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Updated on Monday, September 1 at 09:55 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Bay-breasted Warbler

1 Sep Re: A NH story [Jane Stein ]
1 Sep September Whip-poor-wills. Snake Mountain, Weybridge ["Ian A. Worley" ]
1 Sep Re: A NH story [Justin LeClaire ]
1 Sep Nighthawks [Don Clark ]
1 Sep Re: A NH story [Jane Stein ]
1 Sep A NH story [Charlie La Rosa ]
1 Sep Red-wings at Charcoal Creek [Alison Wagner ]
1 Sep St Albans Town Park Shorebirds [Liz Lackey ]
1 Sep Migrants: Charlotte to Addison [Allan Strong ]
1 Sep Red Knot continues at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
31 Aug Due Diligence with Vermont Dowitchers [Kent McFarland ]
31 Aug Osprey Lk Lamoille [Bob Budliger ]
31 Aug Re: Osprey still on nest this morn (derby/lake Memphremagog) [Karan Cutler ]
31 Aug Re: Osprey still on nest this morn (derby/lake Memphremagog) [Jane Stein ]
31 Aug Osprey still on nest this morn (derby/lake Memphremagog) [Walter Medwid ]
31 Aug Sanderling, Black-bellied Plover & Red Knot at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
30 Aug Cape May warbler- Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 30, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
30 Aug Red Knot at Delta Park right now [Jim Mead ]
29 Aug St. Albans and Delta Park [Gary Chapin ]
29 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
29 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Joe Cuoco ]
29 Aug Brilyea Access on the 28th. Baird's Sandpiper, Short-billed Dowitchers, Pectoral Sandpiper, et al. ["Ian A. Worley" ]
28 Aug Winged Warnings: Our series day-by-day — Environmental Health News [Julie Filiberti ]
28 Aug Brilyea Stilt Sandpiper [Maeve Kim ]
28 Aug Re: Red Knot not at Delta Park [Bob Dill ]
28 Aug Brown Booby news [Kaye Danforth ]
28 Aug Re: Red Knot not at Lagoon Road [Jim Mead ]
28 Aug Re: Red Knot not at Lagoon Road [Alison Wagner ]
27 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
27 Aug Red Knot at Delta Park [Jim Mead ]
27 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
27 Aug Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Joe Cuoco ]
26 Aug Brilyea Access (Addison) -- Stilt Sandpiper, Bay-breasted Warbler, Blue-winged Teal ["Ian A. Worley" ]
26 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
26 Aug Nighthawks [Sue ]
25 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Michele Patenaude ]
25 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
25 Aug Re: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September [Alison Wagner ]
25 Aug Re: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September [Alison Wagner ]
25 Aug Re: goshawk on Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 25, 2014 [Jim Mead ]
25 Aug Re: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September [Ian Almer Worley ]
25 Aug Re: loons Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Aug 25, 2014 [Jane Stein ]
25 Aug Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September [Allan Strong ]
25 Aug migrants - Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 23, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
25 Aug goshawk on Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 25, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
25 Aug loons Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Aug 25, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
25 Aug Re: dipped at Champlain Bridge [Linda LaPan ]
25 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Kent McFarland ]
25 Aug Half Billion Records [Kent McFarland ]
25 Aug Re: reminder [Kent McFarland ]
25 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Jane Stein ]
25 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Kent McFarland ]
25 Aug Dead Creek shorebirds and owl ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
25 Aug Booby Updates Requested [Mike Resch ]
25 Aug WITU in Leicester [Shelagh Smith ]
24 Aug Nighthawks [Sue Wetmore ]
24 Aug NEK Northern Goshawk, Newark, VT [Jim Sparrell ]
24 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
24 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Michele Patenaude ]
24 Aug dipped at Champlain Bridge [Susan Fogleman ]
24 Aug North Bennington Nighthawks [Theresa Armata ]
24 Aug Cuckoo [Sue ]
24 Aug Ruddy Turnstone St. Albans [Gary Chapin ]
24 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Jane Stein ]
24 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
24 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
24 Aug Carolina Wren, RedeyedVireo (not over yet) [Veer Frost ]
24 Aug Shorebird Bonanza at St. Albans Bay Town Park [Charlotte Bill ]
24 Aug Booby yes! [UVM ]
24 Aug Booby [UVM ]
24 Aug Wild Turkey in Leicester [Shelagh Smith ]
23 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Scott Stoner ]
23 Aug Nighthawks [Sue ]
23 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Liz Lackey ]
23 Aug Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird [Richard ]
23 Aug Giant swallowtail - not a bird ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]

Subject: Re: A NH story
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:28:58 -0400
That's right, Justin, you did!  Great pix, too.

My guess would be that the duck's more buoyant and substantial body
provided just enough of a platform for the eagle's feet to push off from
to get up in the air.  But just a guess.  Also, Charlie didn't see the 
initial plunge onto the fish, so it may be the eagle went far enough 
into the water to be unable to recover its balance and get its wings in 
position.

This one's an eagle making repeated unsuccessful passes at something 
large in the water, then landing on it and tugging it across the water 
to shore.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=87xNpOYOlQ4

These two came out empty-taloned.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVnz8OIsBY0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhJFmWDsZf0

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 9/1/2014 9:59 PM, Justin LeClaire wrote:
> Two winters ago on New Years Eve (day), I posted to the listserv a
> picture set on flickr of an adult Bald Eagle that chased after a hen
> Mallard and eventually landed on it around 100 meters out in the
> water at Charlotte Town Beach. After about a 10 second float to catch
> it's breathe and a of couple flaps to dry it's wings, it picked up
> straight out of the water, seemingly quite easily, and flew off south
> around the corner with its prize. Though a bigger fish could
> definitely be an issue, I guess some eagles have had swimming lessons
> and can manage. Here's the link to the set in case anyone is
> interested!..
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/85270080 AT N05/sets/72157632410832517/
>
> Justin LeClaire (Currently residing in middle-of-the-desert, CA)
>
>> On Sep 1, 2014, at 6:16 PM, Jane Stein 
>> wrote:
>>
>> Haven't seen it myself, but YouTube apparently has a number of
>> videos of this, given how often friends send them to me, and of
>> other unlikely birds "swimming."  Somebody once sent me one of an
>> owlet crossing a stream that way.
>>
>> Unlike Osprey, I don't think Eagles are built to take off from the
>> water is the problem, and the weight of the fish tips the scales,
>> so to speak.  If they hit a fish from the air but go a little too
>> deep and don't have any air under their wings, they have to row
>> their way out.
>>
>> Jane (Shoreham)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On 9/1/2014 8:54 PM, Charlie La Rosa wrote: Not VT but
>>> interesting. While on Nubanusit Lake just after sunrise this
>>> morning, I spotted some something lunging in the water. Loons are
>>> numerous on this lake and I assumed it was one of them getting
>>> its morning shower. As I watched, the lunging continued, but I
>>> could see no white on the bird and it became apparent that the
>>> bird was headed toward shore from far out in the lake. As I got
>>> closer I could make out the white head of an adult eagle. It
>>> continued to lung forward using its wings like a swimmer doing
>>> the butterfly stroke. I was concerned that it had been shot or
>>> had captured a fish with fishing line attached and had become
>>> tangled. It finally reached the shore and jumped up on a low rock
>>> and then I saw that it had a fish in its talons. It shook itself
>>> off and simply stood there for a while.
>>>
>>> I was still concerned because the size of the fish was not so
>>> large that an adult eagle would not be able to fly off with it. I
>>> continued by and the eagle, unperturbed, began to eat the fish.
>>> On my reverse trip back up the shore I noticed the eagle was
>>> still there. As I passed by it launched itself, with fish, and
>>> flew out over the lake. Is this a story of  'a fish in the talons
>>> is worth two in the lake'? Has anyone seen eagles doing this
>>> butterfly stroke?
>>>
>>> By the way, eagles nest on the lake annually and are common daily
>>> residents there. It's a beautiful lake, lots of preserved
>>> woodland shoreline. Half way between Keene and Concord. Always a
>>> good number of loons, as well.
>>>
>>> Charlie La Rosa Brattleboro
>>>
>>>
>>> ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG -
>>> www.avg.com Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4015/8136 -
>>> Release Date: 09/01/14
>>>
>
>
> ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4015/8136 - Release Date:
> 09/01/14
>
Subject: September Whip-poor-wills. Snake Mountain, Weybridge
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:20:56 -0400
This evening, beginning a 7:56pm, three Whip-poor-wills let go with a 
raucous cannonade of songs, chattering call notes, and mellow soft calls 
at the site on Snake Mountain Road, Weybridge where they have been all 
summer.

There are only three other September reports in eBird:  Hartland 1973, 
Sept 1; Hartford 1974, Sept 15, and Mt. Holly, 2013 Sept 14th.

Checklist is below.

Ian
===========
Snake Mtn. Rd. Weybridge, Addison, US-VT
Sep 1, 2014 7:54 PM - 8:28 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     Calm, cloudless, nearly half-moon, warm (74 deg. F)
1 species

Eastern Whip-poor-will  3
------- At 7:56pm there began a raucous amount of singing at different 
pitches, call note chattering, and soft call sequences from the wooded 
slopes on the west side of the road ... from near the road to well 
upslope.  The birds were moving around a lot, judging by the number of 
locations from which they vocalized. This continued for about 11 
minutes, after which there were no further vocalizations while I was 
there. All the activity was from the same locations as the birds have 
been heard and seen all summer.  I am 95% or more sure there were three 
birds, but the racket was so varied, and from so many locations, that 
absolute certainty of three individuals (and not two or four) was not 
possible.

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19643375
Subject: Re: A NH story
From: Justin LeClaire <justin.leclaire87 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:59:45 -0700
Two winters ago on New Years Eve (day), I posted to the listserv a picture set 
on flickr of an adult Bald Eagle that chased after a hen Mallard and eventually 
landed on it around 100 meters out in the water at Charlotte Town Beach. After 
about a 10 second float to catch it's breathe and a of couple flaps to dry it's 
wings, it picked up straight out of the water, seemingly quite easily, and flew 
off south around the corner with its prize. Though a bigger fish could 
definitely be an issue, I guess some eagles have had swimming lessons and can 
manage. Here's the link to the set in case anyone is interested!.. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/85270080 AT N05/sets/72157632410832517/

Justin LeClaire
(Currently residing in middle-of-the-desert, CA)

> On Sep 1, 2014, at 6:16 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> Haven't seen it myself, but YouTube apparently has a number of videos of 
this, given how often friends send them to me, and of other unlikely birds 
"swimming." Somebody once sent me one of an owlet crossing a stream that way. 

> 
> Unlike Osprey, I don't think Eagles are built to take off from the water is 
the problem, and the weight of the fish tips the scales, so to speak. If they 
hit a fish from the air but go a little too deep and don't have any air under 
their wings, they have to row their way out. 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On 9/1/2014 8:54 PM, Charlie La Rosa wrote:
>> Not VT but interesting. While on Nubanusit Lake just after sunrise this
>> morning, I spotted some something lunging in the water. Loons are numerous
>> on this lake and I assumed it was one of them getting its morning shower.
>> As I watched, the lunging continued, but I could see no white on the bird
>> and it became apparent that the bird was headed toward shore from far out
>> in the lake. As I got closer I could make out the white head of an adult
>> eagle. It continued to lung forward using its wings like a swimmer doing
>> the butterfly stroke. I was concerned that it had been shot or had captured
>> a fish with fishing line attached and had become tangled. It finally
>> reached the shore and jumped up on a low rock and then I saw that it had a
>> fish in its talons. It shook itself off and simply stood there for a while.
>> 
>> I was still concerned because the size of the fish was not so large that an
>> adult eagle would not be able to fly off with it. I continued by and the
>> eagle, unperturbed, began to eat the fish. On my reverse trip back up the
>> shore I noticed the eagle was still there. As I passed by it launched
>> itself, with fish, and flew out over the lake. Is this a story of  'a fish
>> in the talons is worth two in the lake'? Has anyone seen eagles doing this
>> butterfly stroke?
>> 
>> By the way, eagles nest on the lake annually and are common daily residents
>> there. It's a beautiful lake, lots of preserved woodland shoreline. Half
>> way between Keene and Concord. Always a good number of loons, as well.
>> 
>> Charlie La Rosa
>> Brattleboro
>> 
>> 
>> -----
>> No virus found in this message.
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4015/8136 - Release Date: 09/01/14
>> 
Subject: Nighthawks
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:17:47 -0400
142 birds observed in Westminster Station this evening.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: A NH story
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:16:06 -0400
Haven't seen it myself, but YouTube apparently has a number of videos of 
this, given how often friends send them to me, and of other unlikely 
birds "swimming."  Somebody once sent me one of an owlet crossing a 
stream that way.

Unlike Osprey, I don't think Eagles are built to take off from the water 
is the problem, and the weight of the fish tips the scales, so to speak. 
  If they hit a fish from the air but go a little too deep and don't 
have any air under their wings, they have to row their way out.

Jane
(Shoreham)





On 9/1/2014 8:54 PM, Charlie La Rosa wrote:
> Not VT but interesting. While on Nubanusit Lake just after sunrise this
> morning, I spotted some something lunging in the water. Loons are numerous
> on this lake and I assumed it was one of them getting its morning shower.
> As I watched, the lunging continued, but I could see no white on the bird
> and it became apparent that the bird was headed toward shore from far out
> in the lake. As I got closer I could make out the white head of an adult
> eagle. It continued to lung forward using its wings like a swimmer doing
> the butterfly stroke. I was concerned that it had been shot or had captured
> a fish with fishing line attached and had become tangled. It finally
> reached the shore and jumped up on a low rock and then I saw that it had a
> fish in its talons. It shook itself off and simply stood there for a while.
>
> I was still concerned because the size of the fish was not so large that an
> adult eagle would not be able to fly off with it. I continued by and the
> eagle, unperturbed, began to eat the fish. On my reverse trip back up the
> shore I noticed the eagle was still there. As I passed by it launched
> itself, with fish, and flew out over the lake. Is this a story of  'a fish
> in the talons is worth two in the lake'? Has anyone seen eagles doing this
> butterfly stroke?
>
> By the way, eagles nest on the lake annually and are common daily residents
> there. It's a beautiful lake, lots of preserved woodland shoreline. Half
> way between Keene and Concord. Always a good number of loons, as well.
>
> Charlie La Rosa
> Brattleboro
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4015/8136 - Release Date: 09/01/14
>
Subject: A NH story
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:54:41 -0400
Not VT but interesting. While on Nubanusit Lake just after sunrise this
morning, I spotted some something lunging in the water. Loons are numerous
on this lake and I assumed it was one of them getting its morning shower.
As I watched, the lunging continued, but I could see no white on the bird
and it became apparent that the bird was headed toward shore from far out
in the lake. As I got closer I could make out the white head of an adult
eagle. It continued to lung forward using its wings like a swimmer doing
the butterfly stroke. I was concerned that it had been shot or had captured
a fish with fishing line attached and had become tangled. It finally
reached the shore and jumped up on a low rock and then I saw that it had a
fish in its talons. It shook itself off and simply stood there for a while.

I was still concerned because the size of the fish was not so large that an
adult eagle would not be able to fly off with it. I continued by and the
eagle, unperturbed, began to eat the fish. On my reverse trip back up the
shore I noticed the eagle was still there. As I passed by it launched
itself, with fish, and flew out over the lake. Is this a story of  'a fish
in the talons is worth two in the lake'? Has anyone seen eagles doing this
butterfly stroke?

By the way, eagles nest on the lake annually and are common daily residents
there. It's a beautiful lake, lots of preserved woodland shoreline. Half
way between Keene and Concord. Always a good number of loons, as well.

Charlie La Rosa
Brattleboro
Subject: Red-wings at Charcoal Creek
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:41:43 -0400
Hello fellow-birders,

Yesterday I stopped at Charcoal Creek to check out the Red-wings. This must be 
a place where they flock up and feast before the big move south as I’ve seen 
large numbers of blackbirds at this location in the past during migration. So I 
was curious to see what was up, and.....THEY WERE! Earlier that morning I 
estimated about 1,000 Redwings flying over the wetland grasses as I gave a 
quick look before heading out to Campbell Bay. When I returned, I decided to 
park along the edge of the road to see if I could get a similar recount. Cars 
whizzed by my parked car, causing it to shake, but that didn’t impress 
me....The birds did! A steady stream of mostly mature male birds flew west to 
east, popping up out of the wetlands, skimming along the vegetation and 
dropping back into the grasses; A sort of avian version of leap frogging. 
Occasionally I would put my bins down to confirm they were traveling only west 
to east and not circling back to be counted twice. My bins remained fixed in 
one spot as I tried my best to count by 10’s, then 20’s, but they were so 
thick and coming so fast, I’m sure my count was way low! A few times a bolus 
of birds would flash by, hundreds of birds in synchronized flight, each in 
their own space: Perfect! There seemed to be no end to this pattern as I 
counted for a few minutes. Next, a massive flock flew high into the air, 
swarming black-b(s) creating a huge dark cloud against a tall wall of green 
trees in the distance. And then, in an instant, they dropped down as one, 
flashing red, and convincing me that peak foliage happened in that split 
second! 


My estimate for my eBird entry was 4,000, but I wouldn’t be surprised if 
there were two or three times that many! My only disappointment was that I had 
no one to share it with in that moment. But alas, Dear Reader, I can share it 
with you now and I hope some of you can see this for yourself! 


Ali
Huntington

      
Subject: St Albans Town Park Shorebirds
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:37:03 -0400
What a gem of a location is St. Albans Town Park. Thank you Charlotte Bill for 
giving the bird list a heads up about this. 


I was there late morning today. Birds were close in, lighting was great 
(afternoons would not be as good), disturbance minimal as no dogs allowed, and 
since the beach is closed cuz of blue green algae, hardly a soul there - on 
Labor Day. 

And with the nutrient load, the birds seemed to be finding plenty to eat.

Shorebirds:
12 Killdeer
30 Semipalmated Sandpipers
2 Ruddy Turnstones
2 Sanderlings
1 White-rumped Sandpiper
1 Pectoral
1 Spotted
49 Lesser Yellowlegs
4 Greater Yellowlegs
18 Semipalmated Plovers
1 Short-billed Dowitcher
4 Least Sandpipers

Ducks included Blue-Wing Teal 1
		Green Wing Teal 18
		Shoveler - 1  (this was a surprise)
		Mallard 12
		Canada Geese 17

Eventually a merlin appeared and periodically strafed the birds, but only the 
peeps took off. The yellow legs, plovers, turnstones ignored it. 


Caspian Tern adults were being harassed by begging juveniles.

A Black-crowned night heron adult was at the bridge over Black Creek.

I highly recommend this spot for good looks at shorebirds.

Liz Lackey
Stowe VT
Subject: Migrants: Charlotte to Addison
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 13:37:15 -0400
I was out today (9/1) with Ted Murin and Hank Kaestner. There were a few 
shorebirds on the exposed rocks at Charlotte Town Beach, including Least, 
Semipalmated, and Solitary sandpipers with a number of Killdeer and a Lesser 
Yellowlegs. 25+ Common Terns over the Lake with 3 Black Terns mixed in. One 
White-winged Scoter was on the water as well as an epic Peregrine vs. Common 
Tern battle (won by the Peregrine). 


At Whiskey Bay in Charlotte, we had a young Pomarine Jaeger fly by. A few 
migrant warblers including Magnolia, Black-throated Green, and Black-and-white 
were working the shoreline. 


At Brilyea access in Addison, we had 2 Stilt Sandpipers, 1 Pectoral Sandpiper, 
and a smattering of other shorebirds: Semipalmated, Least, Solitary, and 
Spotted Sandpipers, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, and Semipalmated Plover. 6 
Northern Pintail were a bit of a surprise as well. 


Allan

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Red Knot continues at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 07:32:29 -0400
Hi all,

There are 3 shorebirds on the bar if sand 
today. 1 Red Knot, 1 Sanderling & 1 Semipalmated
Plover. I'm joined today by Michelle Patnaude. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Due Diligence with Vermont Dowitchers
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:23:54 -0400
It's dowitcher time. Check out some tips on how to carefully report them to
Vermont eBird and the Vermont Bird Records Committee with this new article.

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/due-diligence-with-vermont-dowitchers/

Thanks to Ian Worley, Vermont eBird county editor, and Al Strong, co-chair
Vermont Bird Records Committee, for putting this article together.

Good birding!
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  


Subject: Osprey Lk Lamoille
From: Bob Budliger <b8hooter AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 15:44:31 -0400
Two young Osprey still at nest on Lake Lamoille in Morrisville.

Bob Budliger
Subject: Re: Osprey still on nest this morn (derby/lake Memphremagog)
From: Karan Cutler <kdcutler42 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 12:01:20 -0400
Two offspring still on the nest at our house in Bridport on Lake Champlain.
Second parent left about two weeks ago.


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 10:56 AM, Walter Medwid  wrote:

> One FYB (?) still in nest; 2 birds perched on trees in wetland below nest.
> Lots of vocalizations. Two fledglings in nest earlier in the season. Seems
> very late for young one to continue to use the nest. If anyone has info on
> late season behavior I would appreciate it offline. Thanks.
>
Subject: Re: Osprey still on nest this morn (derby/lake Memphremagog)
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 11:22:50 -0400
FYI, there's still one young hanging around in the nest on my road in 
Shoreham, too.

Jane


On 8/31/2014 10:56 AM, Walter Medwid wrote:
> One FYB (?) still in nest; 2 birds perched on trees in wetland below nest.
> Lots of vocalizations. Two fledglings in nest earlier in the season. Seems
> very late for young one to continue to use the nest. If anyone has info on
> late season behavior I would appreciate it offline. Thanks.
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4015/8132 - Release Date: 08/31/14
>
Subject: Osprey still on nest this morn (derby/lake Memphremagog)
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:56:00 -0400
One FYB (?) still in nest; 2 birds perched on trees in wetland below nest.
Lots of vocalizations. Two fledglings in nest earlier in the season. Seems
very late for young one to continue to use the nest. If anyone has info on
late season behavior I would appreciate it offline. Thanks.
Subject: Sanderling, Black-bellied Plover & Red Knot at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 07:40:19 -0400
Hello all again,

I am once again on the bridge that spans
the Winooski River and am looking at the 
bar of sand toward the west. The first bird
I scoped was a Sanderling. It was with the 
Red Knot(probably the same one for the fifth
day in a row). I then found a Black-bellied
Plover(showing mostly breeding plumage).
The birds were all put up when an adult Bald
Eagle flew out to the sandbar and also
plopped down on it. I just looked out there again
and they are all back on the sandbar with a 
second Sanderling and a Semipalmated 
Sandpiper. The lighting is good and it is now
7:35 a.m. A scope is a must by the way. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Cape May warbler- Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 30, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:34:40 +0000
A Cape May warbler in typical fall colors was a highlight this morning. 
  
Sue Wetmore 
----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 12:29:46 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 30, 2014 

Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Aug 30, 2014 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
32 species 

Wood Duck  20 
Mallard  3 
Great Blue Heron  3 
Cooper's Hawk  1 
Red-tailed Hawk  1 
Mourning Dove  2 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1 
Hairy Woodpecker  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2 
Eastern Phoebe  3 
Warbling Vireo  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  3 
Blue Jay  6 
American Crow  5 
Common Raven  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  6 
White-breasted Nuthatch  7 
Carolina Wren  1 
Eastern Bluebird  1 
American Robin  2 
Gray Catbird  3 
European Starling  4 
Common Yellowthroat  4 
Cape May Warbler  1 
Magnolia Warbler  1 
Chipping Sparrow  5 
Swamp Sparrow  2 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1 
Indigo Bunting  2 
Bobolink  3     seen and heard as they fed in some grasses. 
American Goldfinch  13 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19613235 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Red Knot at Delta Park right now
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 07:11:29 -0400
Hi all,

I'm on the bridge that spans the Winooski
River, once again and am seeing the Red Knot
on the sandbar. Beagle Bourgault is here with
me and we have both been enjoying great looks
at it. The lighting right now is fabulous. There
are no other shorebirds on the sandbar at this
time. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: St. Albans and Delta Park
From: Gary Chapin <gchapin1 AT ROCHESTER.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 23:10:14 -0400
At St. Albans Bay Town Park were the following species of interest this 
afternoon. 


Blue-winged Teal - 2
Green-winged Teal - 1
Merlin - 1
Semipalmated Plover - X
Killdeer - X
Lesser Yellowlegs - X
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Ruddy Turnstone - 2
Least Sandpiper - X
Semipalmated Sandpiper - X
Short-billed Dowitcher - 1

From the route 36 bridge at Black Creek WMA were 5 COMMON GALLINULES, 4 
juveniles and a single adult. 


I stopped earlier in the day at Delta Park to look for the previously reported 
Red Knot, but there were no shorebirds on the sandbar. Instead I found a group 
of roughly 10 COMMON TERNS there. 


Gary Chapin
Ticonderoga, NY
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 21:21:54 -0400
An even 50 birds observed this evening. About time to switch gears  
and move to the mountain for raptors.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Joe Cuoco <jcuoco AT MSN.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:04:28 -0400
Will be there tonight around 6

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 27, 2014, at 11:35 AM, "Don Clark"  wrote:
> 
> It is half way between Bellows Falls & Westminster. At the intersection of 
Rt5 & Rt123 take 123. I set up at a relatives car wash on the left. Park to the 
right. I will be there until the end of the week from 5-7:30. A heads up if you 
are coming would be appreciated. Thanks. 

> 
> Don Clark
> 
>> On Aug 27, 2014, at 10:38 AM, Joe Cuoco wrote:
>> 
>> Don
>> Could you give me directions to the Westminster Station observation site
>> I am on Stagecoach Rd in Grafton
>> 
>> Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
>> 973-332-6532
>> jcuoco AT msn.com
>> 
>>> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:23:57 -0400
>>> From: sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM
>>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>>> 
>>> After another slow start a late rally brought our total for the
>>> evening to 425 birds.
>>> 
>>> Don Clark
>>> Grafton
>>                       
Subject: Brilyea Access on the 28th. Baird's Sandpiper, Short-billed Dowitchers, Pectoral Sandpiper, et al.
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 06:21:51 -0400
A most delightful small crowd of birders (11 or so) from near and 
distant parts of Vermont converged at Brilyea Access yesterday morning, 
the 28th, to visit the drawdown shorebirds.  There were lots of birds to 
see.  My list with 62 species is below.  Maeve Kim has already reported 
that she saw the Stilt Sandpiper in a new location.  It appears to be 
quite mobile, if it is the same bird seen previously.

Ian
============
Brilyea Access, Addison, US-VT
Aug 28, 2014 9:22 AM - 12:56 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.3 mile(s)
62 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  64
Wood Duck  7
Mallard  9
Blue-winged Teal  9     Counted in flight.
Green-winged Teal  38
Great Blue Heron  9
Turkey Vulture  2
Osprey  1
Bald Eagle  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Semipalmated Plover  4
Killdeer  11
Spotted Sandpiper  3
Solitary Sandpiper  2
Greater Yellowlegs  4
Lesser Yellowlegs  26     Maximum count when doing complete scans. All 
but five were at west end of trail, the other five in cove by farthest 
parking lot.

Baird's Sandpiper  1     Larger than associated Least Sandpipers, clean 
flanks, buffy chest, weak supercillium, crossed primaries beyond tail, 
brownish back, flat-line of back when foraging (unlike more rounded back 
of White-rumped Sandpiper)

Least Sandpiper  69     Maximum count of birds made by counting two 
large flocks in flight that flew in, in rapid succession plus a scan 
count of the rest of the mudflats just after the two flocks landed.

Pectoral Sandpiper  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  7     Maximum count during complete scan.

Short-billed Dowitcher  2     Pair seen throughout time at mud flats at 
end of west trail.  Foraging and preening.  One more marked than other; 
perhaps one juvenile and one adult.  Straighter back than the 
hump-backed character of Long-billed Dowitchers. Tertials with internal 
markings. Scapulars brightly marked with rich brown centers, light 
margins. Orange wash on breast. One bird with speckles on shoulder and 
some barring on flanks. Gray head, face and neck with prominent eyeline, 
relatively bright supercillium, noticeable ear-spot. Speckled flanks, 
undertailed coverts, and top of tail. Numerous digiscoped images taken, 
not spectacular but helpful in verifying most characters.

Ring-billed Gull  4
Caspian Tern  2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  5
Mourning Dove  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Belted Kingfisher  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Merlin  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Empidonax sp.  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Eastern Kingbird  1
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2
vireo sp.  1     Suspiciously like a Philadelphia Vireo, but could not 
confirm.
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  4
Common Raven  2
Tree Swallow  1
Barn Swallow  5
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  2
Cedar Waxwing  1
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Nashville Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  2
Magnolia Warbler  2
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1     Weak song
Song Sparrow  3
Swamp Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  1
Red-winged Blackbird  5
Baltimore Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19602388
Subject: Winged Warnings: Our series day-by-day — Environmental Health News
From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:25:47 -0400
I thought some of you would be interested in this series of articles that I 
stumbled upon today. They are using that "canary in a coal mine" adage and 
looking at birds in relationship to the health of our environment. Sadly, they 
all look like scary topics. I'm just passing the information along to those of 
you who may be interested. 


http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2014/aug/wingedwarnings1summary

Julie Filiberti
Fairfax
Subject: Brilyea Stilt Sandpiper
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:06:25 -0400
A little after noon today, the bird was feeding in the mudflats along the west 
trail. I first saw it in a little rounded "cove" that's the last place where 
the trail is near the water before it goes into woods. I watched for several 
minutes, then the sandpiper flew north a little and landed briefly closer to 
the Brilyea bridge, and then headed south again, sticking close to the 
shoreline. 


I think the Stilt Sandpiper has now been seen in at least four locations: on 
the mud around water's edge near the furthest parking lot, at the regular 
drawdown viewing area (hang a left past the bluebird boxes and walk through 
tall grass to the water's edge), at the very end of the west trail, and today 
alongside the trail not far from the bridge. So it's a good idea to look 
closely in that area wherever there's mud. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Red Knot not at Delta Park
From: Bob Dill <rdill AT BURLINGTONTELECOM.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 12:37:44 -0400
10:30 AM, from the bike path bridge (see below).  The bird is still 
there with a similar but (probably) slightly smaller friend.  A scope is 
needed.  They seem to fly away from the sandbar for short periods.
Bob Dill

On 8/28/2014 6:36 AM, Jim Mead wrote:
> Hello all again,
>
> I am on the bridge that spans the Winooski
> River and am looking at the one bar of sand
> toward the west. A (or the same one as yesterday)
> Red Knot just arrived with a small peep.
> I also saw a Common Nighthawk feasting in
> an insect hatch on the north end of Delta Park
> at 6:07 a.m.
>
> Enjoy Migration!!!
>
> Jim Mead
>
Subject: Brown Booby news
From: Kaye Danforth <danforthpainting AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:36:46 -0400
This was sent to me this morning by my brother in Conn.
Keep your eyes open everyone!
Kaye in Hinesburg

Begin forwarded message:

> From: "Danforth, Mark E (Mark)" 
> Date: August 28, 2014 8:23:52 AM EDT
> To: Kaye Danforth 
> Subject: BB
>
> Date: 8/28/14 4:09 am
> From: Will Raup 
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Brown Booby Report
> There was a post last night in the Vermont Birds on Facebook by a  
> ferry captain who said he saw the Brown Booby shortly after leaving  
> Essex last night, he provided a good description as the bird flew  
> past the boat and landed on the NY side.
> So hopefully the bird is still around if people are looking.
> Good Birding!
> Will RaupGlenmont, NY
>
>
Subject: Re: Red Knot not at Lagoon Road
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 06:36:34 -0400
Hello all again,

I am on the bridge that spans the Winooski
River and am looking at the one bar of sand
toward the west. A (or the same one as yesterday)
Red Knot just arrived with a small peep. 
I also saw a Common Nighthawk feasting in
an insect hatch on the north end of Delta Park
at 6:07 a.m. 

Enjoy Migration!!!

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Red Knot not at Lagoon Road
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 06:12:50 -0400
Nice!  And at Lagoon Road, a Killdeer convention has obviously taken place. 
I counted 57 individual birds, almost all of them around the treatment 
pools.  I walked the exterior edge of the facility to the far-east pool to 
get a better count of them as well as Wood Ducks.  2 Spotties persist and 
occasionally the Snipes reveal themselves (7 on Monday afternoon).  Aside 
from that, I've only seen a few random peeps passing through.  The wet areas 
in the pastures are not as large or deep and have not been attractive to 
shore birds....yet.

They're definitely on the move!

Ali

-----Original Message----- 
From: Jim Mead
Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 4:05 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Red Knot at Delta Park

Hi all,

Ted Murin and I went out to the bridge
that spans the Winooski River. There is
one bar of sand toward the west. We scoped
it and found 4 shorebirds. Two of them were small peeps.
One of them was a Greater Yellowlegs. We were both
looking at the fourth bird when Ted said," Oh
that's a good shorebird". I am glad he was
with me because he knew what species it was
very quickly. For me, I would have needed a lot
better lighting and much more plumage detail
and coloration. Anyway, we observed it for quite
a while afterwards and as he already knew, it was
definitely a Red Knot. Aging the bird was not possible
with the lighting that we had.

Good luck to any that may try for it.

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead 
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 20:59:57 -0400
A beautiful night with fabulous clouds and a great Merlin show.  
Unfortunately the nighthawks didn't find it to their liking with only  
29 birds passing by in 3 hours.  Rt123 will be closed for paving  
tomorrow evening so will try again on friday.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Red Knot at Delta Park
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:05:47 -0400
Hi all,

Ted Murin and I went out to the bridge
that spans the Winooski River. There is 
one bar of sand toward the west. We scoped
it and found 4 shorebirds. Two of them were small peeps. 
One of them was a Greater Yellowlegs. We were both
looking at the fourth bird when Ted said," Oh
that's a good shorebird". I am glad he was
with me because he knew what species it was
very quickly. For me, I would have needed a lot
better lighting and much more plumage detail
and coloration. Anyway, we observed it for quite
a while afterwards and as he already knew, it was 
definitely a Red Knot. Aging the bird was not possible
with the lighting that we had. 

Good luck to any that may try for it. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:34:47 -0400
It is half way between Bellows Falls & Westminster. At the  
intersection of Rt5 & Rt123 take 123. I set up at a relatives car  
wash on the left. Park to the right. I will be there until the end of  
the week from 5-7:30. A heads up if you are coming would be  
appreciated. Thanks.

Don Clark

On Aug 27, 2014, at 10:38 AM, Joe Cuoco wrote:

> Don
> Could you give me directions to the Westminster Station observation  
> site
> I am on Stagecoach Rd in Grafton
>
> Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
> 973-332-6532
> jcuoco AT msn.com
>
>> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:23:57 -0400
>> From: sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>>
>> After another slow start a late rally brought our total for the
>> evening to 425 birds.
>>
>> Don Clark
>> Grafton
>  		 	   		
Subject: Re: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Joe Cuoco <jcuoco AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:38:07 -0400
Don
Could you give me directions to the Westminster Station observation site
I am on Stagecoach Rd in Grafton

Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
973-332-6532
jcuoco AT msn.com
 
> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:23:57 -0400
> From: sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> After another slow start a late rally brought our total for the  
> evening to 425 birds.
> 
> Don Clark
> Grafton
 		 	   		  
Subject: Brilyea Access (Addison) -- Stilt Sandpiper, Bay-breasted Warbler, Blue-winged Teal
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:11:59 -0400
This morning Ron Payne and I visited the newly drawn-down, western 
impoundment at Brilyea Access where others had recently reported a 
number of shorebirds.  Indeed, we saw 12 species of shorebirds in 
total.  The walk down the west trail provided one warbler flurry, which 
included a young Bay-breasted Warbler.  Upon our arrival there were 
three young Bald Eagles and two Great Blue Herons all keeping company on 
a wee beach on the western shore.

Highlight of the day was provided by Fred and Chris Pratt whom we had 
met just as we were leaving Brilyea, as they were arriving.  An hour or 
so later our paths crossed again at Tri-town, where they told us about 
finding a Stilt Sandpiper in the cove near the last parking area, 
viewable from the road atop the dam.  Ron and I scampered back to 
Brilyea and surely enough, there was the Stilt with a few Lesser 
Yellowlegs, some Green-winged Teal, plus to our delight, half a dozen 
Blue-winged Teal.

Our two Brilyea checklists, containing 52 species total, are below.

Ian
=================================

Brilyea Access, Addison, US-VT
Aug 26, 2014 7:24 AM - 11:03 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.4 mile(s)
Comments:     Ron Payne, Ian Worley.  Took west trail to the upper, 
shallow waters of the western impoundment.
50 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  63
Wood Duck  5
Mallard  2
Green-winged Teal  6
Great Blue Heron  6
Turkey Vulture  26
Osprey  2
Bald Eagle  3     Three youngsters and two Great Blue Herons were on the 
west shore a bit south of the beginning of the trail.
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Semipalmated Plover  3
Killdeer  7
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Solitary Sandpiper  1
Greater Yellowlegs  3
Lesser Yellowlegs  11
Least Sandpiper  57     One group of flying birds counted by individuals 
by each of us was 46 in number.
White-rumped Sandpiper  1
Pectoral Sandpiper  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  3
Short-billed Dowitcher  2
Mourning Dove  4
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
Willow Flycatcher  1
Empidonax sp.  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  7
Common Raven  3
Barn Swallow  5
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Gray Catbird  1
Cedar Waxwing  4
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Tennessee Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  1
Magnolia Warbler  2
Bay-breasted Warbler  1     Immature
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Song Sparrow  6
Red-winged Blackbird  18
Common Grackle  1
American Goldfinch  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19583724



Brilyea Access, Addison, US-VT
Aug 26, 2014 12:31 PM - 1:20 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Ron Payne, Ian Worley.  Most of the time was spent with 
the birds in the cove just southwest of the farthest parking lot.  It 
was viewed from the road atop the dam.
10 species

Blue-winged Teal  6
Green-winged Teal  19
Bald Eagle  1     Adult
Lesser Yellowlegs  5
Stilt Sandpiper  1     We thank Fred and Chris Pratt alerting us to this 
bird.  Mixed with the Lesser Yellowlegs in the shallows of the cove, 
allowing for excellent comparison.  Bill thicker than that of Lesser 
Yellowlegs; downcurved.  Browish chest and pale belly.  Back with scaly 
pattern, brownish with whitish fringes to feathers.  Legs yellow-green 
in sharp contrast to the yellow legs of the Yellowlegs.  Prominent, 
light supercillium.  Back more arched than that of Lesser Yellowlegs.  
Neck longer than that of Dunlin.  Gait noticeably more choppy than that 
of Yellowlegs.  Tail higher than body when probing.
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Blue Jay  1
Cedar Waxwing  3
Yellow Warbler  1
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19583949
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:50:52 -0400
Only 111 birds tonight. Highlights were a couple of 30+ groups.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Nighthawks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 19:56:55 -0400
Only  3 nighthawks over Brandon plus 2 chimney swifts.

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 22:51:09 -0400
The Giant Swallowtail is one very impressive butterfly. The first time I saw 
one fly by, I said, "What the heck was that?" 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Aug 25, 2014, at 11:23 AM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> Kent, I wonder how much of this is an artifact of observer bias. I'm a 
birder, not a butterfly-er, and if it hadn't been for that post a few years ago 
on this list, I wouldn't have even thought to look for them. Truth be told, I 
barely knew what a Swallowtail was, and didn't know there was such a thing as a 
Giant Swallowtail. I could have been seeing them for years without knowing it, 
and they could very well have been here for decades before I got here. 

> 
> Many more birders are into butterflies and other large insects these days 
than there used to be, but still not a huge number of knowledgeable observers 
on the ground. Do you have something in your model that compensates for that? 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
>> On 8/25/2014 11:08 AM, Kent McFarland wrote:
>> Hi Folks,
>> Great to see butterflies taking over a bird site. Couple of quick notes
>> that may be of interest. We have been able to track the invasion to
>> residency of Giant Swallowtail from the very first one observed in 2010 to
>> now, thanks in no small part to a lot of great citizen scientists. I
>> collected all of those sightings and asked many to add their sightings to
>> our e-butterfly.org database (works much like eBird and VCE is partner on
>> this North American project). Because of this amazing dataset, my
>> colleagues and I are right now working on a model that we hope will help us
>> understand why and how this species moved so abruptly northward. We'd of
>> course love all of your sightings of this species and any butterflies on
>> e-butterfly.org. Or, if you are not a butterfly watcher per se, you can
>> post just your Giant Swallowtail sightings on our iNaturalist Vermont site
>> at http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/vermont-atlas-of-life.
>> 
>> Second, many of you may not know, there is a great list serve for Vermont
>> butterflies and moths on the UVM server too. You can find it at
>> https://list.uvm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=VTLEPS
>> And there is a Facebook page at
>> https://www.facebook.com/groups/vermontbutterflies/
>> 
>> Hope to see some of your data on eButterfly.org 
(http://www.e-butterfly.org/) 

>> and enjoy your posts on one of the Vermont Butterfly sites.
>> Kent
>> 
>> ____________________________
>> 
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>> 
>> [image: VCE Logo] 
>>   
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -----
>> No virus found in this message.
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4007/8097 - Release Date: 08/25/14
>> 
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 21:23:57 -0400
After another slow start a late rally brought our total for the  
evening to 425 birds.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:07:37 -0400
Sorry, everyone......you don't all need to know my plans!  Ali

-----Original Message----- 
From: Allan Strong
Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 4:01 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September

Hi VT Birders,

After last year's successful trips, I've been working with the Captain
of our 45' research boat, the Melosira, to organize another "pelagic"
birding trip on Lake Champlain. We have finally settled on two days in
September: Saturday the 20th, and Sunday the 21st.  The trips will be
half days...roughly 7:00-12:00 and the cost will be $50.00. We'll be
leaving out of the Burlington harbor, just outside the ECHO Center where
we will be able to check out the broad lake and south to the Four
Brothers Islands and Charlotte Town Beach.  If you are interested,
please let me know. To make sure everyone has good viewing
opportunities, we'll only be able to take 15-20 birders per trip.

Of course, with a Brown Pelican on Lake Dunmore, an Ancient Murrelet on
Shelburne Pond, and a Brown Booby at the Crown Point Bridge, who needs
to go out on the Lake you might ask?  Well, a very good question, but if
those birds have found these little corners of the state, what pray tell
is sitting out in the middle of our largest water body?

The hope is that we will have an opportunity to view some of the birds
that can only be seen at a distance from shore. We'll be right around
the "peak" for jaeger migration, and we'll be chumming with the goal of
bringing birds close to the boat.  It's a pretty good time of year for
that annual Sabine's Gull, and we'll be in season for other ducks,
shorebirds (phalaropes!), terns, and, well, who knows what else?

A note about the Melosira.  It is a steady boat, but if the water is
choppy, viewing can be challenging as you are watching from a moving
platform. Additionally, the boat is designed to chase fish and the
things fish eat (like zooplankton), so it is not designed to get
anywhere in a hurry. If an unusual bird comes whizzing by the boat, we
probably won't have much luck in trying to outrun it for a better look.
But, this is a totally different perspective on birding, and we might
just find some really cool birds!

If you are interested, please send me an email to reserve a place, and
I'll send you further instructions on making a final reservation.
astrong AT uvm.edu

I hope you can make it!

Allan
-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
******************************************************************* 
Subject: Re: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:02:55 -0400
Hi Allan,

Please sign me up for Sunday.  If it's full, I'd settle for Saturday!  Ali

-----Original Message----- 
From: Allan Strong
Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 4:01 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September

Hi VT Birders,

After last year's successful trips, I've been working with the Captain
of our 45' research boat, the Melosira, to organize another "pelagic"
birding trip on Lake Champlain. We have finally settled on two days in
September: Saturday the 20th, and Sunday the 21st.  The trips will be
half days...roughly 7:00-12:00 and the cost will be $50.00. We'll be
leaving out of the Burlington harbor, just outside the ECHO Center where
we will be able to check out the broad lake and south to the Four
Brothers Islands and Charlotte Town Beach.  If you are interested,
please let me know. To make sure everyone has good viewing
opportunities, we'll only be able to take 15-20 birders per trip.

Of course, with a Brown Pelican on Lake Dunmore, an Ancient Murrelet on
Shelburne Pond, and a Brown Booby at the Crown Point Bridge, who needs
to go out on the Lake you might ask?  Well, a very good question, but if
those birds have found these little corners of the state, what pray tell
is sitting out in the middle of our largest water body?

The hope is that we will have an opportunity to view some of the birds
that can only be seen at a distance from shore. We'll be right around
the "peak" for jaeger migration, and we'll be chumming with the goal of
bringing birds close to the boat.  It's a pretty good time of year for
that annual Sabine's Gull, and we'll be in season for other ducks,
shorebirds (phalaropes!), terns, and, well, who knows what else?

A note about the Melosira.  It is a steady boat, but if the water is
choppy, viewing can be challenging as you are watching from a moving
platform. Additionally, the boat is designed to chase fish and the
things fish eat (like zooplankton), so it is not designed to get
anywhere in a hurry. If an unusual bird comes whizzing by the boat, we
probably won't have much luck in trying to outrun it for a better look.
But, this is a totally different perspective on birding, and we might
just find some really cool birds!

If you are interested, please send me an email to reserve a place, and
I'll send you further instructions on making a final reservation.
astrong AT uvm.edu

I hope you can make it!

Allan
-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
******************************************************************* 
Subject: Re: goshawk on Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 25, 2014
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:15:05 -0400
Sue, thanks for posting your story about the extraordinary event watching the 
Loon hunting. I also saw something pretty extraordinary this past Friday 
(8/22/14). I was driving south on Goodrich Corner Rd. in Addison and had just 
rounded the corner when I saw a Raptor in a tree on the left (south) side of 
the road. It was being slightly harrassed by a couple of crows. I stopped my 
vehicle, looked up at it and thought," Is that a Cooper's Hawk?". I then looked 
at it through my bins and then new exactly what it was. It was a first year 
Northern Goshawk!! I got out of my vehicle and was then looking eye to eye with 
it. It actually moved its' head and upper body forward a couple of times 
without losing eye contact with me. I definitely wondered at that moment if it 
was thinking of having a go at me. Luckily for me it did not. It simply took 
off and flew toward the east and put down in a tree where I could still see it. 
I watched it for about a minute and then it took off again an! 

 d headed in a southwest direction. I watched it go diagonally across a field 
until some trees blocked my view of it. I then drove west and saw it again, 
this time flying northwest and back toward Goodrich Corner Rd. It then found a 
branch in a snag on the south side of the road. It was looking toward the north 
so I did the same thing. That is when I saw a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk in a 
snag on the north side of Goodrich Corner Rd. They were both locked onto each 
other and I began to wonder if anything would transpire between them. I didn't 
have to wait long because the Red-tailed Hawk suddenly took off and headed 
directly at the Goshawk. When the Red-tail got pretty close the Goshawk flew to 
a different tree about 15' away and the Red-tail took the spot in the snag 
where the Goshawk was. I could not see the Goshawk just then but the Red-tail 
was certainly locked onto it. After around 20 seconds the Goshawk suddenly came 
back out and flew directly at the Red-tail and when it ! 

 got within 5' from the Red-tail, it reached its' talons forward and opened 
them as wide as a nestling's mouth at feeding time. The Red-tail saw this and 
moved out of the way just in time to avoid a certain confrontation. Then the 
Goshawk took back the same spot in the snag. The Red-tail then flew back to the 
snag that it had flown from earlier. The two birds once again locked onto each 
other. After about a minute the Goshawk suddenly flew directly toward the 
Red-tail and landed on a branch in the same snag as the Red-tail. That was a 
first for me. Two Hawks (one accipiter, one Buteo) in the same tree. At that 
point they were about 15' apart and still looking at each other. After about 15 
seconds the Red-tail flew to the next tree over. Then the Goshawk flew to a 
higher perch but was still in its' same tree. About a minute later the Red-tail 
took wing, headed west and out of sight. About a minute after that the Goshawk 
took off heading on that same line. I did see the Goshawk one final time while 
driving down that same road. Moments like that a! 

 re right on top of the list of reasons why I bird. . . I spotted the Goshawk 
(the first time) at 7:58 a.m. 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September
From: Ian Almer Worley <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 16:47:37 -0400
Sign me up!

Ian
.........Quoting Allan Strong :

> Hi VT Birders,
>
> After last year's successful trips, I've been working with the Captain
> of our 45' research boat, the Melosira, to organize another "pelagic"
> birding trip on Lake Champlain. We have finally settled on two days in
> September: Saturday the 20th, and Sunday the 21st.  The trips will be
> half days...roughly 7:00-12:00 and the cost will be $50.00. We'll be
> leaving out of the Burlington harbor, just outside the ECHO Center
> where we will be able to check out the broad lake and south to the Four
> Brothers Islands and Charlotte Town Beach.  If you are interested,
> please let me know. To make sure everyone has good viewing
> opportunities, we'll only be able to take 15-20 birders per trip.
>
> Of course, with a Brown Pelican on Lake Dunmore, an Ancient Murrelet on
> Shelburne Pond, and a Brown Booby at the Crown Point Bridge, who needs
> to go out on the Lake you might ask?  Well, a very good question, but
> if those birds have found these little corners of the state, what pray
> tell is sitting out in the middle of our largest water body?
>
> The hope is that we will have an opportunity to view some of the birds
> that can only be seen at a distance from shore. We'll be right around
> the "peak" for jaeger migration, and we'll be chumming with the goal of
> bringing birds close to the boat.  It's a pretty good time of year for
> that annual Sabine's Gull, and we'll be in season for other ducks,
> shorebirds (phalaropes!), terns, and, well, who knows what else?
>
> A note about the Melosira.  It is a steady boat, but if the water is
> choppy, viewing can be challenging as you are watching from a moving
> platform. Additionally, the boat is designed to chase fish and the
> things fish eat (like zooplankton), so it is not designed to get
> anywhere in a hurry. If an unusual bird comes whizzing by the boat, we
> probably won't have much luck in trying to outrun it for a better look.
> But, this is a totally different perspective on birding, and we might
> just find some really cool birds!
>
> If you are interested, please send me an email to reserve a place, and
> I'll send you further instructions on making a final reservation.
> astrong AT uvm.edu
>
> I hope you can make it!
>
> Allan
> -- 
>
> *******************************************************************
> Allan M. Strong
> University of Vermont
> The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
> 220L Aiken Center
>
> 81 Carrigan Drive
> Burlington, VT 05405
> 802-656-2910
> *******************************************************************
Subject: Re: loons Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Aug 25, 2014
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 16:43:21 -0400
Did it catch it??

Jane


On 8/25/2014 3:14 PM, Sue Wetmore wrote:
> We had an extrordinary event while watching the loon family fish. One
> of the adults submerged just below the surface of the water and began
> to rocket after a fish like a demented torpedo. The speed at which
> this bird moved underwater was amazing. Something I'd never witnessed
> before. Sue Wetmore
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net Sent:
> Monday, August 25, 2014 2:59:45 PM Subject: eBird Report - Lake
> Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Aug 25, 2014
>
> Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Addison, US-VT Aug 25, 2014
> 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Protocol: Stationary 6 species
>
> Mallard  4 Common Loon  3     watched as they dove for fish-----the
> imm. finally caught one. Spotted Sandpiper  1 Ring-billed Gull  51
> Belted Kingfisher  1 Blue Jay  1
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19570781
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3
> (http://ebird.org)
>
>
> ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4007/8097 - Release Date:
> 08/25/14
>
Subject: Birding Lake Champlain...from a boat: 20 and 21 September
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 16:01:03 -0400
Hi VT Birders,

After last year's successful trips, I've been working with the Captain 
of our 45' research boat, the Melosira, to organize another "pelagic" 
birding trip on Lake Champlain. We have finally settled on two days in 
September: Saturday the 20th, and Sunday the 21st.  The trips will be 
half days...roughly 7:00-12:00 and the cost will be $50.00. We'll be 
leaving out of the Burlington harbor, just outside the ECHO Center where 
we will be able to check out the broad lake and south to the Four 
Brothers Islands and Charlotte Town Beach.  If you are interested, 
please let me know. To make sure everyone has good viewing 
opportunities, we'll only be able to take 15-20 birders per trip.

Of course, with a Brown Pelican on Lake Dunmore, an Ancient Murrelet on 
Shelburne Pond, and a Brown Booby at the Crown Point Bridge, who needs 
to go out on the Lake you might ask?  Well, a very good question, but if 
those birds have found these little corners of the state, what pray tell 
is sitting out in the middle of our largest water body?

The hope is that we will have an opportunity to view some of the birds 
that can only be seen at a distance from shore. We'll be right around 
the "peak" for jaeger migration, and we'll be chumming with the goal of 
bringing birds close to the boat.  It's a pretty good time of year for 
that annual Sabine's Gull, and we'll be in season for other ducks, 
shorebirds (phalaropes!), terns, and, well, who knows what else?

A note about the Melosira.  It is a steady boat, but if the water is 
choppy, viewing can be challenging as you are watching from a moving 
platform. Additionally, the boat is designed to chase fish and the 
things fish eat (like zooplankton), so it is not designed to get 
anywhere in a hurry. If an unusual bird comes whizzing by the boat, we 
probably won't have much luck in trying to outrun it for a better look. 
But, this is a totally different perspective on birding, and we might 
just find some really cool birds!

If you are interested, please send me an email to reserve a place, and 
I'll send you further instructions on making a final reservation.
astrong AT uvm.edu

I hope you can make it!

Allan
-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
*******************************************************************
Subject: migrants - Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 23, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:17:28 +0000
I thought I'd had an exciting morning until I read about the Brown Booby and 
made tracks to see it!! 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 3:07:15 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Aug 23, 2014 

Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Aug 23, 2014 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
42 species 

Canada Goose  1 
Wood Duck  1 
American Black Duck  9 
Mallard  9 
Great Blue Heron  1 
Green Heron  4 
Turkey Vulture  1 
Bald Eagle  1 
Mourning Dove  1 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2 
Eastern Phoebe  1 
Eastern Kingbird  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  6 
Blue Jay  1 
American Crow  15 
Common Raven  1 
Barn Swallow  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  4 
Tufted Titmouse  1 
White-breasted Nuthatch  3 
Carolina Wren  2 
Eastern Bluebird  1 
Veery  1 
American Robin  5 
Gray Catbird  6 
European Starling  1 
Cedar Waxwing  3 
Black-and-white Warbler  2 
Common Yellowthroat  3 
Canada Warbler  1 
Chipping Sparrow  8 
Song Sparrow  2 
Scarlet Tanager  2 
Northern Cardinal  2 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2     feeding on grapes 
Indigo Bunting  6     males and females plus young of the year 
Bobolink  2 
Red-winged Blackbird  2 
American Goldfinch  7 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19570835 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: goshawk on Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 25, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:16:17 +0000
A Goshawk sat in a dead tree while four crows sedately sat nearby. Obviously 
did not want to be on its menu. 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 2:57:12 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 25, 2014 

Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Aug 25, 2014 8:35 AM - 10:05 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
25 species 

Northern Goshawk  1 
Mourning Dove  4 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1 
Downy Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2 
Eastern Phoebe  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  3 
Blue Jay  7 
American Crow  6 
Black-capped Chickadee  6 
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1 
Eastern Bluebird  2 
Veery  1 
American Robin  3 
Gray Catbird  6 
European Starling  1 
Cedar Waxwing  7 
Canada Warbler  2 
Eastern Towhee  2 
Song Sparrow  2 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1 
Purple Finch  1 
American Goldfinch  2 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19570762 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: loons Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Aug 25, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:14:53 +0000
We had an extrordinary event while watching the loon family fish. One of the 
adults submerged just below the surface of the water and began to rocket after 
a fish like a demented torpedo. The speed at which this bird moved underwater 
was amazing. Something I'd never witnessed before. 

Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 2:59:45 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Aug 25, 2014 

Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Addison, US-VT 
Aug 25, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM 
Protocol: Stationary 
6 species 

Mallard  4 
Common Loon  3     watched as they dove for fish-----the imm. finally caught 
one. 

Spotted Sandpiper  1 
Ring-billed Gull  51 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Blue Jay  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19570781 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: dipped at Champlain Bridge
From: Linda LaPan <stickadk AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:22:43 -0700
Sorry you didn't get to see the magnificent bird Susan. Carol Pinneyand I 
stopped at theWestport Boat Launcha little after 4 pm on the NY side 
yesterday, to look for her, as she wasn't at theChamplain Bridge anymore. 
Carol spotted her quickly after we arrived.We watched her till 4:30 flying, 
diving for fish, and resting on the water for short periods in the bay.She 
then flew across the lake, and our best estimation was Button Bay area. was 
where we lost sight of her. Nothing was bothering her, as she was diving near 
boats going by. Wish we had been in a boat! Boy does this species exert a LOT 
of energy trying to feed! 


I only have a dumb phone, so posted our sighting to Northern NY Birds when we 
got back home. 


Linda LaPan
Lake Placid, NY 


On Sunday, August 24, 2014 9:18 PM, Susan Fogleman  
wrote: 

  


As of 4:40 this afternoon the Brown Booby had not reappeared since 
last seen around 2. Despite our dipping, it was great to meet Pat 
Folsom of Mad Birders, Ali Wagner, Kim Likakis (sp?), Ann and Fred 
Curran, Ron Payne, two Daves, and... sorry if I'm leaving someone 
out! Great looks at local Bald Eagles, Osprey, Caspian Tern, among 
other expected critters, and oh, yes, the drake Redhead. Too much sun 
for me -- had to quit.

Thanks, all, for good company and conversations.

Susan Fogleman
Campton NH
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:29:32 -0400
The short answer is, this is not an artifact. We, and other states, spent
thousands of hours in the field from 2002-2007 completing the Vermont
Butterfly Survey. Not a single Giant Swallowtail was found. I have
thousands of historic records from VT and there was not a single one found.
 This is also the case in Maine, and in the Maritimes. The last decade has
seen them move northward in other areas too, such as Ontario, where they
have a lot of watchers and an earlier atlas.

Compensating for observer bias is a big deal in our business and we spend a
lot of statistical energy on it. There are some amazing and great ways to
understand it, but those require intensive and rigorously designed surveys,
such as our Mountain Bird Watch. With ad hoc data such as this kind of
crowd-source data, we do have some ways to compensate for it.

Great question!
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  





On Mon, Aug 25, 2014 at 11:23 AM, Jane Stein  wrote:

> Kent, I wonder how much of this is an artifact of observer bias.  I'm a
> birder, not a butterfly-er, and if it hadn't been for that post a few years
> ago on this list, I wouldn't have even thought to look for them. Truth be
> told, I barely knew what a Swallowtail was, and didn't know there was such
> a thing as a Giant Swallowtail.  I could have been seeing them for years
> without knowing it, and they could very well have been here for decades
> before I got here.
>
> Many more birders are into butterflies and other large insects these days
> than there used to be, but still not a huge number of knowledgeable
> observers on the ground.  Do you have something in your model that
> compensates for that?
>
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
>
>
>
> On 8/25/2014 11:08 AM, Kent McFarland wrote:
>
>> Hi Folks,
>> Great to see butterflies taking over a bird site. Couple of quick notes
>> that may be of interest. We have been able to track the invasion to
>> residency of Giant Swallowtail from the very first one observed in 2010 to
>> now, thanks in no small part to a lot of great citizen scientists. I
>> collected all of those sightings and asked many to add their sightings to
>> our e-butterfly.org database (works much like eBird and VCE is partner on
>> this North American project). Because of this amazing dataset, my
>> colleagues and I are right now working on a model that we hope will help
>> us
>> understand why and how this species moved so abruptly northward. We'd of
>> course love all of your sightings of this species and any butterflies on
>> e-butterfly.org. Or, if you are not a butterfly watcher per se, you can
>> post just your Giant Swallowtail sightings on our iNaturalist Vermont site
>> at http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/vermont-atlas-of-life.
>>
>> Second, many of you may not know, there is a great list serve for Vermont
>> butterflies and moths on the UVM server too. You can find it at
>> https://list.uvm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=VTLEPS
>> And there is a Facebook page at
>> https://www.facebook.com/groups/vermontbutterflies/
>>
>> Hope to see some of your data on eButterfly.org (
>> http://www.e-butterfly.org/)
>> and enjoy your posts on one of the Vermont Butterfly sites.
>> Kent
>>
>> ____________________________
>>
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>>
>> [image: VCE Logo] 
>>    
>> > >
>> 
>>
>>
>>
>>>
>>
>> -----
>> No virus found in this message.
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4007/8097 - Release Date: 08/25/14
>>
>>
Subject: Half Billion Records
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:17:08 -0400
Thanks everyone for sharing your observations!

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/a-half-a-billion-biodiversity-records/

Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  


Subject: Re: reminder
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 11:25:56 -0400
The State turkey survey site is at
http://www.vtfishandwildlife.com/turkey_survey_survey.cfm.

We also can and do collect the exact same information on Vermont eBird.
We'd love to team up with the state on this, but I have never heard from
anyone there about this or about using the eBird data. In fact, there is a
ton of data in Vermont eBird for Wild Turkey. Anyhow, remember that you can
add age and sex and more to bird sightings in eBird too. After you put in
the total number of individuals counted on the eBird checklist, click on
Add Details button next to it and you can add age, sex, breeding status,
and a whole lot more!

Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  





On Sat, Aug 23, 2014 at 3:50 PM, Jean Arrowsmith  wrote:

> Fish and Wildlife want us to report sightings of WITU during August.  Very
> easy process when I put "turkey" in when I googled them.
>
> Jean Arrowsmith
> Lincoln
>
>  Date:    Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:09:36 -0400
> From:    Larry and Mona Rogers <4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET>
> Subject: A good bunch of kestrels on Gage Road this morning
>
> Gage Road in Addison is always a reliable kestrel spot but this morning
> was exceptional.
> Also saw a mother turkey with 10 poults and the usual two resident ospreys.
> Larry Rogers
>
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 11:23:17 -0400
Kent, I wonder how much of this is an artifact of observer bias.  I'm a 
birder, not a butterfly-er, and if it hadn't been for that post a few 
years ago on this list, I wouldn't have even thought to look for them. 
Truth be told, I barely knew what a Swallowtail was, and didn't know 
there was such a thing as a Giant Swallowtail.  I could have been seeing 
them for years without knowing it, and they could very well have been 
here for decades before I got here.

Many more birders are into butterflies and other large insects these 
days than there used to be, but still not a huge number of knowledgeable 
observers on the ground.  Do you have something in your model that 
compensates for that?

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 8/25/2014 11:08 AM, Kent McFarland wrote:
> Hi Folks,
> Great to see butterflies taking over a bird site. Couple of quick notes
> that may be of interest. We have been able to track the invasion to
> residency of Giant Swallowtail from the very first one observed in 2010 to
> now, thanks in no small part to a lot of great citizen scientists. I
> collected all of those sightings and asked many to add their sightings to
> our e-butterfly.org database (works much like eBird and VCE is partner on
> this North American project). Because of this amazing dataset, my
> colleagues and I are right now working on a model that we hope will help us
> understand why and how this species moved so abruptly northward. We'd of
> course love all of your sightings of this species and any butterflies on
> e-butterfly.org. Or, if you are not a butterfly watcher per se, you can
> post just your Giant Swallowtail sightings on our iNaturalist Vermont site
> at http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/vermont-atlas-of-life.
>
> Second, many of you may not know, there is a great list serve for Vermont
> butterflies and moths on the UVM server too. You can find it at
> https://list.uvm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=VTLEPS
> And there is a Facebook page at
> https://www.facebook.com/groups/vermontbutterflies/
>
> Hope to see some of your data on eButterfly.org (http://www.e-butterfly.org/)
> and enjoy your posts on one of the Vermont Butterfly sites.
> Kent
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
>
> [image: VCE Logo] 
>    
> 
> 
>
>
>>
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4007/8097 - Release Date: 08/25/14
>
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 11:08:02 -0400
Hi Folks,
Great to see butterflies taking over a bird site. Couple of quick notes
that may be of interest. We have been able to track the invasion to
residency of Giant Swallowtail from the very first one observed in 2010 to
now, thanks in no small part to a lot of great citizen scientists. I
collected all of those sightings and asked many to add their sightings to
our e-butterfly.org database (works much like eBird and VCE is partner on
this North American project). Because of this amazing dataset, my
colleagues and I are right now working on a model that we hope will help us
understand why and how this species moved so abruptly northward. We'd of
course love all of your sightings of this species and any butterflies on
e-butterfly.org. Or, if you are not a butterfly watcher per se, you can
post just your Giant Swallowtail sightings on our iNaturalist Vermont site
at http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/vermont-atlas-of-life.

Second, many of you may not know, there is a great list serve for Vermont
butterflies and moths on the UVM server too. You can find it at
https://list.uvm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=VTLEPS
And there is a Facebook page at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/vermontbutterflies/

Hope to see some of your data on eButterfly.org (http://www.e-butterfly.org/)
and enjoy your posts on one of the Vermont Butterfly sites.
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  




>
Subject: Dead Creek shorebirds and owl
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 09:08:45 -0400
Yesterday at Dead Creek, Dave Johnson, Jim Mead and I had quite a few 
shorebirds including 


About 15-20 "mixed" yellowlegs
One snipe spp.
30-40 peeps (leasts and semi ps)
One Bairds sandpiper
A dozen or so solitary sands
4-6 killdeer
One semi-p plover
6-10 spotted sandpipers

Also, a nice (and unexpected) view of a great horned owl drinking out in the 
open at the waters edge. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Booby Updates Requested
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 07:20:42 -0400
Keep those updates coming - both positive and negative. With yesterday 
afternoon's negative report I decided to cancel my 8-hour round-trip trek this 
morning, but will gladly jump into the car and head up your way if the Booby is 
re-spotted. 



Mike Resch
Pepperell, MA

Subject: WITU in Leicester
From: Shelagh Smith <vdxshelagh AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 01:00:53 -0700
WITU follow up: on Sunday afternoon our resident male appeared as usual in the 
vegetable garden, but this time brought two shy hens with him, showed them 
around the weed seed heads, then they took a dust bath where the potatoes had 
been dug up. Is he gathering a new flock together? Shelagh Smith near Fern 
Lake. 

Subject: Nighthawks
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:25:52 -0400
Only 3 nighthawks see here in Brandon tonight---- yesterday 4.

Sue Wetmore

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: NEK Northern Goshawk, Newark, VT
From: Jim Sparrell <jimsparrell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:21:19 -0400
After having this bird sail over our yard for only quick glimpses all
summer, it finally teed up as it flew across the road and gave me time for
a couple of quick record shots. Photos at https://flic.kr/p/oTPrAL

Over the week we had a mixed flock of warblers and vireos affiliating with
some chickadees, juncos, and nuthatches, working over our abundant
caterpillar and bug crop on some old apple trees. There is a photo of a
Blackburnian from this afternoon at the same link above. I had chased them
in the yard all summer and again could never get a decent picture when they
were up high singing.

Jim Sparrell
Katie Towler
Newark, VT
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:17:23 -0400
Only 278 birds passed by tonight (8/24). Sounds like most were  
traveling further east this evening. Concord, NH reported a  
phenomenal 2,811. Last night also sounded good but I skipped out to  
chase a Brown Booby.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 22:05:07 -0400
In the last few weeks I saw some in South Hero on the marsh trail. Last year I 
was at an out door wedding in Williston and saw one. I've seen them in many 
other places this year, I just can't remember where. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Aug 24, 2014, at 3:18 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> Two years ago, when one was reported on this list as having been seen
> somewhere just south of me (Mt. Independence maybe?), I looked up what
> they looked like and kept an eye out around my property just in case,
> and sure enough, I ended up with 4 by the end of that summer.
> 
> Had at least two last year and at least one this year so far, too.
> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
>> On 8/23/2014 8:10 PM, hg2 AT myfairpoint.net wrote:
>> I notice that giant swallowtails are being reported on the northern
>> new York listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two days ago in
>> Dummerston. Maybe irrupting north?
>> 
>> Hector Galbraith, PhD National Wildlife Federation 802 258 4836 802
>> 222 1916 (cell)
>> 
>> 
>> ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4007/8085 - Release Date:
>> 08/23/14
>> 
Subject: dipped at Champlain Bridge
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:18:02 -0400
As of 4:40 this afternoon the Brown Booby had not reappeared since  
last seen around 2.  Despite our dipping, it was great to meet Pat  
Folsom of Mad Birders, Ali Wagner, Kim Likakis (sp?), Ann and Fred  
Curran, Ron Payne, two Daves, and... sorry if I'm leaving someone  
out!  Great looks at local Bald Eagles, Osprey, Caspian Tern, among  
other expected critters, and oh, yes, the drake Redhead.  Too much sun  
for me -- had to quit.

Thanks, all, for good company and conversations.

Susan Fogleman
Campton  NH
Subject: North Bennington Nighthawks
From: Theresa Armata <tarmat AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 19:39:41 -0400
A very pleasant surprise this afternoon. Out for a walk around the 
Park-McCullough loop in North Bennington. 

Between 5:45 and 6:10 PM 18 Nighthawks passed flying west over the Walloomsac 
river. This may be an undercount, 

as they were swirling and diving, scooping up bugs. 

First I have ever seen here. Guess it pays to look up and carry binoculars.

Terri Armata 
Bennington
Subject: Cuckoo
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:04:54 -0400
Among the migrants early this morning in my yard was a Black-billed Cuckoo 
looking for breakfast . 

Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone St. Albans
From: Gary Chapin <gchapin1 AT ROCHESTER.RR.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:55:06 -0400
There is currently a RUDDY TURNSTONE among the other previously reported 
shorebirds at St. Albans Town Park. 


Gary Chapin
Ticonderoga, NY
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 15:18:26 -0400
Two years ago, when one was reported on this list as having been seen
somewhere just south of me (Mt. Independence maybe?), I looked up what
they looked like and kept an eye out around my property just in case,
and sure enough, I ended up with 4 by the end of that summer.

Had at least two last year and at least one this year so far, too.

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 8/23/2014 8:10 PM, hg2 AT myfairpoint.net wrote:
> I notice that giant swallowtails are being reported on the northern
> new York listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two days ago in
> Dummerston. Maybe irrupting north?
>
> Hector Galbraith, PhD National Wildlife Federation 802 258 4836 802
> 222 1916 (cell)
>
>
> ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4745 / Virus Database: 4007/8085 - Release Date:
> 08/23/14
>
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 18:26:27 +0000
Sorry, swallowtail date: August 2. BBP


On 8/24/14 2:21 PM, "Peterson Bruce"  wrote:

> For the record (allbeit late), at a wedding at The Basin Harbor Club, there
> were at least four giant swallowtails in the flower beds.  Bruce Peterson
> 
> 
> On 8/23/14 10:16 PM, "Scott Stoner"  wrote:
> 
>> From personal (but casual) observation in upstate NY it seems that they are
>> on
>> the increase in the Saratoga - Washington county areas. Scott Stoner, Albany
>> NY area.
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
> 
> "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net"
>>  wrote:
> 
>> I notice that giant swallowtails are being
>> reported on the northern new York listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one 
two 

>> days ago in Dummerston. Maybe irrupting north?
>> 
>> Hector Galbraith,
>> PhD
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> 802 258 4836
>> 802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 18:21:41 +0000
For the record (allbeit late), at a wedding at The Basin Harbor Club, there
were at least four giant swallowtails in the flower beds.  Bruce Peterson


On 8/23/14 10:16 PM, "Scott Stoner"  wrote:

> From personal (but casual) observation in upstate NY it seems that they are 
on 

> the increase in the Saratoga - Washington county areas. Scott Stoner, Albany
> NY area.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

"hg2 AT myfairpoint.net"
>  wrote:

>I notice that giant swallowtails are being
> reported on the northern new York listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two
> days ago in Dummerston. Maybe irrupting north?
>
>Hector Galbraith,
> PhD
>National Wildlife Federation
>802 258 4836
>802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Carolina Wren, RedeyedVireo (not over yet)
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 06:09:42 -0700
Both still singing persistently early morning, CAWR also at feeder.

_________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Shorebird Bonanza at St. Albans Bay Town Park
From: Charlotte Bill <vtcrossbill AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 06:07:20 -0700
Shorebird Bonanza at St. Albans Bay Town Park
Our (Hal's & my) list of 10 species of shorebirds from Saturday includes the 
following: 


Sandpipers: Solitary, Spotted, Semi-palmated, Least, White-rumped
Yellowlegs: Greater and Lesser
Dowitchers: (Short-billed, as agreed upon with us by 3rd observer)
Plovers: Killdeer, Semi-palmated

A Peregrine Falcon flew in about 2:00 and scattered them all, though they were 
gradually drifting back by the time we left about 2:30. 


Also seen by earlier observer: Wilson's Snipe and possible Red-necked Phalarope

Charlotte Bill
Subject: Booby yes!
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 07:50:57 -0400
The adult brown booby is at the Champlain Bridge being seen right now in 
Vermont waters! Also a drake redhead is present. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Booby
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 06:59:52 -0400
I realize it is early, but has anyone seen the brown booby yet this morning?

Scott

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Wild Turkey in Leicester
From: Shelagh Smith <vdxshelagh AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 01:08:10 -0700
All day, every day - a lone male WITU in our garden. From daylight onwards he 
is either up in the blueberry orchard, or down in the vegetable garden with the 
Chipping Sparrows, and lately, right up next to the house in the Jewelweed 
thicket with the hummers. We are in and out of the house, but he just looks up 
and stalks off, not too far away though. No mate since July, and no poults this 
year. 


Yesterday morning a calling Loon made several passes overhead between Dunmore & 
Fern Lakes. 


3:30am today, lots of very loud Barred Owl chatter outside my window.

Shelagh Smith near Fern Lake.
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Scott Stoner <scottjstoner AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 22:16:35 -0400
From personal (but casual) observation in upstate NY it seems that they are on 
the increase in the Saratoga - Washington county areas. Scott Stoner, Albany NY 
area. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

"hg2 AT myfairpoint.net"  wrote:

>I notice that giant swallowtails are being reported on the northern new York 
listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two days ago in Dummerston. Maybe 
irrupting north? 

>
>Hector Galbraith, PhD
>National Wildlife Federation
>802 258 4836
>802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Nighthawks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 21:20:32 -0400
Over downtown Brandon 4 nighthawks swooped low over buildings.

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 21:06:36 -0400
I make note of Giant Swallowtails when I am out birding, and submit the 
sightings to ebutterfly. 

I do this for monarchs as well, since their numbers are in such decline.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT
On Aug 23, 2014, at 8:49 PM, Richard  wrote:

> Didn't know we could do that on this list serve. I have photographs of Giant 
Swallowtails coming to my garden each month since June. I was trying to keep a 
photographic record since they have been here for 4 years, I think. 

> 
> Dick Harlow
> Middlebury, VT
> raharlow AT comcast.net
> 
> On 8/23/14, 20:10, hg2 AT myfairpoint.net wrote:
>> I notice that giant swallowtails are being reported on the northern new York 
listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two days ago in Dummerston. Maybe 
irrupting north? 

>> 
>> Hector Galbraith, PhD
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> 802 258 4836
>> 802 222 1916 (cell)
>> 
Subject: Re: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: Richard <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 20:49:03 -0400
Didn't know we could do that on this list serve.  I have photographs of 
Giant Swallowtails coming to my garden each month since June.  I was 
trying to keep a photographic record since they have been here for 4 
years, I think.

Dick Harlow
Middlebury, VT
raharlow AT comcast.net

On 8/23/14, 20:10, hg2 AT myfairpoint.net wrote:
> I notice that giant swallowtails are being reported on the northern new York 
listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two days ago in Dummerston. Maybe 
irrupting north? 

>
> Hector Galbraith, PhD
> National Wildlife Federation
> 802 258 4836
> 802 222 1916 (cell)
>
Subject: Giant swallowtail - not a bird
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 20:10:52 -0400
I notice that giant swallowtails are being reported on the northern new York 
listserve but not on VTbirds. I had one two days ago in Dummerston. Maybe 
irrupting north? 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)