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Updated on Sunday, June 26 at 07:14 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Bubo

26 Jun Tent Caterpillars & Birds [Bridget Butler ]
26 Jun Peregrine Falcons [b flewelling ]
26 Jun Re: - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016 [Ruth ]
26 Jun Re: Finding Vermont’s enigmatic Long-eared Owl -- [Ruth ]
25 Jun Re: Shrike? [Stephen Nissenbaum ]
25 Jun Re: Eagles at Sand Bar State Park [Jane Stein ]
25 Jun Eagles at Sand Bar State Park [Becky Giroux ]
25 Jun Merlin revisited [JJ Allen ]
25 Jun Button Bay State Park, Jun 25, 2016 [Sue ]
25 Jun Re: Least Bittern ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
24 Jun PS re Least Bittern [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jun Least Bittern [Maeve Kim ]
24 Jun Finding Vermont’s enigmatic Long-eared Owl -- ["Ian A. Worley" ]
24 Jun Merlin [JJ Allen ]
24 Jun Fwd: eBird Report - Goshen, Jun 23, 2016 [Sue ]
23 Jun Re: Am Kestrel question [Jane Stein ]
23 Jun Am Kestrel question [Mundi Smithers ]
23 Jun Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), Jun 23, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
22 Jun Shrike? [Jane Stein ]
22 Jun Roy Mountain WMA [Chris Rimmer ]
22 Jun Bobolinks Union St Brandon, Jun 22, 2016 [Sue ]
21 Jun Grasshopper Sparrow-Addison [Stacy Robinson ]
21 Jun - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
20 Jun Update [Sue ]
20 Jun book [Jean Arrowsmith ]
20 Jun Re: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Jun 18, 2016 ["Nancy A. Brown" ]
20 Jun Walk [Sue ]
19 Jun eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Jun 18, 2016 [Randy Schmidt ]
18 Jun Evening Gross Beaks [Chris ]
18 Jun Virginia Rail in Milton,VT [Elizabeth Alton ]
18 Jun Re: Mansfield ridgeline update - hardy survivors [Frank Boyle ]
17 Jun Mansfield ridgeline update - hardy survivors [Chris Rimmer ]
18 Jun Brown Thrasher [Ruth ]
17 Jun sora- Syndicate Rd, Brandon, Jun 17, 2016 [Sue Wetmore ]
17 Jun SW birding survey.... [Ruth ]
16 Jun hardwired for pink! [Maeve Kim ]
16 Jun YBCU in Jericho Center [Maeve Kim ]
15 Jun Clay-colored Sparrow, Westford [Tyler Pockette ]
15 Jun Ruddy Duck on Dead Creek [Eric Hynes ]
15 Jun Re: Avian birth announcements [Diane Brown ]
15 Jun Avian birth announcements [Barbara Brosnan ]
15 Jun Re: RFI on a few bird species/photo big year [Tyler Pockette ]
14 Jun Underhill Hairy Woodpeckers [edgreen3 ]
14 Jun Re: RFI on a few bird species/photo big year [Linnea Garrepy ]
14 Jun Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
14 Jun Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Jun 9, 2016 [Ruth ]
13 Jun Northeast Kingdom trip report [rstymeist Bob Stymeist Arlington ]
13 Jun RFI on a few bird species/photo big year [Tyler Pockette ]
13 Jun Grassland Bird Conservation talk [Allan Strong ]
11 Jun Re: Meadowlarks/bobolinks [Sue ]
11 Jun Meadowlarks/bobolinks [Sue ]
10 Jun Middlebury potpourri ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
10 Jun Fwd: eBird Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Jun 9, 2016 [Fred Bates ]
10 Jun Re: VTBIRD Digest - 7 Jun 2016 to 9 Jun 2016 (#2016-155) [Janet Watton ]
10 Jun Re: Birders [Evergreen Erb ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Evergreen Erb ]
9 Jun The biography of Phoebe Snetsinger [Jeannie Elias ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Sue ]
9 Jun it's a convention [Scott Sainsbury ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Roo Slagle ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Larry Clarfeld ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Scott Sainsbury ]
9 Jun inviting all birders [Maeve Kim ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Chip Darmstadt ]
9 Jun Re: Birders [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
9 Jun Cerulean, prothonotary updates? [Eugenia Cooke ]
9 Jun Birders [Patti Haynes ]
7 Jun OCAS Monthly Wildlife Walk [Ron Payne ]
7 Jun OCAS Monthly Wildlife Walk [Ron Payne ]
6 Jun Thrushes Aitken State Forest, Jun 6, 2016 [Sue ]
6 Jun Re: Colchester prairie warbler continues [Louanne Nielsen ]
6 Jun Re: Colchester prairie warbler continues [Jim Mead ]
5 Jun Re: Roy Pilcher - Super Senior [Eugenia Cooke ]
5 Jun Breeding Bird Survey Route - West Rutland [Susan Elliott ]
5 Jun Colchester prairie warbler continues [Larry Clarfeld ]
4 Jun West Rutland Marsh [Larry Levine ]

Subject: Tent Caterpillars & Birds
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 12:13:41 +0000
As I look at the browning hillsides from the forest tent caterpillar, I'm
wondering if anyone's ever done a rapid assessment of birds in those forest
patches?

Curious about how it might impact nesting/fledging birds and if there might
be an increase in cuckoos found in those areas.

I remembered this article from Northern Woodlands in 2005:
http://northernwoodlands.org/outside_story/article/of-cuckoos-and-caterpillars

Anyone have any other specific studies or observations to share?

Bridget
Subject: Peregrine Falcons
From: b flewelling <bflewelling3263 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:15:53 +0000
At least two of the Peregrine Falcon chicks have fledged at Mount Horrid.  You 
can view them practicing their flying from the RT 73 turnout on the east side 
of Brandon Gap. 

  
If you happen to see all three chicks in the air at one time, please let me 
know as I am monitoring the Peregrines for VT Audubon.   

Bruce Flewelling 
RT 73, Rochester 
Subject: Re: - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 02:32:42 +0000
Does anyone have information about the current bloom status at Eshqua? Never 
been. Would love to go. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Sue Wetmore 
<2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> 

Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:38 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016

In addition to the mass of gorgeous Showy Lady Slippers the following birds 
were found. 

The new board walk and trail access is wonderful---anyone now can enjoy this 
spectacle of nature. 

Sue Wetmore

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net>
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:19:30 AM
Subject: eBird Report - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016

Eshqua Bog, Windsor, Vermont, US
Jun 20, 2016 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
23 species

Mourning Dove  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Blue-headed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
Veery  1
Hermit Thrush  1
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
Cedar Waxwing  4     one appeared to be pulling at potential nesting material.
Ovenbird  4
Common Yellowthroat  4
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  1
White-throated Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30328308

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Finding Vermont’s enigmatic Long-eared Owl --
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 02:21:01 +0000
Thank you Ian, Ron and Tyler..... great reading and sleuthing! Ahhh now to see 
one myself! 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Ian A. Worley 
 

Sent: Friday, June 24, 2016 11:01 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Finding Vermont’s enigmatic Long-eared Owl --

Ron Payne, Tyler Pockette, and I got together three years ago and
decided to learn how to find Long-eared Owls in Vermont by intent,
instead of hoping to accidentally come upon them by chance --- basically
the only way to discover one in Vermont to date.

The first two years we found no Long-eared Owls in spite of
considerable, systematic searching. But this February we had a
breakthrough, at a previously untried habitat.  And we were on our way.

 From mid-February to mid-March we located 12 Long-eared Owls at 10
locations in five western Addison County towns.  Three more were added
during our monitoring of a nest from its defense in February to the
departure of three fledglings in June.

For the full story, go to our report on the Vermont eBird website:

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/finding-vemonts-enigmatic-long-eared-owl/

Ian

...........................................

Ian Worley
Cornwall
Subject: Re: Shrike?
From: Stephen Nissenbaum <snissenbaum AT HISTORY.UMASS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 21:37:50 -0400
By sheer coincidence, I was driving on Route 22A up through Shoreham late this 
afternoon when I got a very clear view of a shrike perched on a telephone wire 
on the eastern side of the road over open mowed ground. I got home and reported 
this to my partner (who subscribes to this list) and he pointed out this post. 
So-- for what it's worth! 


Dona Brown
Underhill



> On Jun 22, 2016, at 5:33 PM, Jane Stein > wrote: 

> 
> I swear I just had a shrike in my yard. Is this possible this time of year? 
Even more oddly, it seemed to have a pinkish blush at the top of its breast. 

> 
> The only windows of my house through which I could see this bird -- perched 
on the top of the longest upright spike of a currant bush in the middle of a 
large mowed lawn -- are the antique windows of my kitchen with their somewhat 
distorted glass, so although long and direct and only around 40 feet away, it 
wasn't a very good look. 

> 
> What drew my attention was a flash of black and white in tail and wings in 
flight like a mockingbird, but when it landed and I put the binos on it, I 
could see the short bill and the black mask through the old glass. But then 
there was that rosy blush... I tried for a moment to convince myself it was a 
bluebird, but with that mask, larger size, more elongated shape and stronger 
contrast between back and belly, it clearly was not. 

> 
> Does this make any sense at all? I live in very good shrike habitat, but I've 
never had one on my property itself, though I've seen them from time to time in 
the general area in winter. 

> 
> It flew off after about 5 minutes, but I'll certainly keep an eye open for it 
and I get a clearer look. 

> 
> Anybody have any thoughts on this, or what else it might be?
> 
> Jane
> Shoreham
Subject: Re: Eagles at Sand Bar State Park
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 20:58:56 -0400
There are few things more satisfying than being able to show someone 
their very first Bald Eagle.

I vividly remember my first, when I had to sit down suddenly in a 
snowbank and weep.   When I was growing up in the DDT era, they were 
declining so rapidly, the assumption was that they would soon be 
extinct, and I would never see one.

Jane
Shoreham




On 6/25/2016 8:42 PM, Becky Giroux wrote:
> Today a friend and I rented kayaks at the Sand Bar State Park and I went with 
no binoculars! Not the day to be without. We paddled east from the beach toward 
the Milton shore and down around the buoys I noticed something large in the 
trees lining route 2. Last month at the Helen Buckner Reserve we saw a 
porcupine in a tree and I began telling my friend that story and wondering if I 
might be seeing another porcupine in a tree. Well, today's porcupine turned out 
to be an Eagle. We watched it take off and head out into the lake, dive down 
for a fish and then headed south over route 2 and disappeared. It was the first 
sighting of an eagle for my friend and she was beside herself with excitement. 
We continued to paddle for another 5 minutes when again I noticed 2 large 
"porcupines" sitting in one tree. Turns out to be 2 eagles side by side! I 
wondered if the first eagle took the fish back to share. They took off and 
headed east into the hills of Milton while we kept! 

  o!
> ur eyes on their white tails until they out of sight. With that we turned 
around headed back to the inlet close to the beach area to see what else we 
could find. We did watch the great blue herons slowly strutting in the 
waterlilies grabbing for food. In here I saw a Belted Kingfisher diving for 
fish. On one of his dives as he was trying to come up off the water a red 
winged black bird attacked him pushing him back into the water. As he tried to 
come up again he dropped his fish dove down to grab it and the red winged once 
again attacked him but this time he managed to stay in the air and made it to a 
tree. 

> Something else I noticed were two very small what I think to be, baby ducks. 
They were floating among the lily pads close to shore all alone. They were far 
away so I couldn't see them well but I wondered why two baby ducks would be 
alone. 

> We turned in the kayaks ate some lunch and headed to Niquette Bay State Park. 
This was my first visit and what a gem of a park! For late afternoon there were 
quite a few birds singing. Our exiting find here along side the path was a nest 
of baby woodpeckers. The hole was about 25' off the ground and they were very 
vocal. Sounded like maybe 3 were in the nest. We did see a parent fly in and 
feed them. I'm not sure which woodpecker family it is. The head had a small 
patch of red on top and not a lot of white on the back. It was the size of a 
hairy so I'm thinking it was a hairy. I didn't want to wear out my welcome so 
we moved on. I plan to visit this park again and again. 

> It was a great day to be outside. I hope you all got to be out for a little 
while too. 

>
>
> Happy Birding
>
Subject: Eagles at Sand Bar State Park
From: Becky Giroux <ravenrr AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 20:42:25 -0400
Today a friend and I rented kayaks at the Sand Bar State Park and I went with 
no binoculars! Not the day to be without. We paddled east from the beach toward 
the Milton shore and down around the buoys I noticed something large in the 
trees lining route 2. Last month at the Helen Buckner Reserve we saw a 
porcupine in a tree and I began telling my friend that story and wondering if I 
might be seeing another porcupine in a tree. Well, today's porcupine turned out 
to be an Eagle. We watched it take off and head out into the lake, dive down 
for a fish and then headed south over route 2 and disappeared. It was the first 
sighting of an eagle for my friend and she was beside herself with excitement. 
We continued to paddle for another 5 minutes when again I noticed 2 large 
"porcupines" sitting in one tree. Turns out to be 2 eagles side by side! I 
wondered if the first eagle took the fish back to share. They took off and 
headed east into the hills of Milton while we kept o! 

 ur eyes on their white tails until they out of sight. With that we turned 
around headed back to the inlet close to the beach area to see what else we 
could find. We did watch the great blue herons slowly strutting in the 
waterlilies grabbing for food. In here I saw a Belted Kingfisher diving for 
fish. On one of his dives as he was trying to come up off the water a red 
winged black bird attacked him pushing him back into the water. As he tried to 
come up again he dropped his fish dove down to grab it and the red winged once 
again attacked him but this time he managed to stay in the air and made it to a 
tree. 

Something else I noticed were two very small what I think to be, baby ducks. 
They were floating among the lily pads close to shore all alone. They were far 
away so I couldn't see them well but I wondered why two baby ducks would be 
alone. 

We turned in the kayaks ate some lunch and headed to Niquette Bay State Park. 
This was my first visit and what a gem of a park! For late afternoon there were 
quite a few birds singing. Our exiting find here along side the path was a nest 
of baby woodpeckers. The hole was about 25' off the ground and they were very 
vocal. Sounded like maybe 3 were in the nest. We did see a parent fly in and 
feed them. I'm not sure which woodpecker family it is. The head had a small 
patch of red on top and not a lot of white on the back. It was the size of a 
hairy so I'm thinking it was a hairy. I didn't want to wear out my welcome so 
we moved on. I plan to visit this park again and again. 

It was a great day to be outside. I hope you all got to be out for a little 
while too. 



Happy Birding
Subject: Merlin revisited
From: JJ Allen <jjapple88 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 16:33:29 -0400
Forgot to say this was in Shelburne in the post yesterday:

Taking a walk with a friend on Harbor Road we happened on a food begging Merlin 
that was attended by an adult. 

Subject: Button Bay State Park, Jun 25, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:31:15 -0400
A beautiful morning at the state park and a nice group of birds.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: June 25, 2016 at 12:28:17 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Button Bay State Park, Jun 25, 2016
> 
> Button Bay State Park, Addison, Vermont, US
> Jun 25, 2016 7:30 AM - 10:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 36 species
> 
> Mallard  19
> Ring-billed Gull  11
> Caspian Tern  1
> Mourning Dove  2
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
> Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)  3
> Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern)  2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  3
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  2
> Tree Swallow  5
> Black-capped Chickadee  5
> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  3
> House Wren  1
> American Robin  10
> Gray Catbird  6
> Brown Thrasher  2
> Cedar Waxwing  4
> Ovenbird  2
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> Yellow Warbler  1
> Pine Warbler  1
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
> Song Sparrow  7
> Scarlet Tanager  1
> Northern Cardinal  4
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
> Red-winged Blackbird  4
> Common Grackle  3
> Baltimore Oriole  1
> American Goldfinch  2
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30384736
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Least Bittern
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 00:12:14 +0000
 I have seen several least bitterns in my life, all but one from a canoe,
three in fact (over the years) while paddling at Dead Creek.  In each case
they seemed very tame, as if they didn't regard canoes as a threat. Any
similar experiences out there?  Bruce Peterson


On 6/24/16 2:58 PM, "Maeve Kim"  wrote:

> This morning I paddled from the fishing access across the road from Sand Bar
> State Park to the mouth of the Lamoille and up the river a bit. Early in the
> paddle, I let my kayak drift into a little clear space surrounded by 
flowering 

> rush and pickerel weed and just sat there for about twenty minutes. (There
> were Marsh Wrens calling all around me, and I wanted to actually see one!) I
> was startled and delighted when a small buffy or orange-tan heron with a dark
> back flew right in front of the boat, close enough for me to see red here and
> there, a heavy yellow bill, and yellow eyes. It landed almost directly across
> the clearing from its starting point, turned its head as if looking at me 
from 

> its left eye, and then walked into the dense rushes.
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: PS re Least Bittern
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 15:21:49 -0400
I never heard any Least Bittern calls, and it was so still today I think I 
would have heard if the bittern had made any noise during the two+ hours I was 
out. (The lake was almost glassy.) I wonder if there was a nest nearby. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Least Bittern
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 14:58:29 -0400
This morning I paddled from the fishing access across the road from Sand Bar 
State Park to the mouth of the Lamoille and up the river a bit. Early in the 
paddle, I let my kayak drift into a little clear space surrounded by flowering 
rush and pickerel weed and just sat there for about twenty minutes. (There were 
Marsh Wrens calling all around me, and I wanted to actually see one!) I was 
startled and delighted when a small buffy or orange-tan heron with a dark back 
flew right in front of the boat, close enough for me to see red here and there, 
a heavy yellow bill, and yellow eyes. It landed almost directly across the 
clearing from its starting point, turned its head as if looking at me from its 
left eye, and then walked into the dense rushes. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Finding Vermont’s enigmatic Long-eared Owl --
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 11:01:27 -0400
Ron Payne, Tyler Pockette, and I got together three years ago and 
decided to learn how to find Long-eared Owls in Vermont by intent, 
instead of hoping to accidentally come upon them by chance --- basically 
the only way to discover one in Vermont to date.

The first two years we found no Long-eared Owls in spite of 
considerable, systematic searching. But this February we had a 
breakthrough, at a previously untried habitat.  And we were on our way.

 From mid-February to mid-March we located 12 Long-eared Owls at 10 
locations in five western Addison County towns.  Three more were added 
during our monitoring of a nest from its defense in February to the 
departure of three fledglings in June.

For the full story, go to our report on the Vermont eBird website:

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/finding-vemonts-enigmatic-long-eared-owl/

Ian

...........................................

Ian Worley
Cornwall
Subject: Merlin
From: JJ Allen <jjapple88 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 07:58:01 -0400
Taking a walk with a friend on Harbor Road we happened on a food begging Merlin 
that was attended by an adult. 

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Goshen, Jun 23, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 06:11:46 -0400
My grandson and I discovered yet another pair of nesting loons. 
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: June 24, 2016 at 6:10:10 AM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Goshen, Jun 23, 2016
> 
> Goshen, Addison, Vermont, US
> Jun 23, 2016 10:30 AM - 1:30 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     Kayaking on Sugar Hill Resevoir
> 7 species
> 
> Common Loon  2
> Least Flycatcher  1
> Blue-headed Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Ovenbird  2
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> Red-winged Blackbird  1
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30367046
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: Am Kestrel question
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 18:39:40 -0400
One brood only.

Jane
Shoreham


On 6/23/2016 5:55 PM, Mundi Smithers wrote:
> We’ve been enjoying the Kestrel fledgelings testing their wings and
> landing skills.  Such fun!
>
> This morning I was out in the garden and caught sight of an adult
> entering and exiting the nest box. Odd??   Do Kestrels have more than
> one brood??
>
> Thanks for your thoughts.
>
> Mundi North Pownal
>
>
> Mundi Smithers
>
>
> The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the
> hijacking of morality by religion. Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
>
Subject: Am Kestrel question
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 17:55:56 -0400
We’ve been enjoying the Kestrel fledgelings testing their wings and landing 
skills. Such fun! 


This morning I was out in the garden and caught sight of an adult entering and 
exiting the nest box. Odd?? Do Kestrels have more than one brood?? 


Thanks for your thoughts.

Mundi
North Pownal


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of 
morality by religion. 

Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
Subject: Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), Jun 23, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 21:06:12 +0000
A pair of Pied-billed Grebes were calling to each other on Lefferts Pond this 
morning. We also had a bonus moose. 

Later in the afternoon, while walking along Wildcat Road, we heard many of the 
same species plus a Black-billed Cuckoo. 



Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
Jun 23, 2016 9:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:    by kayak around perimeter of pond
38 species

Canada Goose  2
Wood Duck  17
Mallard  7
Pied-billed Grebe  2    calling in response to each other
American Bittern  1
Great Blue Heron  2
Belted Kingfisher  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
Least Flycatcher  3
Eastern Kingbird  2
Blue-headed Vireo  3
Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  1
Common Raven  2
Tree Swallow  3
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Red-breasted Nuthatch  3
Brown Creeper  2
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  2
Cedar Waxwing  6
Ovenbird  3
Northern Waterthrush  4
Common Yellowthroat  4
Northern Parula  1
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  6
White-throated Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  4
Swamp Sparrow  4
Red-winged Blackbird  11
Common Grackle  3
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30361473

Sue and Marv Elliott



Subject: Shrike?
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:33:48 -0400
I swear I just had a shrike in my yard.  Is this possible this time of 
year?  Even more oddly, it seemed to have a pinkish blush at the top of 
its breast.

The only windows of my house through which I could see this bird -- 
perched on the top of the longest upright spike of a currant bush in the 
middle of a large mowed lawn -- are the antique windows of my kitchen 
with their somewhat distorted glass, so although long and direct and 
only around 40 feet away, it wasn't a very good look.

What drew my attention was a flash of black and white in tail and wings 
in flight like a mockingbird, but when it landed and I put the binos on 
it, I could see the short bill and the black mask through the old glass. 
  But then there was that rosy blush... I tried for a moment to convince 
myself it was a bluebird, but with that mask, larger size, more 
elongated shape and stronger contrast between back and belly, it clearly 
was not.

Does this make any sense at all?  I live in very good shrike habitat, 
but I've never had one on my property itself, though I've seen them from 
time to time in the general area in winter.

It flew off after about 5 minutes, but I'll certainly keep an eye open 
for it and I get a clearer look.

Anybody have any thoughts on this, or what else it might be?

Jane
Shoreham
Subject: Roy Mountain WMA
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 14:27:56 -0400
I conducted my annual point count surveys for VCE's Vermont Forest Bird
Monitoring Program at Roy Mt. WMA yesterday. This seldom-visited, low-lying
cedar-fir swamp is a special place, if treacherous to navigate with its
many deadfalls and hummocks. It has a unique (in my experience)
constellation of breeding birds, mostly boreal species but with northern
hardwoods residents intruding along its edges.

Seven Days did a nice feature on Roy Mt. WMA a year ago:

http://www.sevendaysvt.com/vermont/off-trail-roy-mountain-wildlife-management-area/Content?oid=2804341 


Highlights:

Ruffed Grouse  1     probable female; flushed and clucked nearby for 10 mins
American Woodcock  1     probable female; flushed and feigned injury
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  1     called 2X. Never heard a bird sing, which
is very unusual, but timing may be such that females are incubating, so
males quiet
Blue-headed Vireo  1     singing
Red-eyed Vireo  2     singing
Red-breasted Nuthatch  5
Winter Wren  3     singing
Veery  3     1 singing, 2 calling
Hermit Thrush  2     singing
Northern Waterthrush  8     singing
Nashville Warbler  2
Magnolia Warbler  2     singing
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  3
Canada Warbler  6     4 singing; 1 pair carrying food and alarm calling
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  4     3 singing
White-throated Sparrow  5     4 singing
Rusty Blackbird  4     small group moved by quickly after my last point
count in the forest east of open wetland; 2 males singing
Purple Finch  4     singing

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30337653


________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Bobolinks Union St Brandon, Jun 22, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 10:10:38 -0400
Bobolinks seen both male and females . I nearly avoided the rain but alas got 
soaked. 

Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: June 22, 2016 at 9:57:17 AM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Jun 22, 2016
> 
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jun 22, 2016 8:15 AM - 9:25 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> 36 species
> 
> Wood Duck  2
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Mourning Dove  3
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Phoebe  4
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  2
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  2
> Blue Jay  2
> American Crow  1
> Common Raven  2
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
> Tree Swallow  12
> Barn Swallow  5
> Veery  1
> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  3
> Gray Catbird  1
> European Starling  6
> Ovenbird  3
> Common Yellowthroat  2
> Yellow Warbler  1
> Song Sparrow  6
> Swamp Sparrow  2
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
> Indigo Bunting  2
> Bobolink  7     male and females flying about.
> Red-winged Blackbird  10
> Common Grackle  1
> Baltimore Oriole  1     this bird was calling because of a nearby crow.
> American Goldfinch  2
> House Sparrow  2
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30341565
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Grasshopper Sparrow-Addison
From: Stacy Robinson <maplemeadows AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 11:52:42 -0400
Of interest today was a Grasshopper Sparrow on Gage Road in Addison. I heard 
the bird singing from the north side of the road just before the turn to the 
barn. The field has been recently cut so it was easy enough to find the bird 
that went with the song. An Eastern Meadowlark was also seen. 


Stacy Robinson
Port Henry, NY
Subject: - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:38:56 +0000
In addition to the mass of gorgeous Showy Lady Slippers the following birds 
were found. 

The new board walk and trail access is wonderful---anyone now can enjoy this 
spectacle of nature. 

Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:19:30 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Eshqua Bog, Jun 20, 2016 

Eshqua Bog, Windsor, Vermont, US 
Jun 20, 2016 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
23 species 

Mourning Dove  1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1 
Blue-headed Vireo  2 
Red-eyed Vireo  3 
Blue Jay  1 
American Crow  1 
Common Raven  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  1 
White-breasted Nuthatch  1 
Brown Creeper  1 
Veery  1 
Hermit Thrush  1 
Wood Thrush  1 
American Robin  2 
Cedar Waxwing  4     one appeared to be pulling at potential nesting 
material. 

Ovenbird  4 
Common Yellowthroat  4 
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1 
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  1 
White-throated Sparrow  1 
Scarlet Tanager  1 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30328308 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Update
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:35:32 -0400
The Lake St. Catherine State Park walk is Saturday July 2!
This Saturday June 25 is at Button Bay State Park.
Both start at 8:00 a.m.
Both walks are easy and suitable for beginners too.
Sorry for the confusion.

Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod
Subject: book
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 10:15:56 -0400
Does anyone want a "like new" copy of Wally Ellison's 1981 "A Guide to Bird 
Finding in Vermont? This is listed on Amazon for $3 plus handling. You can have 
it for the price of postage. Please respond off-list. 


Jean Arrowsmith
Lincoln
Subject: Re: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Jun 18, 2016
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 06:29:37 -0400
Birds and trees;  We always associate the two. But many of our woods 
warblers nest on the ground.  Black & White, both winged warblers, 
Tennessee, Nashville, Palm , Mourning, Common Yellow throat, Wilson's, 
Canada and Ovenbird     Something else to ponder, Do birds sleep.  9:45 pm 
last night as I glazed at the full moon and thousands of fire flies a 
Killdeer calls from over head and the Adler Flycatcher calls from the marsh.
From: "Randy Schmidt" 
Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2016 11:22 AM
To: 
Subject: [VTBIRD] eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Jun 18, 2016

> Perfect morning for a bird walk at Hildene here in Manchester yesterday. 
> Of note were the discovery a Black and white Warbler pair both carrying 
> food - canopy proved too dense to find the nest. Also found 2 very active 
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker nests with parents bringing food to the very loud 
> but unseen young and a possible just fledged sapsucker with parent at 
> another nest site.
>
> Most notably was the incredible Red-eyed Vireo activity we witnessed, many 
> times just above our heads or at eye-level. Seemed to be a lot of 
> territorial/nest protection going on, with a lot of calling and with some 
> views that you don't often get with these birds. Also this activity 
> occurred in virtually all areas of the property we normally cover.
>
> Of non-birding note, we discovered a small patch of Showy Lady's Slippers 
> in wetland area that we had never walked by before (added to iNaturalist). 
> Really good day.
>
> Randy Schmidt
> The Vermont Bird Place & Sky Watch
> Manchester Center, VT
>
>>
>> 41 species
>>
>> Wild Turkey  10
>> Turkey Vulture  1
>> Cooper's Hawk  1
>> Mourning Dove  1
>> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
>> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  7     Nesting hole
>> Downy Woodpecker  2
>> Northern Flicker  2
>> Pileated Woodpecker  1
>> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
>> Eastern Phoebe  3
>> Warbling Vireo  1
>> Red-eyed Vireo  13
>> Blue Jay  5
>> American Crow  5
>> Black-capped Chickadee  3
>> Tufted Titmouse  2
>> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
>> House Wren  1
>> Eastern Bluebird  1
>> Veery  1
>> Hermit Thrush  1
>> Wood Thrush  1
>> American Robin  12
>> Gray Catbird  1
>> Cedar Waxwing  8
>> Ovenbird  2
>> Black-and-white Warbler  2     Carrying food
>> Common Yellowthroat  3
>> Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
>> Black-throated Green Warbler  1
>> Chipping Sparrow  1
>> White-throated Sparrow  2
>> Song Sparrow  2
>> Scarlet Tanager  2
>> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
>> Indigo Bunting  1
>> Brown-headed Cowbird  4
>> House Finch  1
>> American Goldfinch  5
>>
>> View this checklist online at 
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30281927
>>
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>>
>
> 
Subject: Walk
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 05:46:53 -0400
This Saturday at Lake St. Catherine I will be offering a bird walk. Time 8:00 
a.m. 

Easy walk , good for beginners.

Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Jun 18, 2016
From: Randy Schmidt <randy AT THEVERMONTBIRDPLACE.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 11:22:11 -0400
Perfect morning for a bird walk at Hildene here in Manchester yesterday. Of 
note were the discovery a Black and white Warbler pair both carrying food - 
canopy proved too dense to find the nest. Also found 2 very active 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker nests with parents bringing food to the very loud but 
unseen young and a possible just fledged sapsucker with parent at another nest 
site. 


Most notably was the incredible Red-eyed Vireo activity we witnessed, many 
times just above our heads or at eye-level. Seemed to be a lot of 
territorial/nest protection going on, with a lot of calling and with some views 
that you don't often get with these birds. Also this activity occurred in 
virtually all areas of the property we normally cover. 


Of non-birding note, we discovered a small patch of Showy Lady's Slippers in 
wetland area that we had never walked by before (added to iNaturalist). Really 
good day. 


Randy Schmidt
The Vermont Bird Place & Sky Watch
Manchester Center, VT 

> 
> 41 species
> 
> Wild Turkey  10
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Mourning Dove  1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  7     Nesting hole
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Northern Flicker  2
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Eastern Phoebe  3
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  13
> Blue Jay  5
> American Crow  5
> Black-capped Chickadee  3
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> White-breasted Nuthatch  2
> House Wren  1
> Eastern Bluebird  1
> Veery  1
> Hermit Thrush  1
> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  12
> Gray Catbird  1
> Cedar Waxwing  8
> Ovenbird  2
> Black-and-white Warbler  2     Carrying food
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
> Black-throated Green Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  1
> White-throated Sparrow  2
> Song Sparrow  2
> Scarlet Tanager  2
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
> Indigo Bunting  1
> Brown-headed Cowbird  4
> House Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  5
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30281927
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
> 
Subject: Evening Gross Beaks
From: Chris <starkmtn AT MADRIVER.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:11:16 -0400
We've had a bunch of Rose Breasted Gross Beaks here in Starksboro for many
weeks now enjoying the bear proof (so far) sunflower feeder.  This after
noon we were enjoying the company of a pair of Evening Gross Beaks at the
feeder.  I can't recall ever seeing them here this time of year.
Delightful!

 

Chris Child

 
Subject: Virginia Rail in Milton,VT
From: Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 14:33:49 -0400
As I was headed home from a great Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring walk this
AM, I turned onto Hardscrabble Rd in Milton, headed home. As I rounded the
corner, there was an adult Virginia Rail with one fluffy black ball of
feathers flowing her, trying to cross the street. They flushed back into
the weeds. They were coming out of the swath of cattails growing by the
edge of the road which had just recently been destroyed by someone with
large equipment. As I sat quietly in my Prius, watching, she tried twice
more to cross but was flushed back into the weeds each time by passing cars
and bicycles. Finally, the road was quiet. She inched out and strutted
across the road, this time alone. I waited a long time, heard some little
peeps, but never saw the hatchling cross. Hopefully they will get safely
reunited on the other side.... I would never have thought that such a small
patch of cattails could hold such wonders!

Liz, Milton, VT

-- 
Liz Alton:
"Keep a green tree in your heart; perhaps a singing bird will come."
Subject: Re: Mansfield ridgeline update - hardy survivors
From: Frank Boyle <ravenfrank AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 05:11:29 -0400
Chris, I absolutely love your reports! As an expatriate Vermont birder now 
living in the hills of Western Maryland, they take me back to my solo hikes on 
Mansfield from years ago. 


Can't help but wonder if some of the BITH we had moving through here this 
spring are now nesting there on the mountain. 


Good birding my Vermont friends,

Frank

Frank Boyle
Broken Wallet Farm
Rohrersville, MD
(And Burlington, VT)


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2016, at 10:55 PM, Chris Rimmer  wrote:
> 
> After a stretch during which Mansfield's weather was fit for neither bird
> or beast (humans anyway), VCE returned to our long-term study site after a
> 2-week hiatus. Last week's field trip was scuttled by the polar express
> that saw wind chills of 14F on the ridgeline.
> 
> Brendan Collins, Steve Faccio, Susan Hindinger and I arrived on the
> ridgeline in early evening on Tuesday to mostly clear skies, but a brisk
> northwest wind. Other than American Robins, of which 4 were singing
> robustly within earshot of the parking lot, we heard few birds. We fanned
> out and set 27 nets, mainly on the mherst, Long and Lakeview trails. Our
> first capture was a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, second a Swainson’s Thush.
> Although we were treated to a spectacular sunset, with the Nose positively
> glowing, the dusk chorus was subdued. I don’t think I’ve ever heard so 
few 

> Bicknell’s Thrush (BITH) singing and calling on Mansfield in mid-June. Even
> the White-throats were muted. A few BITH let loose with brief flight songs
> as darkness fell, but with far less intensity than 2 weeks ago.
> 
> 
> 
> The wind dropped overnight, and we were back on the ridgeline shortly after
> 4 am to open nets. The dawn chorus continued evening’s uninspired trend,
> with robins again providing a notable exception. This weak vocalizing may
> have been partly an artifact of timing, as early-nesting robins are likely
> tending nestlings, while other species are still incubating, or even
> building (we caught one female Swainson’s Thrush with nesting material in
> the net).
> 
> 
> 
> An early morning surprise was the recapture of a feisty male Sharp-shinned
> Hawk, a bird that we banded in 2013 and have now caught in each year since.
> It’s interesting that this individual has been prowling the ridgeline for
> at least 4 consecutive summers (one wonders how many BITH he’s fed to
> nestlings - we recovered a female BITH’s radio transmitter in a Sharpie
> nest in Underhill several years ago). Further, of the 7 Sharpies we’ve
> netted in mountaintop forests over the years, all have been male. No
> wonder, considering the advantage of smaller size when navigating at high
> speeds through the krummhloz!
> 
> 
> 
> Despite the ridgeline’s seemingly low vocal activity, by morning’s end we
> had 53 total captures (including a dozen the previous evening), of which 41
> were new bandings or returns from previous years, and 12 recaptures of
> birds banded earlier this season:
> 
> 
> 
> Sharp-shinned Hawk  1     male banded in 2013, captured every year since
> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  2     neither bird in obvious breeding condition
> Bicknell's Thrush  6     2 new, 4 returns (2 females with full incubation
> patches)
> Swainson's Thrush  4     3 new, one male banded in 2015
> Hermit Thrush  1     yearling female with regressing brood patch, probably
> a failed breeder
> Black-and-white Warbler  1     female w/regressing brood patch, probably
> another dispersing failed breeder
> Magnolia Warbler  1     male
> Blackpoll Warbler  8     7 new; one male return originally banded in 2009,
> so at least 8 years old (possibly our oldest bird on record)
> Dark-eyed Junco  3     all new bandings
> White-throated Sparrow  9     5 new, 4 birds banded in previous years
> Purple Finch  4     all new birds (2 yearling m   78u ales, 1 older male, 1
> female)
> Pine Siskin  1     free-flying juvenile
> 
> We couldn’t help wondering if last week’s harsh weather caused some
> mortality, either of adult birds or nests, leading to the reduced vocal
> chorus. However, we found no direct evidence for this. The female Blackpoll
> Warbler that had nearly completed building her nest on June 1 was now
> incubating 4 eggs, and the persistently singing male robins almost
> certainly had active nests. Most netted females of all species showed
> well-developed incubation or brood patches. So, despite several days of
> severe weather that must have stressed energy budgets and diminished
> feeding opportunities, it seems most everyone survived. Living in
> mountaintop forests is not for the avian faint of heart.
> 
> ________________________
> 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x1
> http://vtecostudies.org/
> 
> 
Subject: Mansfield ridgeline update - hardy survivors
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:55:02 -0400
After a stretch during which Mansfield's weather was fit for neither bird
or beast (humans anyway), VCE returned to our long-term study site after a
2-week hiatus. Last week's field trip was scuttled by the polar express
that saw wind chills of 14F on the ridgeline.

Brendan Collins, Steve Faccio, Susan Hindinger and I arrived on the
ridgeline in early evening on Tuesday to mostly clear skies, but a brisk
northwest wind. Other than American Robins, of which 4 were singing
robustly within earshot of the parking lot, we heard few birds. We fanned
out and set 27 nets, mainly on the mherst, Long and Lakeview trails. Our
first capture was a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, second a Swainson’s Thush.
Although we were treated to a spectacular sunset, with the Nose positively
glowing, the dusk chorus was subdued. I don’t think I’ve ever heard so few
Bicknell’s Thrush (BITH) singing and calling on Mansfield in mid-June. Even
the White-throats were muted. A few BITH let loose with brief flight songs
as darkness fell, but with far less intensity than 2 weeks ago.



The wind dropped overnight, and we were back on the ridgeline shortly after
4 am to open nets. The dawn chorus continued evening’s uninspired trend,
with robins again providing a notable exception. This weak vocalizing may
have been partly an artifact of timing, as early-nesting robins are likely
tending nestlings, while other species are still incubating, or even
building (we caught one female Swainson’s Thrush with nesting material in
the net).



An early morning surprise was the recapture of a feisty male Sharp-shinned
Hawk, a bird that we banded in 2013 and have now caught in each year since.
It’s interesting that this individual has been prowling the ridgeline for
at least 4 consecutive summers (one wonders how many BITH he’s fed to
nestlings - we recovered a female BITH’s radio transmitter in a Sharpie
nest in Underhill several years ago). Further, of the 7 Sharpies we’ve
netted in mountaintop forests over the years, all have been male. No
wonder, considering the advantage of smaller size when navigating at high
speeds through the krummhloz!



Despite the ridgeline’s seemingly low vocal activity, by morning’s end we
had 53 total captures (including a dozen the previous evening), of which 41
were new bandings or returns from previous years, and 12 recaptures of
birds banded earlier this season:



Sharp-shinned Hawk  1     male banded in 2013, captured every year since
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  2     neither bird in obvious breeding condition
Bicknell's Thrush  6     2 new, 4 returns (2 females with full incubation
patches)
Swainson's Thrush  4     3 new, one male banded in 2015
Hermit Thrush  1     yearling female with regressing brood patch, probably
a failed breeder
Black-and-white Warbler  1     female w/regressing brood patch, probably
another dispersing failed breeder
Magnolia Warbler  1     male
Blackpoll Warbler  8     7 new; one male return originally banded in 2009,
so at least 8 years old (possibly our oldest bird on record)
Dark-eyed Junco  3     all new bandings
White-throated Sparrow  9     5 new, 4 birds banded in previous years
Purple Finch  4     all new birds (2 yearling m   78u ales, 1 older male, 1
female)
Pine Siskin  1     free-flying juvenile

We couldn’t help wondering if last week’s harsh weather caused some
mortality, either of adult birds or nests, leading to the reduced vocal
chorus. However, we found no direct evidence for this. The female Blackpoll
Warbler that had nearly completed building her nest on June 1 was now
incubating 4 eggs, and the persistently singing male robins almost
certainly had active nests. Most netted females of all species showed
well-developed incubation or brood patches. So, despite several days of
severe weather that must have stressed energy budgets and diminished
feeding opportunities, it seems most everyone survived. Living in
mountaintop forests is not for the avian faint of heart.

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Brown Thrasher
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 01:58:39 +0000
Delighted to be entertaining a Brown Thrasher in the yard all day. Been a long 
time since the last one visited. 

Not so delighted that the Red-winged Blackbirds have discovered the yard feeder 
(only sunflower seeds). Each day the word spreads! 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Friday, June 17, 2016 9:48 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, Jun 17, 2016

My yard birds, Bennington, Vermont, US
Jun 17, 2016 7:45 AM - 8:15 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     66degrees, sunny.
16 species

Mourning Dove  6
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  3     vocalizing yg
House Wren  2
Gray Catbird  2
Brown Thrasher  1     Surprise yard visitor. About all day.
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Red-winged Blackbird  7
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  5
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30274246

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: sora- Syndicate Rd, Brandon, Jun 17, 2016
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 17:59:46 +0000
Deer flies make birding here currently a little annoying. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: "2birdvt" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> 
Sent: Friday, June 17, 2016 1:40:06 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Syndicate Rd, Brandon, Jun 17, 2016 

Syndicate Rd, Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jun 17, 2016 7:30 AM - 9:30 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
3.0 mile(s) 
34 species 

Wood Duck  3 
Sora  1 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1 
Pileated Woodpecker  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1 
Least Flycatcher  4 
Eastern Kingbird  3 
Yellow-throated Vireo  1 
Warbling Vireo  5 
Red-eyed Vireo  4 
American Crow  3 
Common Raven  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  1 
Tufted Titmouse  2 
Veery  5 
Hermit Thrush  2 
American Robin  3 
Gray Catbird  9     pair with food agitated. 
European Starling  2 
Cedar Waxwing  4 
Ovenbird  3 
Common Yellowthroat  8 
American Redstart  1 
Yellow Warbler  3 
Song Sparrow  7 
Northern Cardinal  1 
Bobolink  4 
Red-winged Blackbird  7 
Eastern Meadowlark  1 
Common Grackle  8 
American Goldfinch  4 

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30268517 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: SW birding survey....
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 02:49:00 +0000
Join us here in the VT banana belt for our monthly 7 am. bird walk at Hildene, 
the Lincoln Family Home in Manchester, VT. Sat, June 18. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: hardwired for pink!
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 13:19:20 -0400
I was just out doing yard work and was startled when a male Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird stopped and danced in mid-air about a foot from my waist. Then I 
realized that he was enjoying my brand-new hot pink gardening gloves! 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: YBCU in Jericho Center
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 11:37:30 -0400
… crossing Browns Trace just south of the village, heading for a wooded area 
with a little stream 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow, Westford
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 22:26:29 -0400
I was able to add species #214 for my photo year yesterday thanks to Martha
McClintock who reported a Clay-colored Sparrow to ebird in Westford. The
bird was still present where she found it near a young Christmas tree farm
at the North end of Old Stage Road. It was singing for her, and was singing
today for a few other observers according to ebird reports. It wasn't
singing yesterday afternoon though when I arrived but I was lucky enough to
have the bird feeding in the road when I drove up to the location. It flew
off low to the West side of the road and dropped into the tall grass in the
meadow to the North of the tree farm. I watched and waited for several
minutes and began to fear I had spooked the bird for good without getting
my photo. I tried a little pishing and began to see the grass twitching
about 30 yards ahead of me where the bird had disappeared. The twitching
blades of grass slowly crept in my direction (kind of like that scene with
the Velociraptors in Jurassic Park: The Lost World), so I crawled on my
hands and knees through the tall grass and took cover behind a low shrub
(more like a clump of weeds, actually). The vegetation shakin' moved
towards me further as I continued some light pishing. The suspense must
have been equally unbearable for the mystery bird because he hopped up out
of his cover and perched atop a small stump for all of 3 seconds, revealing
himself to be my target bird, and perched just long enough for me to fire
off a few quick photos before his curiosity was quenched and he dove back
into his sea of green. He never did vocalize for me, but it was quite warm
at that time of day with direct sunlight and bird activity as a whole was
very low.

A link to my photo of the Clay-colored Sparrow, as well as the rest of my
photos from my photo big year:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/27088647583/

I'd like to extend a big thank you to all of those who responded to my last
message with advice on where to find some of my remaining bird species, and
again a HUGE thank you to all of those who have pledged so far.

Thanks everyone! Keep finding good birds :)

Tyler Pockette
Subject: Ruddy Duck on Dead Creek
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:35:02 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

I canoed this afternoon (hot) from Farrell Access to Route 17 on Dead Creek
in Addison and enjoyed being on the water despite the midday lull.

The surprise of the paddle was a drake Ruddy Duck. He was diving along the
west bank about half way between Farrell Access and Rt. 17.

Next "best" bird was a calling Common Gallinule in the cattails opposite
the pullout at Rt. 17.

Hear is the complete list:

http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/view/checklist/S30248144

Good birding,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Re: Avian birth announcements
From: Diane Brown <deejbrown AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 15:32:55 -0400
Thank you for this beautifully written summary of your discoveries during
your forced confinement. Hope you are healing well and in the meantime,
please keep these coming to those of us in our own kind of confinement!

Diane Brown
Middlebury


On Wednesday, June 15, 2016, Barbara Brosnan  wrote:

> Recent foot surgery has confined me to a Big Sit of sorts on my back deck.
> Here is my report.
>
>
>
> I am not certain if it is proper to issue birth announcements upon evidence
> of nestlings emerging from their eggs or if one should wait for fledglings
> flying or falling from nests.  In any case, two juvenile Ospreys are flying
> over and calling, an RT Hummingbird is slicing "U"s in the air in front of
> his feeder as I write this, a Baltimore Oriole pair is feeding young in the
> willow tree, E. Phoebes are feeding young in their nest on the thwart of my
> upturned canoe in the back of our garage, Am Robins are feeding and calling
> to nestlings in the hedgerow, and YB Sapsuckers are drilling into a large
> branch in the top story of the willow and flying off to a probable nest in
> the honey locusts.  Ravens fledged noisily about a month ago from the woods
> but N Cardinals, the Grey Catbird, the Common Yellowthroats, Chipping
> Sparrows and even the YS Flickers have gone silent in the hedgerow and
> woods.  Also no recent reports from the Great Horned Owls. Song Sparrows
> are
> busily scrambling for food for young in the hedgerow, and tree Swallows and
> House Sparrows are already on their second broods in the bluebird houses.
> WB Nuthatches are chasing young, one of which flew into our wood shed and
> landed on the chopping block.  Kingfishers have been hunting fish and
> bullfrogs at our pond, perhaps feeding young in a nest on an Otter Creek
> riverbank across the road.  If I am sounding a bit proprietary or maternal,
> please excuse me..but.. there might just be a few folks reading this who
> have felt a bit like parents themselves while watching a Robin spreading
> her
> wings to keep a rainstorm off her nestlings or, as the couple who mow our
> lawn told us, stopped using a tractor to allow a phoebe to finish nesting
> atop the tractor seat.
>
>
>
> Good birding, all, and I'll go back to observing our avian nursery.
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
>
Subject: Avian birth announcements
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 14:34:31 -0400
Recent foot surgery has confined me to a Big Sit of sorts on my back deck.
Here is my report.

 

I am not certain if it is proper to issue birth announcements upon evidence
of nestlings emerging from their eggs or if one should wait for fledglings
flying or falling from nests.  In any case, two juvenile Ospreys are flying
over and calling, an RT Hummingbird is slicing "U"s in the air in front of
his feeder as I write this, a Baltimore Oriole pair is feeding young in the
willow tree, E. Phoebes are feeding young in their nest on the thwart of my
upturned canoe in the back of our garage, Am Robins are feeding and calling
to nestlings in the hedgerow, and YB Sapsuckers are drilling into a large
branch in the top story of the willow and flying off to a probable nest in
the honey locusts.  Ravens fledged noisily about a month ago from the woods
but N Cardinals, the Grey Catbird, the Common Yellowthroats, Chipping
Sparrows and even the YS Flickers have gone silent in the hedgerow and
woods.  Also no recent reports from the Great Horned Owls. Song Sparrows are
busily scrambling for food for young in the hedgerow, and tree Swallows and
House Sparrows are already on their second broods in the bluebird houses.
WB Nuthatches are chasing young, one of which flew into our wood shed and
landed on the chopping block.  Kingfishers have been hunting fish and
bullfrogs at our pond, perhaps feeding young in a nest on an Otter Creek
riverbank across the road.  If I am sounding a bit proprietary or maternal,
please excuse me..but.. there might just be a few folks reading this who
have felt a bit like parents themselves while watching a Robin spreading her
wings to keep a rainstorm off her nestlings or, as the couple who mow our
lawn told us, stopped using a tractor to allow a phoebe to finish nesting
atop the tractor seat.

 

Good birding, all, and I'll go back to observing our avian nursery.

 

Barbara Brosnan

Weybridge
Subject: Re: RFI on a few bird species/photo big year
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 07:37:07 -0400
Thank you, Lin :) Its very much appreciated! Id love to bird together if
you're around sometime. I still have several species I need so I think Ill
be busy all year!

-Tyler
On Jun 14, 2016 7:31 PM, "Linnea Garrepy"  wrote:

> Tyler,
>
> You don't have to do any hiking on Mt Mansfield to get the Bicknell's
> Thrush. Drive up, walk around and one will appear on the top of some fir
> tree. Always works for me.
>
>
> Please put me down for $0.25 per bird. It's a worthy project.
>
>
> Maybe on one of my trips to VT, a week next May and and June, I can meet
> you. You could show me your favorite haunts. I'm always looking for new
> places. In the meantime,carry on!
>
>
> Regards,
>
>    Lin Garrepy
>
>    607 Crawford Ave
>
>    Syracuse, NY 13224
>
>    802-236-5449
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Tyler Pockette <
> tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
> Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2016 12:39:57 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] RFI on a few bird species/photo big year
>
> Hi all!
>
> I'm turning to you all as a valued source of information in hopes of
> gaining some advice on finding a few species that I'm struggling to locate
> on my own for my VT photo big year. As the breeding season moves onward,
> the pressures to nail my last few local breeding species grow, especially
> when trying to balance my time birding with a 45 hour work week and other
> personal obligations. I'm currently at 213 species and I have been stalled
> there for over a week. I haven't added a new species since a trip to the
> Northeast Kingdom last Friday (link to my photo big year photos:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/). By my count, I can get up
> to
> 222 species if I get all of the species which breed in the state, and then
> maybe 20 more when fall migration comes. Some species, like Bicknell's
> Thrush, I still need but I just haven't put in the effort to hike for one
> yet. Although if anyone knows of any locations that are accessible by
> vehicle or a relatively short hike, I'd be happy to hear about them.
>
> Anyway, here are the species I would greatly appreciate some help with!
> Thank you!
>
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo
>
> Red-shouldered Hawk
>
> Northern Goshawk
>
> Clay-colored Sparrow
>
> Sandhill Crane (I've tried Bristol Pond, but no luck. Perhaps they're busy
> on the nest?)
>
> Cattle Egret (has anyone seen them at Shelburne Farms lately?)
>
>
> For those who missed my previous post a few weeks back, I am doing a photo
> big year as a fundraiser to send a student or teacher to Hog Island Audubon
> camp in Maine next year. Rather than retype it all, here is a copy/paste of
> my previous post:
>
>
> I've been on a bit of a photography binge for the last few months. Some of
> you already know, but I'd like to make an announcement to the VTBIRDers
> about a year long fundraiser I'm doing to raise money for an Otter Creek
> Audubon grant to send a student or teacher to the Hog Island Audubon summer
> camp in Maine where they will gain an education in bird conservation and
> identification. I'm in the midst of a photographic big year of Vermont,
> attempting to photograph as many species of birds as I can until December
> 31st. Similar to the way the annual bird-a-thon fundraisers work, I am
> taking pledges that can either be in the form of one lump sum, or pledged
> per species. For instance, Tammy Tanager could pledge $20 or she could
> choose to pledge $0.20 per species. 100% of the money raised goes directly
> towards this cause.
> This is my personal way of paying it forward, as Otter Creek Audubon
> awarded me a similar grant 12 years ago that allowed me to attend an
> Audubon camp in the Northeast Kingdom that I would have otherwise not been
> able to afford. It's a great cause, and past recipients of the grant have
> gone on to do great things in bird education and conservation. For example,
> myself and Carol Ramsayer of Otter Creek Audubon have been spending time
> with the Salisbury Elementary School science classes led my Amy Clapp, a
> past recipient to attend the Hog Island camp. She is teaching all of her
> classes (K-6) bird identification and about bird migration, culminating in
> a bird-a-thon finale where each student is raising money by doing their own
> birding big days! Sending one person to Audubon camp is making lifetime
> birders out of an entire school of kids, and this is a course that is being
> done year after year at Salisbury. If that isn't a great cause, I don't
> know what is!
>
> If you would like to help out with a pledge, or if you have some good
> advice to find a species that I don't have yet, please email me at
> tylerpockette4 AT gmail.com. Every bit helps! Also, please feel free to share
> this with anyone you know who might be interested in pledging!
>
> You can follow along at my Flickr page that I've created specifically for
> my photo big year: https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/
>
> Thank you all so much! I hope this wasn't too off topic and long-winded!
>
> Lastly, I'd like to wish everyone who has contributed so far a HUGE thank
> you!!!
>
> See you out there!
> -Tyler Pockette
>
Subject: Underhill Hairy Woodpeckers
From: edgreen3 <edgreen3 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 21:01:15 -0400
Enjoying a new family nesting in a hole in an old tree in our yard.  Main 
reason to keep trees like this standing. 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S®6 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: RFI on a few bird species/photo big year
From: Linnea Garrepy <mwtic AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 23:31:16 +0000
Tyler,

You don't have to do any hiking on Mt Mansfield to get the Bicknell's Thrush. 
Drive up, walk around and one will appear on the top of some fir tree. Always 
works for me. 



Please put me down for $0.25 per bird. It's a worthy project.


Maybe on one of my trips to VT, a week next May and and June, I can meet you. 
You could show me your favorite haunts. I'm always looking for new places. In 
the meantime,carry on! 



Regards,

   Lin Garrepy

   607 Crawford Ave

   Syracuse, NY 13224

   802-236-5449

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Tyler Pockette 
 

Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2016 12:39:57 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] RFI on a few bird species/photo big year

Hi all!

I'm turning to you all as a valued source of information in hopes of
gaining some advice on finding a few species that I'm struggling to locate
on my own for my VT photo big year. As the breeding season moves onward,
the pressures to nail my last few local breeding species grow, especially
when trying to balance my time birding with a 45 hour work week and other
personal obligations. I'm currently at 213 species and I have been stalled
there for over a week. I haven't added a new species since a trip to the
Northeast Kingdom last Friday (link to my photo big year photos:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/). By my count, I can get up to
222 species if I get all of the species which breed in the state, and then
maybe 20 more when fall migration comes. Some species, like Bicknell's
Thrush, I still need but I just haven't put in the effort to hike for one
yet. Although if anyone knows of any locations that are accessible by
vehicle or a relatively short hike, I'd be happy to hear about them.

Anyway, here are the species I would greatly appreciate some help with!
Thank you!

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Red-shouldered Hawk

Northern Goshawk

Clay-colored Sparrow

Sandhill Crane (I've tried Bristol Pond, but no luck. Perhaps they're busy
on the nest?)

Cattle Egret (has anyone seen them at Shelburne Farms lately?)


For those who missed my previous post a few weeks back, I am doing a photo
big year as a fundraiser to send a student or teacher to Hog Island Audubon
camp in Maine next year. Rather than retype it all, here is a copy/paste of
my previous post:


I've been on a bit of a photography binge for the last few months. Some of
you already know, but I'd like to make an announcement to the VTBIRDers
about a year long fundraiser I'm doing to raise money for an Otter Creek
Audubon grant to send a student or teacher to the Hog Island Audubon summer
camp in Maine where they will gain an education in bird conservation and
identification. I'm in the midst of a photographic big year of Vermont,
attempting to photograph as many species of birds as I can until December
31st. Similar to the way the annual bird-a-thon fundraisers work, I am
taking pledges that can either be in the form of one lump sum, or pledged
per species. For instance, Tammy Tanager could pledge $20 or she could
choose to pledge $0.20 per species. 100% of the money raised goes directly
towards this cause.
This is my personal way of paying it forward, as Otter Creek Audubon
awarded me a similar grant 12 years ago that allowed me to attend an
Audubon camp in the Northeast Kingdom that I would have otherwise not been
able to afford. It's a great cause, and past recipients of the grant have
gone on to do great things in bird education and conservation. For example,
myself and Carol Ramsayer of Otter Creek Audubon have been spending time
with the Salisbury Elementary School science classes led my Amy Clapp, a
past recipient to attend the Hog Island camp. She is teaching all of her
classes (K-6) bird identification and about bird migration, culminating in
a bird-a-thon finale where each student is raising money by doing their own
birding big days! Sending one person to Audubon camp is making lifetime
birders out of an entire school of kids, and this is a course that is being
done year after year at Salisbury. If that isn't a great cause, I don't
know what is!

If you would like to help out with a pledge, or if you have some good
advice to find a species that I don't have yet, please email me at
tylerpockette4 AT gmail.com. Every bit helps! Also, please feel free to share
this with anyone you know who might be interested in pledging!

You can follow along at my Flickr page that I've created specifically for
my photo big year: https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/

Thank you all so much! I hope this wasn't too off topic and long-winded!

Lastly, I'd like to wish everyone who has contributed so far a HUGE thank
you!!!

See you out there!
-Tyler Pockette
Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 17:46:38 -0400
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday June 18, 2016 on the
Old Railroad Passage Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the refuge parking lot on
Tabor Rd, about 1 mile south of Rte 78.  If you have any questions, reply
to copenhvr AT gmail.com.

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 74 months of walks we have observed 142 species.  (We picked up THREE
new species in May:  American Kestrel, Swainson's Thrush, and Golden-winged
Warbler.)  Hope to see you there!


--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Jun 9, 2016
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 02:32:41 +0000
Fred, Is this the power line that runs parallel to the W Rutland Marsh? I, If 
so I was there on Fri (w Sue W)After Sue left a large 'flap flap, soooar flew 
over... and Goshawk came to mind. I see you have one on this list. We did not 
have Prarie or I Buniting, etc Ruth Stewart 


________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Fred Bates 
 

Sent: Friday, June 10, 2016 6:44 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 
1to15, Jun 9, 2016 


A little wet and chilly to start but we got it done.
Fred and Graham Bates
Rutland

----- Forwarded Message -----From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.eduTo: 
batesx2 AT comcast.netSent: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 22:01:42 -0000 (UTC)Subject: eBird 
Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Jun 9, 2016 


Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Rutland, Vermont, USJun 9, 
2016 6:30 AM - 10:00 AMProtocol: Traveling5.0 mile(s)22 species (+1 other taxa) 


Turkey Vulture 1Northern Goshawk 1 Flying down the power line.Red-tailed Hawk 
1Mourning Dove 4Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1Downy Woodpecker 1Eastern Wood-Pewee 
1Alder Flycatcher 10Blue Jay 1Black-capped Chickadee 1Veery 3American Robin 
3Gray Catbird 1Golden-winged x Blue-winged Warbler (hybrid) 1 Bird was heard 
but not seenCommon Yellowthroat 10Yellow Warbler 1Chestnut-sided Warbler 
4Prairie Warbler 5 Target BirdField Sparrow 2 Target BirdSong Sparrow 14Eastern 
Towhee 7 Target BirdIndigo Bunting 3American Goldfinch 2 


View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30166992

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Northeast Kingdom trip report
From: rstymeist Bob Stymeist Arlington <rstymeist AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:08:09 -0500
Thought this might be of interest to Vermont birders:

Last Friday through Sunday afternoon we led a group of eleven Massachusetts 
birders on our third annual Brookline Bird Club trip criss-crossing the three 
counties of the NEK: Caledonia, Essex and Orleans (see Bird Observer Vol 44 # 3 
for a comprehensive Where to Go birding in Essex County by Tom Berriman 
focusing on Victory Basin WMA and East Mountain) 


The weather was not ideal, the temperature barely hit 60 degrees for about two 
minutes on Saturday, the rest of the weekend the temps ranged from 42-55 with 
wind and occasional showers though collectively we found 111 species. Bird song 
was subdued and wind didn't help, we had 18 species of warblers including five 
Mourning. 


On Friday we birded the famous Moose Bog hoping for the Grand Slam four Boreal 
specialties, we managed only to get to first base with a family of Gray Jays 
but singing Olive-sided and Yellow-bellied flycatchers as well as Palm Warbler, 
Rusty Blackbird and Lincoln's Sparrow were a treat for us southern New 
Englanders. We next moved on to Silvio Conti NWR, this Nulhegan section 
encompasses 26,000 acres (about 40 square miles) of mainly forested land 
formerly owned by Champion International, a large wood-products company. The 
forest type is northern hardwoods, dominated by beech, birch, and maple. This 
day the woods were quiet. The highlight was spotting a dark grouse (species 
debated) perched on a big rock which was used as a "outrock" and by the looks 
of it probably since the last snowfall! Leaving the refuge we came upon an 
active feeder on Henshaw Road with lots of Purple Finches and Siskins and many 
other birds, isn't it always that we find more birds near people! Back at! 

 the hotel in Island Pond, five loons and a Bald Eagle and a female Goldeneye 
were noted. 


Saturday the sun shown through the fog but lasted only until about 8AM and the 
temperature continued to decline to just 44 at 5PM. Birding was much better 
today as we hit some of our favorite birding areas in Orleans County. We 
started along the Clyde River and enjoyed watching a winnowing snipe as it 
continued circling overhead the entire time we were there, Then on to Job's 
Pond where we heard the resident Peregrines screaming as it flew along the 
cliffs, such a beautiful spot with nesting loons too! Birding along the way 
past Willoughby Lake we encountered a singing but secretive Mourning Warbler. 
We made a brief but welcomed stop at our home on Wood Warblers Way for some 
coffee to warm up. We then visited a Bank Swallow colony before travelling 
along to the Coventry Marshes where we had wonderful looks at Virginia Rail. 
This area is good for many birds not regularly found in the NEK such as 
Warbling Vireos, Willow Flycatchers, Marsh Wrens, Yellow Warblers and Baltimore 
O! 

 rioles. At South Bay we added American Bittern and Pied-billed Grebe. Another 
interesting observation was watching two Swamp Sparrows walking and jumping 
while feeding from lily pad to lily pad .We ended our birding at Eagle Point 
WMA in North Derby with many singing Bobolinks and a wonderful study experience 
of swallow identification. The cold damp weather put down a string of swallows 
on the wires- Tree, Bank, Cliff and Northern Rough-winged. Saturday evening we 
hosted the group at our house for dinner, the fireplace welcoming on this cool 
mid June night, 


Sunday morning at the hotel we had nice looks at an adult Bald Eagle and a very 
frustrating attempt to identify a flock of nine shorebirds (always unusual in 
the NEK). They flew up and down the lake circling and circling but never 
landing- peep sp. We made another brief try at Moose Bog for the elusive Spruce 
Grouse; unsuccessful again but the Olive-sided and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers 
as well as some White-winged Crossbills. We ended the day at Victory Basin WMA 
where we added Black-backed Woodpecker, three singing Mourning Warblers, and 
both Yellow-bellied and Olive-sided Flycatchers. 


Northeast Kingdom, Vermont
Jun 10-12, 2016 
Comments: Brookline Bird Club Weekend Trip in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont- 
leaders Bob Stymeist and Martha Steele 

111 species (+3 other taxa)
(Numbers of birds entered into ebird at specific locations-check ebird explore 
counties for specific data) 


Canada Goose X
Wood Duck X
Mallard X
Ring-necked Duck 2
Common Goldeneye 1 female
Hooded Merganser X
Ruffed Grouse X
Wild Turkey X
Common Loon X
Pied-billed Grebe X
Double-crested Cormorant X
American Bittern 1
Great Blue Heron X
Turkey Vulture X
Osprey 6
Accipiter sp. X
Bald Eagle 1 adult
Broad-winged Hawk X
Virginia Rail 3
peep sp. 9
Wilson's Snipe X
Ring-billed Gull X
Herring Gull 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) X
Mourning Dove X
Black-billed Cuckoo 1
Barred Owl calling at 1AM at leaders home
Chimney Swift 1 Moose Bog
Ruby-throated Hummingbird X
Belted Kingfisher X
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker X
Downy Woodpecker X
Hairy Woodpecker X
Black-backed Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker X
Pileated Woodpecker 1
American Kestrel 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Olive-sided Flycatcher 3
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 2
Alder Flycatcher X
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher) X
Least Flycatcher X
Eastern Phoebe X
Great Crested Flycatcher X
Eastern Kingbird X
Blue-headed Vireo X
Warbling Vireo X
Red-eyed Vireo X
Gray Jay 5
Blue Jay X
American Crow X
Common Raven X
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
Tree Swallow X
Bank Swallow X
Barn Swallow X
Cliff Swallow X
Black-capped Chickadee X
Red-breasted Nuthatch X
Winter Wren X
Marsh Wren X
Golden-crowned Kinglet X
Ruby-crowned Kinglet X
Eastern Bluebird X
Veery X
Swainson's Thrush X
Hermit Thrush X
Wood Thrush X
American Robin X
Gray Catbird X
Brown Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 1- only fourth record (all this year) in Essex Cty
European Starling X
Cedar Waxwing X
Ovenbird X
Northern Waterthrush X
Black-and-white Warbler X
Nashville Warbler X
Mourning Warbler 5
Common Yellowthroat X
American Redstart X
Northern Parula X
Magnolia Warbler X
Blackburnian Warbler X
Yellow Warbler X
Chestnut-sided Warbler X
Black-throated Blue Warbler X
Palm Warbler X
Pine Warbler X
Yellow-rumped Warbler X
Black-throated Green Warbler X
Canada Warbler X
Chipping Sparrow X
Dark-eyed Junco X
White-throated Sparrow X
Savannah Sparrow X
Song Sparrow X
Lincoln's Sparrow X
Swamp Sparrow X
Scarlet Tanager X
Northern Cardinal X
Rose-breasted Grosbeak X
Bobolink X
Red-winged Blackbird X
Rusty Blackbird 1 Moose Bog
Common Grackle X
Brown-headed Cowbird X
Baltimore Oriole X
Purple Finch X
White-winged Crossbill X
Pine Siskin X
American Goldfinch X
House Sparrow X


Bob Stymeist and Martha Steele
Westmore Vermont
Arlington Massachusetts

Bob Stymeist
bobstymeist AT gmail.com


-
Subject: RFI on a few bird species/photo big year
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:39:57 -0400
Hi all!

I'm turning to you all as a valued source of information in hopes of
gaining some advice on finding a few species that I'm struggling to locate
on my own for my VT photo big year. As the breeding season moves onward,
the pressures to nail my last few local breeding species grow, especially
when trying to balance my time birding with a 45 hour work week and other
personal obligations. I'm currently at 213 species and I have been stalled
there for over a week. I haven't added a new species since a trip to the
Northeast Kingdom last Friday (link to my photo big year photos:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/). By my count, I can get up to
222 species if I get all of the species which breed in the state, and then
maybe 20 more when fall migration comes. Some species, like Bicknell's
Thrush, I still need but I just haven't put in the effort to hike for one
yet. Although if anyone knows of any locations that are accessible by
vehicle or a relatively short hike, I'd be happy to hear about them.

Anyway, here are the species I would greatly appreciate some help with!
Thank you!

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Red-shouldered Hawk

Northern Goshawk

Clay-colored Sparrow

Sandhill Crane (I've tried Bristol Pond, but no luck. Perhaps they're busy
on the nest?)

Cattle Egret (has anyone seen them at Shelburne Farms lately?)


For those who missed my previous post a few weeks back, I am doing a photo
big year as a fundraiser to send a student or teacher to Hog Island Audubon
camp in Maine next year. Rather than retype it all, here is a copy/paste of
my previous post:


I've been on a bit of a photography binge for the last few months. Some of
you already know, but I'd like to make an announcement to the VTBIRDers
about a year long fundraiser I'm doing to raise money for an Otter Creek
Audubon grant to send a student or teacher to the Hog Island Audubon summer
camp in Maine where they will gain an education in bird conservation and
identification. I'm in the midst of a photographic big year of Vermont,
attempting to photograph as many species of birds as I can until December
31st. Similar to the way the annual bird-a-thon fundraisers work, I am
taking pledges that can either be in the form of one lump sum, or pledged
per species. For instance, Tammy Tanager could pledge $20 or she could
choose to pledge $0.20 per species. 100% of the money raised goes directly
towards this cause.
This is my personal way of paying it forward, as Otter Creek Audubon
awarded me a similar grant 12 years ago that allowed me to attend an
Audubon camp in the Northeast Kingdom that I would have otherwise not been
able to afford. It's a great cause, and past recipients of the grant have
gone on to do great things in bird education and conservation. For example,
myself and Carol Ramsayer of Otter Creek Audubon have been spending time
with the Salisbury Elementary School science classes led my Amy Clapp, a
past recipient to attend the Hog Island camp. She is teaching all of her
classes (K-6) bird identification and about bird migration, culminating in
a bird-a-thon finale where each student is raising money by doing their own
birding big days! Sending one person to Audubon camp is making lifetime
birders out of an entire school of kids, and this is a course that is being
done year after year at Salisbury. If that isn't a great cause, I don't
know what is!

If you would like to help out with a pledge, or if you have some good
advice to find a species that I don't have yet, please email me at
tylerpockette4 AT gmail.com. Every bit helps! Also, please feel free to share
this with anyone you know who might be interested in pledging!

You can follow along at my Flickr page that I've created specifically for
my photo big year: https://www.flickr.com/photos/141790488 AT N02/

Thank you all so much! I hope this wasn't too off topic and long-winded!

Lastly, I'd like to wish everyone who has contributed so far a HUGE thank
you!!!

See you out there!
-Tyler Pockette
Subject: Grassland Bird Conservation talk
From: Allan Strong <Allan.Strong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 22:52:47 +0000
Hi Birders,

Noah Perlut has been working on grassland bird conservation for over 10 years 
in Vermont. He'll be presenting his work at 6:00 PM tomorrow (6/14) at the 
coach barn at Shelburne Farms. It's a great opportunity to learn more about 
this conservation work. The talk is free to the public. 


Check out this link for more information.


http://shelburnefarms.org/calendar/event/community-farming-grassland-birds-a-local-conservation-strategy-0 


Allan
Subject: Re: Meadowlarks/bobolinks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 15:37:49 -0400
Yes ! Thanks I'll add it.
Sue

Sent from my iPod

> On Jun 11, 2016, at 3:29 PM, Nathan Dansereau 
<000000ba175420dc-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 

> 
> blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px 
#715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white 
!important; } Hi Sue. Thanks for leading a nice walk. I think you missed common 
yellowthroat. Nate 

> 
> 
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
> 
> 
> On Saturday, June 11, 2016, 11:36 AM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> The tour of this area produced nice views of a variety of birds.
> Big surprise was a common loon flying over.
> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
>> Date: June 11, 2016 at 11:18:28 AM EDT
>> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
>> Subject: eBird Report - Miller Hill Farm, Sudbury, VT, Jun 11, 2016
>> 
>> Miller Hill Farm, Sudbury, VT, Rutland, Vermont, US
>> Jun 11, 2016 7:45 AM - 11:00 AM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 1.0 mile(s)
>> 33 species
>> 
>> Common Loon  1    bird seen flying in a southerly course.
>> Turkey Vulture  2
>> Cooper's Hawk  1
>> Mourning Dove  5
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker 2 this bird has rather pale plumage. According to 
land owners several generations of this coloration has been common. 

>> Downy Woodpecker  2
>> Hairy Woodpecker  1
>> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
>> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
>> Eastern Phoebe  1
>> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
>> Eastern Kingbird  1
>> Warbling Vireo  1
>> Blue Jay  2
>> Tree Swallow  9
>> Barn Swallow  6
>> Cliff Swallow 8 20 nests at this farm. nests were predated upon by red 
squirrels. re-nesting is apparent. 

>> Wood Thrush  1
>> American Robin  2
>> Gray Catbird  1
>> European Starling  7
>> Yellow Warbler  1
>> Chipping Sparrow  1
>> Song Sparrow  4    pair observed taking food to a hidden nest.
>> Eastern Towhee  1    heard but not seen.
>> Northern Cardinal  1
>> Bobolink  6
>> Red-winged Blackbird  10
>> Eastern Meadowlark  2
>> Common Grackle  8
>> Brown-headed Cowbird  4
>> Baltimore Oriole  1
>> American Goldfinch  8
>> 
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30175398 

>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
> 
Subject: Meadowlarks/bobolinks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:34:03 -0400
The tour of this area produced nice views of a variety of birds.
Big surprise was a common loon flying over.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: June 11, 2016 at 11:18:28 AM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Miller Hill Farm, Sudbury, VT, Jun 11, 2016
> 
> Miller Hill Farm, Sudbury, VT, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jun 11, 2016 7:45 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 33 species
> 
> Common Loon  1     bird seen flying in a southerly course.
> Turkey Vulture  2
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Mourning Dove  5
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 2 this bird has rather pale plumage. According to land 
owners several generations of this coloration has been common. 

> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Blue Jay  2
> Tree Swallow  9
> Barn Swallow  6
> Cliff Swallow 8 20 nests at this farm. nests were predated upon by red 
squirrels. re-nesting is apparent. 

> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  2
> Gray Catbird  1
> European Starling  7
> Yellow Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  1
> Song Sparrow  4     pair observed taking food to a hidden nest.
> Eastern Towhee  1     heard but not seen.
> Northern Cardinal  1
> Bobolink  6
> Red-winged Blackbird  10
> Eastern Meadowlark  2
> Common Grackle  8
> Brown-headed Cowbird  4
> Baltimore Oriole  1
> American Goldfinch  8
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30175398
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Middlebury potpourri
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 23:36:15 +0000
Today, South Street Extension. Just north of the kennel, a brown thrasher. At 
the kennel: a yellow-throated vireo singing incessantly in a big silver maple 
(I think it's silver.). Just across the road (west side) is an open field with 
singing bobolinks. 


More interesting: a big, presumably female, Cooper's Hawk sitting on a fence 
post in my backyard (0ff Middle Road), yesterday. (Bluebirds survived.) It's 
probably not realistic to search for a bird with such a big territory, but, for 
the record, this is the third Cooper's I've seen in the neighborhood since the 
first of May, the other two being fly-bys on Creek Road near the town shed and 
over the Hannaford parking lot (Honest!). Both were big and could well be the 
same bird. Keep your eyes open. 


Also - giant swallowtail in our lilacs.

Bruce Peterson
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Jun 9, 2016
From: Fred Bates <batesx2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 22:44:33 +0000
A little wet and chilly to start but we got it done. 
Fred and Graham Bates
Rutland

----- Forwarded Message -----From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.eduTo: 
batesx2 AT comcast.netSent: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 22:01:42 -0000 (UTC)Subject: eBird 
Report - Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Jun 9, 2016 


Pleasant St Power Line Survey Area 1 Pole 1to15, Rutland, Vermont, USJun 9, 
2016 6:30 AM - 10:00 AMProtocol: Traveling5.0 mile(s)22 species (+1 other taxa) 


Turkey Vulture 1Northern Goshawk 1 Flying down the power line.Red-tailed Hawk 
1Mourning Dove 4Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1Downy Woodpecker 1Eastern Wood-Pewee 
1Alder Flycatcher 10Blue Jay 1Black-capped Chickadee 1Veery 3American Robin 
3Gray Catbird 1Golden-winged x Blue-winged Warbler (hybrid) 1 Bird was heard 
but not seenCommon Yellowthroat 10Yellow Warbler 1Chestnut-sided Warbler 
4Prairie Warbler 5 Target BirdField Sparrow 2 Target BirdSong Sparrow 14Eastern 
Towhee 7 Target BirdIndigo Bunting 3American Goldfinch 2 


View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30166992

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 7 Jun 2016 to 9 Jun 2016 (#2016-155)
From: Janet Watton <musbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 11:22:48 -0400
Re: inviting all birders
Run, don't walk and buy and scarf down Maeve's new book before you go. It's 
amazing - could not put it down. 

Janet Watton
Randolph Center

On Jun 10, 2016, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 


> There are 13 messages totaling 454 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Birders (8)
>  2. Cerulean, prothonotary updates?
>  3. Cram Rd-Arnold District Rd power line, Leicester-Brandon, Jun 7, 2016
>  4. inviting all birders
>  5. it's a convention
>  6. The biography of Phoebe Snetsinger
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 06:52:57 -0400
> From:    Patti Haynes 
> Subject: Birders
> 
> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 04:02:13 -0700
> From:    Eugenia Cooke 
> Subject: Cerulean, prothonotary updates?
> 
> Has anyone seen or heard the  Rte 4 Ira rest-stop Cerulean or the Buckner
> Refuge prothonotary recently?
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 07:08:48 -0400
> From:    Zacheriah Cota-Weaver 
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> AHH! Love it! Thanks for sharing.
> 
> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
> 
>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
> 17 Elm St Apt. 3
> Waterbury, VT 05676
> zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 11:32:13 +0000
> From:    Susan Elliott 
> Subject: Cram Rd-Arnold District Rd power line, Leicester-Brandon, Jun 7, 
2016 

> 
> An Audubon Vermont/VELCO winged warbler survey route that runs parallel to 
Arnold District Road in Brandon had an interesting mix of Golden-winged, 
Blue-winged and a Lawrence's hybrid two days ago. Another bird, outside the 
survey route and not on this list, was a Brewster's hybrid. 

> Most interesting was an Olive-sided Flycatcher, which was seen and heard on 
the same survey route almost to the day one year ago. 

> Three Prairie Warbler were seen. Brown-headed Cowbirds, one of the other 
target species, seemed to be in high numbers. 

> 
> 
> Cram Rd-Arnold District Rd power line, Leicester-Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, 
US 

> Jun 7, 2016 7:25 AM - 10:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Audubon Vermont/VELCO power line survey; start temp 60F, end temp 
71 F, cloudy 

> 47 species (+2 other taxa)
> 
> Canada Goose  23
> Broad-winged Hawk  1
> Mourning Dove  1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker  3
> American Kestrel  1
> Olive-sided Flycatcher 1 heard 'pit pit pit' on section not within survey 
route; photo taken of flycatcher earlier, and within survey route and time 
period, revealed it to be an Olive-sided; this species was observed on the same 
survey route 

> Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
> Alder Flycatcher 14 2 mile route with suitable habitat along the whole route 

> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  4
> Eastern Kingbird  4
> Red-eyed Vireo  15
> Blue Jay  1
> American Crow  3
> Black-capped Chickadee  4
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> Veery  5
> Wood Thrush  2
> American Robin  2
> Gray Catbird 24 not excessive for length of survey and amount of suitable 
habitat 

> Cedar Waxwing  18
> Ovenbird  5
> Golden-winged Warbler 1 pole 128: did not sing, yellow cap, black mask and 
throat, pale body with single yellow wing patch 

> Blue-winged Warbler 3 pole 120: heard 'bees buzz', singing male, yellow head 
and body with thin black eye line, two white wing bars; pole 117: heard 'bees 
buzz', singing male, all yellow body with think black eye line, two white wing 
bars; pole 116x: heard 'bees buzz', singing male, all yellow body, black eye 
line; two white wing bars 

> Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid) 1 pole 119: sang 'bees buzz', gold cap, black 
mask and throat, yellow body; two white wing bars 

> Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warbler 1 between poles 128 and 127: heard 'bees 
buzz', singing male, no visual 

> Black-and-white Warbler  5
> Mourning Warbler  1
> Common Yellowthroat  11
> American Redstart  2
> Yellow Warbler  11
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 20 2 mile route with suitable habitat the whole route 

> Prairie Warbler 2 pole 128: singing male, seen; pole 117: singing male, heard 
only 

> Chipping Sparrow  1
> Field Sparrow 7 pole 128: singing male, heard only; between poles 123 and 
122: singing male, heard only pole 122: singing male, heard only; pole 120: 
singing male, heard only; pole 119: singing male, heard only; pole 117, singing 
male, heard only; pole 116x: singing male, heard only 

> Song Sparrow  31
> Eastern Towhee 6 pole 128: call only, sex unknown; between poles 127 ad 128: 
singing male, heard only; pole 127: call only, heard only, sex unknown; pole 
125: singing male, seen; pole 124: singing male, heard only; pole 121: singing 
male, seen 

> Scarlet Tanager  1
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
> Common Grackle  4
> Brown-headed Cowbird 9 near start of survey on Cram Road, singing male; pole 
128: two males singing, seen; pole 126: singing male, seen; pole 125, one 
female, one singing male; between poles 123 and 124, sex undetermined, no song; 
pole 122: singing male; pole 121: singing male, seen 

> Baltimore Oriole  4
> American Goldfinch  10
> 
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30122229
> 
> Sue Wetmore, Sue and Marv Elliott
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 08:45:33 -0400
> From:    Chip Darmstadt 
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> Love the moon-walking Red-capped Manakin on the right!
> 
> 
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> North Branch Nature Center
> (802) 229-6206
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
> Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2016 6:53 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Birders
> 
> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 09:13:42 -0400
> From:    Maeve Kim 
> Subject: inviting all birders
> 
> I want to invite all my fellow birders to one of two scheduled readings and 
discussions of my new book, Ivy’s Optics, in which every character is either a 
birder or a bird. It’s a love story: about love for nature, love for birds and 
birding, and love between the two main characters. Vermont birders will 
recognize many of the locations and all of the birds – except maybe the rare 
little vagrant in the book, a bird that has never been seen in the state. 
Readings are at Phoenix Books in Burlington on Wednesday 6/22 at 7PM, and at 
Emile Gruppé Gallery in Jericho Center on Sunday 6/26 at 3PM. The latter event 
includes refreshments. 

> 
> Please contact me off-list for directions or more information.
> 
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 10:06:45 -0400
> From:    Scott Sainsbury 
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> what’s a google doodle?
> 
> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
> 
> S
> 
> 
> 
>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>> 
>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 10:22:58 -0400
> From:    Larry Clarfeld 
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> For more info, see:
> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday
> 
> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury > wrote:
> 
>> what’s a google doodle?
>> 
>> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>> 
>> S
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 11:27:12 -0400
> From:    Roo Slagle 
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> Never heard of Phoebe. Perfect name!
> 
> 
> 
> On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
> 
> For more info, see:
> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday
> 
> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury > wrote:
> 
>> what’s a google doodle?
>> 
>> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>> 
>> S
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 12:32:25 -0400
> From:    Scott Sainsbury 
> Subject: it's a convention
> 
> There was a multi-cultural gathering in that backyard at CrossHaven Farm 
early this morning. 

> 
> Male Cardinal
> Female Oriole
> 2 baby Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and an adult male
> Evening Grosbeak
> Large contingent of Purple and Gold finches
> Several Siskins
> A Song Sparrow
> A nesting Catbird
> Gaggles of Grackles, Blackbirds, Blue Jays and Pigeons
> 6 Hummingbirds at the feeders at once
> 2 Crows stealing chicken feed
> 3 chickens
> 2 Red squirrels
> 1 Chipmunk
> and Teddy the Bear mangling the peanut feeder 
> 
> (sorry everyone else, but Teddy just spoiled the party for this summer)
> 
> 
> 
> Scott Sainsbury
> CrossHaven Farm
> Moretown
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:31:16 -0400
> From:    Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> Two books written:
> "Birding on Borrowed Time "
> That is Snetsinger's own account.
> "Bird List" by another author.
> 
> Sue Wetmore 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Roo Slagle  wrote:
>> 
>> Never heard of Phoebe. Perfect name!
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
>> 
>> For more info, see:
>> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday
>> 
>> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury >> wrote:
>> 
>>> what’s a google doodle?
>>> 
>>> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>>> 
>>> S
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:35:21 -0400
> From:    Jeannie Elias 
> Subject: The biography of Phoebe Snetsinger
> 
> The book is Life List, by Olivia Gentile and it is the biography of Phoebe 
Snetsinger. 

> An interesting read
> Jeannie
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Sue" <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
> To: "Vermont Birds" 
> Sent: Thursday, June 9, 2016 2:31:16 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Birders
> 
> Two books written:
> "Birding on Borrowed Time "
> That is Snetsinger's own account.
> "Bird List" by another author.
> 
> Sue Wetmore 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Roo Slagle  wrote:
>> 
>> Never heard of Phoebe. Perfect name!
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
>> 
>> For more info, see:
>> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday
>> 
>> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury >> wrote:
>> 
>>> what’s a google doodle?
>>> 
>>> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>>> 
>>> S
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:54:09 -0400
> From:    Evergreen Erb 
> Subject: Re: Birders
> 
> Raven Davis, who is on this list, but birding in Ethiopia right now, was 
friends with Phoebe. They often were on the same Field Guide bird trips and got 
to be friends. Evergreen 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 7 Jun 2016 to 9 Jun 2016 (#2016-155)
> ***********************************************************
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 09:31:24 -0400
We have Bird List at Deborah Rawson Memorial Library in Jericho if anyone is 
close by and interested. Or you could do an Iinterlibrary loan on it. I read it 
and enjoyed it. Evergreen, who is now sadly retired from said library (but 
enjoying the freedom to bird more). 

Subject: Re: Birders
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:54:09 -0400
Raven Davis, who is on this list, but birding in Ethiopia right now, was 
friends with Phoebe. They often were on the same Field Guide bird trips and got 
to be friends. Evergreen 

Subject: The biography of Phoebe Snetsinger
From: Jeannie Elias <moosewoman AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:35:21 -0400
The book is Life List, by Olivia Gentile and it is the biography of Phoebe 
Snetsinger. 

An interesting read
Jeannie

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sue" <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
To: "Vermont Birds" 
Sent: Thursday, June 9, 2016 2:31:16 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Birders

Two books written:
"Birding on Borrowed Time "
That is Snetsinger's own account.
"Bird List" by another author.

Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod

> On Jun 9, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Roo Slagle  wrote:
> 
> Never heard of Phoebe. Perfect name!
> 
> 
> 
> On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
> 
> For more info, see:
> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday
> 
> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury > wrote:
> 
>> what’s a google doodle?
>> 
>> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>> 
>> S
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 14:31:16 -0400
Two books written:
"Birding on Borrowed Time "
That is Snetsinger's own account.
"Bird List" by another author.

Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod

> On Jun 9, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Roo Slagle  wrote:
> 
> Never heard of Phoebe. Perfect name!
> 
> 
> 
> On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
> 
> For more info, see:
> https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday
> 
> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury > wrote:
> 
>> what’s a google doodle?
>> 
>> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>> 
>> S
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
Subject: it's a convention
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 12:32:25 -0400
There was a multi-cultural gathering in that backyard at CrossHaven Farm early 
this morning. 


Male Cardinal
Female Oriole
2 baby Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and an adult male
Evening Grosbeak
Large contingent of Purple and Gold finches
Several Siskins
A Song Sparrow
A nesting Catbird
Gaggles of Grackles, Blackbirds, Blue Jays and Pigeons
6 Hummingbirds at the feeders at once
2 Crows stealing chicken feed
3 chickens
2 Red squirrels
1 Chipmunk
and Teddy the Bear mangling the peanut feeder 

(sorry everyone else, but Teddy just spoiled the party for this summer)



Scott Sainsbury
CrossHaven Farm
Moretown
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Roo Slagle <roospin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 11:27:12 -0400
Never heard of Phoebe. Perfect name!



On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:

For more info, see:
https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday

On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury  wrote:

> what’s a google doodle?
> 
> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
> 
> S
> 
> 
> 
>> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
>> 
>> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 10:22:58 -0400
For more info, see:
https://www.google.com/doodles/phoebe-snetsingers-85th-birthday

On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 10:06 AM, Scott Sainsbury  wrote:

> what’s a google doodle?
>
> We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA
>
> S
>
>
>
> > On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
> >
> > Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
>
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 10:06:45 -0400
what’s a google doodle?

We had a bear on the back porch this morning.  Peanut feeder DOA

S



> On Jun 9, 2016, at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
> 
> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: inviting all birders
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 09:13:42 -0400
I want to invite all my fellow birders to one of two scheduled readings and 
discussions of my new book, Ivy’s Optics, in which every character is either a 
birder or a bird. It’s a love story: about love for nature, love for birds and 
birding, and love between the two main characters. Vermont birders will 
recognize many of the locations and all of the birds – except maybe the rare 
little vagrant in the book, a bird that has never been seen in the state. 
Readings are at Phoenix Books in Burlington on Wednesday 6/22 at 7PM, and at 
Emile Gruppé Gallery in Jericho Center on Sunday 6/26 at 3PM. The latter event 
includes refreshments. 


Please contact me off-list for directions or more information.

Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 08:45:33 -0400
Love the moon-walking Red-capped Manakin on the right!


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2016 6:53 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Birders

Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Birders
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 07:08:48 -0400
AHH! Love it! Thanks for sharing.

On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 6:52 AM, Patti Haynes  wrote:

> Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>



-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
17 Elm St Apt. 3
Waterbury, VT 05676
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Cerulean, prothonotary updates?
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 04:02:13 -0700
Has anyone seen or heard the  Rte 4 Ira rest-stop Cerulean or the Buckner
Refuge prothonotary recently?
Subject: Birders
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 06:52:57 -0400
Today's Google doodle will bring a smile to your face ;)

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: OCAS Monthly Wildlife Walk
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 21:32:58 -0400
Let's try that again with the date this time. 

June 11, 7am - Otter Creek Audubon and the Middlebury Area Land Trust invite 
community members to help us survey birds and other wildlife at Otter View Park 
and the Hurd Grassland. Meet at the parking area of Otter View Park at the 
intersection of Weybridge St. and Pulp Mill Bridge Road in Middlebury. Birders 
of all ages and abilities welcome. For more information, call 388-6019 or 
388-1007. 


For a complete list of our upcoming events, see the calendar on our website:
http://wp.me/Pt0Pq-70

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: OCAS Monthly Wildlife Walk
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Jun 2016 21:20:50 -0400
Otter Creek Audubon and the Middlebury Area Land Trust invite community members 
to help us survey birds and other wildlife at Otter View Park and the Hurd 
Grassland. Meet at 7am at the parking area of Otter View Park at the 
intersection of Weybridge St. and Pulp Mill Bridge Road in Middlebury. Birders 
of all ages and abilities welcome. For more information, call 388-6019 or 
388-1007. 


--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: Thrushes Aitken State Forest, Jun 6, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 15:05:56 -0400
Thrushes were present and the Swainson's was a nice surprise.
Sue Wetmore, Sue & Marv Elliott 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: June 6, 2016 at 2:41:57 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Aitken State Forest, Jun 6, 2016
> 
> Aitken State Forest, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jun 6, 2016 9:00 AM - 12:15 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 18 species
> 
> Mallard  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  11
> Blue Jay  1
> Common Raven  1
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
> Veery  1
> Swainson's Thrush  1
> Hermit Thrush  1
> American Robin  1
> Ovenbird  7
> Black-and-white Warbler  1
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Blackburnian Warbler  1
> Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  1
> Black-throated Green Warbler  2
> Scarlet Tanager  3
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S30107477 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Colchester prairie warbler continues
From: Louanne Nielsen <000000a6b2e2a179-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 07:10:52 -0400
If you have a Green Mountain Passport, the fee is waived at Vermont State
Parks including Niquette State Park.


Louanne Nielsen
Jericho



-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Mead 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Mon, Jun 6, 2016 6:56 am
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Colchester prairie warbler continues

Hello all,

The Prairie Warbler that Larry Clarfeld found is still here. I heard
it sing twice this morning about 4 minutes apart. I
heard it between the boardwalk and actual lake view. The boardwalk
is about 1/2 a mile from the parking lot, along The Ledges Trail. 
The park fee is $4.00/ day visit. 
Good luck if you try for it. 

Thanks Larry!!!

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Colchester prairie warbler continues
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 06:56:28 -0400
Hello all,

The Prairie Warbler that Larry Clarfeld found is still here. I heard
it sing twice this morning about 4 minutes apart. I
heard it between the boardwalk and actual lake view. The boardwalk
is about 1/2 a mile from the parking lot, along The Ledges Trail. 
The park fee is $4.00/ day visit. 
Good luck if you try for it. 

Thanks Larry!!!

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Roy Pilcher - Super Senior
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 06:11:58 -0700
Loved it! Wonderful to hear his life story.
On Jun 5, 2016 9:04 AM, "Susan Elliott" <
00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> For those of you who missed it, the link to the Super Senior segment on
> Roy Pilcher is now online:
>
> http://www.wcax.com/story/32126805/super-senior-roy-pilcher
>
> The piece is very well done and there is some beautiful photography of
> West Rutland Marsh.
> Sue Elliott
>
Subject: Breeding Bird Survey Route - West Rutland
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 13:09:41 +0000
Yesterday we ran our Breeding Bird Survey Route, a 25-mile from West Rutland to 
Leicester.  

Highlights were three American Bitterns along Rte 4a and Whipple Hollow Road in 
West Rutland and two Great Horned Owls along Fire Hill Road in Pittsford.  

We also heard (and then fortunately saw) a Blue-winged Warbler along Fire Hill 
Road which is a new location for us (although we've never looked there 
extensively).  

Despite the 4:42 a.m. start, it's worth getting up to hear the dawn chorus.
Sue and Marv Elliott
Subject: Colchester prairie warbler continues
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 07:10:43 -0400
Hi VTBirders,

Prairie warbler at Niquette bay state park still singing on the ledges trail, 
this time closer to the lake, as of 7am. 


 - Larry

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: West Rutland Marsh
From: Larry Levine <levine5279 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 21:27:16 -0400
I finally stopped by the West Rutland marsh boardwalk this morning on the way 
back from my nephew's HS graduation in Manchester. I've been wanting to see it 
for a long time but the timing has never been right. 

When I arrived, I immediately saw two GBH flying together beyond the boardwalk. 
One was getting harassed by a Red-winged Blackbird. 

I then started down the boardwalk, looked out to my left with my binos and 
immediately spotted a LEAST BITTERN straddling some reeds about 3 ft over the 
water and about 3 ft from a Red-winged Blackbird. It was about 75 ft from the 
boardwalk. I had clear views for about 10 min. That was a life bird for me so I 
was very excited of course. I don't usually believe in luck but I felt very 
lucky to be in the right place at the right time. 

I also had a nice 30 sec look at a foraging VIRGINIA RAIL near the end of the 
boardwalk. 


Larry Levine
Jericho

Sent from my iPhone