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Updated on Thursday, May 5 at 08:08 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


American Redstart,©Mimi Hoppe Wolf

5 May Re: Mad Birders walk Saturday- Camel's Hump State Forest [Susan Werntgen ]
5 May Mad Birders walk Sat - Starksboro [Patti Haynes ]
5 May Mad Birders walk Saturday- Camel's Hump State Forest [Patti Haynes ]
5 May Re: Looking for a Few Good Birders [Marvin Elliott ]
5 May Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, May 5, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
5 May Looking for a Few Good Birders [Steve Faccio ]
4 May Bear in Dorset! [Valerie Radford ]
5 May RBGO - My yard birds, May 4, 2016 [Ruth ]
4 May Re: Crown point Banding Station [Marianne Ward ]
4 May Crown point Banding Station [Tom Barber ]
4 May Not so brown Thrasher ["Ian A. Worley" ]
4 May Green Up Day - May 7 [Susan Elliott ]
4 May New arrivals in our Randolph Center woods [Kathy Leonard ]
4 May Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year [Scott Sainsbury ]
4 May New arrivals in our Randolph Center woods [Kathy Leonard ]
4 May Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year [Scott Sainsbury ]
4 May glossy ibis Herrick's Cove Bellows Falls [suki russo ]
4 May [SPAM?:##] Ovenbird [Mundi Smithers ]
4 May Rosie Return [Connie Youngstrom ]
4 May Re: E. Grosbeak [Veer Frost ]
4 May FOY Ovenbird [Sarah Janson ]
4 May Fw: Yellow-throated Vireo - Bomoseen State Park, May 3, 2016 & Ruddy Duck on Bomoseen [Susan Elliott ]
4 May E. Grosbeak [Sue ]
3 May loons [Barclay Morris ]
3 May Barred Owl nest at Mt. Philo [Eric Hynes ]
3 May Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year [Susan Werntgen ]
3 May Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year [Larry Levine ]
3 May Big Morning is Skipping This Year [Scott Sainsbury ]
3 May New VT eBird media search tool! [Kent McFarland ]
3 May Photos of 6 species at Campbell Flats in Norwich [Jim Block ]
3 May Bittern Eating Huge Frog-photo sequence [cynthia crawford ]
3 May Fw: eBird Report - Emerald Lake State Park, May 2, 2016 [Ruth ]
2 May Whip-poor-wills ... Weybridge ["Ian A. Worley" ]
2 May FOY AMBI [Marcy Blauvelt ]
2 May FOY RBG [Jane Stein ]
2 May Wren [Sue ]
2 May Shorebirds and more in Arlington [Anne Hunter and Andrew Knafel ]
2 May Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, May 2, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
2 May Female Indigo Bunting ... Bittersweet Falls, Weybridge ["Ian A. Worley" ]
2 May Spring Bird Walks [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
1 May Re: Mad Birders Berlin Pond Walk [Martha Whitney ]
1 May [SPAM?:##] White crowned sparrow in Montpelier [Tom slayton ]
1 May Mad Birders Berlin Pond Walk [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
1 May Bird walk [Sue ]
1 May Rose-breasted Grosbeak [b flewelling ]
1 May FLICKER [Ed Green ]
1 May Re: Mansfield ["LaBarr, Mark" ]
1 May FOY Hummer [Ruth ]
1 May FOY - Yellow warblers & House Wren [Ruth ]
30 Apr RBGB [Barbara Brosnan ]
30 Apr rose-breasted grosbeak [Eric Wood ]
29 Apr John Fitzpatrick and the Lab of O [Scott Sainsbury ]
29 Apr Mansfield [Chris Rimmer ]
29 Apr New arrivals [Theresa Armata ]
29 Apr Snow Geese at Mud Creek WMA [Bruce MacPherson ]
29 Apr Brandon list [Sue ]
29 Apr Waterthrush [Sue ]
28 Apr Whip poor will [carolclyde ]
28 Apr Join the Mad Birders at Berlin Pond [Patti Haynes ]
28 Apr Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, Apr 28, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
28 Apr Great Horned Owl PHOTOS [Jim Block ]
28 Apr Re: Pacific Loon, Lake Dunmore [Alison Wagner ]
27 Apr Louisiana Waterthrush [Linda Gionti ]
27 Apr Pacific Loon, Lake Dunmore [Ron Payne ]
27 Apr Hermit Thrush and Blue Headed Vireo [Becky Giroux ]
27 Apr Re: Emerald Lake, East Dorset [Barbara Powers ]
27 Apr Re: Killdeer, chapter 10! [Evergreen Erb ]
26 Apr Re: Brazil [Michelle ]
26 Apr No Subject [Kent McFarland ]
26 Apr No Subject [Kent McFarland ]
26 Apr Re: Killdeer, chapter 10! [John Snell ]
26 Apr Re: Killdeer, chapter 10! [Chip Darmstadt ]
26 Apr Re: Hermit thrushes in Randolph Center [Chip Darmstadt ]
26 Apr Hermit thrushes in Randolph Center [Kathy Leonard ]
26 Apr Re: Killdeer, chapter 10! [John Snell ]
26 Apr killdeer update... [alison wagner ]

Subject: Re: Mad Birders walk Saturday- Camel's Hump State Forest
From: Susan Werntgen <swerntgen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 21:03:44 -0400
Patti,
Jeannie and I (sole Madbirders) enjoyed a lovely walk this morning. I plan to 
do Hubbard Park with NBNC tomorrow. Plan on Saturday walk too! 


Shall we tentatively plan to carpool?

Awesome warblers....and am getting slightly improved at recognizing bird calls 
:-) 


S

Sent from my iPad

> On May 5, 2016, at 8:29 PM, Patti Haynes  wrote:
> 
> Join the Mad Birders as we venture out of the Mad River Valley and over the
> mountain to Camel's Hump State Forest in Starksboro this Saturday morning
> for some early spring birding. This is a beautiful uphill walk, so be sure
> to wear appropriate footwear. A Black-throated Blue was heard there this
> afternoon!
> The walk begins at 7:30 and parking is VERY limited, so please carpool and
> contact Ali Wagner at alikatofvt AT gmavt for information on how to get there
> and where to park.
> 
> We hope to see you there despite the late notice.
Subject: Mad Birders walk Sat - Starksboro
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 20:37:17 -0400
Sorry, the contact should be alikatofvt AT gmavt.net  or call her at 434-7672
for location and parking information for the Camel's Hump State Forest.
Subject: Mad Birders walk Saturday- Camel's Hump State Forest
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 20:29:05 -0400
Join the Mad Birders as we venture out of the Mad River Valley and over the
mountain to Camel's Hump State Forest in Starksboro this Saturday morning
for some early spring birding. This is a beautiful uphill walk, so be sure
to wear appropriate footwear. A Black-throated Blue was heard there this
afternoon!
The walk begins at 7:30 and parking is VERY limited, so please carpool and
contact Ali Wagner at alikatofvt AT gmavt for information on how to get there
and where to park.

We hope to see you there despite the late notice.
Subject: Re: Looking for a Few Good Birders
From: Marvin Elliott <marvelliott61 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 11:22:10 -0400
I just read Steveís email asking for survey route volunteers. Since Sue and I 
have been running a BBS route for about five years I want to recommend them. 
When we started the prospect of getting up at 4AM and running a 25 mile route 
with stops every half mile was pretty daunting. Now, looking back, I am real 
glad we got started and have stuck with it. Birding is fun but a route like 
this adds something special. We all know the threats bird populations face but 
are we doing anything about it? When our route is done (including submitting 
the data) there is always a special feeling of satisfaction that comes over me. 
I think it has to do with completing a challenging task and knowing we have 
done something to help. As a bonus we can remember some of the experiences like 
waiting for the hen turkey and chicks to cross the road ahead of us. And then 
there are routine birds like Virginia Rails, Wood Ducks and American Bittern we 
observed. Great birding and helping the birds. That i! 

 s definitely a win win.
Marv Elliott
> On May 5, 2016, at 9:53 AM, Steve Faccio  wrote:
> 
> Hello Birders;
> The Vermont Center for Ecostudies is looking for skilled birders to conduct 
breeding bird surveys in Vermont for two different long-term avian monitoring 
programs--the North American Breeding Bird Survey 
 (BBS) and the Vermont Forest Bird 
Monitoring Program 
 
(FBMP). 

> 
> _*The BBS*_ -- Initiated in 1966, the BBS is North America's longest-running 
bird monitoring program with survey routes in every state, as well as in Canada 
and Mexico. Each survey route is 24.5 miles long with stops at 0.5-mile 
intervals. At each stop, a 3-minute point count is conducted during a single 
morning in June. In Vermont, there are 23 BBS routes, six of which are 
currently vacant and in-need of volunteers. Below is a list of the vacant 
routes; to view a map of the routes click here 
. 

> 
> 87002 - North Pownal
> 87003 - Stratton
> 87004 - Landgrove
> 87006 - Gaysville
> 87009 - S Wallingford
> 87116 - Newbury
> 
> _*The FBMP*_ -- The FBMP was initiated in 1989 with the primary goal of 
tracking long-term population trends of interior forest birds. The program 
consists of 30 study sites in forested habitats throughout the state. Each 
study site has 5 permanently marked survey stations (point counts) at which 
birds are sampled for 10 minutes on two different mornings during June. 
Currently, the 4 study sites listed below are vacant--two are in the Manchester 
area and two are near Middlebury. Maps of each study site can be found here 
. 

> 
> Lye Brook Wilderness Area
> Merck Forest and Farmland
> Cornwall Swamp
> Chandler Ridge
> 
> We recently completed a 25-year analysis of FBMP data, and will be publishing 
a report of those results soon. See our most recent issue of /Field Notes/ 
 for a summary of that analysis. 

> 
> _*Skills Required:*_ Volunteer observers must possess excellent bird 
identification skills (both visual and aural) for both the BBS and FBMP. For 
the FBMP, volunteers must be capable of hiking on variable terrain, often 
without trails, and navigating with GPS and/or map and compass. 

> 
> _*Time Commitment:*_ BBS surveys require a single morning in June and each 
survey takes approximately 4-5 hours to complete. FBMP sites should be surveyed 
on two different mornings during June, with each survey taking between 1.5 and 
2 hours to complete (not including travel time to and from the study site). For 
both projects, survey start-times are ~ 5:00 AM). In addition, another 1-1.5 
hours of time is required to transfer data from field forms onto coding sheets, 
and to enter data into an online, web-based data entry system. Because these 
are both long-term monitoring programs, participants should be able to make a 
multi-year commitment to the project. 

> 
> This is a great opportunity for someone to "bird with a purpose" and 
contribute to a long-term dataset. 

> 
> Please feel free to contact me if you are interested in participating in 
either project, or if you simply want more information. 

> 
> Thanks,
> Steve
> 
> -- 
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Steve Faccio
> Conservation Biologist
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 
> Physical Address
> 20 Palmer CT
> White River Junction, VT 05001
> 802-649-1431 xt.3
> sfaccio AT vtecostudies.org
> www.vtecostudies.org
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Subject: Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, May 5, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 15:00:49 +0000
It was fairly quiet at Northwood Park today, but it was great to hear the 
Ovenbirds, first for the year. 



Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 5, 2016 8:32 AM - 10:37 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
25 species (+1 other taxa)

Wood Duck  2
Mallard  1
American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid)  1    
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Killdeer  3
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Blue-headed Vireo  2
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  9
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  4
Winter Wren  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
American Robin  5
Ovenbird  3
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Pine Warbler  5
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  8
Dark-eyed Junco  1
Song Sparrow  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29417332 


Sue Elliott


Subject: Looking for a Few Good Birders
From: Steve Faccio <sfaccio AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 09:53:56 -0400
Hello Birders;
The Vermont Center for Ecostudies is looking for skilled birders to 
conduct breeding bird surveys in Vermont for two different long-term 
avian monitoring programs--the North American Breeding Bird Survey 
 (BBS) and the Vermont Forest Bird 
Monitoring Program 

 

(FBMP).

_*The BBS*_ -- Initiated in 1966, the BBS is North America's 
longest-running bird monitoring program with survey routes in every 
state, as well as in Canada and Mexico. Each survey route is 24.5 miles 
long with stops at 0.5-mile intervals. At each stop, a 3-minute point 
count is conducted during a single morning in June. In Vermont, there 
are 23 BBS routes, six of which are currently vacant and in-need of 
volunteers. Below is a list of the vacant routes; to view a map of the 
routes click here .

87002 - North Pownal
87003 - Stratton
87004 - Landgrove
87006 - Gaysville
87009 - S Wallingford
87116 - Newbury

_*The FBMP*_ -- The FBMP was initiated in 1989 with the primary goal of 
tracking long-term population trends of interior forest birds. The 
program consists of 30 study sites in forested habitats throughout the 
state.  Each study site has 5 permanently marked survey stations (point 
counts) at which birds are sampled for 10 minutes on two different 
mornings during June.  Currently, the 4 study sites listed below are 
vacant--two are in the Manchester area and two are near Middlebury. Maps 
of each study site can be found here 

. 


Lye Brook Wilderness Area
Merck Forest and Farmland
Cornwall Swamp
Chandler Ridge

We recently completed a 25-year analysis of FBMP data, and will be 
publishing a report of those results soon.  See our most recent issue of 
/Field Notes/  for a summary of 
that analysis.

_*Skills Required:*_ Volunteer observers must possess excellent bird 
identification skills (both visual and aural) for both the BBS and 
FBMP.  For the FBMP, volunteers must be capable of hiking on variable 
terrain, often without trails, and navigating with GPS and/or map and 
compass.

_*Time Commitment:*_  BBS surveys require a single morning in June and 
each survey takes approximately 4-5 hours to complete.  FBMP sites 
should be surveyed on two different mornings during June, with each 
survey taking between 1.5 and 2 hours to complete (not including travel 
time to and from the study site).  For both projects, survey start-times 
are ~ 5:00 AM).  In addition, another 1-1.5 hours of time is required to 
transfer data from field forms onto coding sheets, and to enter data 
into an online, web-based data entry system.  Because these are both 
long-term monitoring programs, participants should be able to make a 
multi-year commitment to the project.

This is a great opportunity for someone to "bird with a purpose" and 
contribute to a long-term dataset.

Please feel free to contact me if you are interested in participating in 
either project, or if you simply want more information.

Thanks,
Steve

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Steve Faccio
Conservation Biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055

Physical Address
20 Palmer CT
White River Junction, VT 05001
802-649-1431 xt.3
sfaccio AT vtecostudies.org
www.vtecostudies.org
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Subject: Bear in Dorset!
From: Valerie Radford <valerieradford AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 23:19:59 -0400
To all - this is my first post. I hope I did this right. 

Second night in a row a bear shows up in Dorset. 

Valerie and Peter Radford

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBGO - My yard birds, May 4, 2016
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 May 2016 03:13:28 +0000
Within 1/2 after commenting that I had not seen any Rose-breaste Grosbeaks YET 
- 5 showed up in the yard - 4 m and 1 f. Always a treat! 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Wednesday, May 4, 2016 10:27 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, May 4, 2016

My yard birds, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 4, 2016 11:22 AM - 11:42 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     48 degrees, drizzling
14 species

Mourning Dove  4
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  7
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  1
House Wren  1
Dark-eyed Junco  1
White-throated Sparrow  10
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  5
House Finch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29411751 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Crown point Banding Station
From: Marianne Ward <mjw AT BURLINGTONTELECOM.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 18:44:24 -0400
I apologize for sending this email to the entire list.  But, I am having a
miserable time unsubscribing to this list.  I have tried at least 6 times
and repeatedly get 'invalid request received from you".

I know many others have had the same problem.  Couldn't unsubscribing please
be made simpler?  I will not have access to my email for a month and don't
want to return to a gazillion VTBird emails.  Can someone please help?

Thanks,
Marianne Ward





-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Tom Barber
Sent: Wednesday, May 04, 2016 6:11 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Crown point Banding Station

Hi All,

The banding station at the Crown Point Historic Site will open its 41st
consecutive year this Saturday. We will be in operation through Saturday,
May 21st and are open for visitors from 7 AM to 5 PM daily.
The Historic Site is just over the bridge from West Addison, VT. Park in the
main parking lot and walk up the paved road to the East, just in front of
the British fort entrance. walk around the barns and to the South about 200
yards.

Tom Barber
innerimp AT hotmail.com
Subject: Crown point Banding Station
From: Tom Barber <innerimp AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 18:10:50 -0400
Hi All,

The banding station at the Crown Point Historic Site will open its  
41st consecutive year this Saturday. We will be in operation through  
Saturday, May 21st and are open for visitors from 7 AM to 5 PM daily.
The Historic Site is just over the bridge from West Addison, VT. Park  
in the main parking lot and walk up the paved road to the East, just  
in front of the British fort entrance. walk around the barns and to  
the South about 200 yards.

Tom Barber
innerimp AT hotmail.com
Subject: Not so brown Thrasher
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 16:29:52 -0400
This morning outside the kitchen window a weak rendition of what seemed 
to be that of a Brown Thrasher, with most phrases done doubly, took a 
bit of a while to catch my attention.

Went out with the binocs and had good views at the bird as it faced me 
from a branch above my head, and no more than 15 or so feet away.

What immediately struck me was that I was looking at a bird with a 
yellow face, cheeks, and throat; the yellow bordering on 
greenish-yellow.  The yellow area of the throat was bordered below an at 
the sides by a diffuse necklace of darkish spots.  The flanks and belly 
were clear, a dull, cream-white expanse. A search for the signature 
Brown Thrasher russet (mind you I could not see upper side of the bird) 
found a dash of color on the bird's crown, and a wash of russet on the 
long, thin tail. Turning its head revealed the striking eye and 
I-mean-business bill of a Brown Thrasher.

It stayed in that position for 60-90 seconds, occasionally uttering it's 
quiet and limited edition of repeated phrases, and flew away without 
revealing any more about itself.

Does anyone have any ideas about the coloration?

Thanks,

Ian
Subject: Green Up Day - May 7
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 18:23:22 +0000
This Saturday, May 7, is Vermont Green-up Day, a great opportunity to clean up 
our natural areas and neighborhoods, making them safer for birds and wildlife 
and more enjoyable for us and others. Rutland County Audubon will be 
participating at West Rutland Marsh. If you're interested, meet at the West 
Rutland Town Hall at 9 a.m. Gloves and boots recommended. Bags provided. 


Sue Elliotthttp://www.rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
Subject: New arrivals in our Randolph Center woods
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 14:08:17 -0400
We were accompanied on our drizzly walk this morning by several
black-throated blue warblers and green-throated warblers,
an ovenbird,
red-eye vireos,
yellow-rumped warblers,
a chestnut-sided warbler,
a brown creeper,
and
far above our heads in the mist, resembling an airliner,
a north-flying loon.
Subject: Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 13:53:50 -0400
Thanks Larry,
We’re fine. Problems with Pat’s parents in Houston that have us going back 
and forth unpredictably. Our son’s wedding will be taking place here on the 
farm on July 2. Plus travel for work. Just all added up to too much on our 
plates. 

Hope to see you soon.
Scott

Scott Sainsbury
Beacon Associates

802-496-9393
802-249-0525 (mobile)
www.beaconassociates.com
Mailing Address
P.O. 1660
Waitsfield, VT.  05673
Delivery Address
75 Bridge Road
Moretown, VT.  05660



> On May 3, 2016, at 9:01 PM, Larry Levine  wrote:
> 
> Hi Scott
> 
> Too bad to hear that there will be no Big Morning this year. Hope all is well 
with you and Pat and maybe we'll see you in 2017. 

> 
> Thanks for hosting and happy birding
> Larry Levine
> Jericho
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On May 3, 2016, at 4:55 PM, Scott Sainsbury  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> Unfortunately, due to a conjunction of difficulties and responsibilities, 
Pat and I will not be able to host The Big Morning at CrossHaven Farm this 
year. 

>> 
>> We looked forward to seeing of our friends who have shared the woods and 
fields with us for the past four years… and to meeting those who are new to 
the farm. 

>> 
>> Hopefully, we’ll be back at it next year.
>> 
>> Thanks for your understanding.
>> 
>> Scott
>> 
>> Scott and Pat Sainsbury
>> Moretown
> 
Subject: New arrivals in our Randolph Center woods
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 14:01:12 -0400
On our drizzly woods walk this morning we were accompanied by

several black-throated blue warblers and black-throated greens,
an ovenbird,
red-eyed vireos,
a chestnut sided warbler,
yellow-rumped warblers,
a tinkling brown creeper 

and far overhead, looking like a misty airliner,
was a north-flying loon.
Subject: Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 13:54:31 -0400
Thanks Susan,
Straight ahead for next year!
S

Scott Sainsbury
Beacon Associates

802-496-9393
802-249-0525 (mobile)
www.beaconassociates.com
Mailing Address
P.O. 1660
Waitsfield, VT.  05673
Delivery Address
75 Bridge Road
Moretown, VT.  05660



> On May 3, 2016, at 9:36 PM, Susan Werntgen  wrote:
> 
> Scott,
> 
> So grateful for you hosting in previous years.
> Thankful that you are prioritizing your needs. You have been more than 
generous in hosting this event. No worries.... Be well. 

> 
> Your neighbor Susan in Moretown Village.
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On May 3, 2016, at 4:55 PM, Scott Sainsbury  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> Unfortunately, due to a conjunction of difficulties and responsibilities, 
Pat and I will not be able to host The Big Morning at CrossHaven Farm this 
year. 

>> 
>> We looked forward to seeing of our friends who have shared the woods and 
fields with us for the past four years… and to meeting those who are new to 
the farm. 

>> 
>> Hopefully, we’ll be back at it next year.
>> 
>> Thanks for your understanding.
>> 
>> Scott
>> 
>> Scott and Pat Sainsbury
>> Moretown
> 
Subject: glossy ibis Herrick's Cove Bellows Falls
From: suki russo <0000001d6c4a8152-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 15:14:31 +0000
Don Clark found a glossy ibis out near the point at Herrick's. Still present 
when we all left about 10:30. Also 4 red-breasted mergansers, the great egret 
(been around for a couple weeks now) and 3 RB gulls. 

 JoAnne Russo
Saxtons River, VT
Subject: [SPAM?:##] Ovenbird
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 09:48:52 -0400
Heard my first Ovenbird this morning on my way out to do barn chores.

Mundi

N. Pownal
Subject: Rosie Return
From: Connie Youngstrom <conniey AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 09:48:36 -0400
The very first Rose-breasted Grosbeak just landed in the lilac bush.

Sent from my iPad

Connie
Subject: Re: E. Grosbeak
From: Veer Frost <vfrost AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 09:23:15 -0400
Also a pair here in NEK, visiting feeder area, and first HouseWren. 

On Wed, 4 May 2016 06:59:17 -0400, Sue  wrote:

       A pair of Evening Grosbeaks made a brief visit this morning here 
in Brandon. 
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

_____________________________

Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: FOY Ovenbird
From: Sarah Janson <sbjanson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 08:27:25 -0400
I heard my first ovenbird of the year up in the woods this morning. 

-Sarah
North Underhill
Subject: Fw: Yellow-throated Vireo - Bomoseen State Park, May 3, 2016 & Ruddy Duck on Bomoseen
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 11:09:21 +0000
A Yellow-throated Vireo has returned to Bomoseen State Park. Just down the road 
on the lake, from Cedar Mountain Road, we saw a Ruddy Duck and a Common Loon. 


     
Bomoseen State Park, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 3, 2016 9:48 AM - 11:43 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.75 mile(s)
32 species

Canada Goose  1
Common Merganser  3
Osprey  1
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Lesser Yellowlegs  1
Ring-billed Gull  1
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Yellow-throated Vireo  1    in same area as prior years
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  3
Common Raven  1
Tree Swallow  50
Barn Swallow  6
Black-capped Chickadee  5
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
American Robin  4
European Starling  1
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  1
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Common Grackle  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  7

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29381567 


Sue and Marv Elliott, Sue Wetmore, Kathleen Guinness



Subject: E. Grosbeak
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 May 2016 06:59:17 -0400
A pair of Evening Grosbeaks made a brief visit this morning here in Brandon.
Sue Wetmore  

Sent from my iPod
Subject: loons
From: Barclay Morris <bemorris AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 23:17:12 -0400
Any idea why dozens of common loons would be hanging out in the Inland Sea? 
Largely in the area bordered by Savage, Fish Bladder and Grand Isle. 

We have been seeing unusual numbers of them for a week or more. Our 28th summer 
here and this is a first. 

Last week we had 2 pair arguing over territory closer to Grand Isle, I’m 
surprised that the ones out there tonight are tolerating/ignoring each other. 


Any opinions?

Barclay Morris
Subject: Barred Owl nest at Mt. Philo
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 23:06:42 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

I was hiking this morning with my two year old daughter at Mount Philo
State Park in Charlotte, when I noticed a cavity in a white pine snag was
once again occupied by a Barred Owl.  I first noticed the/a Barred Owl pair
using the nest site two springs ago but the cavity was usurped by a Gray
Squirrel last year. The bird today appeared to be in an incubating position
(or more likely brooding given the date) so I feel pretty confident it was
not simply a roost site. I could be wrong.

I returned this afternoon with Molly and her five year old sister, Rita.
Rita is old enough to operate binoculars and it was quite a thrill to see
her face light up when she found the cavity in her bins.

This nest site seems ideal for sharing. There is a steady dose of hikers
and dog walkers parading by it every day so as long as people stay on the
road and don't linger, get loud, or use flash, I am guessing transient
observers will be tolerated. Getting off the road to get closer to the nest
tree diminishes the viewing and would require going down a steep slope so I
am trusting that nobody will be doing that.

As you start up the road (not trail) from the parking area, about 1/2 way
up Mount Philo, the road splits. Stay to the right on the upper road, which
wraps around the mountain on the west and south sides. As you get closer to
the summit, utility lines cross the road. Approximately 50 meters beyond
the wooden power pole on the right, there is a conspicuous sawed-off stump
on the right (downslope side) edge of the road. The cavity is in a white
pine snag, which forks at the top, approximately 50 feet off the road,
directly behind this stump as you are looking downhill. In order to see
into the cavity however, you need to continue up the road another 50 feet
or more and look back at eye level or slightly above eye level. I uploaded
an image in my eBird report so you can get a sense of what you are looking
for.

 http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29390563

I am confident the outstanding Vermont birding community will act
responsibly.

Another interesting natural history encounter on our hike was witnessing a
chipmunk attack, kill, and drag off a garter snake that was approximately
twice the length of the chipmunk (including the chipmunk's tail). That was
a first for me and prompted Rita to state: "Boy, I sure am glad I'm not
that garter snake!"

Good birding,
Eric

.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year
From: Susan Werntgen <swerntgen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 21:36:08 -0400
Scott,

So grateful for you hosting in previous years.
Thankful that you are prioritizing your needs. You have been more than generous 
in hosting this event. No worries.... Be well. 


Your neighbor Susan in Moretown Village.


Sent from my iPad

> On May 3, 2016, at 4:55 PM, Scott Sainsbury  
wrote: 

> 
> Hi all,
> 
> Unfortunately, due to a conjunction of difficulties and responsibilities, Pat 
and I will not be able to host The Big Morning at CrossHaven Farm this year. 

> 
> We looked forward to seeing of our friends who have shared the woods and 
fields with us for the past four years… and to meeting those who are new to 
the farm. 

> 
> Hopefully, we’ll be back at it next year.
> 
> Thanks for your understanding.
> 
> Scott
> 
> Scott and Pat Sainsbury
> Moretown
Subject: Re: Big Morning is Skipping This Year
From: Larry Levine <levine5279 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 21:01:55 -0400
Hi Scott

Too bad to hear that there will be no Big Morning this year. Hope all is well 
with you and Pat and maybe we'll see you in 2017. 


Thanks for hosting and happy birding
Larry Levine
Jericho


Sent from my iPhone

> On May 3, 2016, at 4:55 PM, Scott Sainsbury  
wrote: 

> 
> Hi all,
> 
> Unfortunately, due to a conjunction of difficulties and responsibilities, Pat 
and I will not be able to host The Big Morning at CrossHaven Farm this year. 

> 
> We looked forward to seeing of our friends who have shared the woods and 
fields with us for the past four years… and to meeting those who are new to 
the farm. 

> 
> Hopefully, we’ll be back at it next year.
> 
> Thanks for your understanding.
> 
> Scott
> 
> Scott and Pat Sainsbury
> Moretown
Subject: Big Morning is Skipping This Year
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 16:55:39 -0400
Hi all,

Unfortunately, due to a conjunction of difficulties and responsibilities, Pat 
and I will not be able to host The Big Morning at CrossHaven Farm this year. 


We looked forward to seeing of our friends who have shared the woods and fields 
with us for the past four years… and to meeting those who are new to the 
farm. 


Hopefully, we’ll be back at it next year.

Thanks for your understanding.

Scott

Scott and Pat Sainsbury
Moretown
Subject: New VT eBird media search tool!
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 16:39:48 -0400
We are excited release eBird Media Search, a tool for exploring photos and
sounds uploaded through eBird, as well as the full collection of bird
sounds and video archived in the Macaulay Library through traditional
methods. With more than half a million images and thousands of audio files
uploaded to eBird over the past five months there is plenty to explore!
This initial version of Media Search is focused on providing results for
species, date range, and location combinations, while subsequent
development will focus on increasing the metadata associated with uploaded
media, and building out advanced search capabilities. We hope these tools
provide an exciting environment to explore the contributions of others, and
also to increase the public visibility of your own efforts.

Read more about it (
http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/introducing-the-ebird-media-search/) and take
the new Media Search tool for a test drive right now!
https://ebird.org/media/vt/catalog

Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


Subject: Photos of 6 species at Campbell Flats in Norwich
From: Jim Block <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 13:17:00 -0400
I put photos from yesterday morning of a Lesser Yellowlegs, Eastern
Kingbird, a pair of Blue-winged Teal, a Mallard, and an American Bittern at:

http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/05/campbell-flats/  

This blog also has photos from a few days earlier of a Green Heron at the
same spot.

 

Jim Block

Etna, NH
Subject: Bittern Eating Huge Frog-photo sequence
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 06:42:05 -0400
I got some videos of this event, but haven't figured out how to get them on
Flickr yet. Meanwhile, here is a slideshow of the sequence. You can click
on the background to slow down the slides.

http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?p=1142

Does anyone know what kind of frog this is?

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Emerald Lake State Park, May 2, 2016
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 03:10:23 +0000
Not expecting much given today's weather, but waterthrushes were fun - swallow 
count a challenge and the 'little' fall out of YRWarblers unexpected. 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2016 10:38 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - Emerald Lake State Park, May 2, 2016

Emerald Lake State Park, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 2, 2016 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments:     45 degrees, overcast - rain predicted, noticeable  s wind
17 species

Canada Goose  1
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1     heard
Blue Jay  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 30 Difficult to determine numbers - among flock 
of TRES. Observed a few (brown) swallows actually alight on beach so 
comfortable with ID. 

Tree Swallow 100 100s flying over water. Also observed Rough-wings and Barn, 
but no others 

Barn Swallow  30     Difficult to determine numbers
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  5
American Robin  8
Louisiana Waterthrush  2     Call note heard
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1     Only other warbler seen among YRWA
Yellow-rumped Warbler  50     Large group responded to pishing
Chipping Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  1
House Finch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29369730 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Whip-poor-wills ... Weybridge
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 21:05:56 -0400
The Whip-poor-wills are back at the Snake Mountain Road, Weybridge site; 
perhaps having taken advantage of the warm, southerly winds of yesterday.

Two singing at the same time, starting at 8:25, virtually exactly at the 
end of civil twilight (8:28pm) considering the low overcast.  They sang 
for about 40 seconds.

The location is 0.7miles north of the intersection of Forrest Road and 
Snake Mountain Road. They were up the wooded slope on the west side of 
the road.

I have been to this site virtually every night for the past two weeks 
hoping to identify the arrival date.

Earliest dates at this site for recent years are:
2015     May 3rd
2014     May 10th
2013     May 7th
2012     May 6th

Ian
Subject: FOY AMBI
From: Marcy Blauvelt <mbblauvelt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 17:21:35 -0400
Our Bittern is back on Gregg Hill Road in Waterbury Center, blending right in 
with the reeds and grasses this morning. 

Subject: FOY RBG
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 16:46:01 -0400
First Rose-Breasted Grosbeak male is back in all his flamboyant glory. 
I had three pairs nesting here last year, so I'm still hoping for more.

Jane
(Shoreham)
Subject: Wren
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 16:22:12 -0400
House wren returned to the yard claiming loudly the birdhouse.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Shorebirds and more in Arlington
From: Anne Hunter and Andrew Knafel <anneandandrew AT CLEARBROOKFARM.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 16:15:14 -0400
Making a quick trip to Arlington this afternoon I just found a Common Tern and 
Cormorant at Miller’s pond on the North end of Depot Rd. At Howell’s swamp 
I counted 21 Lesser Yellowlegs, 3 Greater Yellowlegs, 1 Solitary Sandpiper, 2 
Spotted Sandpipers, 1 Snipe and 2 Killdeer. 


Andrew Knafel
Shaftsbury
Subject: Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, May 2, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 19:58:03 +0000
A Hermit Thrush, a Winter Wren and a Lousiana Waterthrush all were singing at 
the sme time at Northwood Park this morning. Black-throated Green Warblers have 
returned. A Field Sparrow, not usual at this spot, was singing near the parking 
area. 



Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 2, 2016 8:42 AM - 10:35 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
25 species (+1 other taxa)

Mallard  3
American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid)  
Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Mourning Dove  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
Northern Flicker  2
Eastern Phoebe  3
Blue-headed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  17
Tufted Titmouse  2
Brown Creeper  7
Winter Wren  2
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  3
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Pine Warbler  3
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  12
Field Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29353305 


Sue and Marv Elliott


Subject: Female Indigo Bunting ... Bittersweet Falls, Weybridge
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 11:55:14 -0400
At Bittersweet Falls early yesterday morning, in a cacophony of dozens 
of Yellow-rumps, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and White-throated Sparrows, 
plus a Black-throated Green Warbler, one piercing Louisiana Waterthrush, 
and a solitary, singing Hermit Thrush, there was one, more subdued, 
female Indigo Bunting in the mid-canopy.

Ian
Subject: Spring Bird Walks
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 08:28:47 -0400
Hello VT Birders! I'm going to be leading/co-leading some bird walks this
spring, and would love it if you joined me. Sites include some well known
hotspots, as well as some new places with great habitat. For more
information you can visit the website of the sponsoring group, or contact
me directly. Hope to see you there!


State Farm Property, Duxbury
Mad Birders, Duxbury Land Trust
Saturday, May 14th 07:30

(Meet at Crossett Brook Middle School at 07:15)


Woodside Park, Essex
Winooski Valley Park District
Sunday, May 15th 07:30


Big Morning, Moretown
Mad Birders
Saturday, May 21st 07:00


Muddy Brook Wetland Reserve, South Burlington
Winooski Valley Park District
Sunday, May 22nd 07:30


Cross Vermont Trail, Waterbury
North Branch Nature Center
Friday, May 27th 07:00


BirdFest, Montpelier
North Branch Nature Center
Saturday, May 28th 07:00


Waterbury Reservoir, Waterbury
Mad Birders, Friends of the Waterbury Reservoir
Sunday, May 29th 07:30 (Preregistration required)


Chimney Trail, Waterbury
Waterbury Conservation Commission
Saturday, June 4th 07:30

-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
17 Elm St Apt. 3
Waterbury, VT 05676
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Mad Birders Berlin Pond Walk
From: Martha Whitney <marthacwhitney AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 20:28:55 -0400
Hi Zach,
Thank you for an absolutley wonderful birding feast.  Its my first time
with the mad Birders and look to many more.
Martha from Burlington

On Sun, May 1, 2016 at 4:42 PM, Zacheriah Cota-Weaver  wrote:

> This morning, 17 Mad Birders ventured out on a dreary May Day to celebrate
> early spring migration at Berlin Pond. Despite missing a few expected
> regulars and migrants, several surprise appearances gave us a grand total
> of 54 species for the day. Highlights included Common Loon, Bald Eagle,
> Green Heron, Bonaparte's Gull, displaying Wilson's Snipe, and a plethora of
> migrating songbirds. Link to the full checklist is below. Thanks to all in
> attendance for a fun morning of birding!
>
> Berlin Pond checklist
> 
>
> --
> Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
> 17 Elm St Apt. 3
> Waterbury, VT 05676
> zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
>
Subject: [SPAM?:##] White crowned sparrow in Montpelier
From: Tom slayton <slayton.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 19:36:26 -0400
The feeders are down, but a handsome white-crowned sparrow was scouting about 
the back yards of Terrace Street. Along with a couple of white throated 
sparrows and a song sparrow. Also saw a spotted sandpiper on a small gravel bar 
at the mouth of the North Branch. (In back of downtown Shaw's supermarket!) 

  Tom Slayton

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Mad Birders Berlin Pond Walk
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 16:42:11 -0400
This morning, 17 Mad Birders ventured out on a dreary May Day to celebrate
early spring migration at Berlin Pond. Despite missing a few expected
regulars and migrants, several surprise appearances gave us a grand total
of 54 species for the day. Highlights included Common Loon, Bald Eagle,
Green Heron, Bonaparte's Gull, displaying Wilson's Snipe, and a plethora of
migrating songbirds. Link to the full checklist is below. Thanks to all in
attendance for a fun morning of birding!

Berlin Pond checklist


-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
17 Elm St Apt. 3
Waterbury, VT 05676
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Bird walk
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 16:33:24 -0400
May 21 in Brandon a tour of Hawk Hill behind the Otter Valley High School. 
Time:8:00 a.m. Parking on the south end of the parking lot.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: b flewelling <bflewelling3263 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 20:12:44 +0000
First of year Rose-breasted Grosbeak In my Lilac bush this afternoon in 
Rochester. 

Also, a friend of mine reported a Ruby-throated Hummingbird at her feeder 
Friday afternoon.  


Bruce Flewelling 
RT 73, Rochester 
Subject: FLICKER
From: Ed Green <edgreen3 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 12:31:35 -0400
Saw my first Flicker of the season.  
Subject: Re: Mansfield
From: "LaBarr, Mark" <MLaBARR AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 12:31:07 +0000
And closer to sea level...a little more than 97ft above sea level, 3 Common 
Terns back at Popasquash Island and 17 on Rock Island as of Friday. A little 
balmier conditions on the lake with...sun and 60 degrees in St. Albans Bay. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Chris Rimmer
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2016 10:31 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield

Kent McFarland, John Loyd and I spent yesterday on the Mt. Mansfield ridgeline, 
prepping for our upcoming field season. With the toll road not yet open and a 
pile of gear to transport up there, we were whisked up the ski trails on a 
monster Snowcat, courtesy of the Stowe Mountain Resort. 

Snow conditions on the ridgeline are at what might be an historic low for the 
date, with only 24" at the fabled snow stake 
 and patches of bare ground in 
more exposed areas. 


Our goal was to place 10 automated recording devices (ARDs) and 3 time-lapse 
cameras (phenocams) at 200-250 yard intervals across the ridgeline, in advance 
of the main arrival of migrants, of which there were precious few yesterday. 
Despite relatively mild temperatures that approached 40F degrees and light NW 
winds, we encountered only 3 recent arrivals - 2 Winter Wrens that sang briefly 
along the Amherst Trail and a single junco in the uppermost parking lot. Pine 
Siskins were the most common species, with several groups of 2-5 individuals. 
Two individual flyover Bohemian Waxwings were a surprise - our first in 25 
years studying Mansfield's birds (though we're typically only there 
May-September...). We had more evidence of mammalian than avian life on the 
ridgeline, with tracks of snowshoe hare, bobcat, moose, red squirrel, and 
red-backed vole. 


The ARDs and phenocams are a new element of VCE's long-term studies on 
Mansfield, as we seek to investigate the impacts of climate change on the 
mountain's breeding bird populations. The ARDs will document the arrival of 
each species and the build-up of numbers, while phenocams will document 
snowmelt and leaf-out of heartleaf paper birch and mountain ash. We'll also 
sample the emergence of insects and spiders, and correlate all of this with 
nesting phenology, which we'll measure via the breeding condition of birds we 
capture in our mist nets. Our overall goal is to determine whether 
'phenological mismatches' occur, in 2016 and/or in years to come, as the timing 
of avian breeding and arthropod prey abundance become (as preliminary evidence 
indicates elsewhere) increasingly misaligned. 


We hope to get an early start on our annual mist netting in two weeks. If 
Bicknell's Thrush are back by then, it will be an all-time early record. 

I'm putting the chances at < 50:50.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: FOY Hummer
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 11:58:41 +0000
Seen feeding on the Mertensia blooming in my garden. It must be May 1! Out goes 
the feeder. 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Sunday, May 1, 2016 7:54 AM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, May 1, 2016

My yard birds, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 1, 2016 7:10 AM - 7:20 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     45 degrees, overcast, rain predicted
8 species

Mourning Dove  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 7:10a.m. - male seen feeding on Mertensia in 
garden. Observed at 10' from house window 

Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
White-throated Sparrow  4
House Finch  1
Purple Finch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29322508 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: FOY - Yellow warblers & House Wren
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 01:52:38 +0000
About to leave local birding swamp in E. Dorset when in fly 2 FOY Yellow 
Warblers - sunny day, sunny birds, sunny smile! 


Back at home to be greeted by House Wren - who appeared to arrive ready to 
breed. I first saw/heard him on feeder platform and next thing I knew, he was 
on fence rail fluttering both wings madly and singing away! Did he think I was 
a HOWR??? 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2016 9:46 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds, Apr 30, 2016

My yard birds, Bennington, Vermont, US
Apr 30, 2016 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     60 degrees - tallied while working in yd
15 species

Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  3
Black-capped Chickadee  1
Tufted Titmouse  1
House Wren 1 FOY - singing all pm. Sat on fence doing wing fluttering - no 
other wren seen. 

Chipping Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  6
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  1
Common Grackle  2     Chasing Sharpie
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  6

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29316685 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: RBGB
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 15:58:59 -0400
A FOY male Rose-breasted Grosbeak has been at our feeder today.  Beautiful.
No female yet.

 

Barbara Brosnan

Weybridge
Subject: rose-breasted grosbeak
From: Eric Wood <ericw5 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 09:40:00 -0400
First sighting of the year for the RBG, at the feeder, here in Jericho. A bit 
earlier than usual. 


Eric
Subject: John Fitzpatrick and the Lab of O
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 23:52:33 -0400
If you’ve not had the opportunity to hear John Fitzpatrick elucidate the 
vision and impact of the Lab of Ornithology, his talks are always inspiring. 


Here is a recording of a presentation he did recently. I believe that he was 
speaking to a group of emeriti at Cornell. 


http://www.cornell.edu/video/john-fitzpatrick-birds-can-save-the-world

By the way, he‚Äôs introduced by Charlie Wolcott ‚ÄĒ former head of the Lab ‚ÄĒ 
who many of you may remember from when he traveled up here a few years ago to 
present his research on Loons, and spend a morning birding with all who wanted 
to come at Dead Creek. 


Scott 
Moretown
Subject: Mansfield
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 22:31:28 -0400
Kent McFarland, John Loyd and I spent yesterday on the Mt. Mansfield
ridgeline, prepping for our upcoming field season. With the toll road not
yet open and a pile of gear to transport up there, we were whisked up the
ski trails on a monster Snowcat, courtesy of the Stowe Mountain Resort.
Snow conditions on the ridgeline are at what might be an historic low for
the date, with only 24" at the fabled snow stake
 and patches of bare ground in
more exposed areas.

Our goal was to place 10 automated recording devices (ARDs) and 3
time-lapse cameras (phenocams) at 200-250 yard intervals across the
ridgeline, in advance of the main arrival of migrants, of which there were
precious few yesterday. Despite relatively mild temperatures that
approached 40F degrees and light NW winds, we encountered only 3 recent
arrivals - 2 Winter Wrens that sang briefly along the Amherst Trail and a
single junco in the uppermost parking lot. Pine Siskins were the most
common species, with several groups of 2-5 individuals. Two individual
flyover Bohemian Waxwings were a surprise - our first in 25 years studying
Mansfield's birds (though we're typically only there May-September...). We
had more evidence of mammalian than avian life on the ridgeline, with
tracks of snowshoe hare, bobcat, moose, red squirrel, and red-backed vole.

The ARDs and phenocams are a new element of VCE's long-term studies on
Mansfield, as we seek to investigate the impacts of climate change on the
mountain's breeding bird populations. The ARDs will document the arrival of
each species and the build-up of numbers, while phenocams will document
snowmelt and leaf-out of heartleaf paper birch and mountain ash. We'll also
sample the emergence of insects and spiders, and correlate all of this with
nesting phenology, which we'll measure via the breeding condition of birds
we capture in our mist nets. Our overall goal is to determine whether
'phenological mismatches' occur, in 2016 and/or in years to come, as the
timing of avian breeding and arthropod prey abundance become (as
preliminary evidence indicates elsewhere) increasingly misaligned.

We hope to get an early start on our annual mist netting in two weeks. If
Bicknell's Thrush are back by then, it will be an all-time early record.
I'm putting the chances at < 50:50.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: New arrivals
From: Theresa Armata <tarmat AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 21:17:25 -0400
At a couple of stops in Bennington County today:
 Black and White Warbler 2 (1 each at Greenberg Reserve Benn, South Stream Pond 
Pownal 

  Black Throated Green   2  ( One each as above)
           Nashville Warbler 1 ( South Stream Pond Pownal)
 Broad-wing Hawk 2 (one perched on wire near Clear Brook Farm Shaftsbury, one 
soaring over Greenberg Reserve Benn). 


Many Yellow Rumps, plentiful Ruby - crowned Kinglets , still a few Palm 
Warblers. 


Terri Armata Bennington
Subject: Snow Geese at Mud Creek WMA
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 19:51:39 -0400
This afternoon I counted well over 500 Snow Geese at the Mud Creek WMA in 
Alburgh. 



Oh yes. I also counted 14 Rusty Blackbirds flipping leaves next to a shallow 
pool in search of invertebrates. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington, VT
Subject: Brandon list
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 16:29:48 -0400
My Short Swamp Rd was listed as Rutland but it is in Brandon.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Waterthrush
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 09:27:48 -0400
This morning four Northern Waterthrushes sang loud and clear while Ruffed 
Grouse kept 

the rhythm section going. Sapsuckers provided a syncopated beat with several 
drum rolls by a Pileated. 

This on Short Swamp Rd. in Brandon.
Sue Wetmore
Sent from my iPod
Subject: Whip poor will
From: carolclyde <carolclyde AT FAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 21:03:05 -0400
Heard at 8:30 pm on the Alburgh Tongue.

Clyde and Carol Yarnell


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S‚ĄĘ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Join the Mad Birders at Berlin Pond
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 12:41:38 -0400
Come celebrate May Day this *SUNDAY* at BERLIN POND, a Mecca for birds and
birders alike! It is a great location for finding migrating song birds,
waterfowl, loons, herons, and much more. Join Zac Cota and Patti Haynes as
the Mad Birders explore different habitats around the pond. Please carpool
if possible and* meet at 7:30* in the parking lot at the north end.

The weather promises to be wonderful, so we hope to see many of you out
there celebrating the first of May with us. If you have questions contact
Patti Haynes by phone: 496-2220 or by email: patti.haynes AT gmail.com.

We have many other spring walks planned, including the ever popular BIG
MORNING on May 21st. Click on this link to madbirders.org and check under
'events' to find out more.
Subject: Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, Apr 28, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:37:11 +0000
A Louisiana Waterthrush has returned to the Northwood Park Loop in Rutland 
Town, where I first heard it during the 2nd breeding bird atlas. A Spotted 
Sandpiper has also returned and a Winter Wren, Pine Warblers and Blue-headed 
Vireos are singing in their usual spots. 



Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, Rutland, Vermont, US
Apr 28, 2016 10:00 AM - 11:35 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
29 species

Mallard  2
Common Merganser  2
Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Blue-headed Vireo  4
American Crow  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  3
Tree Swallow  1
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  13
Tufted Titmouse  2
Red-breasted Nuthatch  2
Brown Creeper  2
Winter Wren  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  11
Hermit Thrush  3
American Robin  3
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Pine Warbler  3
Chipping Sparrow  2
Dark-eyed Junco  1
White-throated Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  5
American Goldfinch  7

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29260489 


Sue Elliott


Subject: Great Horned Owl PHOTOS
From: Jim Block <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 07:30:53 -0400
I put some photos from the short time I spent recently with a pair of Great
Horned Owls in central Vermont here:

http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/04/great-horned-owl/

 

Jim Block

Etna, NH
Subject: Re: Pacific Loon, Lake Dunmore
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 06:16:35 -0400
great comparison with common loons!

-----Original Message----- 
From: Ron Payne
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2016 9:51 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pacific Loon, Lake Dunmore

Mike Korkuc found and photographed an adult breeding plumaged Pacific Loon 
on Lake Dunmore yesterday afternoon. Pictures of it can be found on the Lake 
Dunmore / Fern Lake Association blog:


https://lakedunmorefernlakeassoc.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/busy-couple-days-unusual-bird-news/ 


--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT 
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 21:59:06 -0400
This evening I had some great looks at a Louisiana Waterthrush as it worked 
it’s way up the brook, bobbing its tail constantly, grabbing things out of 
the water to eat, and turning over leaves. It did not sing at all, so I’m 
guessing it was a female. I was able to follow it for about 10 minutes perhaps, 
as the road paralleled the brook. Got to have another wonderful look at one 
further up the same brook on Saturday. Feeling very fortunate in getting to see 
them now, as it’ll be much harder once the trees leaf out. Such cute pink 
legs! 


Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT
Subject: Pacific Loon, Lake Dunmore
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 21:51:47 -0400
Mike Korkuc found and photographed an adult breeding plumaged Pacific Loon on 
Lake Dunmore yesterday afternoon. Pictures of it can be found on the Lake 
Dunmore / Fern Lake Association blog:  



https://lakedunmorefernlakeassoc.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/busy-couple-days-unusual-bird-news/ 


--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: Hermit Thrush and Blue Headed Vireo
From: Becky Giroux <ravenrr AT WCVT.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:37:29 -0400
FOY Hermit Thrust foraging in the brush. Tuesday at 7am I heard and saw the 
Blue Headed Vireo. 


Welcome Spring
Subject: Re: Emerald Lake, East Dorset
From: Barbara Powers <barkiepvt AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 18:05:33 -0400
So glad the birds were still there and you could experience such a wonderful 
display of YRWA. It was magical seeing so many at once. A true gift. 

Barbara Powers 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 27, 2016, at 5:20 PM, Pamela Coleman 
<0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 

> 
> Although not in the same numbers as in earlier posts, the Yellow-Rumped 
fallout here was still respectful. The walk along the canal leading to the 
beach produced at least a dozen, along w/two palm warblers. I made my way to 
one of the picnic tables close to the shore line trail and did a quick scan and 
saw a few more. I was disappointed by the lack of birds as I started down the 
trail but after 10 minutes or so was delighted to see my FOY Hermit Thrush! 
Other than a few robins the rest of my walk was uneventful. But on the way back 
was a different story. 2-3 more hermit thrushes, several robins and finally the 
fall-out I was waiting for! The closer I came to the trail head the more 
numerous they became. At least 2-3 dozen yellow rumps, and at least 2 palm 
warblers. Also seen was 1 titmouse and 1 wb nuthatch. This time the edge along 
the beach was a twitter with sound and motion. It was noon-time and the sun 
made it hard to make them all out but at least another c! 

 ouple dozen YRWA and probably a few other species as well. Also seen were 2 
ruby-crowned kinglets and 2 flickers, robins, chickadees, and crows. Heard from 
across the lake a barred owl. All in all a great day, at least for me! Pam 

Subject: Re: Killdeer, chapter 10!
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 09:08:04 -0400
I remember when my oldest kids were at Jericho Elementary School (back in the 
late seventies and eighties) and the old portion had a flat gravel roof, horned 
larks used to nest up there. Our tennis courts are there also, and I used to 
love to see and hear them while playing tennis. Itís been a long time since 
Iíve heard or seen any horned larks near there. Evergreen in Jericho 

Subject: Re: Brazil
From: Michelle <milowhite AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 22:46:14 -0400
Are you all set with guides? We went 5 years ago I have our guides info he was 
great. Fluent in English 

Michele 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 25, 2016, at 8:48 AM, Connie Youngstrom  wrote:
> 
> Hi Ruth,
> Sounds exciting! Silly question: could that possibly include airfare?? 
Thanks, 

> Connie
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> Connie
> 
>> On Apr 24, 2016, at 10:40 PM, Ruth  wrote:
>> 
>> A good friend is putting together a medium budget birding trip to the 
Pantanal and Atlantic Rain Forest in Brazil. I have signed up but 4 more 
commitments are needed to make the trip a go. 

>> 
>> 
>> The Pantanal and More - 10 days  $2,990   Oct 18 - 27.
>> 
>> Post-trip Extension to Intervales (Atlantic Rain Forest) - $835.  Oct 27-31.
>> 
>> 
>> Max participants: 8 plus - Brazilian guide and US guide. Please request full 
itinerary off list. 

>> 
>> 
>> Ruth Stewart
>> E. Dorset, VT
>> 
>> 
Subject: No Subject
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:42:14 -0400
Barbara,
On the phone app, you are correct, right now there is no way to add gender
counts. But, you can always log into eBird at home and go to My eBird and
edit the checklist easily and quickly by adding gender counts, nesting
information, photos, etc etc.
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2



On Sun, Apr 24, 2016 at 2:15 PM, Barbara Powers 
wrote:

> I have also found that there is no spot for gender other than the comment
> box. Does anyone transcribe this information to the right box?  Suggestions.
> Barbara Powers
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Apr 24, 2016, at 2:06 PM, Patti Haynes 
> wrote:
> >
> > Yes Kent, very good to know and I have been trying to be diligent about
> adding that kind of information on my eBird lists.
> >
> > However, I have run into a problem now that I am entering the majority
> of my data via my iPhone. There is no way that I can see to enter a
> breeding code. I can put that information in the comment section for each
> species, but that's it. Any suggestions? It seems rather a pain to have to
> go back in and edit once the list has already been submitted.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Patti
> > Moretown Village
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Apr 24, 2016, at 1:30 PM, Charlotte Bill <
> 00000027776b430b-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
> >>
> >> Thank you, Kent! This article is helpful, ESPECIALLY the part that says
> we need not worry about safe dates when we enter our data. This is valuable
> information. Thanks again!
> >> Charlotte BillEnosburgh
> >>
> >>
> >>     From: Kent McFarland 
> >> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> >> Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:50 AM
> >> Subject: [VTBIRD]
> >>
> >> The Second Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Vermont (2003-2007) (see
> >> http://val.vtecostudies.org/projects/vermont-breeding-bird-atlas/), a
> >> project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, was an amazing effort by the
> birding
> >> community. Many of us searched the state to document breeding bird
> species.
> >> The atlas collected important conservation information and it was a lot
> of
> >> fun. Many of us miss it! But with Vermont eBird, the atlas never ends!
> We
> >> want you to keep documenting the nesting status of the birds you are
> >> finding. You can make your Vermont eBird sightings even more valuable by
> >> adding breeding information to them. Read more to learn how…
> >>
> >>
> 
http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/the-breeding-bird-atlas-is-never-complete-at-vermont-ebird/ 

> >>
> >> Good birding!
> >> Kent
> >> ____________________________
> >>
> >> Kent McFarland
> >> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> >> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> >> 802.649.1431 x2
> >>
> >> 
> >>
> >>
>
Subject: No Subject
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:40:30 -0400
I am afraid that there is no way around this currently Patti. When I use
the eBird phone app, I then go into My eBird and add auxiliary data such as
nesting information, photos and sounds, counts of age and sex, etc etc. It
really doesn't take me long at all.
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2



On Sun, Apr 24, 2016 at 2:05 PM, Patti Haynes 
wrote:

> Yes Kent, very good to know and I have been trying to be diligent about
> adding that kind of information on my eBird lists.
>
> However, I have run into a problem now that I am entering the majority of
> my data via my iPhone. There is no way that I can see to enter a breeding
> code. I can put that information in the comment section for each species,
> but that's it. Any suggestions? It seems rather a pain to have to go back
> in and edit once the list has already been submitted.
>
> Thanks,
> Patti
> Moretown Village
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Apr 24, 2016, at 1:30 PM, Charlotte Bill <
> 00000027776b430b-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
> >
> > Thank you, Kent! This article is helpful, ESPECIALLY the part that says
> we need not worry about safe dates when we enter our data. This is valuable
> information. Thanks again!
> > Charlotte BillEnosburgh
> >
> >
> >      From: Kent McFarland 
> > To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> > Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:50 AM
> > Subject: [VTBIRD]
> >
> > The Second Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Vermont (2003-2007) (see
> > http://val.vtecostudies.org/projects/vermont-breeding-bird-atlas/), a
> > project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, was an amazing effort by the
> birding
> > community. Many of us searched the state to document breeding bird
> species.
> > The atlas collected important conservation information and it was a lot
> of
> > fun. Many of us miss it! But with Vermont eBird, the atlas never ends! We
> > want you to keep documenting the nesting status of the birds you are
> > finding. You can make your Vermont eBird sightings even more valuable by
> > adding breeding information to them. Read more to learn how…
> >
> >
> 
http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/the-breeding-bird-atlas-is-never-complete-at-vermont-ebird/ 

> >
> > Good birding!
> > Kent
> > ____________________________
> >
> > Kent McFarland
> > Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> > PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> > 802.649.1431 x2
> >
> > 
> >
> >
>
Subject: Re: Killdeer, chapter 10!
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:17:51 -0400
No idea! Thanks for establishing "how done it!Ē 

On Apr 26, 2016, at 2:03 PM, Chip Darmstadt  
wrote: 


> Is that gravel patch at U32 still there John? Larry Clarfeld and I installed
> that with students quite a few years ago in an attempt to provide nesting
> substrate for Common Nighthawk (or at least Killdeer)! Never heard anything
> back about the success of it (or not!).
> Cheers, Chip
> 
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> North Branch Nature Center
> (802) 229-6206
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of John Snell
> Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2016 12:23 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Killdeer, chapter 10!
> 
> Great story Ali. I used to work up on roofs at night with infrared imagers
> and it was so easy to see the Killdeers who seemed totally perplexed that I
> knew where they were. Even when they flew off the next, the eggs remained
> very warm and, to me, visible. The advent of all rubber, no gravel roofs
> means less nesting habitat thought U32 in East Montpelier installed a couple
> square yards of gravel just to try to attract them.
> 
> John
> 
> 
> On Apr 26, 2016, at 9:52 AM, alison wagner  wrote:
> 
>> Fellow birders, 
>> 
>> Snow on the 26th of April has enabled me to find, for the first time in
> ten years, the Killdeer nest on top of the 1958 wing-addition of the
> Hinesburg Community School! This roof has been habitat for the shorebirds
> every year, but they have blended in so well with the multi-colored round
> stones, they've always eluded my detection. Regardless of my endless
> searching and waiting for a changing of the guard, I've never found them
> (like looking for that one jigsaw puzzle piece that MUST be missing). Until
> now! Like Horton the elephant, the Killdeer are faithful 100 percent! The
> snow is melting on the parent on the nest while it covers the roof around
> them and eliminates their ability to hide. 
>> 
>> I've been able to share this with middle school students and the timing is
> perfect as they have been learning about natural selection! Questions are
> coming out: 
>> 
>> What will happen to the eggs? ( hopefully the parent's body will keep them
> warm) 
>> 
>> Can we bring the eggs inside to keep them warm? (it's best to let nature
> do the work) 
>> 
>> Will the eggs freeze? What if they die? (the parents will try again). 
>> 
>> Fingers crossed they'll all make it through this cold spell and face the
> challenges that await the chicks after hatching! 
>> 
>> Ali 
>> HCS (& Huntington) 
Subject: Re: Killdeer, chapter 10!
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:03:05 -0400
Is that gravel patch at U32 still there John? Larry Clarfeld and I installed
that with students quite a few years ago in an attempt to provide nesting
substrate for Common Nighthawk (or at least Killdeer)! Never heard anything
back about the success of it (or not!).
Cheers, Chip

Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org



-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of John Snell
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2016 12:23 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Killdeer, chapter 10!

Great story Ali. I used to work up on roofs at night with infrared imagers
and it was so easy to see the Killdeers who seemed totally perplexed that I
knew where they were. Even when they flew off the next, the eggs remained
very warm and, to me, visible. The advent of all rubber, no gravel roofs
means less nesting habitat thought U32 in East Montpelier installed a couple
square yards of gravel just to try to attract them.

John


On Apr 26, 2016, at 9:52 AM, alison wagner  wrote:

> Fellow birders, 
> 
> Snow on the 26th of April has enabled me to find, for the first time in
ten years, the Killdeer nest on top of the 1958 wing-addition of the
Hinesburg Community School! This roof has been habitat for the shorebirds
every year, but they have blended in so well with the multi-colored round
stones, they've always eluded my detection. Regardless of my endless
searching and waiting for a changing of the guard, I've never found them
(like looking for that one jigsaw puzzle piece that MUST be missing). Until
now! Like Horton the elephant, the Killdeer are faithful 100 percent! The
snow is melting on the parent on the nest while it covers the roof around
them and eliminates their ability to hide. 
> 
> I've been able to share this with middle school students and the timing is
perfect as they have been learning about natural selection! Questions are
coming out: 
> 
> What will happen to the eggs? ( hopefully the parent's body will keep them
warm) 
> 
> Can we bring the eggs inside to keep them warm? (it's best to let nature
do the work) 
> 
> Will the eggs freeze? What if they die? (the parents will try again). 
> 
> Fingers crossed they'll all make it through this cold spell and face the
challenges that await the chicks after hatching! 
> 
> Ali 
> HCS (& Huntington) 
Subject: Re: Hermit thrushes in Randolph Center
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 13:02:29 -0400
Ditto in here in Middlesex! Plus a couple more along the edge of the road. I've 
definitely seen this before with late April snow showers! 

Cheers, Chip


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org



-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Kathy Leonard
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2016 12:30 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hermit thrushes in Randolph Center

Hermit thrushes - THREE of them - poking around among the snow-laden daffodils 
in the flowerbed in front of our house this morning. 


Randolph Center
Subject: Hermit thrushes in Randolph Center
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 12:29:34 -0400
Hermit thrushes - THREE of them - poking around among the snow-laden daffodils 
in the flowerbed in front of our house this morning. 


Randolph Center
Subject: Re: Killdeer, chapter 10!
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 12:23:08 -0400
Great story Ali. I used to work up on roofs at night with infrared imagers and 
it was so easy to see the Killdeers who seemed totally perplexed that I knew 
where they were. Even when they flew off the next, the eggs remained very warm 
and, to me, visible. The advent of all rubber, no gravel roofs means less 
nesting habitat thought U32 in East Montpelier installed a couple square yards 
of gravel just to try to attract them. 


John


On Apr 26, 2016, at 9:52 AM, alison wagner  wrote:

> Fellow birders, 
> 
> Snow on the 26th of April has enabled me to find, for the first time in ten 
years, the Killdeer nest on top of the 1958 wing-addition of the Hinesburg 
Community School! This roof has been habitat for the shorebirds every year, but 
they have blended in so well with the multi-colored round stones, they've 
always eluded my detection. Regardless of my endless searching and waiting for 
a changing of the guard, I've never found them (like looking for that one 
jigsaw puzzle piece that MUST be missing). Until now! Like Horton the elephant, 
the Killdeer are faithful 100 percent! The snow is melting on the parent on the 
nest while it covers the roof around them and eliminates their ability to hide. 

> 
> I've been able to share this with middle school students and the timing is 
perfect as they have been learning about natural selection! Questions are 
coming out: 

> 
> What will happen to the eggs? ( hopefully the parent's body will keep them 
warm) 

> 
> Can we bring the eggs inside to keep them warm? (it's best to let nature do 
the work) 

> 
> Will the eggs freeze? What if they die? (the parents will try again). 
> 
> Fingers crossed they'll all make it through this cold spell and face the 
challenges that await the chicks after hatching! 

> 
> Ali 
> HCS (& Huntington) 
Subject: killdeer update...
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:31:11 -0400
...diligent parent still on the nest, surrounded by snow, with just its head 
showing. That's commitment! I hear it's supposed to get up into the 40's 
today....it better hurry up! 


Ali 
HCS