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Updated on Thursday, October 2 at 10:23 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Northern Shrike,©Barry Kent Mackay

2 Oct Brattleboro warblers and sparrows ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
2 Oct New eBird Hotspot location at Dead Creek (Missisquoi NWR) [Ron Payne ]
2 Oct Re: ID Help with Confusing Fall Warbler [Charlotte Bill ]
1 Oct Waitsfield birds [Pat Folsom ]
1 Oct Migration Timing [Larry and Mona Rogers ]
1 Oct Sandhill Cranes [Jeffrey Nelson ]
30 Sep Brattleboro dickcissel and others ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
30 Sep Re: Robins and Sparrows [Sharon Turner ]
30 Sep Robins and Sparrows [Ruth ]
29 Sep Re: mystery warbler - CT??? [Ken Copenhaver ]
29 Sep mystery warbler - CT??? [Maeve Kim ]
29 Sep Fwd: eBird Report - Court St. Rutland VT., Sep 29, 2014 [Fred Bates ]
29 Sep Camel's hump fall out/summit pipit [Liz Lee ]
27 Sep Victory: Amer. Pipit, Pine Siskins [tfberriman ]
26 Sep Hudsonian Godwit - Dead Creek Mouth at Goose Bay, Plus, 9/26 [Mike Resch ]
26 Sep Red rocks park this morning [UVM ]
26 Sep Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests [Jim Shallow ]
25 Sep Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests [Kim Likakis ]
25 Sep Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests [Allan Strong ]
25 Sep Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests [Larry and Mona Rogers ]
25 Sep Lincoln sparrow [Sue ]
25 Sep Cota Field Monthly Walk [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
24 Sep Re: ID Help with Confusing Fall Warbler [Ken Copenhaver ]
24 Sep RTH [Walter Medwid ]
24 Sep Immature Bald Eagle [Robert Spring ]
24 Sep RFI - Birding Mouth of Dead Creek at Goose Bay [Mike Resch ]
24 Sep Northern Harrier - Randolph Center [Kathy Leonard ]
24 Sep Fwd: [VTBIRD] Dark-eyed Juncos [Randy Schmidt ]
24 Sep Dark-eyed Juncos [Randy Schmidt ]
24 Sep Saving our Songs and our Forest [Jim Shallow ]
24 Sep Re: sky opera [Veer Frost ]
23 Sep Brilyea godwit still there [Maeve Kim ]
23 Sep Re: Carolina wren [Patti Haynes ]
23 Sep Re: sky opera [Jane Stein ]
23 Sep sky opera [Veer Frost ]
23 Sep Carolina wren [Patrick Phillips ]
23 Sep Scavengers [Sue ]
22 Sep Pine Grosbeak? [Ken Copenhaver ]
22 Sep Fwd: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015 [eve ticknor ]
22 Sep NNYBirds: Fwd: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015 ["eve ticknor edticknor AT sympatico.ca [Northern_NY_Birds]" ]
22 Sep Broad-winged ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
22 Sep Re: late season Rubythroat [Barbara Shaw ]
22 Sep late season Rubythroat [Veer Frost ]
21 Sep Eastern Bluebirds Galore! [Linda Verchereau Becker ]
21 Sep Hummer [m372 AT aol.com ]
21 Sep goldfinch behavior [Jean Arrowsmith ]
21 Sep Re: Anyone Near Brilyea? [UVM ]
21 Sep Anyone Near Brilyea? [Cathryn Abbott ]
21 Sep Re: Sharp-shinned and a Flicker [David Hoag ]
21 Sep Sharp-shinned and a Flicker [Linda Gionti ]
21 Sep Pipits, Horned Larks, Meadow Larks, Savannah Sparrows, Kestrels - western Addison Co. ["Ian A. Worley" ]
20 Sep Pipits Charlotte Town Beach, Sep 20, 2014 [Sue ]
19 Sep Two nighthawks [Walter Medwid ]
19 Sep Hummer [Sue ]
19 Sep NEK: Victory Blowdown, Merlin, Bald Eagle Boreal birds [tfberriman ]
19 Sep hummer [Sarah Fellows ]
19 Sep Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington [John Snell ]
19 Sep Botswana [John Snell ]
19 Sep Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington [Larry Clarfeld ]
19 Sep Blue Jays on the move - Burlington [Eric Hynes ]
19 Sep Hummers [Ron Payne ]
19 Sep Re: Mansfield wrap-up [Veer Frost ]
18 Sep Mansfield wrap-up [Chris Rimmer ]
18 Sep Mt Philo Sept 18 Hawk/Monarch count [Liz Lackey ]
18 Sep Re: A ___________ of Killdeer [Deborah Benjamin ]
18 Sep A ___________ of Killdeer [Bruce MacPherson ]
18 Sep Creek Road Sedge Wren [Donald Jones ]
18 Sep Fwd: My Independence [Sue ]
18 Sep What is Status of Dead Creek Draw Down [Mike Resch ]
18 Sep Hummers [Richard ]
18 Sep Hummer [Elizabeth Alton ]
18 Sep Re: VTBIRD Digest - 15 Sep 2014 to 17 Sep 2014 (#2014-259) [Elizabeth Alton ]
18 Sep Bird Walk at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center [Bruce MacPherson ]
18 Sep 18Sept early morning hummingbird [Veer Frost ]
17 Sep Hummer [Jim and Chris Runcie ]
15 Sep Re: P.s. From the border in Derby [Jane Stein ]

Subject: Brattleboro warblers and sparrows
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 10:56:22 -0400
This morning in the Marina field a good selection of species including 6 
warblers (yellow, magnolia, yellow-rumped, northern waterthrush, yellowthroat, 
and both races of palm), Lincoln sparrows -about 8, song, swamp, 
white-throated, white-crowned, savanna, and field sparrows. Also still around 
are several phoebes, a red-eyed video, and a willow/alder flycatcher. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: New eBird Hotspot location at Dead Creek (Missisquoi NWR)
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 09:34:42 -0400
Given the great suite of birds that have been found recently at the mouth of 
Dead Creek in Missisiquoi Bay, a new eBird Hotspot has been created named "Dead 
Creek Outlet". If you have checklists from the outlet of Dead Creek, or any of 
the other locations represented by hotspots in the Missisquoi NWR area, please 
consider merging them into hotspots as this will enhance birder's ability to 
see value of a location with just one click in eBird. 


Instructions on how to merge checlists into hotspots can be found here:
http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010517?b_id=1928?t=401180

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: Re: ID Help with Confusing Fall Warbler
From: Charlotte Bill <vtcrossbill AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 00:05:34 +0000
Hi Ken,


Thanks for following up about this! Initially, after looking at Peterson and 
National Geographic 5th edition, I'd had hopes for a young Bay-breasted 
Warbler, but then I looked at Audubon online photos and Sibley and gave up on 
that idea! After posting, I heard from Ian Worley, who made the same suggestion 
as you do (female Pine Warbler). He thought the timing was a tad early for 
Blackpoll Warbler, which seemed to be the only other possibility. 


Hey! I see you and Julie have added Dunlin to your lists! That's great! It 
surely has been an exciting year for shorebirds in Franklin County! 



Thanks again for writing!Charlotte




On Wednesday, September 24, 2014 10:38 PM, Ken Copenhaver  
wrote: 




Hi Charlotte.

I just found this in my Spam folder.  Gmail has been putting a lot of
VTBird messages in Spam lately, and I forget to check for them.

Wandering if you solved this warbler mystery?  I'm thinking first year
female Pine Warbler, though they do have a slight eye-stripe.  The
combination of wing-bars but no eye-ring, no eye-stripes, no yellow, and no
streaking is a challenge!

I'm pretty sure I saw a Nashville and a Tennessee together in my yard this
evening.  Interesting combination (geographically speaking).  I'm sure of
the Nashville (gray head, eye ring, yellow undertail coverts), but the
Tennessee is more iffy as it looked like the adult breeding female in
Sibley with a pale yellow wash on the throat.  Hard to say what
non-breeding female should look like.  The Warbler Guide says "in Fall some
adult males may be separable, all others not" but it's not really clear how
to separate them.  Fall Warblers: The Ultimate Challenge -- should be a
video game!!!


--Ken


On Sat, Sep 6, 2014 at 1:22 PM, Charlotte Bill 
wrote:

> Greetings,
>
>
> Two warblers stopped by this morning with the chickadees at the balsams in
> front of our porch. I got a few details on the first bird but not on the
> second before they all flew.
>
>
> Is there enough here for an ID on the first bird?
>
> *two white wing bars per wing (very obvious, very striking)
> *small, thin, pointy dark beak (definitely a warbler beak)
> *olive-brown back and head
> *light buffy breast and belly
> *no eye ring
> *no noticeable eyebrows or eye lines
> *no yellow at all
> *no streaking anywhere
>
> Unfortunately, I did not notice its undertail coverts, corners of tail, or
> color of legs and feet.
>
> Picture a female Black-throated Blue Warbler with two very distinct white
> wing bars on each wing (instead of little white wing patch), and with a
> plain, olive-brown head without a white eyebrow, and that's a lot like the
> bird I saw.
>
> Again, is there enough here for an ID? Thanks in advance!
>
> Charlotte Bill
> Enosburgh
>
Subject: Waitsfield birds
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 16:09:28 -0400
This afternoon I heard a Common Raven calling, went outside to look
around.  Circling overhead were two huge birds, slight dihedral, but all
dark underneath, not the head of a Turkey Vulture.  I know most reported
eagles are Bald in VT, but I'm thinking these were Goldens.  I just
returned from a trip out west, so have not been keeping track of birds seen
in the area.

Other birds in the yard today include Chipping, Song, White-throated and
White-crowned Sparrows, and a Catbird.

Happy October birding everyone,
Pat
Subject: Migration Timing
From: Larry and Mona Rogers <4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 15:00:02 -0400
               The recent discussion under "Robins and Sparrows" got me
thinking about just when migratory birds leave and arrive.  While predicting
a hard winter based on early migration seems fairly silly, just how much
effect does current weather/climate have on departure dates?  Do birds leave
earlier during cold and wet autumns?  I always thought that migratory
movement was basically driven by sun angle;  how much is caused by local
weather conditions?

                              Larry

 

 
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Jeffrey Nelson <jeffreynelson2005 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 11:09:39 -0700
Hello, new to the list and amateur birder here!

This morning I saw a pair of massive (4'-5' wingspan) sandhill cranes in my 
fields here in Fairfield, a few miles east of St. Albans. They were picking 
through my windrows for 10-20 minutes and weren't very skittish. They did 
eventually take off south with an impressive disturbance FWOMP! I wasn't 
completely sure what they were until I did a WhatBird search and saw that that 
size, red eyepatches/crown pretty much seals the deal. Their stalky legs are 
quite the sight. 


Normally we get killdeers aplenty, sandpipers, robins, swallows, and the 
occasional pheasants, but these were a rarity for here (and I guess, for our 
part of the country too). 


Jeffrey Nelson
Swamp Rd, Fairfield, VT
Subject: Brattleboro dickcissel and others
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:42:22 -0400
This morning at the Retreat Meadows Marina Field were: a female or juvenile 
dickcissel, several pine siskins, both eastern and western palm warblers, lots 
of savanna, song, swamp, white-throated sparrows, indigo buntings, phoebes, a 
wood pewee, and a few yellow-rumps. 



Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Re: Robins and Sparrows
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner AT SWITCHED.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:29:55 -0400
A friend of mine in Texas reported seeing robins 6 weeks earlier than normal. 
Perhaps a prediction of a long hard winter? We have not seen any Robins around 
our yard in over a month. Many unidentified sparrows though. No juncos yet. 



Sharon Turner
Danby, Vt
sharxxturner AT switched.com




-----Original Message-----
From: Ruth 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Tue, Sep 30, 2014 9:16 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Robins and Sparrows





Lots of early robin activity. Later in pm - sparrows in good numbers - feeding 

on ground, low bushes, too "busy' to count but  Song, White throated and 
Chipping (mostly?).    

Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT

 
> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:43:43 -0400
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, Sep 29, 2014
> 
> My yard birds, Bennington, US-VT
> Sep 29, 2014 8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.25 mile(s)
> Comments:     Robins on the move - feeding/flying
> 18 species
> 
> Mourning Dove  9
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  1
> Blue Jay  13
> Black-capped Chickadee  11
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> American Robin  30
> Gray Catbird  1
> Magnolia Warbler  1
> Song Sparrow  1
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Common Grackle  2
> House Finch  9
> Purple Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  8
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19987666 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)

 		 	   		  

 

Subject: Robins and Sparrows
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:16:08 -0400


Lots of early robin activity. Later in pm - sparrows in good numbers - feeding 
on ground, low bushes, too "busy' to count but Song, White throated and 
Chipping (mostly?). 


Ruth Stewart

E. Dorset, VT

 
> Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:43:43 -0400
> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, Sep 29, 2014
> 
> My yard birds, Bennington, US-VT
> Sep 29, 2014 8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.25 mile(s)
> Comments:     Robins on the move - feeding/flying
> 18 species
> 
> Mourning Dove  9
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  1
> Blue Jay  13
> Black-capped Chickadee  11
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
> American Robin  30
> Gray Catbird  1
> Magnolia Warbler  1
> Song Sparrow  1
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Common Grackle  2
> House Finch  9
> Purple Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  8
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19987666 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: mystery warbler - CT???
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 17:08:47 -0400
Hi Maeve,

What about Nashville?  (See Sibley's drab 1st year.)  I had a Nashville and
a Tennessee together in a lilac last week.  The belly of the Nashville was
very pale, but it had notably yellow undertail coverts, so I'm pretty
certain of my ID.  However, Nashville wouldn't explain the longer bill on
your bird, as the Nashville bill is fairly dainty.

--Ken

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 2:55 PM, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> Hello, everyone - I saw two small, slender birds at Woodside today.
> Unfortunately, they stayed in shade so my impression of colors might be
> off. They had dark hoods, with light bellies; the belly on one looked very
> pale yellow, but the other one's belly appeared more creamy. The backs were
> brown or brownish-green. There were no wing bars, no stripes through the
> eye or on the heads. When one flew, it looked like its tail was uniform
> grayish-greenish- brownish. The bills were slender and somewhat longer than
> bills on many warblers. What drew my attention in the first place was
> constant quiet noises: clear little chirps in groups of three and four
> notes, often (but not always) speeding up toward the end.
>
> My first thought was Mourning Warbler but their bellies weren't as richly
> yellow as I'd expect, even at this time of year. Also, the sound really was
> like recordings of Connecticut Warbler - quieter and more whispery than
> many recordings, but that's not unusual in the fall.
>
> What does everyone think? Any possibility of not one but two Connecticut
> Warblers??
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
Subject: mystery warbler - CT???
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:55:05 -0400
Hello, everyone - I saw two small, slender birds at Woodside today. 
Unfortunately, they stayed in shade so my impression of colors might be off. 
They had dark hoods, with light bellies; the belly on one looked very pale 
yellow, but the other one's belly appeared more creamy. The backs were brown or 
brownish-green. There were no wing bars, no stripes through the eye or on the 
heads. When one flew, it looked like its tail was uniform grayish-greenish- 
brownish. The bills were slender and somewhat longer than bills on many 
warblers. What drew my attention in the first place was constant quiet noises: 
clear little chirps in groups of three and four notes, often (but not always) 
speeding up toward the end. 


My first thought was Mourning Warbler but their bellies weren't as richly 
yellow as I'd expect, even at this time of year. Also, the sound really was 
like recordings of Connecticut Warbler - quieter and more whispery than many 
recordings, but that's not unusual in the fall. 


What does everyone think? Any possibility of not one but two Connecticut 
Warblers?? 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Court St. Rutland VT., Sep 29, 2014
From: Fred Bates <batesx2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:31:59 +0000
Watched the two Peregrines this morning.  One was very vocal up on the star.
Fred Bates
Rutland

Court St. Rutland VT., Rutland, US-VTSep 29, 2014 8:00 AM - 8:15 AMProtocol: 
Stationary1 species 


Peregrine Falcon 2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19981379 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Camel's hump fall out/summit pipit
From: Liz Lee <lizl AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 13:44:55 -0400
What was going to be a quick morning hike turned into some nice fall 
birding.  From about halfway up the mountain until just below the 
summit, I encountered mixed flocks of kinglets and yellow rumps. The 
yellow rumps were by the dozen.  There were both types of kinglets, but 
twice as many ruby crowned, some of them were singing.

At the summit, a lone American pipit was hopping around and bobbing.  It 
was pretty oblivious to the human activity and I pretty much waled right 
up to it (sorry no camera).  Another hiker who climbs the mountain 
weekly says he's seen it for about two months. Has anyone else 
encountered this bird?

On the way down I watched a mixed feeding flock along the trail for 
about 10 minutes, highlights were a  blackpoll,  a pair of black 
throated blue warblers and a Philadelphia vireo.

The foliage from the summit wasn't bad either!

Liz
Hinesburg
Subject: Victory: Amer. Pipit, Pine Siskins
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 15:05:49 -0400
David Hof, the Marshall brothers and I spent the morning out at Victory.
Fantastic weather and colors here in the Kingdom (and no bugs) We spent a
half hour at Damon's Crossing and moved on to the Blowdown and Roger's Creek
Trail. Lots of Yellow Rumps moving through but what caught our attention was
an American Pipit and some Pine Siskins. Black-backed woodpeckers were a
treat both male and female. List follows

 

Tom Berriman

 

Victory IBA, Essex, US-VT

Sep 27, 2014 8:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Protocol: Traveling

2.0 mile(s)

35 species

 

Canada Goose  X

Great Blue Heron  1

Sharp-shinned Hawk  1

Belted Kingfisher  1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1

Hairy Woodpecker  2

Black-backed Woodpecker  3

Northern Flicker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  1

Merlin  1

Blue-headed Vireo  2

Gray Jay  1

Blue Jay  8

Common Raven  2

Black-capped Chickadee  22

Red-breasted Nuthatch  1

Winter Wren  1

Golden-crowned Kinglet  4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3

Hermit Thrush  1

American Robin  X

Gray Catbird  2

American Pipit  1

Cedar Waxwing  7

Common Yellowthroat  1

Black-throated Blue Warbler  1

Palm Warbler  2

Yellow-rumped Warbler  X

Song Sparrow  2

Swamp Sparrow  2

White-throated Sparrow  4

Dark-eyed Junco  2

Purple Finch  1

Pine Siskin  7

American Goldfinch  2
Subject: Hudsonian Godwit - Dead Creek Mouth at Goose Bay, Plus, 9/26
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 19:20:53 -0400
Spent the afternoon shorebirding in northwest VT, finding some nice birds. Many 
thanks to Ted Murin, Eddy Edwards, and Ian Worley for their advice to help me 
find my targets. 


Dead Creek Mouth, Goose Bay - seen from Shipyard Road though at considerable 
distance - 5:30 PM 


Hudsonian Godwit - 1 - likely the continuing bird seen there a few days ago
Black-bellied Plover - 9
Dunlin - about 40 - only quick looks at this one flock before they all took off
Lesser Yellowlegs - 2
Small peeps - 20 (likely Semi's)

Colchester Causeway, South end - Noon - 1 - all shorebirds on mudflat to the 
south adjacent to the first island from shore 


Black-bellied Plover - 5
Semi  Plover - 6
Dunlin - 4
Semi Sand - 3
Sanderling - 1
Baird's Sand - 2
Peregrine Falcon - 1 - lying south down the lake

Dead Creek WMA - Brilyea Access - 2:30-4

Greater Yellowlegs - 3
Lesser Yellowlegs - 21
Killdeer - 8
Dunlin - 1
Semi Sand - 18
Pectoral Sand - 1

The Godwit, Dunlin, and Black-bellied Plover were new for my VT state list - 
now at 267. That gives me 1,984 in the 6 New England states, just 16 shy of my 
goal of 2,000. 



Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA



Subject: Red rocks park this morning
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 09:44:25 -0400
Blue headed vireo
Pine warbler
Black throated green Warbler
Yellow rumped Warbler
Red breasted nuthatch (abundant)

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests
From: Jim Shallow <jshallow AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 09:44:05 -0400
Larry
Good question. I often get this response. Please see: Vermont Biodiversity 
Report published by The Nature Conservancy. A pdf of the report is available at 
http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/sal/vbp/VBP.pdf. See the map on page 13. "Within the 
United States, the highest number of breeding bird species occur in the North. 
Many of these species require large areas of contiguous forest, and some are 
more abundant in old growth forests. Others thrive in old fields and 
shrublands. Our core reserves and stewardship lands contribute significantly to 
their conservation." So the reference is to the average number of breeding bird 
species found on Breed Bird Survey routes in the United States. As you'll see 
on the map the Atlantic Northern Forest which Vermont shares with parts of New 
York, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts and Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova 
Scotia has on average between 61 and 70 species per BSS route. Since most of 
this region (>80%) is forested many of these birds a! 

 re forest breeding birds. This is one reason why Audubon Vermont's Forest Bird 
Initiative (see: http://vt.audubon.org/forest-bird-initiative-1) is working 
with forest landowners and foresters to maintain or improve breeding habitat in 
our woodlots and forests. 


I hope you can make it to Mike Snyder's talk. He is an excellent speaker and 
will highlight why we birders should take an active role in assuring that 
Vermont remains one of the country's most forested states. 


-jim shallow
audubon vermont
Subject: Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests
From: Kim Likakis <kim.likakis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 17:59:00 -0400
Larry, I ticked the BTGU, too, and it definitely was not in a forest. Maybe
the writer meant the greatest diversity of forest-occurring species that
call Vermont's forests home (or at least, a meaningful way-station). If
that's the case, is *that* statement factual? I think it might be an
interesting argument.

Kim L.
Bennington

On Thu, Sep 25, 2014 at 5:21 PM, Larry and Mona Rogers <
4181rogers AT comcast.net> wrote:

>                In yesterday's VTBIRD there was a statement that "Vermont's
> forests are home to the highest diversity of birds in the United States."
> Is this really true?  Having birded over most of the lower 48, I would say
> that Texas, Southern Arizona, California, and Florida have us licked, but I
> really don't know.  Mona and I (if nothing else, compulsive listers) have
> seen   207 species in Vermont including some of the real  oddities (e.g.
> the
> Black-Tailed Gull,  Golden-Crowned Sparrow, Gyrfalcon, et al).  I suspect
> the Vermont Total State List probably has 280 to 300 species.  Does anybody
> know how this compares to the places I've listed above?
>
>
>
>                               Larry
>
Subject: Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 17:53:09 -0400
Hi Larry,

There are likely a number of places to find this sort of information, 
but here's one source (I just Googled it...).


http://www.wildbirds.com/FindBirds/StateProvinceChecklistsatWildBirdscom/tabid/198/Default.aspx 


But, there is no indication of habitat associations for the species on 
the lists, so it would take a lot of work to look at forest vs. wetland 
vs. grassland bird diversity.

Anyway...interesting list.

Allan

On 9/25/2014 5:21 PM, Larry and Mona Rogers wrote:
>                 In yesterday's VTBIRD there was a statement that "Vermont's
> forests are home to the highest diversity of birds in the United States."
> Is this really true?  Having birded over most of the lower 48, I would say
> that Texas, Southern Arizona, California, and Florida have us licked, but I
> really don't know.  Mona and I (if nothing else, compulsive listers) have
> seen   207 species in Vermont including some of the real  oddities (e.g. the
> Black-Tailed Gull,  Golden-Crowned Sparrow, Gyrfalcon, et al).  I suspect
> the Vermont Total State List probably has 280 to 300 species.  Does anybody
> know how this compares to the places I've listed above?
>
>   
>
>                                Larry

-- 
**************************************************
Allan M. Strong
Rubenstein School of Env and Natural Resources
200L Aiken Center
81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
**************************************************
Subject: Re: Saving our Songs and our Forests
From: Larry and Mona Rogers <4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 17:21:30 -0400
               In yesterday's VTBIRD there was a statement that "Vermont's
forests are home to the highest diversity of birds in the United States."
Is this really true?  Having birded over most of the lower 48, I would say
that Texas, Southern Arizona, California, and Florida have us licked, but I
really don't know.  Mona and I (if nothing else, compulsive listers) have
seen   207 species in Vermont including some of the real  oddities (e.g. the
Black-Tailed Gull,  Golden-Crowned Sparrow, Gyrfalcon, et al).  I suspect
the Vermont Total State List probably has 280 to 300 species.  Does anybody
know how this compares to the places I've listed above?

 

                              Larry
Subject: Lincoln sparrow
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 16:13:15 -0400
Lincoln sparrow in my usual spot by Otter Creek here in Brandon.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: September 25, 2014 at 4:10:29 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Sep 25, 2014
> 
> Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT
> Sep 25, 2014 12:45 PM - 2:15 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 13 species
> 
> Canada Goose  2
> Wood Duck  4
> Mallard  4
> Green-winged Teal  9
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Red-shouldered Hawk  1
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> American Crow  1
> Gray Catbird  2
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Song Sparrow  7
> Lincoln's Sparrow  1
> Indigo Bunting  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19939642 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Cota Field Monthly Walk
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 11:25:11 -0400
The September monthly wildlife walk at Cota Field in Starksboro will be
this Saturday 9/27 at 8am. Nature lovers of all kinds are invited to join
as we scout for resident creatures as well as fall migrants. Please meet at
the parking area off of States Prison Hollow Road. Feel free to email me
for more information or for directions.

-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
4317 Main Street
Waitsfield, VT 05673
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: ID Help with Confusing Fall Warbler
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 22:38:10 -0400
Hi Charlotte.

I just found this in my Spam folder.  Gmail has been putting a lot of
VTBird messages in Spam lately, and I forget to check for them.

Wandering if you solved this warbler mystery?  I'm thinking first year
female Pine Warbler, though they do have a slight eye-stripe.  The
combination of wing-bars but no eye-ring, no eye-stripes, no yellow, and no
streaking is a challenge!

I'm pretty sure I saw a Nashville and a Tennessee together in my yard this
evening.  Interesting combination (geographically speaking).  I'm sure of
the Nashville (gray head, eye ring, yellow undertail coverts), but the
Tennessee is more iffy as it looked like the adult breeding female in
Sibley with a pale yellow wash on the throat.  Hard to say what
non-breeding female should look like.  The Warbler Guide says "in Fall some
adult males may be separable, all others not" but it's not really clear how
to separate them.  Fall Warblers: The Ultimate Challenge -- should be a
video game!!!


--Ken

On Sat, Sep 6, 2014 at 1:22 PM, Charlotte Bill 
wrote:

> Greetings,
>
>
> Two warblers stopped by this morning with the chickadees at the balsams in
> front of our porch. I got a few details on the first bird but not on the
> second before they all flew.
>
>
> Is there enough here for an ID on the first bird?
>
> *two white wing bars per wing (very obvious, very striking)
> *small, thin, pointy dark beak (definitely a warbler beak)
> *olive-brown back and head
> *light buffy breast and belly
> *no eye ring
> *no noticeable eyebrows or eye lines
> *no yellow at all
> *no streaking anywhere
>
> Unfortunately, I did not notice its undertail coverts, corners of tail, or
> color of legs and feet.
>
> Picture a female Black-throated Blue Warbler with two very distinct white
> wing bars on each wing (instead of little white wing patch), and with a
> plain, olive-brown head without a white eyebrow, and that's a lot like the
> bird I saw.
>
> Again, is there enough here for an ID? Thanks in advance!
>
> Charlotte Bill
> Enosburgh
>
Subject: RTH
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:40:25 -0400
One RT Hummer still competing with yellow jackets at the feeder.
Derby/Lake Memphremagog
Subject: Immature Bald Eagle
From: Robert Spring <robwspring24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:31:36 -0400
Immature bald eagle at Cady Falls in Morrisville about a quarter mile south of 
falls on the road to Cady Falls Nursery. 


Rob Spring
Subject: RFI - Birding Mouth of Dead Creek at Goose Bay
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 14:06:45 -0400
Hoping my VT birding friends can help me out on this one -

I've seen a couple posts on e-bird from the mouth of Dead Creek at Goose Bay. 
Based on the associated e-bird maps the mouth of Dead Creek looks to be quite a 
distance from any roads. So my question is - how do you bird this location? 
Maybe park at the SW end of Platt Road and walk west. Or maybe view this spot 
from Platt Road? Any advice you could give me would be most appreciated. 


Recent posts from this spot have included 2 of my VT targets (Dunlin and 
Black-bellied Plover), so I'm hoping to be able to bird this spot when I'm in 
the area this Friday. 


Many thanks in advance -

Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA

Subject: Northern Harrier - Randolph Center
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 13:44:37 -0400
A Northern Harrier flew over us while we sat at our picnic table on Davis Road 
this noon. He was quite high up and was 'booking it' so perhaps he was 
migrating. 


Black underwing bands and long tail made ID easy....I'm more used to looking 
for white rump patch and hovering flight. 

Subject: Fwd: [VTBIRD] Dark-eyed Juncos
From: Randy Schmidt <randy AT THEVERMONTBIRDPLACE.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:09:31 -0400
That would be at home, in Sunderland, VT  (forgot to put location!)


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Randy Schmidt 
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Dark-eyed Juncos
> Date: September 24, 2014 11:08:30 AM EDT
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Reply-To: Vermont Birds 
> 
> First batch arrived this morning! About 6-8 of them down from their 
mountain-top summer ground! 

> 
> Randy Schmidt
> The Vermont Bird Place & Sky Watch
> 
Subject: Dark-eyed Juncos
From: Randy Schmidt <randy AT THEVERMONTBIRDPLACE.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:08:30 -0400
First batch arrived this morning! About 6-8 of them down from their 
mountain-top summer ground! 


Randy Schmidt
The Vermont Bird Place & Sky Watch
Subject: Saving our Songs and our Forest
From: Jim Shallow <jshallow AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 09:35:50 -0400
Saving our Songs and our Forest
Wednesday, October 1
7:00 p.m.
Meeting Place: Unitarian Universalist Church, Montpelier, Vermont
FREE
 
Can bird conservation create a unified approach to conserve Vermont’s 
forests? Vermont’s forests are home to the highest diversity of birds in the 
United States. Their colors dazzle, their songs enchant, and their migrations 
amaze and connect us to the larger world. At this year’s Seward Weber 
Lecture, Mike Snyder, Vermont Commissioner of Forests Parks and Recreation, 
will discuss how he thinks bird conservation can unify Vermonters’ efforts to 
have forests that meet our ecological, social and economic needs today and 
tomorrow. Mike is a dynamic speaker who brings a unique perspective to bird 
conservation. Please join us in what is sure to be a provocative conversation. 

 
Co-sponsored by: Audubon Vermont, Vermont Natural Resources Council, and the 
Vermont Land Trust in memory of Seward Weber, who played an influential role in 
the history and accomplishments of each of these conservation organizations. 


more info at: vt.audubon.org
Subject: Re: sky opera
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 04:56:47 -0700
This chimes so well with what I saw, very interesting! thanks, Veer


---- On Tue, 23 Sep 2014 12:49:59 -0700 Jane Stein<jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET> 
wrote ---- 



Wow, great mental picture there! Wish I'd seen it. 
 
Corvids tend not to be as programmed for certain behaviors only at 
certain times as many other birds, perhaps because they have more varied 
and abundant food sources and thus more energy to spare. I haven't seen 
this kind of behavior with ravens so much, but crows mob and harass 
raptors 12 months of the year just on general principles. 
 
At the risk of veering into anthropomorphism, ravens do clearly like to 
play and goof off, and my guess is that the unexpected encounter with 
the sharpie gave them the opportunity to do that. 
 
Sometimes on the hawkwatch, you'll just catch a very distant mob of 
specks in the scope that looks like it might be a kettle of broad-wings 
forming, but then you realize they're not bws, they're ravens, because 
they're all diving on each other and continue to dive on each other as 
they move past you. 
 
 
 
On 9/23/2014 2:41 PM, Veer Frost wrote: 
> Raven pair in wild, hoarse voice, in tangle with third I thought was 
> another raven until out of the show a Sharpshinned raced away, ravens 
> flew something like a victory lap around each other before steering 
> south over the river valley again, supremely (it looked) in charge. 
> Presumably no nestlings by this time?? Not sure why such a vehement 
> encounter! 
> 
> 
> 
> 




____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Brilyea godwit still there
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 16:15:29 -0400
I couldn't find it this morning - but I was peering into bright sun-sparkly 
water. At about 12:30, Roy Pilcher located the bird and shared it with me. The 
light was much better, and we watched the godwit for many minutes until an 
eagle flew over. The bird was feeding where it's been seen before: at the cove 
straight across from the access road before the first pull-off, with the osprey 
platform visible in back. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Carolina wren
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 14:48:06 -0400
I found two this weekend at the Von Trapp Greenhouse on Waitsfield Common. They 
were chattering and scolding in the display garden and one popped right out 
into view when I pished. Toby Von T said he'd been hearing them for the past 10 
days or so and was pleased to learn what they were. 


Patti Haynes, sent from my iPod

On Sep 23, 2014, at 1:56 PM, Patrick Phillips  wrote:

> Running on Middle Road in Colchester early yesterday morning, I heard the
> distinct call of a Carolina Wren.  No sighting, so it could have been some
> mimicry, but there was no question about the call.
Subject: Re: sky opera
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 15:49:59 -0400
Wow, great mental picture there!  Wish I'd seen it.

Corvids tend not to be as programmed for certain behaviors only at
certain times as many other birds, perhaps because they have more varied
and abundant food sources and thus more energy to spare.  I haven't seen
this kind of behavior with ravens so much, but crows mob and harass
raptors 12 months of the year just on general principles.

At the risk of veering into anthropomorphism, ravens do clearly like to
play and goof off, and my guess is that the unexpected encounter with
the sharpie gave them the opportunity to do that.

Sometimes on the hawkwatch, you'll just catch a very distant mob of
specks in the scope that looks like it might be a kettle of broad-wings
forming, but then you realize they're not bws, they're ravens, because
they're all diving on each other and continue to dive on each other as 
they move past you.



On 9/23/2014 2:41 PM, Veer Frost wrote:
> Raven pair in wild, hoarse voice, in tangle with third I thought was
> another raven until out of the show a Sharpshinned raced away, ravens
> flew something like a victory lap around each other before steering
> south over the river valley again, supremely (it looked) in charge.
> Presumably no nestlings by this time?? Not sure why such a vehement
> encounter!
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________ Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
>
>
> ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8146 - Release Date:
> 09/03/14 Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>
Subject: sky opera
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:41:31 -0700
Raven pair in wild, hoarse voice, in tangle with third I thought was another 
raven until out of the show a Sharpshinned raced away, ravens flew something 
like a victory lap around each other before steering south over the river 
valley again, supremely (it looked) in charge. Presumably no nestlings by this 
time?? Not sure why such a vehement encounter! 





____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Carolina wren
From: Patrick Phillips <phillipspatj AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 13:56:19 -0400
Running on Middle Road in Colchester early yesterday morning, I heard the
distinct call of a Carolina Wren.  No sighting, so it could have been some
mimicry, but there was no question about the call.
Subject: Scavengers
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 10:04:44 -0400
In Leicester this morning I saw three ravens, and an imm. red-tail hawk 
partaking of the buffet from a recently mowed field. Kestrel on a wire regarded 
the scene. 


Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Pine Grosbeak?
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 22:22:09 -0400
This afternoon I saw what I think was a Pine Grosbeak in Georgia, VT.  It
was Robin-sized, with an all-grayish body and reddish crown.  It was on the
ground and I was viewing it from a second floor window, through a screen
and without binoculars, so I didn't see details, like the bill, and I
didn't notice any wingbars.  For overall color and shape, it looked very
much like the "russet adult" female in Sibley, except I saw just a wash of
red only on the crown, and didn't note any red on the nape or rump.

I checked eBird and found only one other September record for VT: 9/18/2000
in Caledonia, so I realize this would be quite unusual.  I would be happy
to consider any other suggestions!

--Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Fwd: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
From: eve ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:56:01 -0400
Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jean Iron 
> Date: September 22, 2014 4:30:11 PM EDT
> To: "Ontbirds" 
> Subject: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
> 
> Please find the winter finch forecast in the link below.
> http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/forecast14.htm
> 
> I thank the many people who gathered tree seed information and the birders
> who asked me when the forecast was coming out. You kept me going.
> 
> Ron Pittaway
> Toronto ON
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial 
birding organization. 

> Send bird reports to birdalert AT ontbirds.ca
> For information about ONTBIRDS including how to unsubscribe visit 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdssetup 

> Posting guidelines can be found at 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdsguide 

> 
> 
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY  12996
U S A
res: 518-314-7707
cell: 518-524-7377

"Change how you see, not how you look."

http://aquavisions.me
Subject: NNYBirds: Fwd: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
From: "eve ticknor edticknor AT sympatico.ca [Northern_NY_Birds]" <Northern_NY_Birds@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:56:01 -0400

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jean Iron 
> Date: September 22, 2014 4:30:11 PM EDT
> To: "Ontbirds" 
> Subject: [Ontbirds] WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
> 
> Please find the winter finch forecast in the link below.
> http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/forecast14.htm
> 
> I thank the many people who gathered tree seed information and the birders
> who asked me when the forecast was coming out. You kept me going.
> 
> Ron Pittaway
> Toronto ON
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial 
birding organization. 

> Send bird reports to birdalert AT ontbirds.ca
> For information about ONTBIRDS including how to unsubscribe visit 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdssetup 

> Posting guidelines can be found at 
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/information.ontbirdsguide 

> 
> 
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY  12996
U S A
res: 518-314-7707
cell: 518-524-7377

"Change how you see, not how you look."

http://aquavisions.me
Subject: Broad-winged
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 13:04:22 -0400
A south-bound Broad-winged Hawk cruised over my north-facing window at  
UVM in Burlington a few minutes ago.  I wonder how many other  
stragglers are taking advantage of last night's cold front passage to  
make their move today.

Scott
Subject: Re: late season Rubythroat
From: Barbara Shaw <babashaw47 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 07:43:24 -0400
In Winooski, hummingbird seen at the Sunset Hyssop moments ago.This is the
first year I've planted one there and saw several hummers having breakfast
this summer while I was having mine. Barbara H Shaw

On Mon, Sep 22, 2014 at 7:25 AM, Veer Frost  wrote:

> Flicked through garden half an hour ago, still dividing time between
> feeder and delphs. This seems very late.
>
> ____________________________________
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
>
Subject: late season Rubythroat
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 04:25:45 -0700
Flicked through garden half an hour ago, still dividing time between feeder and 
delphs. This seems very late. 


____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic (NEK)
Subject: Eastern Bluebirds Galore!
From: Linda Verchereau Becker <daylilies56 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 19:02:35 -0400
Went to Richford today to walk the Rails to Trails path – what a nice 
surprise of 30 + Eastern Bluebirds. 

They were having a ball catching bugs and enjoying the warm weather – males, 
females and lots of juveniles. 

The trailhead is 1/2 mile taking a right from middle of town. The birds were 
about 2/10 of a mile further in 

from the trailhead.  

Linda Verchereau Becker
Montpelier, VT  
Subject: Hummer
From: m372 AT aol.com <m372@AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:49:56 -0400
Hummer. In South Hero this afternoon.
Marylyn Pillsbury
South Hero
Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone
Subject: goldfinch behavior
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 15:39:31 -0400
Seeing a flock of goldfinches descend on my jerusalem artichokes, I  
watched  them devour the bright yellow petals.  I figured that they  
need the carotene in the petals, but not until spring, when they moult  
into their breeding plumage.  So the carotene must be stored in fat.   
A google search confirms this.  Then my question is:  since carotene  
is found, along with chlorophyll, in plant leaves, why don't the  
finches use this source in the spring when they need it?  Any chemists  
out there?

Jean Arrowsmith
Lincoln
Subject: Re: Anyone Near Brilyea?
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 14:55:50 -0400
I had a voicemail from Ted Murin a while ago that he had a Hudsonian Godwit 
there today. 


Scott

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 21, 2014, at 1:17 PM, Cathryn Abbott  wrote:
> 
> Have just come from Dead Creek Brilyea Access where viewing conditions were 
tough given heat waves and wind. But ... spent some time observing a large 
shorebird that looked quite a bit like a Hudsonian godwit. It had a very long, 
slightly upturned bill, a light supercilium, light underparts, dark legs, and 
black-tipped tail. It was probing mud in a shallow cove on the left side of the 
access road. The cove is in the first opening on the left side of the access 
road. There is an osprey platform behind it, a wood duck box on the right side 
of the cove, and a blue box to the left. Have some distant pictures to download 
and check tonight. If anyone happens to be in the Brilyea area, it would be 
great to have a second opinion. 

> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Cat Abbott
> Dummerston, VT
Subject: Anyone Near Brilyea?
From: Cathryn Abbott <catabbott1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 13:17:37 -0400
Have just come from Dead Creek Brilyea Access where viewing conditions were 
tough given heat waves and wind. But ... spent some time observing a large 
shorebird that looked quite a bit like a Hudsonian godwit. It had a very long, 
slightly upturned bill, a light supercilium, light underparts, dark legs, and 
black-tipped tail. It was probing mud in a shallow cove on the left side of the 
access road. The cove is in the first opening on the left side of the access 
road. There is an osprey platform behind it, a wood duck box on the right side 
of the cove, and a blue box to the left. Have some distant pictures to download 
and check tonight. If anyone happens to be in the Brilyea area, it would be 
great to have a second opinion. 


Thanks!

Cat Abbott
Dummerston, VT
Subject: Re: Sharp-shinned and a Flicker
From: David Hoag <SR71BLBRD AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:30:41 -0400
A week ago I watched  a merlin and two flickers Playing tag 
and king-of-the-perch for nearly 10 minutes.
 
  One or or the other of the two flickers would keep returning
to the same lakeshore tree -- the same exposed dead branch perch 
preferred by the merlin.   There was a lot of squawking going on,
during chases of flicker/merlin/flicker into the surrounding woods, 
but no apparent casualties.
 
Dave Hoag, Grand Isle
Subject: Sharp-shinned and a Flicker
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 08:01:13 -0400
Had just come in from a little birding around the yard when I heard distressed 
shrieking, which did not abate with my movements down the steep bank to the 
creek. Two birds were thrashing around -- one was a Flicker which took the 
opportunity to disentangle itself and fly off. And the other I believe was a 
juvenile Sharp-shinned Hawk, which flew just a little ways off and perched 
where I got a decent look at it. 


Linda Gionti
Huntington
Subject: Pipits, Horned Larks, Meadow Larks, Savannah Sparrows, Kestrels - western Addison Co.
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 06:18:26 -0400
The large, open pastures and cut hayfields of western Addison County 
have attracted several field species of late.

In the last week or so in the area from Route 125 north to Panton Road:

American Pipit
    --- Slang Road, Panton 20th    58   (with Ron Payne)
    --- Jersey Street, Addison 20th    3   (with Ron Payne)
    --- Slang Road,  Panton 18th   19

Savannah Sparrow
    --- Slang Road, Panton 20th    8  (with Ron Payne)

Horned Lark
    --- Slang Road, Panton 15th    3

Eastern Meadowlark
    --- Lemon Fair Road, Weybridge 17th    18

American Kestrel
    --- I've recorded at least one at 16 different locations.

Northern Harrier
    --- Noted by various observers at 11 different locations.

Ian
Subject: Pipits Charlotte Town Beach, Sep 20, 2014
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 16:35:56 -0400
Wind a blowin' and white caps on the water but by the gravel bar saw the 
following. Ted Murin and Scott Morrical kindly pointed out the pipits. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: September 20, 2014 at 4:33:05 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Charlotte Town Beach, Sep 20, 2014
> 
> Charlotte Town Beach, Chittenden, US-VT
> Sep 20, 2014 10:50 AM - 11:05 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 3 species
> 
> Killdeer  9
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> American Pipit  5
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19885750 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Two nighthawks
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:16:00 -0400
Two nighthawks observed for 15 minutes working hard the tops of pine trees
at the edge of the meadow. Very surprised to see them with temps at 46
degrees. First sighting of this species this year. Derby/lake Memphremagog.
Subject: Hummer
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:19:35 -0400
A hummer here at my feeder in Brandon around five this evening. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: NEK: Victory Blowdown, Merlin, Bald Eagle Boreal birds
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:35:02 -0400
Great day to be in Victory procrastinating working on all those fall chores
that need to be done. Just as I was about to start onto the "Blowdown trail"
I heard tapping about 150' up the road. A female Black-backed Woodpecker
lured me off the road and into chest high tickets. (no problem except I was
carrying tripod & scope, backpack, 2 DSLR's and Binoculars) At least I had
Xtra Tuffs on! I lost her (an old sad story) and 45 minutes later finally
made it to a clearing. All the while every time  I looked up 8 or 14 Blue
Jays passed above quietly migrating through. I stopped trying to get a count
after 150. The soft chirps of warblers flew above me but I couldn't decipher
which as I stumbled over fallen trees and stumps. At the clearing I caught
my breath and found good fortune as a male Black-backed flew to a snag about
50' away. For 20 minutes I watched him work setting the scope up on moss
(like a mattress) and tried a few digiscopes.

3 Gray Jays flew in calling and looking for a hand-out. Finally a few
warblers landed in some spruce close enough to identify, 2 Bay-breasted, a
Yellow-rumped, one Black-throated Green. I heard a Merlin but had had enough
bush-whacking to even try to track it down. The delicious aroma of fall was
thick. It was 28 degrees this morning at the house and frost finally!! 

A Winter Wren popped up along with White-throated Sparrows. The Robins were
moving through but what got my attention was a new bird for the Blowdown:
Adult Bald Eagle floating above. Someday I'll actually make of list of the
birds in this 40 acre spot of Victory (but I've become so uninterested in
listing). I love Vermont!

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/

 

Tom Berriman

p.s. on Wednesday at the Blowdown I had a Boreal Chickadee only the third
time at this location in 12 years. On the River Road as I left a Kestrel on
the wire.
Subject: hummer
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:05:36 -0400
A female hummer just visited me and my geraniums and has been in my garden 
foxgloves all week. A jay is busy chattering almost like a parrot, upset with 
the many other jays flying through. 


Sally Fellows
Williston
Subject: Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:39:15 -0400
Sorry for that personal communication to Larry going out to all :-( John

On Sep 19, 2014, at 11:31 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:

> Blue Jays were on the move in Montpelier this morning as well. We had
> around 40 during today's Fall Migration Bird Walk at North Branch Nature
> Center. It is amazing how loose groups can silently flow overhead, like
> someone didn't completely close a giant faucet, and Blue Jays slowly but
> continuously trickle out of it.
> 
> Other highlights from this morning's walk were a smathering of warblers,
> including plenty of Yellow-rumped and Black-throated Greens, and a lone
> Blackpoll mixed in, an Osprey, an American Kestrel, and a sleeping Great
> Blue Heron in the river. We have 2 more fall migration bird walks
> left... Fridays,
> Sept. 26 and Oct. 3, 7:30 - 9 a.m. More info is online at
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org/nbncbirds.html
> 
> Good Birding,
> Larry
> 
> On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:20 AM, Eric Hynes  wrote:
> 
>> Hello Vermont Birders:
>> 
>> I just spent 30 minutes naked eye birding in Battery Park in Burlington.
>> While pushing my daughter on the swings, I counted flock after flock of
>> Blue Jays passing south overhead. One flock had 127 birds in it. I love
>> seeing those low squadrons in early fall.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Eric
>> .....................
>> Eric Hynes
>> Burlington, VT
>> ---------------------
>> Field Guides Birding Tours
>> www.fieldguides.com
>> http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Larry Clarfeld
> Environmental Educator
> Youth Birding Coordinator
> 
> North Branch Nature Center
> 713 Elm St.
> Montpelier, VT 05602
> 
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> (802) 229-6206
> larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Botswana
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:38:19 -0400
Larry,

Looking aheadIm wondering if youd like to have me present another slide show 
next winter, this one about my trip to Botswana, I can make it of particular 
interest to birders (175 new species for me) without it being one bird slide 
after another. Give it some thought and let me know when you make decisions. 





Still learning to see,

John
802-229-1751

http://www.eyeimagein.com
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com
Subject: Re: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:31:16 -0400
Blue Jays were on the move in Montpelier this morning as well. We had
around 40 during today's Fall Migration Bird Walk at North Branch Nature
Center. It is amazing how loose groups can silently flow overhead, like
someone didn't completely close a giant faucet, and Blue Jays slowly but
continuously trickle out of it.

Other highlights from this morning's walk were a smathering of warblers,
including plenty of Yellow-rumped and Black-throated Greens, and a lone
Blackpoll mixed in, an Osprey, an American Kestrel, and a sleeping Great
Blue Heron in the river. We have 2 more fall migration bird walks
left... Fridays,
Sept. 26 and Oct. 3, 7:30 - 9 a.m. More info is online at
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org/nbncbirds.html

Good Birding,
Larry

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:20 AM, Eric Hynes  wrote:

> Hello Vermont Birders:
>
> I just spent 30 minutes naked eye birding in Battery Park in Burlington.
> While pushing my daughter on the swings, I counted flock after flock of
> Blue Jays passing south overhead. One flock had 127 birds in it. I love
> seeing those low squadrons in early fall.
>
> Cheers,
> Eric
> .....................
> Eric Hynes
> Burlington, VT
> ---------------------
> Field Guides Birding Tours
> www.fieldguides.com
> http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
>



-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Blue Jays on the move - Burlington
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:20:09 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

I just spent 30 minutes naked eye birding in Battery Park in Burlington.
While pushing my daughter on the swings, I counted flock after flock of
Blue Jays passing south overhead. One flock had 127 birds in it. I love
seeing those low squadrons in early fall.

Cheers,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Hummers
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 10:46:30 -0400
One Ruby-throated Hummingbird seen visiting Orange Jewelweed blossoms at Otter 
View Park in Middlebury this morning. 


I also had three Blackpoll Warblers and a Blue-headed Vireo. 

 --
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: Re: Mansfield wrap-up
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 05:10:46 -0700
Thank you, Chris and VCE! we're fortunate indeed to have a glimpse, through 
reports like yours to the listserv, of the life (and song) on that mountaintop. 
We should all be holding our breath for the Bicknells. 



---- On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:53:35 -0700 Chris Rimmer 
<crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG> wrote ---- 



VCE wrapped up its 2014 field season with an overnight visit to our Mt. 
Mansfield ridgeline study site on Tuesday. Arriving at the upper toll 
road parking lot ~5 pm, we were greeted by chilly, damp conditions, but 
also by calling Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH), which annually undergo a 
resurgence of vocal activity in mid-September. We set up 17 mist nets, 
mostly on the Amherst and Lakeview trails, and ran them until dusk. 
BITH calls pierced the skies until darkness fell, and a few birds sang 
briefly. The frequency and vigor of vocalizing was nowhere near that of 
3 months ago, but the chorus was a far cry from the eerily quiet evening 
of our visit in late July. 
 
The ridgeline was still bathed in clouds when we returned at 5:45 am to 
open nets, and temperatures hovered in the raw low 40s F. BITH put on a 
solid dawn chorus, as we heard 16-18 birds total. Swainson's Thrushes 
were nowhere to be seen or heard. Our nets started filling, and by noon 
we had captured 76 birds. Yellow-rumped Warblers were by far the most 
abundant species on the ridgeline, and in our nets, but BITH may have 
been second, judging from both captures and birds heard vocalizing. Of 
the 13 BITH we mist-netted, 5 were recaptures of adult males from June 
and July (one a bird originally banded in 2011). Our total of BITH 
captures for 2014 ended up at 57, possibly a single-season record over 
our 23 years of banding. 
 
Overall diversity on the ridgeline was low, as we identified only 16 
species during the morning, which included 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks and a 
single Peregrine Falcon. One unexpected encounter was of 3 Ruffed 
Grouse flushed at ~3800 ft elevation on Tuesday evening. Surprisingly, 
Black-throated Blue Warblers, which our fall migration banding study in 
the mid-1990s showed to be the most abundant transient species on 
Mansfield, were almost non-existent - we saw and netted only one bird. 
[For a truly scintillating read about our results from that study, check 
out http://www.vtecostudies.org/PDF/WB112.pdf]. 
 
Our combined capture totals for the 16-17th: 
 
Black-capped Chickadee 1 
Bicknell's Thrush 13 (7 immatures, 1 new adult, 5 recaptured adult males) 
Nashville Warbler 1 
Blackpoll Warbler 6 (2 immatures, 4 adults) 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 1 imm. female 
Yellow-rumped Warbler 50 (41 immatures, 9 adults) 
White-throated Sparrow 6 (3 immatures, 3 adults) 
Dark-eyed Junco 8 (7 immatures, 1 adult) 
 
A final note: there are very few cones on the balsam fir trees (and we 
saw or heard no red squirrels), so it's likely that squirrel populations 
will again be low in 2015, leading to higher breeding productivity by 
BITH and other open-cup nesting species. The biennial "boom-bust" cycle 
of cone crops, which has been remarkably consistent across the entire 
Northeast for many decades, appears to have broken down in recent 
years. Whether this results from climatic changes and/or other 
environmental factors, and whether the cycle will self-correct or not, 
is unknown. In the short term, the current scarcity of cones in montane 
forests appears to be benefitting BITH, which have shown relatively high 
recruitment of young birds during the past 3 summers, and probably will 
again in 2015. 
 
VCE will be back at it again next June, so stay tuned. 
 
Chris 
 
-- 
Chris Rimmer 
Vermont Center for Ecostudies 
P.O. Box 420 
Norwich, VT 05055 
802-649-1431 ext. 1 
www.vtecostudies.org 




____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Mansfield wrap-up
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:56:37 -0400
VCE wrapped up its 2014 field season with an overnight visit to our Mt. 
Mansfield ridgeline study site on Tuesday.  Arriving at the upper toll 
road parking lot ~5 pm, we were greeted by chilly, damp conditions, but 
also by calling Bicknell's Thrushes (BITH), which annually undergo a 
resurgence of vocal activity in mid-September. We set up 17 mist nets, 
mostly on the Amherst and Lakeview trails, and ran them until dusk.  
BITH calls pierced the skies until darkness fell, and a few birds sang 
briefly.  The frequency and vigor of vocalizing was nowhere near that of 
3 months ago, but the chorus was a far cry from the eerily quiet evening 
of our visit in late July.

The ridgeline was still bathed in clouds when we returned at 5:45 am to 
open nets, and temperatures hovered in the raw low 40s F.  BITH put on a 
solid dawn chorus, as we heard 16-18 birds total. Swainson's Thrushes 
were nowhere to be seen or heard.  Our nets started filling, and by noon 
we had captured 76 birds. Yellow-rumped Warblers were by far the most 
abundant species on the ridgeline, and in our nets, but BITH may have 
been second, judging from both captures and birds heard vocalizing.  Of 
the 13 BITH we mist-netted, 5 were recaptures of adult males from June 
and July (one a bird originally banded in 2011).  Our total of BITH 
captures for 2014 ended up at 57, possibly a single-season record over 
our 23 years of banding.

Overall diversity on the ridgeline was low, as we identified only 16 
species during the morning, which included 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks and a 
single Peregrine Falcon.  One unexpected encounter was of 3 Ruffed 
Grouse flushed at ~3800 ft elevation on Tuesday evening. Surprisingly, 
Black-throated Blue Warblers, which our fall migration banding study in 
the mid-1990s showed to be the most abundant transient species on 
Mansfield, were almost non-existent - we saw and netted only one bird.  
[For a truly scintillating read about our results from that study, check 
out http://www.vtecostudies.org/PDF/WB112.pdf].

Our combined capture totals for the 16-17th:

Black-capped Chickadee    1
Bicknell's Thrush    13 (7 immatures, 1 new adult, 5 recaptured adult males)
Nashville Warbler    1
Blackpoll Warbler    6 (2 immatures, 4 adults)
Black-throated Blue Warbler     1 imm. female
Yellow-rumped Warbler    50 (41 immatures, 9 adults)
White-throated Sparrow    6 (3 immatures, 3 adults)
Dark-eyed Junco     8 (7 immatures, 1 adult)

A final note: there are very few cones on the balsam fir trees (and we 
saw or heard no red squirrels), so it's likely that squirrel populations 
will again be low in 2015, leading to higher breeding productivity by 
BITH and other open-cup nesting species.  The biennial "boom-bust" cycle 
of cone crops, which has been remarkably consistent across the entire 
Northeast for many decades, appears to have broken down in recent 
years.  Whether this results from climatic changes and/or other 
environmental factors, and whether the cycle will self-correct or not, 
is unknown.  In the short term, the current scarcity of cones in montane 
forests appears to be benefitting BITH, which have shown relatively high 
recruitment of young birds during the past 3 summers, and probably will 
again in 2015.

VCE will be back at it again next June, so stay tuned.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Mt Philo Sept 18 Hawk/Monarch count
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:07:16 -0400
11:20a - 3:45pm  North wind till 3pm, then shifted to NW
Broadwings 185
American Kestrel  30
Peregrine 1
Northern Harrier 3
Osprey 3
Sharpies 9
Coopers 1
Bald Eagles 9

Monarchs  85

The kestrel flight was inspiring as well as the monarchs.  

Enjoy migration,

Liz Lackey


   
Subject: Re: A ___________ of Killdeer
From: Deborah Benjamin <dbenjamin AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 20:12:56 -0400
Hello,
   
  I found on iBird Pro app for tablets that a group of killdeer(s) is 
known as a "season" of killdeer(s). 
   
  What a nice "seasonal" experience you had to see 60 at a time. 
   
  Debbie Benjamin,  Eden

On Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:16:40 -0400, Bruce MacPherson  wrote:
This afternoon I counted 60 Killdeer in the field at the corner of 
Greenbush Road and Lake St. in Charlotte. We know we have a gaggle of 
geese and a murder of crows, so what do we call a large flock of 
Killdeer. A convocation? a congregation? or just amazing. 
>
>
> Fill in the blank. 
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
>
>
>
>

   
Subject: A ___________ of Killdeer
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:16:40 -0400
This afternoon I counted 60 Killdeer in the field at the corner of Greenbush 
Road and Lake St. in Charlotte. We know we have a gaggle of geese and a murder 
of crows, so what do we call a large flock of Killdeer. A convocation? a 
congregation? or just amazing. 



Fill in the blank.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington



Subject: Creek Road Sedge Wren
From: Donald Jones <dwilbertjones AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:46:26 -0400
Hi All,

I rode my bike out Creek Road before class this morning with the goal of
finding one of the lingering Sedge Wrens, and I'm happy to report that I
was successful! It took more than half an hour of trying but I was able to
get good looks at one individual (aged as immature by the yellow gape David
mentioned), and I may have heard a different bird calling. They are holding
tight in the patch of tall grass where they've been regularly seen, but by
walking around to the north side of this patch one should be able to get
close enough for good views. Also in the area were hoards of Swamp Sparrows
with a few Song thrown in for good measure.

Good birding,
Don Jones
Middlebury, VT / Laramie, WY
Subject: Fwd: My Independence
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 15:54:31 -0400
> Date: September 18, 2014 at 1:53:21 PM 
> Subject: My Independence
> 
> Today a rather cool tour of Mt Indy but Magnolias were moving thru.
> Of interest was the seven Kestrels on the road to the Mount.
> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
>> Date: September 18, 2014 at 1:46:08 PM EDT
>> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> Subject: eBird Report - Mount Independence, Sep 18, 2014
>> 
>> Mount Independence, Addison, US-VT
>> Sep 18, 2014 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 2.0 mile(s)
>> 27 species
>> 
>> Canada Goose  36
>> Wood Duck  8
>> Mallard  5
>> Great Blue Heron  1
>> Bald Eagle  2     2 adults by nest on New York side.
>> Red-tailed Hawk (Eastern) 1 flew up from ground where is had consumed 1/2 of 
a red squirrel. 

>> Ring-billed Gull  5
>> Mourning Dove  1
>> Belted Kingfisher  1
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
>> Downy Woodpecker  1
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2
>> Pileated Woodpecker  1
>> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1     weakly singing partial song
>> Red-eyed Vireo  3
>> Blue Jay  9
>> American Crow  5
>> Common Raven  2
>> Black-capped Chickadee  6
>> White-breasted Nuthatch  3
>> American Robin  1
>> Gray Catbird  2
>> Magnolia Warbler  3
>> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  2
>> White-throated Sparrow  1
>> Northern Cardinal  5
>> American Goldfinch  1
>> 
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19866733 

>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: What is Status of Dead Creek Draw Down
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:38:04 -0400
I'm heading up to NW VT this weekend for the "pelagic trip" and hope to do some 
shorebirding from land as well. What is the status of the drawdown of the Dead 
Creek impoundment? Don't think I've seen any recent posts from there and hoping 
there are still some muddy margins for shorebirds. Dunlin is one of my many 
targets... 


Many thanks -

Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA

Subject: Hummers
From: Richard <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 12:24:00 -0400
Here in Middlebury, I have had Hummers at the feeders every day but 
three.  I panicked last week when
I didn't see any for one day.  But, since then I have had 2-4 hummers 
vying for a chance to feed.  However, I expect
they will disappear till next year after the cold front arrives and puts 
down freezing temperatures.  If I see them this
weekend I'll make a new food batch.

Dick Harlow
Middlebury
Subject: Hummer
From: Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:44:15 -0400
One lone Hummer tanking up at feeder in Milton at 7:00 AM today. Have not
seen any for about 1 week. (Sorry if I double posted. I replied to a VTBIRD
digest and then realized that might not work...) Liz

-- 
Liz Alton:
"Keep a green tree in your heart; perhaps a singing bird will come."
 [image: mail.gif]
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 15 Sep 2014 to 17 Sep 2014 (#2014-259)
From: Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:42:50 -0400
Saw a hummer tanking up at the feeder in Milton 7:00 AM. Have not seen
others for about 1 week.

On Thu, Sep 18, 2014 at 12:01 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <
LISTSERV AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> There is 1 message totaling 11 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Hummer
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:56:32 -0400
> From:    Jim and Chris Runcie 
> Subject: Hummer
>
> Hummer at the petunias today, 11AM in Starksboro. So beautiful here, why
> leave?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 15 Sep 2014 to 17 Sep 2014 (#2014-259)
> *************************************************************
>



-- 
Liz Alton:
"Keep a green tree in your heart; perhaps a singing bird will come."
 [image: mail.gif]
Subject: Bird Walk at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center
From: Bruce MacPherson <BMacPhe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:27:34 -0400
Date: Saturday, September 20, 2014
Time: 7:30 A.M.
Location:  Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Gov. Chittenden Road, 
Williston, VT
Leaders:  Carl Runge, Bruce MacPherson, and Bill Mercia

The next GMAS bird walk at  the Catamount Outdoor Family Center is 
scheduled for Saturday, September 20. We will be walking on the south side of 
the 

property this month. Over the years we  have identified over 130 bird species 
at the COFC, including a variety of  waterfowl, grassland birds, wood 
warblers, and flycatchers. The COFC bird checklist is available for viewing and 

download in the Resources section of the  GMAS website at:

http://greenmountainaudubon.org 

These walks are  free and open to the public. Please register in advance, 
however, by sending  an e-mail to _gmas AT greenmountainaudubon.org_ 
(mailto:gmas AT greenmountainaudubon.org) . If you are a new participant, please 
indicate 

your level of birding expertise  (beginner, intermediate, expert). We will 
meet in the COFC parking lot on  Governor Chittenden Road at 7:30 A.M. to 
begin this walk.

Looking forward  to seeing some of you there.

Bruce MacPherson on behalf of the  GMAS
Subject: 18Sept early morning hummingbird
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 06:29:43 -0700
... still overseeing Tithonia patch from crabapple ... this beats latest 
Rubythroat for me in Passumpsic/NEK by one day. A startling and moving moment 
as it flew out of the 6.30am mist for my orange fleece, so glad I had it on! 
(and a feeder up) 






Veer Frost
Subject: Hummer
From: Jim and Chris Runcie <runcie AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:56:32 -0400
Hummer at the petunias today, 11AM in Starksboro. So beautiful here, why leave?
Subject: Re: P.s. From the border in Derby
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:35:59 -0400
Oh, I sure hope so.  I used to be loaded with them, and haven't seen a 
single one here the last two years, despite having milkweed all over the 
place.



On 9/15/2014 4:05 PM, Walter Medwid wrote:
> A steady trickle of monarchs floated due southwest throughout the day after
> a 32 degree evening. Very encouraging to witness them with all the dire
> reports about the population crash. Hopefully all the milkweed we've
> encouraged has helped make a tiny difference.
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8146 - Release Date: 09/03/14
> Internal Virus Database is out of date.
>