking at a Nashville.   Is it just because both are late migrants.  Or 
birds stick together, everywhere I find Chickadees calling there has been 
warblers with them.  Nancy at Danby, VT

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Fred and Chris Pratt" 
Sent: Friday, October 17, 2014 4:01 PM
To: 
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler

> Interesting. Twice this fall Team Pipit found late Nashville Warblers and
> twice suspected an Orange-crowned was also present. In both cases, we did
> not see the bird well enough to rule out Tennessee. Also, as you know, 
> some
> Orange-crowneds are devilishly similar to Nashvilles, showing broken 
> rather
> than complete eye circles. On one occasion I concluded that I had probably
> seen two Nashvilles.
>
> Pipit
>
> On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 9:34 PM, Chris Rimmer 
> wrote:
>
>> For a second time this month, today I found an Orange-crowned and
>> Nashville warbler foraging together.  They were in second growth scrub
>> behind the Norwich Racquet Club, off Rt. 5 near Fogg's Hardware.  I first
>> saw the Nashville, then the Orange-crowned, and I watched both forage 
>> side
>> by side in the same willow for ~2 minutes. It's likely pure coincidence
>> that the only two Orange-crowneds I've seen this fall were associating
>> closely with Nashvilles, but it has been striking both times.
>>
>> Highlights of birds seen here and around the Coop gardens:
>>
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
>> Blue-headed Vireo  1
>> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
>> American Robin  8
>> Orange-crowned Warbler  1
>> Nashville Warbler  1
>> Palm Warbler (Yellow)  2
>> Chipping Sparrow  6
>> Song Sparrow  8
>> Lincoln's Sparrow  1
>> White-throated Sparrow  8
>> White-crowned Sparrow  1
>> Pine Siskin  2     calling in flight
>>
>> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
>> checklist?subID=S20252635
>>
>> --
>> Chris Rimmer
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> P.O. Box 420
>> Norwich, VT 05055
>> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
>> www.vtecostudies.org
>>
> 
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:01:02 -0400
Interesting. Twice this fall Team Pipit found late Nashville Warblers and
twice suspected an Orange-crowned was also present. In both cases, we did
not see the bird well enough to rule out Tennessee. Also, as you know, some
Orange-crowneds are devilishly similar to Nashvilles, showing broken rather
than complete eye circles. On one occasion I concluded that I had probably
seen two Nashvilles.

Pipit

On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 9:34 PM, Chris Rimmer 
wrote:

> For a second time this month, today I found an Orange-crowned and
> Nashville warbler foraging together.  They were in second growth scrub
> behind the Norwich Racquet Club, off Rt. 5 near Fogg's Hardware.  I first
> saw the Nashville, then the Orange-crowned, and I watched both forage side
> by side in the same willow for ~2 minutes. It's likely pure coincidence
> that the only two Orange-crowneds I've seen this fall were associating
> closely with Nashvilles, but it has been striking both times.
>
> Highlights of birds seen here and around the Coop gardens:
>
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Blue-headed Vireo  1
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
> American Robin  8
> Orange-crowned Warbler  1
> Nashville Warbler  1
> Palm Warbler (Yellow)  2
> Chipping Sparrow  6
> Song Sparrow  8
> Lincoln's Sparrow  1
> White-throated Sparrow  8
> White-crowned Sparrow  1
> Pine Siskin  2     calling in flight
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
> checklist?subID=S20252635
>
> --
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> P.O. Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
> www.vtecostudies.org
>
Subject: dickcissel- Maple St, Brandon, Oct 17, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:08:26 +0000
This is the second time a DICKCISSEL has visited our yard. Last time was 
several years ago during the first week in December. 

Observed two blue jays engage in a real combat---both on the ground with much 
wing flapping and scuffling. No doubt over some peanuts. 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, October 17, 2014 1:04:06 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Maple St, Brandon, Oct 17, 2014 

Maple St, Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Oct 17, 2014 9:38 AM - 12:38 PM 
Protocol: Stationary 
14 species 

Mourning Dove  5 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Pileated Woodpecker  1 
Blue Jay  4 
Black-capped Chickadee  3 
Tufted Titmouse  2 
White-breasted Nuthatch  2 
Carolina Wren  1 
White-throated Sparrow  3 
White-crowned Sparrow (Eastern)  1 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Dickcissel  1     bird first heard calling a buzzy"zeet" note, landed 
briefly on the feeder and appeared to be either a female or imm. 

Purple Finch  5 
American Goldfinch  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20257117 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Catamount Family Center, Oct 17, 2014
From: Carl Runge <cfrun2 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:47:07 +0000
A good morning at Catamount for 16 folks from GMAS.  The south wind seemed to 
be holding back the migrants for a while.  Lots of kinglets and yellow-rumps, 
a nice collection of raptors, and the first Buffleheads recorded at this 
location. 

Carl


 On Friday, October 17, 2014 12:33 PM, "ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu" 
 wrote: 

   

 Catamount Family Center, Chittenden, US-VT
Oct 17, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments:    60F cloudy south wind
38 species

Canada Goose  35
Mallard  1
Bufflehead  3    First record this locale
Hooded Merganser  1
Turkey Vulture  3
Northern Harrier  3
Sharp-shinned Hawk  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Ring-billed Gull  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  2
American Kestrel  1
Merlin  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  12
Black-capped Chickadee  15
Tufted Titmouse  3
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  16    Common: undercounted
Eastern Bluebird  8
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  25    Abundant: undercounted
Gray Catbird  1
European Starling  17
Yellow-rumped Warbler  25    Abundant: under counted
Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  5
Swamp Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  35    Abundant: undercounted
White-crowned Sparrow  2
Dark-eyed Junco  4
Northern Cardinal  4
Red-winged Blackbird  20
Common Grackle  25
House Finch  3
Purple Finch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20256813 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)



Subject: Rarity!!!!
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 09:40:57 -0400
Dickcissel just blew thru my yard!!! I heard this weird buzz call and had a 
brief visual of the bird and then it left. The call note was the buzzy zeet . 
Second time for this species. 


Sent from my iPod
Subject: Orange-crowned and Nashville warbler
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 21:34:35 -0400
For a second time this month, today I found an Orange-crowned and 
Nashville warbler foraging together.  They were in second growth scrub 
behind the Norwich Racquet Club, off Rt. 5 near Fogg's Hardware.  I 
first saw the Nashville, then the Orange-crowned, and I watched both 
forage side by side in the same willow for ~2 minutes. It's likely pure 
coincidence that the only two Orange-crowneds I've seen this fall were 
associating closely with Nashvilles, but it has been striking both times.

Highlights of birds seen here and around the Coop gardens:

Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
American Robin  8
Orange-crowned Warbler  1
Nashville Warbler  1
Palm Warbler (Yellow)  2
Chipping Sparrow  6
Song Sparrow  8
Lincoln's Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  8
White-crowned Sparrow  1
Pine Siskin  2     calling in flight

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20252635

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: juncos
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:43:08 -0400
Have come, white-thr sparrows have gone.... but the grackles have not.  

Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT
 		 	   		  
Subject: Carolina Wren
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 04:49:55 -0700
Singing right now in light, warm rain!




____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Phoebe, ladybugs, harrier, white-crowned sparrow
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 16:38:19 -0400
The near 80 degree temperatures have brought hundreds of ladybugs out of
the siding's cracks and crevices. A phoebe has been working the sides of
the house in search of the easy meals. One bird broke into its spring call
note for about a minute. A female harrier cruised by very closely. It
looked very big that close up. White crowned sparrows are enjoying the
winter rye seeds  I planted in the garden. Peepers are calling from their
hibernation locations in the woodlands. From the border....Derby/Lake
Memphremagog.
Subject: Re: Night hawk migration
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 15:23:08 -0400
Here is the cut and paste version of the link to watch the nighthawk flight.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVAgKjc39u4

Liz Lackey
On Oct 15, 2014, at 10:49 AM, Liz Lackey  wrote:

> I have yet to witness the Nighthawk migration in Vermont. Stowe just doesnt 
seem to be on their route. However, if you want to watch a video of their 
migration, check out the footage of this years passage of these birds over the 
Florida Keys Hawk Watch. 

> They recorded 4275 birds on Sept. 10.
> Enjoy.
> Liz Lackey
> 
> 4275 Nighthawks! | Florida Keys Hawkwatch
Subject: Night hawk migration
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 10:49:53 -0400
I have yet to witness the Nighthawk migration in Vermont. Stowe just doesnt 
seem to be on their route. However, if you want to watch a video of their 
migration, check out the footage of this years passage of these birds over the 
Florida Keys Hawk Watch. 

They recorded 4275 birds on Sept. 10.
Enjoy.
Liz Lackey

4275 Nighthawks! | Florida Keys Hawkwatch
Subject: Important upgrades in the eBird submission process
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 10:27:57 -0400
Hi Birders,

We wanted to alert all of you to some changes that have been made on eBird
in the data submission process. You might have noticed recently three
changes in the eBird submission process.

(a) There is now a "historical" category added to the list of types of
observations.  It is for observations for which effort measures are not
available.  This is for use by birders putting into eBird their records
from years before there was eBird, and often those effort measures (number
of observers, duration, distance, and/or area) were not documented in those
days.  Providing the "historical" category simplifies eBird data for its
major analytical purposes.

(b) When you select "incidental" as your type of observation, eBird
automatically selects “No” for the question about "complete checklists".
Thus you no longer can have a checklist that is both "incidental" and
"complete".  This resolves a common misunderstanding about what an
"incidental" checklist is.

(c) And, if you submit a checklist with only one species and select "Yes"
for the question"Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you
were able to identify?" a big red box appears and asks you if it really is
a complete checklist.

The big red box question states:

"You have reported fewer than five taxa on a complete checklist of birds.
Answering 'yes' to 'Are you reporting all species?' implies that an effort
was made to record all species present, not just highlight species. Please
confirm that you understand this question or change it to 'no' if it was
not an effort to record all species present."

{The reference to five taxa is a typo and will soon be changed to say "one
species"}

The "complete checklist" question is very important in the application of
eBird records in many analyses and applications of the data.  For example,
any questions about which birds are common and which rare requires that
there is an effort to record all species detectable. It extends to all
checklists, not just those with a single species.

The lists of species are based on the observer putting in some effort to
record all species that they were able to identify by sight and/or sound.
 "Identify" means to name the species, or use a category such as
Lesser/Greater Scaup, Larus sp., dabbling duck, etc. as provided by eBird.

However, eBird has discovered that the Yes/No question was widely
misunderstood and incorrectly answered.  For example, they discovered that
tens of thousands of checklists recorded as "complete" for a Snowy Owl, or
other charismatic uncommon species, contained only that one species and
none of the other surrounding birds ... even if other species were in
photographs submitted.  This really made a mess of the data and rendered
them generally unusable for the basic eBird analyses.

Thus, to answer "Yes, this is a complete checklist" you should have "made
an effort to record all species present." In practice this means to record
all the birds you were able to detect by the common methods used by the
birding community, and to identify them to species or group as noted above.

Also, thankfully, it does not mean that specialized methods such as mist
netting, baiting, calling, stationary cameras, radar, etc. are necessary.
It also does not mean that you must spend any certain amount of time, cover
any specific acreage, travel a standard distance or increase the number of
observers .... since the effort measures capture all the variety of
everyday birding outings, and make the eBird data we all collect useful for
countless analyses locally and worldwide.

Thanks for your contributions to eBird.

Kent McFarland and the county coordinators at Vermont eBird

Special thanks to county coordinator Ian Worley for getting this
information together.
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  


Subject: Brown Booby, Grand Isle, Oct 15
From: David Hoag <SR71BLBRD AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 09:46:50 -0400
The adult Brown Booby flew north past the west shore 
of Grand Isle at 07:55 this morning, Oct 15,
and returned south, against the wind, at 08:25.

Dave Hoag, Grand Isle
Subject: Vesper sparrow at Brattleboro
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 09:21:06 -0400
This morning at the Marina fields were at least one, possibly two, vespers, not 
a common bird around here. Also still around a phoebe, two eastern palms, and a 
few Lincolns sparrows 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: snow geese, Addison Goose Viewing Area
From: Karan Cutler <kdcutler42 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 20:23:56 -0400
The snow geese are back! Several hundred visible the last three mornings.
Subject: Bomoseen State Park 13 October
From: Marvin Elliott <vtbirdhouses AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 06:40:10 -0700
A red-necked grebe was seen yesterday at Bomoseen State Park.
There was a large flock of American goldfinches with a few pine siskins mixed 
in. 



Bomoseen State Park, Rutland, US-VT
Oct 13, 2014 11:25 AM - 2:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.75 mile(s)
34 species

Wood Duck  2
Mallard  9
Pied-billed Grebe  1
Red-necked Grebe  1
Double-crested Cormorant  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  2
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  9
Tufted Titmouse  1
Red-breasted Nuthatch  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
Brown Creeper  1
Hermit Thrush  2
American Robin  1
Gray Catbird  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  5
Song Sparrow  1
Swamp Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  14
White-crowned Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  3
Red-winged Blackbird  1
House Finch  2
Purple Finch  1
Pine Siskin  7
American Goldfinch  52


Sue and Marv Elliott
	* 
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler
From: Jean Harrison <seajean AT CRUZIO.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 21:59:36 -0700
Is it .......an Orange-crowned Warbler?  I've never seen an orange crown on 
one, but that is what they're called.
 Jean Harrison

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "b flewelling" 
To: 
Sent: Monday, October 13, 2014 11:03 AM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned Warbler


> For a few days, I have been trying to identify a small bird that has been 
> hanging around in my lilac and rhododendron bushes. It wasn't one of the 
> Yellow-rumped which also showed up at the same time. This morning as I 
> watched it, it flew up to the windowsill, flared his orange crown and 
> pecked at his reflection in the window! What a sight.
>
>
> Bruce Flewelling
> RT 73, Rochester
>
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5315 / Virus Database: 4181/8382 - Release Date: 10/13/14
> 
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 10 Oct 2014 to 11 Oct 2014 (#2014-281)
From: Blake Allison <blake_allison AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:31:13 -0700
Does anyone have an an update on activity at Missisquoi NWR? I am thinking of 
heading up there Wednesday but have seen no reports regarding activity. Input 
will be appreciated. 


Blake Allison
Lyme, NH 03768-3322




On Sunday, October 12, 2014 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

 


There are 8 messages totaling 325 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Lake Champlain Birds are on the move (2)
  2. Fw: eBird Report - Merck Forest and Farmland, Rupert VT, Oct 11, 2014
  3. Ruddy Ducks - Lake Bomoseen
  4. Chickadees
  5. EABLs in the birdbath
  6. Cackling Goose in Burlington
  7. Whiney Creek WMA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 13:42:43 -0400
From:    Jim Mead 
Subject: Lake Champlain Birds are on the move

Hello all,

I went to Whiskey Bay this morning for a mini Lake Watch and found the 
following: 


Cloudy sky, SW wind  AT  1 mph, 42 F. (7:34 a.m.- 8:51 a.m.)

Brant- 273 (131, 142) heading south

Canada Goose- 171 (16,16,31,20,3,4,36,23,5,17) heading south

American Black Duck- 34 (2,10,15,7) heading south

Mallard- 13 (8,5) heading south

White-winged Scoter- 30 (4,21,5) heading south

Common Goldeneye- 1 heading south

Hooded Merganser- 4 heading south

Common Merganser- 1 on the water west of Whiskey Bay.

Common Loon- 6 (4 heading south & 2 on the water W of Whiskey Bay).

Red-necked Grebe- 2 on the water in Whiskey Bay and were quite close to me.

Double-crested Cormorant- x

Bonaparte's Gull- 100+ conservative estimate as there were many flying around.

Ring-billed Gull- x

Peregrine Falcon- I spooked it off its' perch when I walked down there. It flew 
south and found another perch. I believe 

 it is a local bird because I have seen it there on several different 
occasions. 


American Crow- 2


I also stopped at The Charlotte Town Beach and counted 42 Common Loons and 12 
Horned Grebes. 


I then went to Meach Cove and joined Scott Morrical.
We saw 35-40 Common Loons, 65 Brant flying south, at least 10 Horned Grebes, 1 
Red-necked Grebe & others. 


I "suspect" tomorrow morning "might" be another good movind day. Last night 
brought in hundreds of new migrants 

and it was just the beginning of what's to come. . .

I will stop by The Charlotte Town Beach this afternoon sometime to look for 
birds on the water. The visibilty should be decent if the clouds stick around. 
Good luck if any of you are able to get out there sometime soon. 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 13:54:37 -0700
From:    Martha Pfeiffer 
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Merck Forest and Farmland, Rupert VT, Oct 11, 2014





On Saturday, October 11, 2014 4:44 PM, "ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu" 
 wrote: 



>
>
>Merck Forest and Farmland, Rupert VT, Bennington, US-VT
>Oct 11, 2014 8:15 AM - 11:45 AM
>Protocol: Traveling
>4.04 mile(s)
>Comments:     Cloudy, no wind, 58 degrees
>12 species
>
>
>For the amount of time spent and distance walked, this was a short checklist. 
No "flocks" of any species. 

>
>Ruffed Grouse  1
>Hairy Woodpecker  1
>Northern Flicker  3
>Blue Jay  10
>American Crow  3
>Black-capped Chickadee  15
>White-breasted Nuthatch  2
>American Robin  15
>Song Sparrow  2
>Lincoln's Sparrow 1 perched on branch facing me with a beige streaked breast 
band glowing in early morning light 

>White-throated Sparrow  12
>Dark-eyed Junco  6
>
>View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20200136 

>
>This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>
>
>

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 21:04:04 +0000
From:    Susan Elliott 
Subject: Ruddy Ducks - Lake Bomoseen

Yesterday there were 16 Ruddy Ducks on Lake Bomoseen. Also, four Pine Siskins 
were mixed in with a large flock of goldfinches at Bomoseen State Park. 

Bomoseen State Park, Rutland, US-VT
Oct 10, 2014 12:10 PM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
26 species

Canada Goose  54   Wood Duck  2
Mallard  9
Turkey Vulture  2
Ring-billed Gull  1
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Northern Flicker  3
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  2
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  8
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
Carolina Wren  1
American Robin  6
Chipping Sparrow  8
Song Sparrow  1
Swamp Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  13
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Purple Finch  3
Pine Siskin  4
American Goldfinch  47

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 17:36:37 -0400
From:    Alison Wagner 
Subject: Re: Lake Champlain Birds are on the move

Nice!  Also today, at Sand Bar, in the marshy areas at the eastern end of 
the causeway, I estimated 320 Ring-necked Ducks and 200 Wood Ducks!

Ali
Huntington

-----Original Message----- 
From: Jim Mead
Sent: Saturday, October 11, 2014 1:42 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Lake Champlain Birds are on the move

Hello all,

I went to Whiskey Bay this morning for a mini Lake Watch and found the 
following:

Cloudy sky, SW wind  AT  1 mph, 42 F. (7:34 a.m.- 8:51 a.m.)

Brant- 273 (131, 142) heading south

Canada Goose- 171 (16,16,31,20,3,4,36,23,5,17) heading south

American Black Duck- 34 (2,10,15,7) heading south

Mallard- 13 (8,5) heading south

White-winged Scoter- 30 (4,21,5) heading south

Common Goldeneye- 1 heading south

Hooded Merganser- 4 heading south

Common Merganser- 1 on the water west of Whiskey Bay.

Common Loon- 6 (4 heading south & 2 on the water W of Whiskey Bay).

Red-necked Grebe- 2 on the water in Whiskey Bay and were quite close to me.

Double-crested Cormorant- x

Bonaparte's Gull- 100+ conservative estimate as there were many flying 
around.

Ring-billed Gull- x

Peregrine Falcon- I spooked it off its' perch when I walked down there. It 
flew south and found another perch. I believe
                             it is a local bird because I have seen it there 
on several different occasions.

American Crow- 2


I also stopped at The Charlotte Town Beach and counted 42 Common Loons and 
12 Horned Grebes.

I then went to Meach Cove and joined Scott Morrical.
We saw 35-40 Common Loons, 65 Brant flying south, at least 10 Horned Grebes, 
1 Red-necked Grebe & others.

I "suspect" tomorrow morning "might" be another good movind day. Last night 
brought in hundreds of new migrants
and it was just the beginning of what's to come. . .

I will stop by The Charlotte Town Beach this afternoon sometime to look for 
birds on the water. The visibilty should be decent if the clouds stick 
around. Good luck if any of you are able to get out there sometime soon.

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead 

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 17:39:26 -0400
From:    Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Subject: Chickadees

I was on the NY side of the Champlain Bridge in the campground when I 
encountered the largest flock of chickadees ever, 32. They were moving rapidly 
thru the trees then headed to the Vt side as one large flock. 

The other exciting scene was a sharp shinned hawk performing amazing maneuvers 
while chasing a small bird. We were at the arch on the bridge as this scene 
unfolded. The lucky small bird finally hid in the structure avoiding becoming 
lunch! 


Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 17:58:11 -0400
From:    Jane Stein 
Subject: EABLs in the birdbath

Glanced out my window to see 5 male bluebirds splashing around at once 
in the birdbath.  I usually have a pair nesting here, but hadn't seen or 
heard any around since late summer, so I assume these gentlemen just 
blew in.  I've never seen bluebirds at the birdbath before.

Also, the first bunch of juncos of the season, and the male red-bellied 
woodpecker, a couple of downies and a wb nuthatch hanging upside down at 
the sunflowers.

I am sooo ready for Redpolls!

Jane
(Shoreham)

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 18:23:03 -0400
From:    Jim Mead 
Subject: Cackling Goose in Burlington

Hello all,

I am at Blodgett Beach parked in front 
of the gate. The Cackling Goose is so close
that I ID'd it with my bins. There are at 
least 500 Canada Geese here. Tomorrow morning 
this might be a good stop. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 11 Oct 2014 21:35:29 -0400
From:    Gary Chapin 
Subject: Whiney Creek WMA

Early this afternoon I walked the lane at Whitney Creek WMA. Only a short
walk down the lane (the gate was still visible behind me) I had an immature
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER foraging in the goldenrod that lines the initial
portion of the lane.

There were lots of birds along the lane (up until I reached the woods
further along where all activity essentially ceased), although diversity was
limited. Other birds seen here included;

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1
Nashville Warbler - 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler - X
Common Yellowthroat - 1
Song Sparrow - X
Swamp Sparrow - X
White-throated Sparrow - X
White-crowned Sparrow - X
Dark-eyed Junco - 1

Gary Chapin 
Ticonderoga, NY

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 10 Oct 2014 to 11 Oct 2014 (#2014-281)
*************************************************************
Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 20:04:55 -0400
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday October 18, 2014 on
the Old Railroad Passage Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the parking lot on
Tabor Rd, about 1 mile south of the refuge Visitor Center and across the
road from the marsh.  If you have any questions, just reply to this email.

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 54 months of walks we have observed 134 species.  Hope to see you
there!

--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 16:50:06 -0400
Ovenbird would have streaks on the breast. I think that would have been noted 
right away by Bruce but an orange-crowned is fairly dull overall. 

Sue Wetmore


Sent from my iPod

> On Oct 13, 2014, at 4:25 PM, Jean Harrison  wrote:
> 
> Ovenbird?  Jean Harrison, currently in California
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "b flewelling" 
 

> To: 
> Sent: Monday, October 13, 2014 11:03 AM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned Warbler
> 
> 
>> For a few days, I have been trying to identify a small bird that has been 
hanging around in my lilac and rhododendron bushes. It wasn't one of the 
Yellow-rumped which also showed up at the same time. This morning as I watched 
it, it flew up to the windowsill, flared his orange crown and pecked at his 
reflection in the window! What a sight. 

>> 
>> 
>> Bruce Flewelling
>> RT 73, Rochester
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -----
>> No virus found in this message.
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 2015.0.5315 / Virus Database: 4181/8382 - Release Date: 10/13/14
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler
From: Jean Harrison <seajean AT CRUZIO.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 13:25:46 -0700
Ovenbird?  Jean Harrison, currently in California

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "b flewelling" 
To: 
Sent: Monday, October 13, 2014 11:03 AM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned Warbler


> For a few days, I have been trying to identify a small bird that has been 
> hanging around in my lilac and rhododendron bushes. It wasn't one of the 
> Yellow-rumped which also showed up at the same time. This morning as I 
> watched it, it flew up to the windowsill, flared his orange crown and 
> pecked at his reflection in the window! What a sight.
>
>
> Bruce Flewelling
> RT 73, Rochester
>
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5315 / Virus Database: 4181/8382 - Release Date: 10/13/14
> 
Subject: Kinglets
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 16:10:48 -0400
Sent from my iPod

> Subject: eBird Report - Pine Hill Cemetery, Oct 12, 2014
> 
> Pine Hill Cemetery, Brandon,US-VT
> Oct 12, 2014 3:00 PM - 3:46 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 10 species
> 
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> Mourning Dove  4
> Blue Jay  5
> American Crow  1
> Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  3
> Golden-crowned Kinglet  3
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> White-throated Sparrow  7
> American Goldfinch  6
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20222037 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Evening grosbeaks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 16:09:05 -0400
> Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Oct 13, 2014
> 
> Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT
> Oct 13, 2014 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> 23 species
> 
> Canada Goose  4
> Green-winged Teal (American)  13
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Mourning Dove  2
> Blue-headed Vireo  1
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  3
> Black-capped Chickadee  4
> White-breasted Nuthatch  3
> Carolina Wren  1
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
> Hermit Thrush  1
> American Robin  4
> European Starling  11
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  2
> Song Sparrow  8
> White-throated Sparrow  5
> White-crowned Sparrow (Eastern)  2
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Red-winged Blackbird  49
> American Goldfinch  4
> Evening Grosbeak  2
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20222019 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Eurasian Wigeon?
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 15:38:27 -0400
I spent quite a while at McCuen Slang today (not the fishing access, but the 
small parking area on the east side of the road, near Whitney Creek), much of 
it staring at a distant mystery duck. My notes: 


a little larger than two wood ducks that drifted by it at one point
red or red-brown head that looked like a slightly flattened ball
pale bill
gray and brown top of body, orangy-tan on the sides at the water line
tail sort of pointed
a bit of white at the side just before the tail
fairly noticeable eye in a dark smudge
The closest I can come up with is a female Eurasian Wigeon.


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Orange-crowned Warbler
From: b flewelling <bflewelling3263 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 18:03:59 +0000
For a few days, I have been trying to identify a small bird that has been 
hanging around in my lilac and rhododendron bushes.  It wasn't one of the 
Yellow-rumped which also showed up at the same time.  This morning as I 
watched it, it flew up to the windowsill, flared his orange crown and pecked at 
his reflection in the window!  What a sight.  

   

Bruce Flewelling 
RT 73, Rochester 
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk, Randolph
From: Clifford Seifer <clifdisc AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 13:05:49 -0400
Sitting in the passenger seat driving on 89S I just passed a Rough-legged
Hawk sitting close to the road just past exit 4 in Randolph.

-- Clifford Seifer
Keene NH
Subject: UNSUBSCRIBE
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 11:51:02 -0400
sign off VTBIRD


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of 
morality by religion. 

Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
Subject: Grosbeaks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 09:24:51 -0400
Two evening grosbeaks seen on Pearl St in Brandon this morning.
Sue Wetmorr

Sent from my iPod
Subject: unsubscribe
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 14:58:55 -0400
sign off vtbird

Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT
  		 	   		  
Subject: American Avocet in Highgate
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 12:06:20 -0400
Hello all,

Dick Lavallee has found an American Avocet in 
Goose Bay in Highgate this morning. He is on
Shipyard Rd. I'm sorry that I do not remember
the exact address but the coordinates are
44.9773446, -73.1108272. I hope that this is
helpful info. 

Good luck,

Jim Mead
Subject: Red Crossbill
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 10:05:44 -0400
Here at the Big Sit at the Birds of Vermont Museum we had a pair of Red 
Crossbills at 7:14. We are watching for a Northern Goshawk which has been here 
regularly and as recently as two days ago. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085
Subject: first-of-fall juncos back
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 06:08:24 -0700
One of those balancing moments between seasons: halfdozen Darkeyed Juncos 
flitting/flashing in leaf litter around feeder area (with Whitethroats, song 
sparrows), while Carolina wren offers four clear notes as the sun finally 
dispels river fog. 



____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Juncos
From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 09:00:39 -0400
First juncos of the year on the deck this morning.

Marcia in Brownsville

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 12, 2014, at 8:46 AM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> First of the season tree sparrow at my feeder this morning.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
> 
> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Tree sparrow
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 08:46:51 -0400
First of the season tree sparrow at my feeder this morning.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: EABLs in the birdbath
From: Janet Warren <jwarren AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 05:20:39 -0400
We had a family of bluebirds somewhere in the field north of us this summer. 
The whole family came to bathe in our birdbaths every afternoon at around 4:00 
for a week or two in late July. 

On Oct 11, 2014, at 5:58 PM, Jane Stein wrote:

> Glanced out my window to see 5 male bluebirds splashing around at once in the 
birdbath. I usually have a pair nesting here, but hadn't seen or heard any 
around since late summer, so I assume these gentlemen just blew in. I've never 
seen bluebirds at the birdbath before. 

> 
> Also, the first bunch of juncos of the season, and the male red-bellied 
woodpecker, a couple of downies and a wb nuthatch hanging upside down at the 
sunflowers. 

> 
> I am sooo ready for Redpolls!
> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
Subject: Whiney Creek WMA
From: Gary Chapin <gchapin1 AT ROCHESTER.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 21:35:29 -0400
Early this afternoon I walked the lane at Whitney Creek WMA. Only a short
walk down the lane (the gate was still visible behind me) I had an immature
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER foraging in the goldenrod that lines the initial
portion of the lane.

There were lots of birds along the lane (up until I reached the woods
further along where all activity essentially ceased), although diversity was
limited. Other birds seen here included;

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1
Nashville Warbler - 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler - X
Common Yellowthroat - 1
Song Sparrow - X
Swamp Sparrow - X
White-throated Sparrow - X
White-crowned Sparrow - X
Dark-eyed Junco - 1

Gary Chapin 
Ticonderoga, NY
Subject: Cackling Goose in Burlington
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 18:23:03 -0400
Hello all,

I am at Blodgett Beach parked in front 
of the gate. The Cackling Goose is so close
that I ID'd it with my bins. There are at 
least 500 Canada Geese here. Tomorrow morning 
this might be a good stop. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead