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Updated on Thursday, December 8 at 07:28 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Barbet

8 Dec SE owls, Gage Rd [Fred Nelson ]
7 Dec Re: Glaucous Gull at GROW Compost [Fred and Chris Pratt ]
7 Dec [SPAM?:###] Re: [VTBIRD] Glaucous Gull at GROW Compost [Patti Haynes ]
7 Dec Lake Bomoseen [Susan Elliott ]
7 Dec Glaucous Gull at GROW Compost [Chip Darmstadt ]
6 Dec Glaucous Gull [Isis Erb ]
6 Dec SNOWY OWL / Young Island / Dec. 6 [David Hoag ]
6 Dec Eider [Sue ]
6 Dec Dunmore grebe [Sue ]
6 Dec Loon Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Dec 6, 2016 [Sue ]
5 Dec Carolina wrens Maple St, Brandon, Dec 5, 2016 [Sue ]
5 Dec Submitting your CBC to Vermont eBird [Kent McFarland ]
5 Dec Re: Pileated convention in Jericho [Joyce Werntgen ]
5 Dec Pileated convention in Jericho [Maeve Kim ]
5 Dec Turkey convention in Montpelier [Tom slayton ]
4 Dec Blodgett Beach - Glaucous Gull (12/4) [Taj Schottland ]
4 Dec NEK Report: N.Pintail,C.Eider, R.B.Merg., Bohemians [tfberriman ]
4 Dec Re: Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach [Bruce MacPherson ]
4 Dec Re: Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach [Mark Paul ]
4 Dec Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach [Bruce MacPherson ]
1 Dec Common Eider - Lake Morey [Kyle Jones ]
2 Dec Fox Sparrow still here [Maeve Kim ]
2 Dec Common Eider- NO [Jim Mead ]
3 Dec Sabine's Gull at Delta Park in Colchester [Jim Mead ]
3 Dec Goldeneye Lake Bomoseen - Castleton (2360 acres), Dec 3, 2016 [Sue ]
3 Dec Hoodies--Burr Pond - Sudbury (85 acres), Dec 3, 2016 [Sue ]
3 Dec Owls - Gage Rd. [Scott Morrical ]
30 Nov Loons Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Nov 30, 2016 [Sue ]
30 Nov Turkeys Union St Brandon, Nov 30, 2016 [Sue ]
30 Nov Ross's Goose at Dead Creek WMA/Wet Red-tailed Hawks [Liz Lackey ]
29 Nov Re: Raptor rescue facility seeks donations [Eve Ticknor ]
29 Nov Raptor rescue facility seeks donations [H Nicolay ]
29 Nov Re: 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee [Allan Strong ]
29 Nov Re: 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee [hilke breder ]
29 Nov NEK Report: Essex County, Wallace Pond [tfberriman ]
29 Nov Fox Sparrow [Maeve Kim ]
28 Nov Owl [Sue ]
28 Nov 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee [Kent McFarland ]
28 Nov Birding in Malaysia ["Teage O'Connor" ]
27 Nov Getting Gulls: A Workshop and Virtual Field Trip-a GMAS Program [Bruce MacPherson ]
27 Nov mockingbirds, shrike + [Maeve Kim ]
27 Nov Sapsucker ,Maple St, Brandon, Nov 26, 2016 [Sue ]
27 Nov No Subject [Robert Parish ]
23 Nov NEK Report [tfberriman ]
23 Nov Snow Buntings - Moretown [Patti Haynes ]
23 Nov Getting Gulls: The Map [Bryan Pfeiffer ]
24 Nov Bohemian waxwings in Jericho [Eric Wood ]
25 Nov Kestrel - Waitsfield [Patti Haynes ]
26 Nov Snow goose [Sue ]
26 Nov Long tailed ducks at Hoyts landing [Michael Foster ]
26 Nov Dunmore grebe [Sue ]
26 Nov Re: Snow goose [Veer Frost ]
26 Nov Carolina Wren in Montpelier [Tom Slayton ]
26 Nov RN GrebeLake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Nov 26, 2016 [Sue ]
26 Nov Sapsucker [Sue ]
23 Nov Re: more on wintering BWHAs [Mike Resch ]
22 Nov Re: more on wintering BWHAs [Susan Elliott ]
22 Nov Re: more on wintering BWHAs [Jane Stein ]
22 Nov Re: more on wintering BWHAs [Chip Darmstadt ]
22 Nov more on wintering BWHAs [Maeve Kim ]
22 Nov PS re possible lingering BWHA [Maeve Kim ]
21 Nov 6796 Snow Geese counted at Dead Creek, Saturday the 19th [Ian Worley ]
20 Nov Shelburne Bay Shrike [Bruce MacPherson ]
20 Nov Red-bellied woodpecker in Jericho [Eric Wood ]
20 Nov Snow Geese on NY Side of Lake [Bridget Butler ]
19 Nov Broad-winged Hawk?? [Maeve Kim ]
19 Nov Re: Northern Shrike @ Shelburne Bay [Ryan Tomazin ]
19 Nov Re: Broad-winged Hawk?? [Mike Resch ]
19 Nov Re: Broad-winged Hawk?? [Richard Harlow ]
19 Nov Re: Broad-winged Hawk?? [Alison Wagner ]
19 Nov Re: Broad-winged Hawk?? [Veer Frost ]
19 Nov Re: Broad-winged Hawk?? [Evergreen Erb ]
19 Nov Re: Northern Shrike @ Shelburne Bay [Ryan Tomazin ]
19 Nov Northern Shrike - Rockingham 11/18 ["James P. Smith" ]
19 Nov Snow Buntings [Michael Blust ]
19 Nov Blue Jays and Broad-winged Hawk noise [Maeve Kim ]

Subject: SE owls, Gage Rd
From: Fred Nelson <fred.d.nelson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 07:21:15 -0500
Yesterday on Gage Rd in Addison there were at least 5 northern harriers and a 
pair of short-eared owls were seen from about 4:40- or about 25 minutes after 
sundown, which seems consistent with the timing for their post-dusk emergence 
on other posts from this site. 


Both birds were extremely ‘interactive’- from hunting well out in the 
field, when they spotted me watching them next to my car on the road, they made 
a bee-line straight for me, until arriving quite close and pulling up, wheeling 
overhead, and then proceeding to the field on the other side of the road. The 
sight of them hunting together over the field on the south side of the road, 
with the dusk-lit sky over the Adirondacks in the background, and several 
hundred roosting snow geese circling and calling above the abandoned barn at 
the end of the road, was pretty spectacular. 


Fred Nelson
Subject: Re: Glaucous Gull at GROW Compost
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 15:37:44 -0500
Just back from GROW Compost having enjoyed great looks at an immature 
Iceland Gull (bill all black, long wings extended well beyond tail,size 
intermediate between Ring-billed and Herring Gull). Thought perhaps 
initial report of Glaucous was incorrect - then saw Zac's photos. 
Appears both species are/were there. Will go back tomorrow to look for 
the Glaucous.

Pipit


On 12/7/2016 10:06 AM, Chip Darmstadt wrote:
> Hello birders,
>
> Reporting for Zac Cota here. He just called me to report an imm. Glaucous
> Gull at GROW Compost in Moretown. A first for Washington Co., I believe.
>
> The owners of GROW are birder-friendly, but it is a private business, so
> please check in at their office before wandering around their property!
>
> Cheers, Chip
>
>   
>
>   
>
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
>
> North Branch Nature Center
>
> (802) 229-6206
>
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org 
>
>   
>
>   
>
Subject: [SPAM?:###] Re: [VTBIRD] Glaucous Gull at GROW Compost
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 15:11:17 -0500
Glaucous Gull is still at GROW Compost as of 3pm.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 7, 2016, at 10:06 AM, Chip Darmstadt 
 wrote: 

> 
> Hello birders,
> 
> Reporting for Zac Cota here. He just called me to report an imm. Glaucous
> Gull at GROW Compost in Moretown. A first for Washington Co., I believe.
> 
> The owners of GROW are birder-friendly, but it is a private business, so
> please check in at their office before wandering around their property!
> 
> Cheers, Chip
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> 
> North Branch Nature Center
> 
> (802) 229-6206
> 
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org  
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Lake Bomoseen
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 19:13:35 +0000
Now that the smaller ponds are freezing up, the number of Hooded Mergansers is 
increasing on Lake Bomoseen with 84 seen this morning. The largest group was 
near Float Bridge Road.  

A female Long-tailed Duck is still present, on the south end, along with a raft 
of Common Goldeneye and one Ring-necked Duck. Three Common Loons were on the 
water and a fourth flew fairly low over our car and circled around over the 
water. A Belted Kingfisher sat on the wire over the water. 

Further north along Avalon Beach Road and Cedar Mountain Road we saw two female 
Black Scoters and one Double-crested Cormorant.  

Love's Marsh is frozen over, but a group of 19 Mallards was put up by a low 
flying adult Bald Eagle. 

Sue and Marv Elliott, Sue Wetmore
Subject: Glaucous Gull at GROW Compost
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 10:06:48 -0500
Hello birders,

Reporting for Zac Cota here. He just called me to report an imm. Glaucous
Gull at GROW Compost in Moretown. A first for Washington Co., I believe.

The owners of GROW are birder-friendly, but it is a private business, so
please check in at their office before wandering around their property!

Cheers, Chip

 

 

Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director

North Branch Nature Center

(802) 229-6206

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org  

 

 
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 20:37:37 +0000
At Blodgett's beach right now (best viewed from St Johns Club lot).

Isis Erb
-- 
Isis Erb Jericho, VT Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious
spelling errors.
Subject: SNOWY OWL / Young Island / Dec. 6
From: David Hoag <00000139fcf15d8e-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 15:26:11 -0500
A SNOWY OWL has joined the resident Rough-leg 
on Young Island, Grand Isle.    ... 2 PM - 3 PM ...  

A corvid (crow?) harasses the owl every few minutes.
Dave  Hoag, G. I., VT
 
Subject: Eider
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 14:00:19 -0500
Does anyone know if there is a purpose to the little triangular projecting 
feathers on a King Eider's back? 

Maybe they are just there to look cool.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Dunmore grebe
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 12:14:52 -0500
I neglected to include the Red-necked grebe that is still on L. Dunmore.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Loon Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Dec 6, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 12:12:34 -0500
Hooded Mergansers were in great number actively diving.
A Loon swam half submerged then would dive. Wondered if was intimidated by the 
hoodie horde?? 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: December 6, 2016 at 12:10:23 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Dec 6, 2016
> 
> Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Addison, Vermont, US
> Dec 6, 2016 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 7 species
> 
> Canada Goose  5
> Common Goldeneye  9
> Hooded Merganser 71 Birds were counted at a couple of spots on the lake using 
a Leica spotting scope. 

> Common Merganser  24
> Common Loon  1
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> American Crow  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32891537
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Carolina wrens Maple St, Brandon, Dec 5, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 15:32:18 -0500
Busy at the feeders--- sapsucker made a brief visit and Carolina wrens busy at 
the suet and peanuts. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: December 5, 2016 at 3:03:44 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Maple St, Brandon, Dec 5, 2016
> 
> Maple St, Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Dec 5, 2016 12:15 PM - 12:50 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 20 species
> 
> Mourning Dove  7
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1     Bird seen briefly at peanut feeder.
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Blue Jay  2
> American Crow  1
> Black-capped Chickadee  2
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> Carolina Wren  2
> American Robin  15
> European Starling  35
> American Tree Sparrow  1
> Dark-eyed Junco  3
> White-throated Sparrow  3
> Northern Cardinal  5
> House Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  3
> House Sparrow  4
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32879543
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Submitting your CBC to Vermont eBird
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 15:12:49 -0500
The Christmas Count is the largest and longest-running ornithological
citizen science project. Vermont eBird can be a great way to store your
sector-level data and compare it from year to year. It is not a problem to
enter data in Vermont eBird and then submit it for the CBC too, since the
two projects are collecting data in similar ways, but at different scales.
Learn more about how you can best add your CBC observations to Vermont
eBird.

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/adding-your-cbc-data-to-vermont-ebird/

Have a great CBC season!

Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201


Subject: Re: Pileated convention in Jericho
From: Joyce Werntgen <0000019178608573-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 11:43:43 -0500
Lucky you!!!

Joyce
Montpelier

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 5, 2016, at 10:56 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
> At the moment, there are three - possibly four - Pileated Woodpeckers in the 
backyard, looking dramatic and striking in the snow. (One of my trees 
apparently has a really good infestation of ants!) 

> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: Pileated convention in Jericho
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 10:56:34 -0500
At the moment, there are three - possibly four - Pileated Woodpeckers in the 
backyard, looking dramatic and striking in the snow. (One of my trees 
apparently has a really good infestation of ants!) 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Turkey convention in Montpelier
From: Tom slayton <slayton.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 10:11:47 -0500
A flock of 14 or more wild turkeys has convened on Crestview St. (Just west 
down Terrace Street from Redstone Mansion). These birds usually hang out in the 
forested hills above the west end of town. Maybe they're picking up salt and 
gravel from the street, or perhaps just celebrating their post-Thanksgiving 
survival... 

   Tom Slayton


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Blodgett Beach - Glaucous Gull (12/4)
From: Taj Schottland <tsurfbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 19:06:39 -0500
I went to Blodgett Beach this evening to try and relocate the previously
reported Iceland Gull. Although the Iceland was a no show, I did find a
Glaucous Gull. Ted Murin and Scott Morrical showed up just in time to see
the bird before all the gulls took off for their evening roost: Details in
the eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32862059

Last year, gull numbers seemed to peak at Blodgett in the evening just
before sunset. Based on today's observation, it would seem the gulls may be
following this same pattern again.

Cheers,
-Taj

-- 
Taj Schottland
Coastal Adaptation Specialist
National Wildlife Federation
CELL: 802-258-1200
EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
Subject: NEK Report: N.Pintail,C.Eider, R.B.Merg., Bohemians
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 17:47:56 -0500
 

 

I found a common Eider, female on Wallace Pond on Thursday (long range views
& digiscopes) but eider was not there Friday morning. Pine Grosbeaks
continue to be seen in several places including Canaan and Meadow Street on
Friday.

 

 

Good variety in Essex County this morning, Sunday,  especially on Meadow St.
in Island Pond with a Northern Pintail at the sewage ponds, a few dozen
Bohemian Waxwing, Evening Grosbeaks, Cardinals & Tree sparrows. The Pintail
was a second new duck from the one reported last week. On Island Pond a lone
Red-breasted Merganser and 3 Red-necked Grebes. At Norton Pond large numbers
of Common Merganser & Hooded Merganser continue. Snow Buntings were found in
a field on RT. 102 & on RT. 105.

 

On Friday Doug Hammond and I found Pine Grosbeaks on Meadow St. & a Mink
(within 15') at Island Pond and were able to get off some digiscopes &
photos.

 

A few photos if interested at:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/ 

 

Tom Berriman

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 13:36:29 -0500
Thanks Mark. Just a bit of well-informed luck.


Bruce



-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Paul 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Sun, Dec 4, 2016 1:00 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach

Nice find Bruce!

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 12:02 PM, Bruce MacPherson <
00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> After attending Bryan Pfieffer's elegant presentation "Getting Gulls" on
> Thursday evening, I've been inspired to be on the look out for rare gulls.
> Yesterday afternoon I found one, an Iceland Gull at Blodgett's beach in
> Burlington. This gull was perched along the shoreline with a group of about
> a hundred other gulls, including mature and immature Ring-billed, Herring,
> and Great Black-backed Gulls. This gull was pale tan, much paler than the
> nearby immature Herring Gulls, with pale wing tips. It was obviously
> smaller than the nearby Herring Gulls and Great Black-backed Gulls.
>
>
> A stiff west wind kept most of these gulls pinned down on the beach on
> Saturday, but the diminished winds today might allow them to move around a
> bit more, so be on the look out in the Shelburne Bay-Burlington Bay area
> for this and other rare gulls in flight.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
Subject: Re: Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach
From: Mark Paul <mrpbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 13:00:13 -0500
Nice find Bruce!

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 12:02 PM, Bruce MacPherson <
00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> After attending Bryan Pfieffer's elegant presentation "Getting Gulls" on
> Thursday evening, I've been inspired to be on the look out for rare gulls.
> Yesterday afternoon I found one, an Iceland Gull at Blodgett's beach in
> Burlington. This gull was perched along the shoreline with a group of about
> a hundred other gulls, including mature and immature Ring-billed, Herring,
> and Great Black-backed Gulls. This gull was pale tan, much paler than the
> nearby immature Herring Gulls, with pale wing tips. It was obviously
> smaller than the nearby Herring Gulls and Great Black-backed Gulls.
>
>
> A stiff west wind kept most of these gulls pinned down on the beach on
> Saturday, but the diminished winds today might allow them to move around a
> bit more, so be on the look out in the Shelburne Bay-Burlington Bay area
> for this and other rare gulls in flight.
>
>
> Bruce MacPherson
> South Burlington
>
Subject: Iceland Gull at Blodgett's Beach
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 12:02:34 -0500
After attending Bryan Pfieffer's elegant presentation "Getting Gulls" on 
Thursday evening, I've been inspired to be on the look out for rare gulls. 
Yesterday afternoon I found one, an Iceland Gull at Blodgett's beach in 
Burlington. This gull was perched along the shoreline with a group of about a 
hundred other gulls, including mature and immature Ring-billed, Herring, and 
Great Black-backed Gulls. This gull was pale tan, much paler than the nearby 
immature Herring Gulls, with pale wing tips. It was obviously smaller than the 
nearby Herring Gulls and Great Black-backed Gulls. 



A stiff west wind kept most of these gulls pinned down on the beach on 
Saturday, but the diminished winds today might allow them to move around a bit 
more, so be on the look out in the Shelburne Bay-Burlington Bay area for this 
and other rare gulls in flight. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Common Eider - Lake Morey
From: Kyle Jones <lkjones13 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 14:53:16 -0500
An adult male Common Eider was found by Jenn Megyesi at Lake Morey (Fairlee, 
VT) this morning and I was able to see it around noon. It was fairly mobile 
swimming and/or flying from end to end often in the company of a Red-necked 
Grebe. There were also Long-tailed Ducks, Black Scoters, and a Greater Scaup on 
the lake. 



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32807863


Kyle Jones
Subject: Fox Sparrow still here
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 08:48:57 -0500
Maybe hes planning on overwintering! Hes been spending a good part of every 
day foraging on the ground under our feeders. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Common Eider- NO
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 07:54:44 -0500
Hello all,

I have been here at Lake Morey for about an hour. 
Though I have seen several great species, the Common
Eider has not been one of them. It must have moved on. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Sabine's Gull at Delta Park in Colchester
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 10:16:11 -0500
Hello all,

About an hour ago, I was standing on the bridge 
that spans the Winooski River, when I spotted a juvenile
Sabine's Gull flying into the NW wind. It was flying up and 
then right back down to the surface presumably feeding. I
did get to watch it for about five minutes straight and was
able to get many good looks at it. I kept my eye on it until 
it flew far enough toward the NW that I could not see it anymore. 
No photos were taken because I know I would have lost sight
of this rarity if I had taken my eye off it. Someone might get lucky
and relocate it. Good luck if you try. 
This is extremely late for this species thus requiring an RSD. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Goldeneye Lake Bomoseen - Castleton (2360 acres), Dec 3, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 18:21:38 -0500
No luck finding the Barrow's goldeneye among the large flock of common 
goldeneyes. 

Red-breasted merganser kept company with bufflehead.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: December 3, 2016 at 6:16:18 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Lake Bomoseen - Castleton (2360 acres), Dec 3, 2016
> 
> Lake Bomoseen - Castleton (2360 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
> Dec 3, 2016 10:05 AM - 10:48 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 7 species
> 
> Mallard  11
> Bufflehead  10
> Common Goldeneye  54
> Hooded Merganser  1
> Red-breasted Merganser  1
> Common Loon  1
> Bald Eagle  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32841314
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Hoodies--Burr Pond - Sudbury (85 acres), Dec 3, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 18:18:42 -0500
Hooded mergs were in large numbers performing synchronized diving.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: December 3, 2016 at 6:12:33 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Burr Pond - Sudbury (85 acres), Dec 3, 2016
> 
> Burr Pond - Sudbury (85 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
> Dec 3, 2016 9:30 AM - 9:40 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 5 species
> 
> Mallard  2
> Bufflehead  1
> Hooded Merganser  33
> Common Merganser  18
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32841285
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Owls - Gage Rd.
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 21:57:55 -0500
It was a chilly evening on Gage Road in Addison this evening, but that didn't 
stop a pair of Short-eared Owls from coming out to play, about 20 minutes after 
sunset. At about the same time the Snow Goose fly-out took off and I estimated 
about 5000 birds. 

Scott Morrical


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Loons Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Nov 30, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:25:43 -0500
Two loons seen actively diving. A black scoter persists off the west side by 
Sunset Lodge. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: November 30, 2016 at 3:23:27 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Nov 30, 2016
> 
> Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Addison, Vermont, US
> Nov 30, 2016 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     Open water with fog forming on the south end.
> 5 species
> 
> Black Scoter  1
> Hooded Merganser  3
> Common Merganser  4
> Common Loon  2
> Dark-eyed Junco  5
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32796490
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Turkeys Union St Brandon, Nov 30, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 13:19:06 -0500
A nice flock of turkeys were feeding in one of the farm fields this morning. In 
another nearly the same number of robins. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: November 30, 2016 at 1:15:52 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Nov 30, 2016
> 
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Nov 30, 2016 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 6 species
> 
> Wild Turkey  36
> Northern Harrier  1
> American Crow  5
> American Robin  30     The flock was in a grassy field.
> European Starling  18
> American Tree Sparrow  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32794606
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Ross's Goose at Dead Creek WMA/Wet Red-tailed Hawks
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 19:16:22 -0500
We found a Ross’s Goose in with the main flock of Snow Geese at Dead Creek 
today. The flock of 4500 birds (my very unprofessional estimate) was foraging 
in the field to the south of, and adjacent to, the western end of Gage Road. We 
also found 5 1/2 neck banded Snow Geese. The 1/2 is due to the fact I could 
only see the letters but not the numbers on the neck band of one individual. 


We saw a lot of very wet Red-tailed Hawks all along our route; from Waterbury 
area to Addison. Some were holding their wings out to dry, including a 
Rough-legged Hawk. They reminded us of cormorants and anhingas. Most however 
were perched with drooped wings held only slightly out from their bodies. Their 
shape from a distance was triangular. Thru binocs and scopes we could see how 
wet the plumage was. 


Liz Lackey

 
Subject: Re: Raptor rescue facility seeks donations
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 21:32:33 -0500
Please give me an address to send you a donation.
Eve
> On Nov 29, 2016, at 9:05 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
> 
> Hi all, it's been a very good year for Barred owlets due to the mild winter
> the parents had last year and some rehab centers around the country have
> taken in 20, 30 young owls in the past month. The juveniles have been
> seeking their own territories and at first find easy meals by the roadside.
> So many are getting hit by cars. The raptor center in Shelburne took in
> eleven owls last month, my rehab facility in Monkton took in five owls plus
> two hit by car hawks. Commercially bought frozen rodents range in price
> from $1.50 for a mouse to about $3.00 for a small rat. Barred owls are
> greedy little things and don't hesitate to pack down four mice per meal.
> Wildlife Rehabilitators do not get any funding from the Vermont Fish &
> Wildlife Department. Donations from any of you avid owl birders would be
> split 50/50 between our raptor rescue facility in Monkton and Outreach for
> Earth Stewardship in Shelburne. Thanks birders! Helena

Eve Ticknor
Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

The bad news is time flies.
The good news is you’re the pilot.
Subject: Raptor rescue facility seeks donations
From: H Nicolay <sqrlma AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 21:05:41 -0500
Hi all, it's been a very good year for Barred owlets due to the mild winter
the parents had last year and some rehab centers around the country have
taken in 20, 30 young owls in the past month. The juveniles have been
seeking their own territories and at first find easy meals by the roadside.
So many are getting hit by cars. The raptor center in Shelburne took in
eleven owls last month, my rehab facility in Monkton took in five owls plus
two hit by car hawks. Commercially bought frozen rodents range in price
from $1.50 for a mouse to about $3.00 for a small rat. Barred owls are
greedy little things and don't hesitate to pack down four mice per meal.
Wildlife Rehabilitators do not get any funding from the Vermont Fish &
Wildlife Department. Donations from any of you avid owl birders would be
split 50/50 between our raptor rescue facility in Monkton and Outreach for
Earth Stewardship in Shelburne. Thanks birders! Helena
Subject: Re: 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee
From: Allan Strong <Allan.Strong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 21:01:12 +0000
Hi Hilke,

I'm replying for Kent on behalf of the VT Bird Records Committee. I won't go 
into the specific details of your sighting, but I would be happy to give you 
some additional information off-line. But, I think it is important to answer 
your general question "publicly" because assessment of Rare Species 
Documentations (RSDs) is one of the more difficult aspects of the work that we 
do. 


The most important thing to keep in mind is when the committee fails to accept 
a record, we are not stating that that an observer did not see that particular 
species. We use the language "not accept" rather than "reject" for just this 
reason. In the evaluation of most RSDs, we do not feel there is a 
misidentification, but rather that there was insufficient evidence to eliminate 
all other similar species. The committee has a responsibility to maintain the 
historical database of bird sightings for the state, and as such, we use 
rigorous, but fair and objective standards. As you likely read in the report, 
all records, whether accepted or not, remain on file and can be re-submitted to 
the committee if additional substantive material is presented. 


I hope this helps you better understand the rationale behind our decision.

All the best,
Allan Strong

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of hilke breder
Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2016 1:25 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee

Hi Kent,

I am very disappointed that the committee did not accept my sighting of a 
Black-headed Grosbeak on July25. The bird was not at a feeder. It was sitting 
in a crab apple tree, in a portion of the tree that had lost a lot of leaves 
due to a white fungus on its branches. I got a very good if brief look at it 
with my binoculars. I was struck by the plump breast in a faded orangey hue 
without streaks. The bird was picking at nearby leaves. I looked at the dark 
head and was surprised to see it ringed with white bands. The bill was a 
characteristic grosbeak bill. After about a minute it lifted off and flew into 
part of the tree that was no longer visible to me. 

I got a very brief look at the fanned tail which was white and black in a 
pattern I don't recall. There is no other bird with which I could have confused 
it. When you look at my website you can see that I have had extensive 
experience with bird watching and photography. (Hector Galbraith put one my 
photos of a red-throated loon into his book on the Hinsdale 

setback.) Unfortunately I did not have my camera close by. It was on the porch 
and I grabbed it on my way out but the bird had left. I assume it was migrating 
through the area. 


Best,
Hilke Breder, M.D.
www.onejackdaw.com

On Mon, Nov 28, 2016 at 3:17 PM, Kent McFarland  wrote:

> The Vermont Bird Records Committee (VBRC) held its annual meeting on 
> November 12, 2016 at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies. The 36th 
> annual report of the VBRC covers the evaluation of 48 records 
> involving 31 species and 2 subspecies.
>
> Read more on Vermont eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/thirty-sixth-annual-
> report-of-the-vermont-bird-records-committee/
>
> Or, go directly to the VBRC annual reports page at 
> http://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/annual-reports/.
>
> Thank you to all of you that submitted reports. 2017 will feature a 
> new online reporting form and media uploading tool to make it easier 
> to report rare sightings. Have a great 2017 filled with awesome bird reports!
>
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
>
> 
>
Subject: Re: 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee
From: hilke breder <htbreder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 13:25:05 -0500
Hi Kent,

I am very disappointed that the committee did not accept my sighting of a
Black-headed Grosbeak on July25. The bird was not at a feeder. It was
sitting in a crab apple tree, in a portion of the tree that had lost a lot
of leaves due to a white fungus on its branches. I got a very good if brief
look at it with my binoculars.  I was struck by the plump breast in a faded
orangey hue without streaks. The bird was picking at nearby leaves. I
looked at the dark head and was surprised to see it ringed with white
bands. The bill was a characteristic grosbeak bill. After about a minute it
lifted off and flew into part of the tree that was no longer visible to me.
I got a very brief look at the fanned tail which was white and black in a
pattern I don't recall. There is no other bird with which I could have
confused it. When you look at my website you can see that I have had
extensive experience with bird watching and photography. (Hector Galbraith
put one my photos of a red-throated loon into his book on the Hinsdale
setback.) Unfortunately I did not have my camera close by. It was on the
porch  and I grabbed it on my way out but the bird had left. I assume it
was migrating through the area.

Best,
Hilke Breder, M.D.
www.onejackdaw.com

On Mon, Nov 28, 2016 at 3:17 PM, Kent McFarland  wrote:

> The Vermont Bird Records Committee (VBRC) held its annual meeting on
> November 12, 2016 at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies. The 36th annual
> report of the VBRC covers the evaluation of 48 records involving 31 species
> and 2 subspecies.
>
> Read more on Vermont eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/thirty-sixth-annual-
> report-of-the-vermont-bird-records-committee/
>
> Or, go directly to the VBRC annual reports page at
> http://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/annual-reports/.
>
> Thank you to all of you that submitted reports. 2017 will feature a new
> online reporting form and media uploading tool to make it easier to report
> rare sightings. Have a great 2017 filled with awesome bird reports!
>
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
>
> 
>
Subject: NEK Report: Essex County, Wallace Pond
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 10:54:54 -0500
There was a very good eBird effort this year in Essex County by Fred & Chris
Pratt, Craig Provost, Bob Stymeist and myself. Large areas of Essex County
had been underreported for the last 40 years. This year's total species
count is a whopping 30-40 species above almost every other year (1970-2016
data base).

A few observations from this year so far are the increased reports of
Cardinal, Tufted Titmouse and Northern Mockingbird (Mockingbird 4 separate
birds with breeding pair) . American Kestrel and Northern Harrier were found
in greater numbers than I had previously thought were in the county. And
while finding a Green Heron, Eastern Meadow Lark or Eastern Towhee (or
almost any shorebird for that matter) is still an exciting find in the
county, at least one Green Heron, Meadow Lark and Towhee were found this
year.

 

The biggest surprise is the large number of waterfowl/grebes/loons that are
passing through the county during fall migration. The northern ponds of
Greater Averill, Little Averill, Norton , Wallace and Island Pond are
providing short term resting spots for these waterfowl. Wallace Pond which
splits the border with Canada is by far the richest of the water bodies in
the county and maybe one of the best ponds in the state during fall
migration. 532 acres which is not huge but it may be the first water body
migrating birds see as they head south. From mid-September until freeze up,
this is a place to check regularly.

However the birds seem to stay here only a few hours or overnight before
moving on.  Each day of the fall there is the possibility of fantastic
sightings, take for instance Craig's post from this past weekend of 17
Red-throated loons on the pond then taking flight. I've never seen that many
loons in flight and now I know the answer to: Do loons migrate together.

 

Another surprise is the village of Brighton (Island Pond) With the pond to
its east and all that is possible year round there. Several people in town
have bird feeders throughout the late fall and winter. Meadow street in
particular is a very 'birdy' street with the sewage treatment plant at the
dead end of the street.

 

I have compiled a short guide for birding Essex County, directions for
numerous locations and for finding each species and what time of year. Some
of this was published by the Bird Observer and more will be published at a
later date. If anyone would like a Word-document of this guide contact me
off the listserve at:

blackpoll AT charter.net 

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Fox Sparrow
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 09:11:24 -0500
a full month later than the previous latest sighting here at my house

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Owl
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 21:29:50 -0500
The Elliotts and I sought out Short-eared owls on Gage Rd.
This early evening.
A large flock of snow geese was moving about. Rough-legged hawks and a harrier 
were seen. Finally I spotted the owl hunting the field just on the north side 
of Gage Rd. 

A great horned owl hooted in the far woods.
Sue Wetmore, Marv & Sue Elliott

Sent from my iPod
Subject: 36th Annual Report of the Vermont Bird Records Committee
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 15:17:39 -0500
The Vermont Bird Records Committee (VBRC) held its annual meeting on
November 12, 2016 at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies. The 36th annual
report of the VBRC covers the evaluation of 48 records involving 31 species
and 2 subspecies.

Read more on Vermont eBird:

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/thirty-sixth-annual-report-of-the-vermont-bird-records-committee/ 


Or, go directly to the VBRC annual reports page at
http://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/annual-reports/.

Thank you to all of you that submitted reports. 2017 will feature a new
online reporting form and media uploading tool to make it easier to report
rare sightings. Have a great 2017 filled with awesome bird reports!

Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201


Subject: Birding in Malaysia
From: "Teage O'Connor" <badger.meli AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 09:44:24 -0500
Hello fellow birders,
  I'm heading to Malaysia in January and am so eager to do as much birding
as I can while there. I'm hoping to connect with a guide/birding tour while
there. I'm also looking for a good field guide to bring with me. Just
wanted to check with the list to see if anyone else has ever been there and
if so, if you've got any resource recommendations. Thanks! Feel free to
contact me off list.

Teage O'Connor
Naturalist Educator
Crow's Path  | CP Blog

Wild Burlington Blog 
(802) 557-7127
Subject: Getting Gulls: A Workshop and Virtual Field Trip-a GMAS Program
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 16:35:05 -0500
Getting Gulls: A Workshop and Virtual Field Trip

Speaker: Bryan Pfeiffer
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2016
Time: 6:30 P.M.
Location: Essex High School Auditorium, Essex Junction, VT
Sponsor: Green Mountain Audubon Society

Gulls are among the most successful birds on the planet, yet identifying them 
can be challenging. Join the members of the GMAS to hear renowned Vermont 
naturalist Bryan Pfeiffer solve the mysteries of gull behavior, distribution, 
and identification for us. 


This program is free for students. Otherwise, a $5 donation is suggested. Free 
parking is available on site. For more information visit Bryan's website at 
bryanpfeiffer.com/blog/ or the GMAS website at: 


http://greenmountainaudubon.org

Looking forward to seeing many of you at this informative and entertaining 
workshop. 


Bruce MacPherson
GMAS
Subject: mockingbirds, shrike +
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 16:21:28 -0500
Lake Road in Addison was hopping this afternoon. Between power poles 87 and 88, 
we saw two mockingbirds, a Northern Shrike, a harrier, robins, crows, 
chickadees, starlings, Cedar Waxwings, juncos, downies and goldfinches. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Sapsucker ,Maple St, Brandon, Nov 26, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 13:33:27 -0500
This is from my yard on Nov. 26. Have not seen the sapsucker today.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: November 27, 2016 at 1:16:49 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Maple St, Brandon, Nov 26, 2016
> 
> Maple St, Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Nov 26, 2016 2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 15 species
> 
> Mourning Dove  36
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1     Bird feeding at peanut feeder.
> Downy Woodpecker  4
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  5
> Black-capped Chickadee  2
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> Dark-eyed Junco  2
> Northern Cardinal  1
> House Finch  4
> American Goldfinch  4
> House Sparrow  8
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32748847
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: No Subject
From: Robert Parish <rparish AT TOGETHER.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 08:52:41 -0500
help
Subject: NEK Report
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 13:38:02 -0500
A lone female Spruce Grouse, 30' up in a Balsam Fir, watched Dave Govatski
and I for a half hour as we cleared brush from the Moose Bog Trail.

In downtown Island Pond a lone Red-necked Grebe on the pond while as many as
65 Bohemians, 35 Evening Grosbeaks and 10 Pine Grosbeaks  rotated between
Meadow St and the 'hill' section of town foraging in crab/cherry trees.

Other town birds included American Tree Sparrows, Cardinals and Robins.
Another 8 Evening Grosbeaks on the road at Wenlock and 3 Snow Buntings north
of Bloomfield on rt. 102.

The town of Canaan had 8 Pine Grosbeaks along rt.114 as you head west out of
town and I watched a lone blackbird fly across Wallace Pond but was unable
to identify as Rusty or Red-wing  (just outside the late zone).

With the naked I could see nothing on Norton Pond, then set up a scope to
find 215 Common Mergansers and 3 Common Loons on the far north side of the
pond(counted by 5's)

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Snow Buntings - Moretown
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 14:39:47 -0500
Once again, an afternoon dog walk turned up more good birds. There was a flock 
of about 30 Snow Buntings on the rec fields at the Moretown School. 


Patti 
Moretown 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Getting Gulls: The Map
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan AT BRYANPFEIFFER.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 18:00:39 -0500
Greetings, VTBIRDers:

Among the extra benefits of my Getting Gulls workshop in Essex on 
December 1 is a new crowd-sourced map to New England gull-watching 
sites. Here’s a preview: http://tinyurl.com/hs92f3t  Please send 
additions or corrections to me (off the list) at bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com.

I hope to see folks at the Essex High School next Thursday starting at 
6:30PM. We can thank Green Mountain Audubon (and gulls) for making this 
event possible. Here’s more on the workshop: 
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2016/10/31/got-gulls/

Best,
Bryan Pfeiffer

-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
Subject: Bohemian waxwings in Jericho
From: Eric Wood <ericw5 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 10:07:00 -0500
A flock in a birch tree at Clarks Truck Center on Rt. 15, as of mid-morning 
today. 


Eric
Subject: Kestrel - Waitsfield
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2016 12:10:16 -0500
Just saw a Kestrel in the same place as a week or so ago. It's perched on a 
wire by Kenyon's Variety on Rt 100. 


Our CBC is only a few weeks away and I think this bird is in team nuthatches 
territory! 


Patti 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Snow goose
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 08:49:33 -0500
This past Tuesday my grandson and I were viewing the large flock of snow geese 
at DCWMA when I saw one with a neck band. Putting the scope on the bird I 
recorded the info and thanks to Ron Payne directing me to the proper site I 
found the following: 

The bird, a 2 year female, banded on Bylot Island in Nunavut Territory.

Sue & Ryan Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Long tailed ducks at Hoyts landing
From: Michael Foster <mfoster AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 10:29:06 -0500
While watching 5 black scoters that were here yesterday 3 long tailed ducks 
flew in and joined them. Not sure they are still there as this was at 7:30 this 
morning 


Sent from my iPhone
Breezyhillturning.com
Subject: Dunmore grebe
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 12:58:54 -0500
Today at Lake Dunmore a huge flock of Canada geese loafing on Branbury Beach 
while off shore a red- necked grebe dove. One Black scoter still present along 
with the mallard mob. 

Birds rock!
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Snow goose
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 11:32:05 -0500
very cool! veer, passumpsic

On November 26, 2016 at 8:49 AM, "Sue"  wrote:This past Tuesday my
grandson and I were viewing the large flock of snow geese at DCWMA
when I saw one with a neck band. Putting the scope on the bird I
recorded the info and thanks to Ron Payne directing me to the proper
site I found the following:
The bird, a 2 year female, banded on Bylot Island in Nunavut
Territory.

Sue & Ryan Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Carolina Wren in Montpelier
From: Tom Slayton <slayton.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 11:52:19 -0500
Along with the more familiar birds at the feeders this morning was a
Carolina Wren. Last winter a pair wintered over...I wonder if they will do
so again.
  Tom Slayton
Terrace Street
Montpelier
Subject: RN GrebeLake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Nov 26, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 13:32:47 -0500
Here is the list.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: November 26, 2016 at 1:29:37 PM EST
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Nov 26, 2016
> 
> Lake Dunmore - Salisbury (985 acres), Addison, Vermont, US
> Nov 26, 2016 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 9 species
> 
> Canada Goose  460     Rough counting by groups of 10.
> Mallard  7
> Black Scoter  1
> Hooded Merganser  3
> Red-necked Grebe  1
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> Blue Jay  1
> Common Raven  1
> Black-capped Chickadee  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32731966
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Sapsucker
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 14:42:02 -0500
At my peanut feeder about 15 minutes ago a particularly attractive 
yellow-bellied sapsucker. The breast had a great deal of yellow on it, there 
was a tinge of red on the throat margin, crown red. 

Sue Wetmore  

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: more on wintering BWHAs
From: Mike Resch <0000012cec6153db-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2016 09:09:35 -0500
The discussion of raptors flying over open water reminds me of the ferry trip I 
took from Nova Scotia to Portland, ME back on 9/26/15. That route was 
undoubtedly the most direct route from Yarmouth near the southwestern tip of NS 
to the Portland area. Of course I was birding during the entire 10-hour trip. 
And during that trip I had 1 Osprey, 2 Harriers, and 2 Peregrines flying right 
along with the ship on virtually the same route - each one was flying faster 
than the boat. Wasn't expecting the raptors, but it was a fun diversion after 
spending time looking at all the great seabirds (3 species of shearwaters, red 
phalaropes, jaegers, and 1 Great Skua). 


Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Jane Stein 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Tue, Nov 22, 2016 12:02 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] more on wintering BWHAs

FWIW, BWs up in Nova Scotia almost certainly go northwest into New 
Brunswick before turning south for migration.  They really, really, 
really don't want to go over water, especially water they can't see the 
end of, and will go a long way out of their way to avoid it, even in the 
wrong direction.  They'd have to flap pretty much the whole way over any 
body of water because of the lack of thermals, and they're not 
physically built for it.

It's why the narrowest crossing points from Canada to the U.S. through 
the Great Lakes are such spectacular high-volume hawkwatching sites, 
like Rochester or Duluth.

Falcons are built to do that and can flap all day, so they don't much 
care.  But buteos and accipters, even the larger ones, are reluctant to 
cross a small inlet, never mind something the size of the Gulf.  I've 
spent a few days hawkwatching on the coast in the fall, and it's comical 
to watch the accipiters trying to follow the coast south, but 
zig-zagging to go around even small inlets rather than over them, while 
kestrels and merlins just zoom across, sometimes very close to the water.

Offered just in case anybody else is as fascinated by hawk migration 
paths as I am....

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 11/22/2016 9:06 AM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> More food for thought:
>
> Interestingly enough, a few Broad-winged Hawks have wintered in Nova
> Scotia. But those have been immature birds. It took a while before it
> was confirmed that indeed it was not a series of misidentifications,
> but the real thing. A theory I've heard is that they were probably
> young of the year birds who hesitated - really hesitated - to cross
> the Gulf of Maine during migration and stayed put. You have to wonder
> what these birds ate to survive through the winter since their main
> fare is reptiles.
>
> Still, I'd like to know that someone has had a close look at photos
> of any winter Broad-winged Hawk in Vermont.
>
> Rich Guthrie
>
> New Baltimore
>
> The Greene County,
>
> New York
>
>
> Maeve Kim Jericho Center
>
Subject: Re: more on wintering BWHAs
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 18:32:12 +0000
Looking at eBird, there are only two accepted records of Broad-winged Hawks in 
Vermont between November and February in 1983 and 1997, both early November, 
and both in the southern part of the state: 


http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/brwhaw?bmo=11&emo=02&byr=1900&eyr=2016&yr=&env.minX=-73.443&env.minY=42.728&env.maxX=-71.468&env.maxY=45.016&gp=true 


That doesn't mean there weren't others, but they were never reported and 
accepted. In fact there are only a few for New England and New York for this 
period. 

Sue Elliott

      From: Maeve Kim 
 To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 9:06 AM
 Subject: [VTBIRD] more on wintering BWHAs
   
More food for thought:

Interestingly enough, a few Broad-winged Hawks have wintered in Nova Scotia. 
But those have been immature birds. It took a while before it was confirmed 
that indeed it was not a series of misidentifications, but the real thing. A 
theory I've heard is that they were probably young of the year birds who 
hesitated - really hesitated - to cross the Gulf of Maine during migration and 
stayed put. You have to wonder what these birds ate to survive through the 
winter since their main fare is reptiles. 


Still, I'd like to know that someone has had a close look at photos of any 
winter Broad-winged Hawk in Vermont. 


Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore

The Greene County,

New York


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center

   
Subject: Re: more on wintering BWHAs
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 12:02:06 -0500
FWIW, BWs up in Nova Scotia almost certainly go northwest into New 
Brunswick before turning south for migration.  They really, really, 
really don't want to go over water, especially water they can't see the 
end of, and will go a long way out of their way to avoid it, even in the 
wrong direction.  They'd have to flap pretty much the whole way over any 
body of water because of the lack of thermals, and they're not 
physically built for it.

It's why the narrowest crossing points from Canada to the U.S. through 
the Great Lakes are such spectacular high-volume hawkwatching sites, 
like Rochester or Duluth.

Falcons are built to do that and can flap all day, so they don't much 
care.  But buteos and accipters, even the larger ones, are reluctant to 
cross a small inlet, never mind something the size of the Gulf.  I've 
spent a few days hawkwatching on the coast in the fall, and it's comical 
to watch the accipiters trying to follow the coast south, but 
zig-zagging to go around even small inlets rather than over them, while 
kestrels and merlins just zoom across, sometimes very close to the water.

Offered just in case anybody else is as fascinated by hawk migration 
paths as I am....

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 11/22/2016 9:06 AM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> More food for thought:
>
> Interestingly enough, a few Broad-winged Hawks have wintered in Nova
> Scotia. But those have been immature birds. It took a while before it
> was confirmed that indeed it was not a series of misidentifications,
> but the real thing. A theory I've heard is that they were probably
> young of the year birds who hesitated - really hesitated - to cross
> the Gulf of Maine during migration and stayed put. You have to wonder
> what these birds ate to survive through the winter since their main
> fare is reptiles.
>
> Still, I'd like to know that someone has had a close look at photos
> of any winter Broad-winged Hawk in Vermont.
>
> Rich Guthrie
>
> New Baltimore
>
> The Greene County,
>
> New York
>
>
> Maeve Kim Jericho Center
>
Subject: Re: more on wintering BWHAs
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 09:26:05 -0500
I observed a really early Broad-winged Hawk on March 18 in Middlesex this
year - or could it be that it never left! No photo, unfortunately.
By the way, Pine Grosbeak here at the North Branch Nature Center yesterday!
Cheers, Chip


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Maeve Kim
Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 9:06 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] more on wintering BWHAs

More food for thought:

Interestingly enough, a few Broad-winged Hawks have wintered in Nova Scotia.
But those have been immature birds. It took a while before it was confirmed
that indeed it was not a series of misidentifications, but the real thing. A
theory I've heard is that they were probably young of the year birds who
hesitated - really hesitated - to cross the Gulf of Maine during migration
and stayed put. You have to wonder what these birds ate to survive through
the winter since their main fare is reptiles. 

Still, I'd like to know that someone has had a close look at photos of any
winter Broad-winged Hawk in Vermont. 

Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore

The Greene County,

New York


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: more on wintering BWHAs
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 09:06:26 -0500
More food for thought:

Interestingly enough, a few Broad-winged Hawks have wintered in Nova Scotia. 
But those have been immature birds. It took a while before it was confirmed 
that indeed it was not a series of misidentifications, but the real thing. A 
theory I've heard is that they were probably young of the year birds who 
hesitated - really hesitated - to cross the Gulf of Maine during migration and 
stayed put. You have to wonder what these birds ate to survive through the 
winter since their main fare is reptiles. 


Still, I'd like to know that someone has had a close look at photos of any 
winter Broad-winged Hawk in Vermont. 


Rich Guthrie

New Baltimore

The Greene County,

New York


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: PS re possible lingering BWHA
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 08:05:08 -0500
Good morning, everyone - This morning I got a message from Dave Merker, whos 
involved with the Cape May Raptor Banding Project. He wrote: I had an adult 
Broadwing in early Nov and photographed one in January in my yard in Etna, 
NH... So yes they can linger, no question about it. Good sighting 


So if anyones in the vicinity of the Birds of Vermont Museum or the Audubon 
Center, keep your eyes and ears open. Maybe we can verify a wintering rarity! 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: 6796 Snow Geese counted at Dead Creek, Saturday the 19th
From: Ian Worley <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:19:41 -0500
Saturday was a good day to take another suite of photos of the Snow 
Geese at Dead Creek WMA from the air.  At about 11:30 am the flock was 
assembled right at the front of the viewing area along Route 17, very 
densely packed.  6796 geese were counted by individuals from the 
photos.  Searched by air Lake Champlain south from the mouth of Otter 
Creek to Ticonderoga, as well as most of western Addison County, but 
found no other flocks, large or small, of Snow Geese.

Back on the 8th of November, a similar count from photos from the air at 
the WMA was 7522 geese.

Ian
Subject: Shelburne Bay Shrike
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2016 19:10:34 -0500
The Northern Shrike at Shelburne Bay appeared again this afternoon. It was 
seeking shelter from the snow in the conifers in the field west of the parking 
lot. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Red-bellied woodpecker in Jericho
From: Eric Wood <ericw5 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2016 14:58:58 -0500
First ever sighting at the house for this species. Came to peanut butter-mix 
feeder. Also, tree sparrows arrived today, and pine siskins here last 
Wednesday. 


Eric
Subject: Snow Geese on NY Side of Lake
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2016 09:53:41 -0500
Greetings All,

Yesterday I led a trip to see snow geese on the New York side of Lake
Champlain.

The following spots were teaming with birds. Many of the cornfields that I
remember being cut in December that held birds still had standing corn on
them. We did not find any birds resting in fields in the usual locations.
All the bird we observed were on the water.

Rouse's Point around 2 pm had approximately 3K
Dunn Bay numbers grew through the day from 3K to maybe 5K
Kings Bay held the most. A very large and dense raft of may 10K birds. I
struggle with my counting when they get like this. Any tips for counting
such large rafts are welcome.

We watched a man in a canoe seemingly drive the geese from Kings Bay.
Neighbors who we talked to said the geese were very noisy and they we
slightly frustrated at not being able to sleep in the morning when the
cacophony was at it's loudest. This lead me into a conversation with the
group about that saying -  you see what you know, love what you see and
protect what you love. The noise for sure could be construed as annoying,
but could that be softened with a little more knowledge about snow geese?

This made me think a lot about how a community could embrace the racket so
to speak and turn it into maybe a tourist/economic opportunity. The group
with me discussed how it was important to let the coffee shops and delis
that you drop in on when birding that what brought you there was the birds!

Anyhoo, I look forward to seeing how the snow geese in the Chazy NY region
shift in numbers and resting sites through the end of the year.

Photos have been posted in my eBird reports thanks to Dave Southwick who
was on the trip. Also, on Facebook on the Bird Diva page, and some on
Vermont Birding.

Cheers!
Bridget

*Bridget Butler*

*Bird Diva Consulting*
*PO Box 613*
*St. Albans VT 05478*
*(802) 393-4147*
*New** Website! www.birddiva.com *
*Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva *
*Twitter:  AT BirdDiva *
*Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT *
Subject: Broad-winged Hawk??
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 05:25:48 -0500
Yesterday two of us stood on the little stone steps looking at the feeder area 
at the Birds of Vermont Museum (after a lovely but pretty much bird-free walk 
at the Audubon Center). There was lots of activity at the feeders. From the 
woods, we heard a repeated piercing whistle, maybe a half dozen times over ten 
minutes. It sounded exactly like a Broad-winged Hawk. Any possibility one might 
be hanging around? 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Northern Shrike @ Shelburne Bay
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 15:38:51 +0000
Hi Isis,


You know, I went there two mornings when we visited there, and never saw the 
shrike. I never got around to posting anything else while we were in VT, but I 
did have one sad looking Snow Bunting clinging for dear life on that big rock 
at the water's edge near the parking lot at S.B. in that windstorm last Friday 
morning. 



Wish I had gotten to meet more of you birders in VT. Tom Berriman and his 
friend were terrific to bird Wenlock in the NEK with, but I have the feeling 
that there are a lot of great people around your state. Yet another reason to 
want to move to VT. 



And the birds... They looked super the week before we got there, and then as 
soon as we leave (without almost any notables), you all get Tufted Duck, 2 more 
Snowys, Pine Grosbeak, more shrikes... Great deal there! 



I am still clinging to the VT listserv, living all of your good birding luck 
vicariously from Western Pennsylvania :) 



Take care,


Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA - wvwarblers AT hotmail.com


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Isis Erb 
 

Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2016 3:39 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Northern Shrike  AT  Shelburne Bay

Hi All -

For anyone interested the Northern Shrike is currently hunting the field
just west of the Shelburne Bay parking lot. It's been bouncing between
treetops, the large bush just north of the groups of pines, and the ground.

Good luck if you try for it!

Isis Erb
--
Isis Erb Jericho, VT Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious
spelling errors.
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawk??
From: Mike Resch <0000012cec6153db-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 06:37:26 -0500
Maeve -
 
I've heard Blue Jays give almost perfect Broad-wing imitations. They are 
typically known for their Red-shouldered Hawk imitations, but are good mimics 
of other calls too. So although a late Broad-wing is a possibility, did you 
rule out a Blue Jay imitator? 

 
Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Maeve Kim 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Sat, Nov 19, 2016 5:25 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk??

Yesterday two of us stood on the little stone steps looking at the feeder area 
at the Birds of Vermont Museum (after a lovely but pretty much bird-free walk 
at the Audubon Center). There was lots of activity at the feeders. From the 
woods, we heard a repeated piercing whistle, maybe a half dozen times over ten 
minutes. It sounded exactly like a Broad-winged Hawk. Any possibility one might 
be hanging around? 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawk??
From: Richard Harlow <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 07:58:09 -0500
Interesting that Maeve should comment on a Broad-winged Hawk. I watched 
a (what i thought was a Broad-winged Hawk) flying steadily upward in 
elevation, BUT moving north. Didn't make sense to me at the time. They 
shouldn't be here now. It had adult tail, breast and wing markings, but, 
hell I'm 80 and could be seeing things, so I put it down as an 
unidentified hawk species.
It would be nice to have at least a third person to verify this hawk.

Dick Harlow
Middlebury, VT



On 11/19/16 05:25, Maeve Kim wrote:
> Yesterday two of us stood on the little stone steps looking at the feeder 
area at the Birds of Vermont Museum (after a lovely but pretty much bird-free 
walk at the Audubon Center). There was lots of activity at the feeders. From 
the woods, we heard a repeated piercing whistle, maybe a half dozen times over 
ten minutes. It sounded exactly like a Broad-winged Hawk. Any possibility one 
might be hanging around? 

>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawk??
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 08:06:11 -0500
I agree with  possible Blue Jay imitating Broadwing.  Sometimes I've noticed 
although the jays get the pitch perfect, they tend to rush the tempo.  They 
might sing shorter notes (i.e. holding for 2 whole notes vs. 3 or 4) with 
quicker repetitions (shorter rests between calls).

I remember a discussion last year about whether or not Blue Jays do these 
imitations after Broadwings migrate and several people responded that 
they've heard jays imitate the hawks "out of season."

Ali
Huntington

-----Original Message----- 
From: Maeve Kim
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 5:25 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk??

Yesterday two of us stood on the little stone steps looking at the feeder 
area at the Birds of Vermont Museum (after a lovely but pretty much 
bird-free walk at the Audubon Center). There was lots of activity at the 
feeders. From the woods, we heard a repeated piercing whistle, maybe a half 
dozen times over ten minutes. It sounded exactly like a Broad-winged Hawk. 
Any possibility one might be hanging around?

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center 
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawk??
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 07:57:11 -0500
Blue jays here do note-perfect Broadwings! (and Cardinals) : )Veer,
Passumpsic

On November 19, 2016 at 6:37 AM, "Mike Resch"  wrote:Maeve -
I've heard Blue Jays give almost perfect Broad-wing imitations. They
are typically known for their Red-shouldered Hawk imitations, but are
good mimics of other calls too.  So although a late Broad-wing is a
possibility, did you rule out a Blue Jay imitator?
Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA
-----Original Message-----
From: Maeve Kim 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Sat, Nov 19, 2016 5:25 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk??

Yesterday two of us stood on the little stone steps looking at the
feeder area at the Birds of Vermont Museum (after a lovely but pretty
much bird-free walk at the Audubon Center). There was lots of activity
at the feeders. From the woods, we heard a repeated piercing whistle,
maybe a half dozen times over ten minutes. It sounded exactly like a
Broad-winged Hawk. Any possibility one might be hanging around? 

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawk??
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 08:09:02 -0500
I have had Blue Jays who have perfected their Broad-winged Hawk whistle. When I 
used to have Red-shouldered Hawks, they had their cry down too. They dont do 
it anymore since those birds left because of habitat destruction. Evergreen in 
Jericho 

Subject: Re: Northern Shrike @ Shelburne Bay
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 15:42:07 +0000
Sorry, all, for that personal email, though I do mean the sentiment for 
everyone who advised us, met us, and otherwise inspired. 



Your listserv works differently from PA and WV, where we can automatically 
respond to the sender, rather than the whole list. I remembered that as soon as 
I clicked 'send'. 



Cheers with all of the terrific birding up there...that, and the snow :)

Ryan - Pennsylvania


________________________________
________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Isis Erb 
 

Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2016 3:39 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Northern Shrike  AT  Shelburne Bay

Hi All -

For anyone interested the Northern Shrike is currently hunting the field
just west of the Shelburne Bay parking lot. It's been bouncing between
treetops, the large bush just north of the groups of pines, and the ground.

Good luck if you try for it!

Isis Erb
--
Isis Erb Jericho, VT Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious
spelling errors.
Subject: Northern Shrike - Rockingham 11/18
From: "James P. Smith" <000001765e12ba34-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 21:58:53 +0000
Greetings birders,
Yesterday, Laura Gaudette, JoAnne Russo and I came across an immature Northern 
Shrike on Hartley Hill Road in Rockingham. An Evening Grosbeak was also heard 
and seen at the same spot with another Evening Grosbeak higher up the same 
road. Good numbers of Evening Grosbeaks are currently being seen in neighboring 
Franklin Co., MA and will be worth watching out for in southern Vermont.  

A few pics of yesterday's can be seen at this link, including a dark mantled 
American Robin with unusually white wing coverts creating a nice white bar on 
the folded 
wing;http://pioneerbirding.blogspot.com/2016/11/mavt-evening-grosbeaks-keep-coming.html 



Good birding,

James

James P. Smith Gill, MA http://pioneerbirding.blogspot.com/
Subject: Snow Buntings
From: Michael Blust <blustm AT GREENMTN.EDU>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 17:19:24 -0500
Flock of about 40  snow buntings along fields of Ghost Hollow Road, West
Haven. Near junction with Cogman Road.


*Michael H. Blust*
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Mexico
Prof. Emer. Green Mountain College
Subject: Blue Jays and Broad-winged Hawk noise
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 18:47:00 -0500
Thanks to everyone who wrote with suggestions and info after I posted that Id 
heard what sounded like a BWHA in Huntington yesterday. I had checked eBird and 
knew that it was highly unlikely at this date, but I wondered if a bird that 
was injured or old might stick around rather than migrating. - The consensus is 
that the noise was probably being made by a Blue Jay (and there were plenty of 
them around). 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center