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Updated on Thursday, July 2 at 06:57 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Eastern Kingbird,©Julie Zickefoose

2 Jul kestrel [Sarah Fellows ]
1 Jul No Fish Crows in Leddy Park. [Michele Patenaude ]
30 Jun Re: To those of you eBirding Fish Crow observations from the Burlington area ... [David Eberly ]
30 Jun Western Meadowlark Still Present [Bruce MacPherson ]
30 Jun Re: Loons [Pamela Coleman ]
30 Jun Loons [Sue ]
29 Jun Re: Peregrine Recapture [anneboby ]
29 Jun Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont [Bruce MacPherson ]
29 Jun Western Meadowlark - Yes [Eric Hynes ]
28 Jun eBird Report - Birds of Vermont Museum, Jun 27, 2015 [E Talmage ]
28 Jun sheep herding bittern [Maeve Kim ]
28 Jun Loons [Sue ]
28 Jun Fw: eBird Report - Catamount Family Center, Jun 27, 2015 [Carl Runge ]
28 Jun Re: Western meadowlark [Linda Gionti ]
28 Jun Re: VTBIRD Digest - 26 Jun 2015 to 27 Jun 2015 (#2015-175) [stowelulu ]
28 Jun other Sibley thoughts [Maeve Kim ]
27 Jun Leddy Park Fish Crows Update [Michele Patenaude ]
27 Jun Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont [eve ticknor ]
27 Jun Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont [Alison Wagner ]
27 Jun David Sibley sighting in Vermont [Alison Wagner ]
27 Jun Re: Western meadowlark ["Nancy A. Brown" ]
27 Jun Western meadowlark [Sue ]
27 Jun Meadowlark continues [Mike Resch ]
26 Jun Re: Meadowlark [Eugenia Cooke ]
26 Jun Babies [Jane Stein ]
26 Jun Meadowlark [Sue ]
26 Jun Peregrine Recapture [David Merker ]
26 Jun Re: Loons [Eugenia Cooke ]
26 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Roy Pilcher ]
26 Jun Loons [Sue ]
26 Jun Western Meadowlark, Lake Road - Yes [Linda McElvany ]
26 Jun Re: Harriers ["Ian A. Worley" ]
26 Jun Western Meadowlark still present [Miriam Lawrence ]
26 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Gary Chapin ]
26 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Ron Payne ]
25 Jun Mansfield [Chris Rimmer ]
25 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Josh Phillips ]
25 Jun BB Cuckoo Union St Brandon, Jun 25, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
25 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Isis Erb ]
25 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [UVM ]
25 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Eugenia Cooke ]
25 Jun Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Allan Strong ]
25 Jun Western Meadowlark present [Zac Cota ]
24 Jun Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property) [Allan Strong ]
24 Jun Bald Eagles [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
24 Jun Re: Nestling Merlin at wildlife rescue [Kenny Pallis ]
24 Jun Re: Nestling Merlin at wildlife rescue [eve ticknor ]
24 Jun Nestling Merlin at wildlife rescue [H Nicolay ]
24 Jun Harriers [Sue ]
24 Jun Bird Fest: Reception This Friday Kicks Off Month Long Event [Nancy Carter ]
24 Jun National Park BioBlitz [Kent McFarland ]
23 Jun Two fledgling fish crows in Leddy Park [Michele Patenaude ]
22 Jun pine siskins [Eric Wood ]
22 Jun Re: snipe on a wire [Kaye Danforth ]
22 Jun snipe on a wire [Liz Lee ]
22 Jun Re: Celebrating Town Forest with eBird Hotspots [Ron Payne ]
22 Jun Celebrating Town Forest with eBird Hotspots [Ron Payne ]
22 Jun - Long Trail south Brandon Gap, Jun 20, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
20 Jun Swainson's thrush [Sue ]
20 Jun Common Gallinule at Charcoal Creek [Bruce MacPherson ]
19 Jun Mansfield hosts Bicknell descendants [Chris Rimmer ]
19 Jun Bobolink field visit tomorrow - rubber boots are best [Allan Strong ]
19 Jun Thrushes [Sue ]
19 Jun Cliff swallows [Sue ]
19 Jun 1 New Google Message [Susan Werntgen ]
19 Jun Kestrels [Mundi Smithers ]
18 Jun Re: forecasting snow [Kent McFarland ]
18 Jun forecasting snow [Scott Sainsbury ]
18 Jun CANCELLED: Mad Birder Lincoln Peak Bicknell's Thrush Bird Walk for June 20,2015 [Jeanne Elias ]
18 Jun Black Vulture, Brattleboro, 6/17 [Mike Resch ]
17 Jun swallows [Jean Arrowsmith ]
17 Jun Indigo bunting Pearl St., Brandon, Jun 17, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
16 Jun Correction - Mad Birders seek Leader for Bicknell Thrush Lincoln Peak walk on Saturday June 20th in Fayston [Jeanne Elias ]
16 Jun Mad Birders seek leader for Bicknell's Thrush Mt. Ellen Walk on Saturday June 20th [Jeanne Elias ]
16 Jun Re: Cedar waxwings redstart [Janet Warren ]
15 Jun Cedar waxwings [Martha McClintock ]

Subject: kestrel
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 07:54:17 -0400
It was a peaceful morning with the tree swallows trying to tease out their last 
baby when the nest box was attacked by a kestrel. The bird stuck its head in 
the box while two swallows attacked. I also got into the mode and ran outside 
and yelled. The kestrel flew and i was too busy interfering to see if it got 
the baby. However, one swallow is guarding the box and I hope for the best. 

And now a house wren has just gone into the new nest box the bluebirds are 
working on after their last nesting failed. Mr. Bluebird is beside himself. 

Oh my.It's bird eat bird out there.

Sally Fellows
Williston
.
Subject: No Fish Crows in Leddy Park.
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 21:58:39 -0400
I walked around Leddy Park this evening for about 50 minutes but I did not hear 
or see any Fish Crows. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085
Subject: Re: To those of you eBirding Fish Crow observations from the Burlington area ...
From: David Eberly <david.eberly AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 21:32:01 -0400
They are now nesting in Burlington VT and creating some excitement. Here's
an email from May you may like
On May 23, 2015 10:15 AM, "Ian A. Worley"  wrote:

> Hello to all observers of Fish Crows in the Burlington area.
>
> As the local eBird reviewer, I am encountering more and more submissions
> that inadequately distinguish Fish Crows from American Crows in the
> Burlington area.  This is a reminder that reporting a nasal call is almost
> always not sufficient for confirmation (
> http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/counting-vermonts-crows/). Here are some
> examples of comments I've received recently to support a Fish Crow
> observation, but do not provide adequate documentation for our small
> Burlington population:
>
> "heard"
> "Fish Crow call"
> "heard distinct call"
> "called"
> "one calling"
> "heard calling"
> "calling distinctively"
> "nasal"
> "nasal call"
> "distinctive nasal call"
>
> Adequate notations that I've seen this year include:
>
> "Gave two note nasal 'uh oh' call."
> "Two note 'uh uh' call in nasal voice."
> "Distinctive high 'hah-hah' repeated."
> "Calling frequently with the classic 'eh eh' call"
> "Nasal caw call repeatedly, and then 'uh-uh' call repeatedly."
> "They both gave the classic 'uh-uh' call."
>
> Jim Mead gave this excellent description and good example of documentation
> (which you can find via the eBird maps) when he submitted two Fish Crows in
> January at the Canoe Access, Champlain Mill Path.  It documents one bird
> and then uses two different size comparisons to document the other.
>
> "Fish Crow 2.  I heard one repeatedly calling with the distinct nasal
> uh-uh call. It called for about a minute, giving me enough time to find and
> watch it while it was still calling. I also found another one next to it
> and on the same branch. It was not calling but was of equal size. I also
> saw them fly off together. There were many American Crows in the same tree.
> Two of them were on a branch about 3' away from the Fish Crows which showed
> a good size comparison. The Fish Crows were noticeably proportionally
> smaller."
>
> A very useful distinction between the nasal calls of the two species is
> found in this widely used reference.  I've excerpted the most useful
> paragraphs below.
>
>
> 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/crows/FishCrow.htm?__hstc=60209138.78aef478b359884bd20fec190b9b8764.1404547686722.1432340445006.1432379190611.924&__hssc=60209138.18.1432379190611&__hsfp=1451114978 

>
> The excerpts:
>
> Visually, Fish Crows are difficult to tell from American Crows. Unless one
> has a great deal of experience in close observation of the species,
> identification is only safely done by voice.
>
> The calls of Fish Crows and American Crows are readily told apart.
> American Crows most frequently give the familiar "caw-caw."   Fish Crows
> have a much more nasal call that may be better enumerated "awh" or "uhn."
> The most diagnostic call of the Fish Crow is the double noted "uh-uh." I
> always say that if you want to tell the species of crow, ask it if it is an
> American Crow. Fish Crows will deny this by their emphatic "uh-uh!"
>
> The begging calls of the American Crow and the normal calls of the Fish
> Crow, although rather similar, can generally be distinguished by their
> construction. The overall quality and tone of the two are about the same.
> American Crow begs, however, are generally of longer duration and do not
> have the same abrupt ending that Fish Crows calls do. Think of if as
> "aaawwwwww" versus "aawwp". The American Crow begging call also often drops
> in pitch slightly at the end, which the Fish Crow call does not. American
> Crows never give the double noted "uh-uh" call that is so typical of Fish
> Crows in most areas. And Fish Crow calls are never terminated by the higher
> pitched gobbling notes that often end an American Crow's begging bout when
> it is fed.
> ...................................
> Hopefully this information will be a helpful aid when you next encounter a
> possible Fish Crow!
>
> Good birding to all,
>
> Ian
> .........................
> eBird reviewer
> Champlain Valley
> Vermont
>
Subject: Western Meadowlark Still Present
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:38:59 -0400
The Western Meadowlark in Charlotte reported by many observers during the past 
week was still present this afternoon at 4 P.M. in the field at the corner of 
Lake Road and Greenbush Road. The bird was actively singing from the second 
line of fence posts south of the road before flying off to a different location 
at the far southeastern corner of the property, where he resumed his 
performance. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Re: Loons
From: Pamela Coleman <perryfalcon1013 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 19:49:44 +0000
Such a cool moment!  Thanks for sharing!  Pam

      From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
 To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2:29 PM
 Subject: [VTBIRD] Loons
   
This early morning we watched the 3 day old loon chicks and parents on L. 
Dunmore. Small minnows were brought in for breakfast which the chicks readily 
consumed. When the food bearing adult neared, soft hoots were exchanged between 
the parents. After awhile both chicks climbed aboard one of the adults for a 
respite. The one lifted a wing to embrace one chick while the other scrambled 
up the tail and onto the back. The little fuzzy head popped up between the 
adult's wings while the other stayed cozy and hidden under the offered wing. 

Neither of the adults were nervous at our presence as we stayed at a respectful 
distance, never approaching them but sitting quietly if they neared us. What a 
privilege to witness this endearing moment in nature. 


Mother Nature Rocks!!
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod



Subject: Loons
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 14:29:15 -0400
This early morning we watched the 3 day old loon chicks and parents on L. 
Dunmore. Small minnows were brought in for breakfast which the chicks readily 
consumed. When the food bearing adult neared, soft hoots were exchanged between 
the parents. After awhile both chicks climbed aboard one of the adults for a 
respite. The one lifted a wing to embrace one chick while the other scrambled 
up the tail and onto the back. The little fuzzy head popped up between the 
adult's wings while the other stayed cozy and hidden under the offered wing. 

Neither of the adults were nervous at our presence as we stayed at a respectful 
distance, never approaching them but sitting quietly if they neared us. What a 
privilege to witness this endearing moment in nature. 


Mother Nature Rocks!!
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Peregrine Recapture
From: anneboby <anneboby AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:03:01 -0400
Merk - congratulations on the phenomenal re-encounter of one of your Cape May P 
birds (as they call them down there). How stunning! 


I banded at Cape May annually for a week in Oct, 1976-1991, with fellow bander 
Bob Pantle and had one of the 15 Peregrines I banded there found dead four days 
later as a road kill on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. 


Then an imm. M Peregrine I banded at Island Beach State Park 10/19/91 was 
reported shot 1/15/93 at Chaco, Argentina near the pampas. 


These birds are such regal creatures given their life style and amazing 
migration range. 


Bob Yunick
Schenectady, NY
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: David Merker 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Fri, Jun 26, 2015 3:56 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] Peregrine Recapture


On June 22, 2015 a raptor ecologist working in Nunavut, Canada – captured a
female peregrine (1807-95417) on north Baffin Island;  she was first banded
under my permit as Hatching Year - Female at Cape May Point, NJ on October 26,
2010.
She was captured by his grad student over fake eggs on her nest site.  I
have a couple of pictures if anyone is interested, she was also seen in 2014 at
the same breeding site (but not re-captured).
 

Dave Merker 
Etna, New
Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.
www.capemayraptors.org

 
Subject: Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 08:40:36 -0400
Speaking of Golden-winged Warblers at Geprags, I have posted a superb photo of 
one of these GW Warblers on the GMAS website Home page. This photo was taken by 
Marc Faucher in May. You can take a look at it by clicking this link: 



http://greenmountainaudubon.org


Bruce MacPherson
GMAS






-----Original Message-----
From: Alison Wagner 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Sat, Jun 27, 2015 7:50 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] David Sibley sighting in Vermont


AND the checklists from the morning:

Green Mountain Audubon Nature Center,
Chittenden, Vermont, US
Jun 27, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:55 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Audubon VT and Local chapter leaders
birding with David Sibley
38 species

Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) 
1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
(Sphyrapicus varius)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Eastern
Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)  1
Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) 
2
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  2
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus
crinitus)  1
Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)  1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo
olivaceus)  4
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  2
American Crow (Corvus
brachyrhynchos)  1
Common Raven (Corvus corax)  1
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta
bicolor)  3
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  5
Tufted Titmouse
(Baeolophus bicolor)  1
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)  1
Brown
Creeper (Certhia americana)  2
Veery (Catharus fuscescens)  3
Wood Thrush
(Hylocichla mustelina)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  2
Gray Catbird
(Dumetella carolinensis)  2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  5
Ovenbird
(Seiurus aurocapilla)  2
Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia)  1
Common
Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  5
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 
1
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca)  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga
pensylvanica)  6     one fledged chick 
seen begging
Black-throated Blue
Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)  1     in parking lot 
area before
gathering
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)  1
Song Sparrow
(Melospiza melodia)  2
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)  1
Dark-eyed Junco
(Junco hyemalis)  1
Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)  2
Red-winged Blackbird
(Agelaius phoeniceus)  4
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  2
American
Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  4

View this checklist online at

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24070275

This report was
generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)





Geprag
Community Park - Hinesburg, Chittenden, Vermont, US
Jun 27, 2015 10:40 AM -
11:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.3 mile(s)
Comments:     Birding with AUdubon
Vermont and David Sibley
19 species



Ring-billed Gull (Larus
delawarensis)  1
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  1
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta
cristata)  1
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  2
House Wren (Troglodytes
aedon)  1
Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)  4
Veery (Catharus fuscescens) 
1
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)
5
Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera)  2     found by Kathy Starr,

confirmed by Mark LaBarr and David Sibley (NOT the guide, the guy)
Common
Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga
pensylvanica)  2
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus)  1
Song Sparrow
(Melospiza melodia)  2
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  1
Indigo
Bunting (Passerina cyanea)  2
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 
2
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)  1     heard only
American Goldfinch
(Spinus tristis)  4

View this checklist online at

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24073580

This report was
generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird


-----Original
Message----- 
From: Alison Wagner
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 7:12 PM
To:
VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] David Sibley sighting in Vermont

Dear
Fellow Birders,

As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington
last night 
thanks to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of
Audubon 
Vermont.

(THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!)

His talk, titled The
Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining 
while focusing on the
challenges we face when trying to identify birds in 
less than ideal
conditions.  We’ve all been there...the Great Egret that 
turns out to be a
plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy 
Owl. Bird
identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, 
distance,
sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another 
birder.  His talk
was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an 
overall tone of joy. 
For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded 
as possible when trying
to identify a challenging bird, to not over look 
what might appear to be a
common (under appreciated) bird, and be able to 
laugh at yourself while in the
company of friends when you make mistakes. 
Take birding seriously, do your
best to get it right, and always keep it 
fun!

This morning, Audubon Vermont
hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon 
Center. Several Audubon Society
Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter 
Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met
with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim 
Shallow  led a walk around the
property.  We started our morning watching a 
fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in
its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out 
of a nest judging by its fluffiness).
David explained the wing and tail 
feathers can give the most helpful clues for
identifying a young bird as 
these feathers have the same color and pattern as
an adult’s. However, 
having an adult bird nearby may be the easiest clue! 
Next, a Veery, teed up 
high in a snag, providing good looks of it singing.  We
enjoyed good (yet 
brief) looks at a Mourning Warbler close to the AV office,
after 
unobtrusively following its song and movement along the edge of the
woods. 
A primary feather of a Blue Jay led to a spontaneous lesson in the
color of 
feathers.  David explained there is actually no blue pigment in the
feather, 
that it is refraction of light  that gives the illusion of blue
color.  Tom 
Berriman proposed changing the name to “Refraction Jay” and there
was no 
objection when it was suggested the name be shortened to “Re J” or
“R.J.” 
Next, convinced that with a little more effort we’d see it, A Wood
Thrush’s 
song kept us at a stand still and lured us back a few times until we
gave up 
seeing it.

The stars for the final portion of the morning turned
out to be Gary and 
Kathy Starr.  Audubon Vermont presented David with a
Golden-winged Warbler 
Christmas ornament created by Gary Starr before we
headed to Geprag’s Park 
in Hinesburg in hopes of finding the real thing.  Mark
led us around the 
property, looking and listening for the bird in its usual
territories.  He 
wondered if the time of day and season, with nesting most
likely underway, 
would leave us empty handed. Even so, at this point, I
believe I speak for 
everyone in saying NONE of us were disappointed.  How
could we be....we were 
birding!

In true Zen birding fashion, we headed
back, accepting the fact that it just 
might not be.  We returned to the area
known as “bench two,”  where we were 
most likely to find the bird, when Kathy
got on a male.  David got his looks 
and it appeared the quest was complete. 
But we were not done!  The male 
flitted around the open area, darting into
dense shrubs or momentarily 
perching in a high tree to sing and grant us good
looks.  We stood together, 
discussing our pleasure, when a pair of
Golden-wings reappeared and shot 
through the opening.  David’s bins landed on
a female carrying food back 
into the dense vegetation while the male did a lap
around the area and teed 
up in a tree for one final song. It was a great way
to end the morning and 
to say farewell to David.

With confidence, I’d say
it was a 100% success.  Thanks again Audubon 
Vermont, David Sibley, and the
entire Vermont birding community!  Birding is 
awesome!

Ali
Wagner
Huntington 

 
Subject: Western Meadowlark - Yes
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 06:06:47 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

The Western Meadowlark on the south side of Lake Road in Charlotte started
singing at 0515 this morning. It was on an isolated fencepost pretty far
out in the middle of the field but it was easily heard giving two different
versions of its distinctive song.

Good birding,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Burlington, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: eBird Report - Birds of Vermont Museum, Jun 27, 2015
From: E Talmage <bovm_erin AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 19:41:02 -0400
Thank you Ali for describing David Sibley's talk and walk, and thank you Carl 
for sharing GMAS' s walk. During the same time, the Birds of Vermont Museum was 
also hosting its monthly monitoring walk. One of the highlights was seeing a 
fledgling Ovenbird staying as still as possible while the parent searched 
around it for food. 


It was a great morning for birding!
Erin


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
To: bobolinks AT comcast.net
Sent: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 15:08:54 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: eBird Report - Birds of Vermont Museum, Jun 27, 2015

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
Jun 27, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 kilometer(s)
Comments:     monitoring walk led by Erin Talmage
30 species

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 7 Observed feeding at 2 very active nesting holes; 
observed additional feeding of fledgling 

Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  1
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
House Wren  1
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  1
Gray Catbird  1
Ovenbird  7
Common Yellowthroat  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Common Grackle  1
Baltimore Oriole  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24068151 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: sheep herding bittern
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 18:14:35 -0400
Ive spent the last half hour watching an American Bittern strolling around in 
the sheep pen next door - hundreds of yards from the nearest wetland (although 
everythings wet today), swamp or pond. The bird seems completely unflustered 
by the nine sheep and appears to be catching and eating something every few 
minutes. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Loons
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 17:43:28 -0400
Two adult loons seen on Burr Pond in Sudbury this afternoon.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Catamount Family Center, Jun 27, 2015
From: Carl Runge <cfrun2 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 16:31:23 +0000
Enjoyed Ali's wonderful account on birding with Sibley.  At the same time you 
were birding the Audubon Center,  GMAS was doing our monthly walk at Catamount 
just a few hills to the west with somewhat similar results.  We particularly 
enjoyed all the mobbing behavior and the Rough-winged parents feverishly 
feeding their hungry chicks.Carl 


 On Sunday, June 28, 2015 12:14 PM, "ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu" 
 wrote: 

   

 Catamount Family Center, Chittenden, Vermont, US
Jun 27, 2015 7:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments:    Main group 2.5 hrs. on north side. Later, 4 walked SE quadrant 
for one hour. Totals include both sides. 

50 species

Green Heron  2    one chased by redwing
Broad-winged Hawk  1    Mobbed by crows
Ring-billed Gull  2
Mourning Dove  2
Barred Owl  1    mobbed by blue jays
Chimney Swift  3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  2    exiting nest box
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Alder Flycatcher  2
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  5
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  7
Blue Jay  9
American Crow  4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  9    2 adults feeding 7 fledgelings sitting 
on branches of dead tree. 

Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  3
House Wren  3
Winter Wren  1
Veery  3
Hermit Thrush  2
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  4
Gray Catbird  1
European Starling  2
Cedar Waxwing  6
Ovenbird  6
Common Yellowthroat  4
Blackburnian Warbler  4
Yellow Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  5
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  5
Swamp Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1
Bobolink  2    adult male and indeterminate flying together at one point
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Common Grackle  1
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24071599 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)



Subject: Re: Western meadowlark
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 11:02:44 -0400
And it was heard and seen a couple of times between 5:30 and 6:00 PM as well. 
It was further away, on fence posts in front of the line of round hay bales. 


Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT


On Jun 27, 2015, at 3:20 PM, Nancy A. Brown wrote:

> From noon to 1:00pm it was singing from near fence line at NW corner.
> 
> --------------------------------------------------
> From: "Sue" <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
> Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 11:43 AM
> To: 
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Western meadowlark
> 
>> I arrived at 7:00am to hear the very vocal W. Meadowlark singing away. It 
stayed in the area until I left at 9:30. 

>> Thanks to all for the precise directions.
>> Sue Wetmore
>> 
>> Sent from my iPod
> 
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 26 Jun 2015 to 27 Jun 2015 (#2015-175)
From: stowelulu <stowelulu AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 10:55:52 -0400
Thank you, Ali, for your superb description of birding with David Sibley. 
Almost like being there. Well, not quite. But, a reminder of why we love the 
pursuit of birding. 

Charlotte 
Stowe Hollow 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 28, 2015, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

> 
> There are 7 messages totaling 539 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Meadowlark continues
>  2. Western meadowlark (2)
>  3. David Sibley sighting in Vermont (3)
>  4. Leddy Park Fish Crows Update
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 27 Jun 2015 09:17:31 -0400
> From:    Mike Resch 
> Subject: Meadowlark continues
> 
> Present when we arrived at 8:45. Singing from a post in the middle of the 
distant field almost non-stop 

> 
> Mike Resch
> Www.statebirding.blogspot.com
> Pepperell MA
> 
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Eugenia Cooke 
> To: VTBIRD 
> Sent: Fri, Jun 26, 2015 06:48 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Meadowlark
> 
> 
> 
> 
> >
Right after you turn onto Lake Street from 
Greenbush, look for a gravel 

> turn
> off on the left. I think it's a couple hundred yards. There are two
> gates
> leading onto a roadway into the fields. The first gate is open and
> that's where
> people set up their scopes.
> On Jun 26, 2015 6:07 PM, "Sue"
> <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:
> 
>> Would someone tell me just where on Lake St
> the meadowlark is located?
>> Sue Wetmore
>> 
>> Sent from my iPod
> 
> >
> > ------------------------------ > > Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 11:43:21 -0400 > From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> > Subject: Western meadowlark > > I arrived at 7:00am to hear the very vocal W. Meadowlark singing away. It stayed in the area until I left at 9:30. > Thanks to all for the precise directions. > Sue Wetmore > > Sent from my iPod > > ------------------------------ > > Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 15:20:18 -0400 > From: "Nancy A. Brown" > Subject: Re: Western meadowlark > > From noon to 1:00pm it was singing from near fence line at NW corner. > > -------------------------------------------------- > From: "Sue" <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> > Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 11:43 AM > To: > Subject: [VTBIRD] Western meadowlark > >> I arrived at 7:00am to hear the very vocal W. Meadowlark singing away. It >> stayed in the area until I left at 9:30. >> Thanks to all for the precise directions. >> Sue Wetmore >> >> Sent from my iPod > > ------------------------------ > > Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 19:12:28 -0400 > From: Alison Wagner > Subject: David Sibley sighting in Vermont > > Dear Fellow Birders, > > As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington last night thanks to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of Audubon Vermont. > > (THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!) > > His talk, titled The Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining while focusing on the challenges we face when trying to identify birds in less than ideal conditions. We’ve all been there...the Great Egret that turns out to be a plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy Owl. Bird identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, distance, sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another birder. His talk was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an overall tone of joy. For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded as possible when trying to identify a challenging bird, to not over look what might appear to be a common (under appreciated) bird, and be able to laugh at yourself while in the company of friends when you make mistakes. Take birding seriously, do your best to get it right, and always keep it fun! > > This morning, Audubon Vermont hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon Center. Several Audubon Society Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim Shallow led a walk around the property. We started our morning watching a fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out of a nest judging by its fluffiness). David explained the wing and tail feathers can give the most helpful clues for identifying a young bird as these feathers have the same color and pattern as an adult’s. However, having an adult bird nearby may be the easiest clue! Next, a Veery, teed up high in a snag, providing good looks of it singing. We enjoyed good (yet brief) looks at a Mourning Warbler close to the AV office, after unobtrusively following its song and movement along the edge of the woods. A primary feather of a Blue Jay led to a spontaneous lesson in the color of feathers. David explai! ned there is actually no blue pigment in the feather, that it is refraction of light that gives the illusion of blue color. Tom Berriman proposed changing the name to “Refraction Jay” and there was no objection when it was suggested the name be shortened to “Re J” or “R.J.” Next, convinced that with a little more effort we’d see it, A Wood Thrush’s song kept us at a stand still and lured us back a few times until we gave up seeing it. > > The stars for the final portion of the morning turned out to be Gary and Kathy Starr. Audubon Vermont presented David with a Golden-winged Warbler Christmas ornament created by Gary Starr before we headed to Geprag’s Park in Hinesburg in hopes of finding the real thing. Mark led us around the property, looking and listening for the bird in its usual territories. He wondered if the time of day and season, with nesting most likely underway, would leave us empty handed. Even so, at this point, I believe I speak for everyone in saying NONE of us were disappointed. How could we be....we were birding! > > In true Zen birding fashion, we headed back, accepting the fact that it just might not be. We returned to the area known as “bench two,” where we were most likely to find the bird, when Kathy got on a male. David got his looks and it appeared the quest was complete. But we were not done! The male flitted around the open area, darting into dense shrubs or momentarily perching in a high tree to sing and grant us good looks. We stood together, discussing our pleasure, when a pair of Golden-wings reappeared and shot through the opening. David’s bins landed on a female carrying food back into the dense vegetation while the male did a lap around the area and teed up in a tree for one final song. It was a great way to end the morning and to say farewell to David. > > With confidence, I’d say it was a 100% success. Thanks again Audubon Vermont, David Sibley, and the entire Vermont birding community! Birding is awesome! > > Ali Wagner > Huntington > > ------------------------------ > > Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 19:50:03 -0400 > From: Alison Wagner > Subject: Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont > > AND the checklists from the morning: > > Green Mountain Audubon Nature Center, Chittenden, Vermont, US > Jun 27, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:55 AM > Protocol: Traveling > 0.5 mile(s) > Comments: Audubon VT and Local chapter leaders birding with David Sibley > 38 species > > Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) 1 > Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 2 > Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) 2 > Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 2 > Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) 1 > Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) 2 > Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 2 > Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) 1 > Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) 1 > Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 4 > Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 2 > American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 1 > Common Raven (Corvus corax) 1 > Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 3 > Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 5 > Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 1 > White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1 > Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) 2 > Veery (Catharus fuscescens) 3 > Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) 1 > American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 2 > Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 2 > Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 5 > Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) 2 > Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia) 1 > Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 5 > American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 1 > Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca) 1 > Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 6 one fledged chick > seen begging > Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens) 1 in parking lot > area before gathering > Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) 1 > Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2 > Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) 1 > Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) 1 > Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) 2 > Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 4 > Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 2 > American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 4 > > View this checklist online at > http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24070275 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) > > > > > > Geprag Community Park - Hinesburg, Chittenden, Vermont, US > Jun 27, 2015 10:40 AM - 11:50 AM > Protocol: Traveling > 0.3 mile(s) > Comments: Birding with AUdubon Vermont and David Sibley > 19 species > > > > Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1 > Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 1 > Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 1 > Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 2 > House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) 1 > Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) 4 > Veery (Catharus fuscescens) 1 > Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 2 > Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 5 > Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) 2 found by Kathy Starr, > confirmed by Mark LaBarr and David Sibley (NOT the guide, the guy) > Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 3 > Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 2 > Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) 1 > Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2 > Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 1 > Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) 2 > Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 2 > Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 1 heard only > American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 4 > > View this checklist online at > http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24073580 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird > > > -----Original Message----- > From: Alison Wagner > Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 7:12 PM > To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU > Subject: [VTBIRD] David Sibley sighting in Vermont > > Dear Fellow Birders, > > As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington last night > thanks to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of Audubon > Vermont. > > (THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!) > > His talk, titled The Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining > while focusing on the challenges we face when trying to identify birds in > less than ideal conditions. We’ve all been there...the Great Egret that > turns out to be a plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy > Owl. Bird identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, > distance, sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another > birder. His talk was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an > overall tone of joy. For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded > as possible when trying to identify a challenging bird, to not over look > what might appear to be a common (under appreciated) bird, and be able to > laugh at yourself while in the company of friends when you make mistakes. > Take birding seriously, do your best to get it right, and always keep it > fun! > > This morning, Audubon Vermont hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon > Center. Several Audubon Society Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter > Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim > Shallow led a walk around the property. We started our morning watching a > fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out > of a nest judging by its fluffiness). David explained the wing and tail > feathers can give the most helpful clues for identifying a young bird as > these feathers have the same color and pattern as an adult’s. However, > having an adult bird nearby may be the easiest clue! Next, a Veery, teed up > high in a snag, providing good looks of it singing. We enjoyed good (yet > brief) looks at a Mourning Warbler close to the AV office, after > unobtrusively following its song and movement along the edge of the woods. > A primary feather of a Blue Jay led to a spontaneous lesson in the color of > feathers. David explained there is actually no blue pigment in the feather, > that it is refraction of light that gives the illusion of blue color. Tom > Berriman proposed changing the name to “Refraction Jay” and there was no > objection when it was suggested the name be shortened to “Re J” or “R.J.” > Next, convinced that with a little more effort we’d see it, A Wood Thrush’s > song kept us at a stand still and lured us back a few times until we gave up > seeing it. > > The stars for the final portion of the morning turned out to be Gary and > Kathy Starr. Audubon Vermont presented David with a Golden-winged Warbler > Christmas ornament created by Gary Starr before we headed to Geprag’s Park > in Hinesburg in hopes of finding the real thing. Mark led us around the > property, looking and listening for the bird in its usual territories. He > wondered if the time of day and season, with nesting most likely underway, > would leave us empty handed. Even so, at this point, I believe I speak for > everyone in saying NONE of us were disappointed. How could we be....we were > birding! > > In true Zen birding fashion, we headed back, accepting the fact that it just > might not be. We returned to the area known as “bench two,” where we were > most likely to find the bird, when Kathy got on a male. David got his looks > and it appeared the quest was complete. But we were not done! The male > flitted around the open area, darting into dense shrubs or momentarily > perching in a high tree to sing and grant us good looks. We stood together, > discussing our pleasure, when a pair of Golden-wings reappeared and shot > through the opening. David’s bins landed on a female carrying food back > into the dense vegetation while the male did a lap around the area and teed > up in a tree for one final song. It was a great way to end the morning and > to say farewell to David. > > With confidence, I’d say it was a 100% success. Thanks again Audubon > Vermont, David Sibley, and the entire Vermont birding community! Birding is > awesome! > > Ali Wagner > Huntington > > ------------------------------ > > Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 21:05:49 -0400 > From: eve ticknor > Subject: Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont > > Is it possible to get a copy of David's talk? > Eve >> On 2015-06-27, at 7:12 PM, Alison Wagner wrote: >> >> Dear Fellow Birders, >> >> As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington last night thanks to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of Audubon Vermont. >> >> (THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!) >> >> His talk, titled The Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining while focusing on the challenges we face when trying to identify birds in less than ideal conditions. We’ve all been there...the Great Egret that turns out to be a plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy Owl. Bird identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, distance, sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another birder. His talk was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an overall tone of joy. For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded as possible when trying to identify a challenging bird, to not over look what might appear to be a common (under appreciated) bird, and be able to laugh at yourself while in the company of friends when you make mistakes. Take birding seriously, do your best to get it right, and always keep it fun! >> >> This morning, Audubon Vermont hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon Center. Several Audubon Society Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim Shallow led a walk around the property. We started our morning watching a fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out of a nest judging by its fluffiness). David explained the wing and tail feathers can give the most helpful clues for identifying a young bird as these feathers have the same color and pattern as an adult’s. However, having an adult bird nearby may be the easiest clue! Next, a Veery, teed up high in a snag, providing good looks of it singing. We enjoyed good (yet brief) looks at a Mourning Warbler close to the AV office, after unobtrusively following its song and movement along the edge of the woods. A primary feather of a Blue Jay led to a spontaneous lesson in the color of feathers. David expla! ined there is actually no blue pigment in the feather, that it is refraction of light that gives the illusion of blue color. Tom Berriman proposed changing the name to “Refraction Jay” and there was no objection when it was suggested the name be shortened to “Re J” or “R.J.” Next, convinced that with a little more effort we’d see it, A Wood Thrush’s song kept us at a stand still and lured us back a few times until we gave up seeing it. >> >> The stars for the final portion of the morning turned out to be Gary and Kathy Starr. Audubon Vermont presented David with a Golden-winged Warbler Christmas ornament created by Gary Starr before we headed to Geprag’s Park in Hinesburg in hopes of finding the real thing. Mark led us around the property, looking and listening for the bird in its usual territories. He wondered if the time of day and season, with nesting most likely underway, would leave us empty handed. Even so, at this point, I believe I speak for everyone in saying NONE of us were disappointed. How could we be....we were birding! >> >> In true Zen birding fashion, we headed back, accepting the fact that it just might not be. We returned to the area known as “bench two,” where we were most likely to find the bird, when Kathy got on a male. David got his looks and it appeared the quest was complete. But we were not done! The male flitted around the open area, darting into dense shrubs or momentarily perching in a high tree to sing and grant us good looks. We stood together, discussing our pleasure, when a pair of Golden-wings reappeared and shot through the opening. David’s bins landed on a female carrying food back into the dense vegetation while the male did a lap around the area and teed up in a tree for one final song. It was a great way to end the morning and to say farewell to David. >> >> With confidence, I’d say it was a 100% success. Thanks again Audubon Vermont, David Sibley, and the entire Vermont birding community! Birding is awesome! >> >> Ali Wagner >> Huntington > > Eve Ticknor > > Box 2206 > Prescott, On K0E 1T0 > Canada > res: 613-925-5528 > cell: 613-859-9545 > > The Blue Nest > 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996 > U S A > res: 518-963-7404 > cell: 518-524-7377 > > http://aquavisions.me > > "We find beauty not in the thing itself, but in the pattern of shadows, the light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates." J. Tanazaki > > ------------------------------ > > Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 23:06:11 -0400 > From: Michele Patenaude > Subject: Leddy Park Fish Crows Update > > The Fish Crows I have been observing this spring in Leddy Park in Burlington > recently fledged two young. This is an update on their first few days out of > the nest. > > > > On Monday, June 22 between 6:15 and 7:30 I observed four Fish Crows in > Leddy Park, two adults and two recently fledged chicks. It is possible that > the two chicks had been fledged that very day. I watched the chicks as they > sat perched in a pine about fifty feet up and adjacent to the pine with the > nest. They were awkward, and worked to keep their balance by flapping their > wings. They and their parents called back and forth to each other for most > of the hour I watched them. The adult birds flew around them and perched > nearby. I believe there was some feeding going on but I did not see it. > However, the adults continually flew near the young and perched beside them. > Fish Crows do not carry food for their young in their beaks; they hold it in > their crops. The fledglings had higher pitched raspier voices, bright red > mouth linings, and could not fly yet. > > > > On Wednesday, June 24 I observed them between 11:30 and 11:45. They had all > moved father into the park. One chick was on the ground, hiding in some low > shrubs at the base of a tree on the southwestern edge of the Leddy Park > soccer field The two parents were very attentive flying back and forth > overhead and perching in low branches near the chick on the ground. All > three were calling to each other. A fourth bird, another chick judging by > its call and probably the second chick seen on Monday, was calling from > farther away in a grove of trees across the soccer field to the north, > > > > On Friday , the 26th I observed three of these birds, one chick and two > adults. They were in the forested area to the west of the soccer field. The > chick was on the ground and the parents were flying protectively overhead in > the trees, often perching on low branches quite close to the grounded > chick. I did not see or hear the second chick. A group of 6 American Crows, > what appeared to be two adults and four youngsters, were perched 50 yards or > so away and squawking > > > > On Saturday the 27th, today, I observed all four Fish Crows, two chicks and > two adults. This time both chicks were up and flying, albeit awkwardly, in > the lower branches of the forest grove to the west of the soccer field. > > > > Stay tuned. > > > > > > > > > > Michele Patenaude > > 172 Woodbury Road > > Burlington, VT 05408 > > 802-862-4085 > > > > ------------------------------ > > End of VTBIRD Digest - 26 Jun 2015 to 27 Jun 2015 (#2015-175) > *************************************************************
Subject: other Sibley thoughts
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 08:15:57 -0400
Fridays Sibley event and Alis post brought back so many memories of an 
amazing experience I had in 2006: birding with David Sibley for an entire week. 


For many years, he has donated a week to The Nature Conservancy. People stay at 
the Conservancys wonderful Pine Butte Guest Ranch near the eastern front of 
the Rockies in Montana and go out every day with David and TNC naturalists. The 
location is jaw-dropping gorgeous, lodging is excellent, the food is gourmet 
quality, and birds are everywhere. 


David appears to be aware of birds on some sort of subsensory or extrasensory 
level. He can look in the same direction that other birders are looking and 
find  when no one else finds them  birds going about their daily activities. 
I cant remember how many birds we saw on the nest, and how many we watched 
courting and mating. 


Three particularly powerful memories (out of hundreds):

One day we were in two vans when David called out stop! Way above us, two 
adult Prairie Falcons were flying back and forth in front of a high cliff, 
trying to get a pair of youngsters to take the daring step off the cliff and 
experience flight for the first time. We watched for a long time until one of 
the young birds finally got brave and joined its parents.  David, his two sons 
and his nephew had camped west from Massachusetts and had arrived the evening 
before. He hadnt done any scouting; none of us had any idea how he knew those 
falcons were there. 


Lonely, open prairie with nothing around for as far as the eye could see  and 
then David heard a Spragues pipit impossibly far off, a tiny speck against the 
sky. We watched for long minutes as it circled and then repeatedly folded its 
wings and plummeted toward the ground, singing as it fell, a jangly, complex 
whistle. David: European poets often wrote poems about birdsong. If theyd 
heard the Spragues pipit, they would have written literally thousands of poems 
to that song! 


On another trip, we passed a lone female Long-billed Curlew. David remarked 
that the bird looked agitated. (It didnt look agitated to any of us.) He 
talked about the efficacy of the deep grass and vastness of the prairies for 
hiding young curlews from four-legged predators but noted their vulnerability 
to aerial attack. Just a few hundred yards down the road, there was a 
Red-tailed Hawk perched in a cottonwood. It had something in its talons, 
something with very long legs. A few of our group (David included) bushwhacked 
across a field and through a small stream and retrieved a wing and a leg that 
had dropped from the hawks talons. It was an immature curlew, very possibly 
the young of the agitated female wed seen a few minutes earlier. (I still 
grin at the comment of one of the birders: Oh! I hate nature!) 


Favorite non-bird memory: This was the year that YouTube was full of videos of 
the Mentos and Diet Pepsi phenomenon. (Mentos dropped into soda results in 
lowered surface tension and some spectacular fountains and eruptions of 
liquid.) Evan and Joel Sibley, then eight and twelve I think, and 13-year old 
nephew Elliott wanted to do a pre-fireworks show as part of the Fourth of July 
celebration. The four boys, including tall serious David, huddled together, 
whispering, setting up four or five different arrangements of liter bottles 
with  of course  different specifics so they could get a scientific read on 
what worked best. (When it got dark, two of the wranglers set up the fireworks 
display. One of them asked young Joel, You wanna light sumpin? - a question 
designed to delight and terrify any eight- or nine-year old!) 


Ive spent two weeks at Pine Butte, once hiking with my daughter and once for 
birding. It seemed pricey to me at first, but it turned out to be worth every 
single cent. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Leddy Park Fish Crows Update
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 23:06:11 -0400
The Fish Crows I have been observing this spring in Leddy Park in Burlington
recently fledged two young. This is an update on their first few days out of
the nest. 

 

On Monday,  June 22  between  6:15 and 7:30  I observed four Fish Crows in
Leddy Park, two adults and two recently fledged chicks. It is possible that
the two chicks had been fledged that very day. I watched  the chicks as they
sat perched in a pine about fifty feet up and adjacent to the pine with the
nest.  They were awkward, and worked to keep their balance by flapping their
wings. They and their parents called back and forth to each other for most
of the hour I watched them. The adult birds flew around them and perched
nearby. I believe there was some feeding going on but I did not see it.
However, the adults continually flew near the young and perched beside them.
Fish Crows do not carry food for their young in their beaks; they hold it in
their crops. The fledglings had higher pitched raspier voices, bright red
mouth linings, and could not fly yet. 

 

On Wednesday, June 24 I observed  them between 11:30 and 11:45. They had all
moved father into the park. One chick was on the ground, hiding in some low
shrubs at the base of a tree on the southwestern edge of the Leddy Park
soccer field  The two parents were very attentive flying back and forth
overhead and perching in low branches near the chick on the ground. All
three were calling to each other. A fourth bird, another chick judging by
its call and probably the second chick seen on Monday, was calling from
farther away in a grove of trees across the soccer field to the north,

 

On Friday , the 26th I observed three of these birds, one chick and two
adults. They were in the forested area to the west of the soccer field. The
chick was on the ground and the parents were flying protectively overhead in
the trees, often perching on low branches  quite close to the grounded
chick. I did not see or hear the second chick. A group of 6 American Crows,
what appeared to be two adults and four youngsters, were perched 50 yards or
so away  and squawking 

 

On Saturday the 27th, today, I observed all four Fish Crows, two chicks and
two adults. This time both chicks were up and flying, albeit awkwardly,  in
the lower branches of the forest grove to the west of the soccer field. 

 

Stay tuned. 

 

 

 

 

Michele Patenaude

172 Woodbury Road

Burlington, VT 05408

802-862-4085

 
Subject: Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont
From: eve ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 21:05:49 -0400
Is it possible to get a copy of David's talk?
Eve
On 2015-06-27, at 7:12 PM, Alison Wagner wrote:

> Dear Fellow Birders,
> 
> As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington last night thanks 
to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of Audubon Vermont. 

> 
> (THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!)  
> 
> His talk, titled The Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining 
while focusing on the challenges we face when trying to identify birds in less 
than ideal conditions. Weve all been there...the Great Egret that turns out to 
be a plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy Owl. Bird 
identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, distance, 
sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another birder. His talk 
was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an overall tone of joy. 
For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded as possible when trying to 
identify a challenging bird, to not over look what might appear to be a common 
(under appreciated) bird, and be able to laugh at yourself while in the company 
of friends when you make mistakes. Take birding seriously, do your best to get 
it right, and always keep it fun! 

> 
> This morning, Audubon Vermont hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon 
Center. Several Audubon Society Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter 
Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim 
Shallow led a walk around the property. We started our morning watching a 
fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out of a 
nest judging by its fluffiness). David explained the wing and tail feathers can 
give the most helpful clues for identifying a young bird as these feathers have 
the same color and pattern as an adults. However, having an adult bird nearby 
may be the easiest clue! Next, a Veery, teed up high in a snag, providing good 
looks of it singing. We enjoyed good (yet brief) looks at a Mourning Warbler 
close to the AV office, after unobtrusively following its song and movement 
along the edge of the woods. A primary feather of a Blue Jay led to a 
spontaneous lesson in the color of feathers. David explained there is actually 
no blue pigment in the feather, that it is refraction of light that gives the 
illusion of blue color. Tom Berriman proposed changing the name to Refraction 
Jay and there was no objection when it was suggested the name be shortened to 
Re J or R.J. Next, convinced that with a little more effort wed see it, A 
Wood Thrushs song kept us at a stand still and lured us back a few times until 
we gave up seeing it. 

> 
> The stars for the final portion of the morning turned out to be Gary and 
Kathy Starr. Audubon Vermont presented David with a Golden-winged Warbler 
Christmas ornament created by Gary Starr before we headed to Geprags Park in 
Hinesburg in hopes of finding the real thing. Mark led us around the property, 
looking and listening for the bird in its usual territories. He wondered if the 
time of day and season, with nesting most likely underway, would leave us empty 
handed. Even so, at this point, I believe I speak for everyone in saying NONE 
of us were disappointed. How could we be....we were birding! 

> 
> In true Zen birding fashion, we headed back, accepting the fact that it just 
might not be. We returned to the area known as bench two, where we were most 
likely to find the bird, when Kathy got on a male. David got his looks and it 
appeared the quest was complete. But we were not done! The male flitted around 
the open area, darting into dense shrubs or momentarily perching in a high tree 
to sing and grant us good looks. We stood together, discussing our pleasure, 
when a pair of Golden-wings reappeared and shot through the opening. Davids 
bins landed on a female carrying food back into the dense vegetation while the 
male did a lap around the area and teed up in a tree for one final song. It was 
a great way to end the morning and to say farewell to David. 

> 
> With confidence, Id say it was a 100% success. Thanks again Audubon Vermont, 
David Sibley, and the entire Vermont birding community! Birding is awesome! 

> 
> Ali Wagner
> Huntington
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

"We find beauty not in the thing itself, but in the pattern of shadows, the 
light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates." J. Tanazaki 

Subject: Re: David Sibley sighting in Vermont
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 19:50:03 -0400
AND the checklists from the morning:

Green Mountain Audubon Nature Center, Chittenden, Vermont, US
Jun 27, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:55 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Audubon VT and Local chapter leaders birding with David Sibley
38 species

Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)  1
Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus)  2
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  2
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)  1
Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)  1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  4
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  2
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  1
Common Raven (Corvus corax)  1
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  3
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  5
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  1
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)  1
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)  2
Veery (Catharus fuscescens)  3
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  2
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  5
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)  2
Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia)  1
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  5
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)  1
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca)  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica)  6     one fledged chick 
seen begging
Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)  1     in parking lot 
area before gathering
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)  1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  2
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)  1
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)  1
Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)  2
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  4
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  2
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24070275

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)





Geprag Community Park - Hinesburg, Chittenden, Vermont, US
Jun 27, 2015 10:40 AM - 11:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.3 mile(s)
Comments:     Birding with AUdubon Vermont and David Sibley
19 species



Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)  1
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  1
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  1
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  2
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  1
Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)  4
Veery (Catharus fuscescens)  1
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  5
Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera)  2     found by Kathy Starr, 
confirmed by Mark LaBarr and David Sibley (NOT the guide, the guy)
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica)  2
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus)  1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  2
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  1
Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea)  2
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  2
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)  1     heard only
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24073580

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird


-----Original Message----- 
From: Alison Wagner
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 7:12 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] David Sibley sighting in Vermont

Dear Fellow Birders,

As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington last night 
thanks to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of Audubon 
Vermont.

(THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!)

His talk, titled The Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining 
while focusing on the challenges we face when trying to identify birds in 
less than ideal conditions.  We’ve all been there...the Great Egret that 
turns out to be a plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy 
Owl. Bird identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, 
distance, sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another 
birder.  His talk was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an 
overall tone of joy.  For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded 
as possible when trying to identify a challenging bird, to not over look 
what might appear to be a common (under appreciated) bird, and be able to 
laugh at yourself while in the company of friends when you make mistakes. 
Take birding seriously, do your best to get it right, and always keep it 
fun!

This morning, Audubon Vermont hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon 
Center. Several Audubon Society Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter 
Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim 
Shallow  led a walk around the property.  We started our morning watching a 
fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out 
of a nest judging by its fluffiness).  David explained the wing and tail 
feathers can give the most helpful clues for identifying a young bird as 
these feathers have the same color and pattern as an adult’s. However, 
having an adult bird nearby may be the easiest clue!  Next, a Veery, teed up 
high in a snag, providing good looks of it singing.  We enjoyed good (yet 
brief) looks at a Mourning Warbler close to the AV office, after 
unobtrusively following its song and movement along the edge of the woods. 
A primary feather of a Blue Jay led to a spontaneous lesson in the color of 
feathers.  David explained there is actually no blue pigment in the feather, 
that it is refraction of light  that gives the illusion of blue color.  Tom 
Berriman proposed changing the name to “Refraction Jay” and there was no 
objection when it was suggested the name be shortened to “Re J” or 
“R.J.” 

Next, convinced that with a little more effort we’d see it, A Wood Thrush’s 

song kept us at a stand still and lured us back a few times until we gave up 
seeing it.

The stars for the final portion of the morning turned out to be Gary and 
Kathy Starr.  Audubon Vermont presented David with a Golden-winged Warbler 
Christmas ornament created by Gary Starr before we headed to Geprag’s Park 
in Hinesburg in hopes of finding the real thing.  Mark led us around the 
property, looking and listening for the bird in its usual territories.  He 
wondered if the time of day and season, with nesting most likely underway, 
would leave us empty handed. Even so, at this point, I believe I speak for 
everyone in saying NONE of us were disappointed.  How could we be....we were 
birding!

In true Zen birding fashion, we headed back, accepting the fact that it just 
might not be. We returned to the area known as “bench two,” where we were 

most likely to find the bird, when Kathy got on a male.  David got his looks 
and it appeared the quest was complete.  But we were not done!  The male 
flitted around the open area, darting into dense shrubs or momentarily 
perching in a high tree to sing and grant us good looks.  We stood together, 
discussing our pleasure, when a pair of Golden-wings reappeared and shot 
through the opening.  David’s bins landed on a female carrying food back 
into the dense vegetation while the male did a lap around the area and teed 
up in a tree for one final song. It was a great way to end the morning and 
to say farewell to David.

With confidence, I’d say it was a 100% success.  Thanks again Audubon 
Vermont, David Sibley, and the entire Vermont birding community!  Birding is 
awesome!

Ali Wagner
Huntington 
Subject: David Sibley sighting in Vermont
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 19:12:28 -0400
Dear Fellow Birders,

As many of you know, David Sibley was present in Burlington last night thanks 
to a conjoined effort by the staff and board members of Audubon Vermont. 


(THANK YOU, AUDUBON VERMONT!)  

His talk, titled The Psychology of Birding, was informative and entertaining 
while focusing on the challenges we face when trying to identify birds in less 
than ideal conditions. We’ve all been there...the Great Egret that turns out 
to be a plastic bag or the plastic bag that is actually a Snowy Owl. Bird 
identifications can be swayed by optical illusions, poor lighting, distance, 
sheer desire, or a misidentification passed on from another birder. His talk 
was interspersed with personal anecdotes relayed with an overall tone of joy. 
For me, the biggest message was to be as open minded as possible when trying to 
identify a challenging bird, to not over look what might appear to be a common 
(under appreciated) bird, and be able to laugh at yourself while in the company 
of friends when you make mistakes. Take birding seriously, do your best to get 
it right, and always keep it fun! 


This morning, Audubon Vermont hosted a walk at the Green Mountain Audubon 
Center. Several Audubon Society Chapter leaders (from Green Mountain, Otter 
Creek, and Northeast Kingdom) met with David Sibley as Mark LaBarr and Jim 
Shallow led a walk around the property. We started our morning watching a 
fledged Chestnut-sided Warbler in its toddler-stage (most likely fresh out of a 
nest judging by its fluffiness). David explained the wing and tail feathers can 
give the most helpful clues for identifying a young bird as these feathers have 
the same color and pattern as an adult’s. However, having an adult bird 
nearby may be the easiest clue! Next, a Veery, teed up high in a snag, 
providing good looks of it singing. We enjoyed good (yet brief) looks at a 
Mourning Warbler close to the AV office, after unobtrusively following its song 
and movement along the edge of the woods. A primary feather of a Blue Jay led 
to a spontaneous lesson in the color of feathers. David explained there is 
actually no blue pigment in the feather, that it is refraction of light that 
gives the illusion of blue color. Tom Berriman proposed changing the name to 
“Refraction Jay” and there was no objection when it was suggested the name 
be shortened to “Re J” or “R.J.” Next, convinced that with a little 
more effort we’d see it, A Wood Thrush’s song kept us at a stand still and 
lured us back a few times until we gave up seeing it. 


The stars for the final portion of the morning turned out to be Gary and Kathy 
Starr. Audubon Vermont presented David with a Golden-winged Warbler Christmas 
ornament created by Gary Starr before we headed to Geprag’s Park in Hinesburg 
in hopes of finding the real thing. Mark led us around the property, looking 
and listening for the bird in its usual territories. He wondered if the time of 
day and season, with nesting most likely underway, would leave us empty handed. 
Even so, at this point, I believe I speak for everyone in saying NONE of us 
were disappointed. How could we be....we were birding! 


In true Zen birding fashion, we headed back, accepting the fact that it just 
might not be. We returned to the area known as “bench two,” where we were 
most likely to find the bird, when Kathy got on a male. David got his looks and 
it appeared the quest was complete. But we were not done! The male flitted 
around the open area, darting into dense shrubs or momentarily perching in a 
high tree to sing and grant us good looks. We stood together, discussing our 
pleasure, when a pair of Golden-wings reappeared and shot through the opening. 
David’s bins landed on a female carrying food back into the dense vegetation 
while the male did a lap around the area and teed up in a tree for one final 
song. It was a great way to end the morning and to say farewell to David. 


With confidence, I’d say it was a 100% success. Thanks again Audubon Vermont, 
David Sibley, and the entire Vermont birding community! Birding is awesome! 


Ali Wagner
Huntington
Subject: Re: Western meadowlark
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 15:20:18 -0400
From noon to 1:00pm it was singing from near fence line at NW corner.

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Sue" <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 11:43 AM
To: 
Subject: [VTBIRD] Western meadowlark

> I arrived at 7:00am to hear the very vocal W. Meadowlark singing away. It 
> stayed in the area until I left at 9:30.
> Thanks to all for the precise directions.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
> 
Subject: Western meadowlark
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 11:43:21 -0400
I arrived at 7:00am to hear the very vocal W. Meadowlark singing away. It 
stayed in the area until I left at 9:30. 

Thanks to all for the precise directions.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Meadowlark continues
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 09:17:31 -0400
Present when we arrived at 8:45. Singing from a post in the middle of the 
distant field almost non-stop 


Mike Resch
Www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell MA

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


-----Original Message-----
From: Eugenia Cooke 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Fri, Jun 26, 2015 06:48 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Meadowlark



Right after you turn onto Lake Street from 
Greenbush, look for a gravel 

turn
off on the left. I think it's a couple hundred yards. There are two
gates
leading onto a roadway into the fields. The first gate is open and
that's where
people set up their scopes.
On Jun 26, 2015 6:07 PM, "Sue"
<2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:

> Would someone tell me just where on Lake St
the meadowlark is located?
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
Subject: Re: Meadowlark
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:48:50 -0700
Right after you turn onto Lake Street from Greenbush, look for a gravel
turn off on the left. I think it's a couple hundred yards. There are two
gates leading onto a roadway into the fields. The first gate is open and
that's where people set up their scopes.
On Jun 26, 2015 6:07 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:

> Would someone tell me just where on Lake St the meadowlark is located?
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
Subject: Babies
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 18:14:19 -0400
This afternoon, a male Downy WP patiently fed a newly fledged little guy 
with mouthful after mouthful of seed-infused suet at the front feeder. 
The little one was perched precariously gripping the narrow edge of the 
platform feeder, while Pops repeatedly flew up to the upside-down suet 
feeder hanging over the platform, grabbed a beakful of suet, dropped 
down and carefully stuffed it in Junior's mouth and then immediately 
went back for more.  This went on for quite some time.

When I passed the window, Dad flushed into the shrubbery, but the 
fledgling just tightened its grip on the platform feeder, looked around 
uncertainly, and waited for him to come back and resume the feeding, 
which he did.

Out my office window in the back, the resident male Bluebird has decided 
the grass is a particularly productive place to hunt, and has been 
closely accompanied for several days now by one of his own Juniors, 
which mostly has been trying its hand at picking up bugs itself, rather 
than lounging around and expecting to be fed.

Why in both cases males, I wonder?  I'm guessing because the females are 
already sitting on their second clutch of the summer, leaving the male 
to tend to the feeding/training of the first offspring.

I love June.

Jane
(Shoreham)
Subject: Meadowlark
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 18:06:32 -0400
Would someone tell me just where on Lake St the meadowlark is located?
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Peregrine Recapture
From: David Merker <buteojamaica AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:56:30 -0400
On June 22, 2015 a raptor ecologist working in Nunavut, Canada  captured a 
female peregrine (1807-95417) on north Baffin Island; she was first banded 
under my permit as Hatching Year - Female at Cape May Point, NJ on October 26, 
2010. 

She was captured by his grad student over fake eggs on her nest site. I have a 
couple of pictures if anyone is interested, she was also seen in 2014 at the 
same breeding site (but not re-captured). 

 

Dave Merker 
Etna, New Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.
www.capemayraptors.org
Subject: Re: Loons
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:55:52 -0700
Hi. Which side of Kent Pond best for viewing?
On Jun 26, 2015 1:52 PM, "Sue" <2birdvt AT comcast.net> wrote:

> At Kent Pond this morning the loon family was assaulted by a  bald eagle.
> A great deal of thrashing and calling occurred twice. Eagle finally left.
> Chicks were still fine.
> Mallard with ducklings plus Canada geese with teenagers were nearby.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Roy Pilcher <shamwarivt AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 14:57:25 -0400
Bird in full song but distant, west of north/south farm service road between 
09:30 and 10:40 today, Friday. 

 
Cheers, Roy Pilcher
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Payne 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Fri, Jun 26, 2015 5:57 am
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)


I'd also like to thank Ted, Quing and Allan for getting the info about
this
bird out so quickly. I got to see and hear it yesterday afternoon. 
 
Like
with the Harris's Sparrow, I have created a stakeout Hotspot in
eBird for
people to use. You can see it at the following
link:
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/hotspot/L3750231
 
If you would like to merge
your sighting into the hotspot, instructions
on how to do so can be found on
the eBird website here:
http://bit.ly/1Lw5bhc

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury,
VT

On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:09:53 -0400, Josh Phillips  wrote:

The Western
Meadowlark was still present from 5:15 to 5:30 this
evening, moving along the
electric fence line to the west of the gravel
farm road that leads south from
the parking spot and singing regularly.

Many thanks as always to everyone for
the updates, and to Ted, Qing,
and Allan for the report!

Josh Phillips

 
Subject: Loons
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:52:17 -0400
At Kent Pond this morning the loon family was assaulted by a bald eagle. A 
great deal of thrashing and calling occurred twice. Eagle finally left. Chicks 
were still fine. 

Mallard with ducklings plus Canada geese with teenagers were nearby.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Western Meadowlark, Lake Road - Yes
From: Linda McElvany <lindap.mack AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:55:18 +0000
Western Meadowlark singing at 10:30AM. Way out there - to the left of distant 
line of hay rolls ... left of red metal gate on farthest fence post. Earlier 
had flow to a post to the right near cattle grazing by farm buildings. Also 
heard Bobolinks singing on both sides of road. The Meadowlark song carried well 
on the wind. Thanks to Roy Pilcher for pointing it out to Norm and me, and for 
interesting conversation. Linda McElvany - Williston 


----- Original Message -----

From: "Miriam Lawrence"  
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2015 9:30:52 AM 
Subject: [VTBIRD] Western Meadowlark still present 

The Western Meadowlark was still there and singing between 8-9 a.m. Its 
pattern (at least for the hour I was there) seems to be to sing actively 
for 5-10 minutes, then move and be quiet for 10-15 minutes, then sing 
again. So if you arrive and hear/see nothing, be patient. 

The bird moved around quite a bit from fencepost to fencepost at the far 
southern and western sides of the field. Definitely bring a scope if you 
have one. 

-- 
Miriam Lawrence 
Monkton 
Subject: Re: Harriers
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 10:28:36 -0400
Hello Sue,

Your comment "We noted a scarcity of harriers this year." caused me to 
do a little research using eBird numbers.

Choosing the Champlain Basin for this little study, I've combined the 
data from Franklin, Grand Isle, Chittenden, Addison, and Rutland 
Counties.  This includes the largest concentrations of Harriers reported 
from Vermont.

I decided to compare different groups of years, and different years, 
using two eBird parameters.  The first is "frequency", which is the 
percentage of all checklists submitted during a time period that has at 
least one Harrier.  The second is "total" which is the sum of all 
individual Harriers reported during a time period.

Both parameters are affected by the habits of birders.  Some years 
birders may spend more of their time in Harrier habitat than, say, in 
the mountains ... where as other years it may be the opposite.

For the months, based on your "this year" I've chosen January through 
the first two weeks of June.  Not used was the first week of January 
because of CBC data warping.

Question #1.  Is the frequency of Harrier reports much less this year 
than in previous years?

The pattern of Harrier numbers in the first half of the year is pretty 
straight forward.  There are a low number of birds overwintering in 
January, February, and March.  Then there is a huge influx the first 
week of April.  By May the numbers observed have dropped to about half 
that in April, and by June the numbers observed are almost back down to 
winter counts.

The frequency values for April, May, and June (first two weeks):

All years:             5.8%    3.5%    3.5%
2010-2014          5.7%    3.0%    4.0%
2014                    4.6%    2.4%    1.9%
2015                    5.3%    2.3%    1.4%

The frequency values for the months of April, May, and first two weeks 
of June combined.

All years:       4.4%
2010-2014     4.3%
2014               3.2%
2015               3.3%

So, looking at the frequencies for the combined three months, there is 
little difference between this year and last year.  But both of those 
years are noticeably lower than previous groups of years during May and 
June.

One could conclude, then, that arriving migrants are of similar numbers 
now as in years before, but then number that take up residence has 
noticeably declined.

Question #2.  How have total numbers of Harriers reported changed during 
the last four years?  (The number of checklists submitted in the each of 
the last four years is much closer to the 2015 numbers than before that 
time when submissions were very much less.)

This table is the weekly average of Harrier numbers for the Champlain 
Basin for the months January to June (excluding the first week of 
January and the last two weeks of June):


Month    J      F      M     A    M     J
2012       9    16    16    16    13    7
2013       3    3       20    40    15    9
2014       1    4       7    37    15      6
2015       7    0       5     32    13    4

--- Note that the arrival flush for 2014 and 2015 is later than for the 
previous two years.
--- April numbers for 2015 are right in the same ballpark as the 
previous couple of years, and greater than 2012.
--- June numbers for this year are slightly less than the previous three 
years but they are such low numbers for all the years that it is not 
clear if the 2015 number represents scarcity or not.  If only a couple 
of observations for this June have yet to be submitted, for example, 
then this year would look like the previous years.
..
So it appears that compared to earlier years in the Champlain Basin, 
Northern Harriers are being reported less frequently in very recent 
years during May, and June.  Hence, since arrival numbers appear to be 
constant, but remaining residents may have declined, there may be local 
factors playing a role.  However, since the actual numbers of birds 
being reported during those months is little changed, there is the 
possibility that changes in birders' habits, or other factors, are also 
affecting the frequency and totals numbers.

Ian


On 6/24/2015 3:39 PM, Sue wrote:
> We noted a scarcity of harriers this year. Has something occurred on the 
wintering grounds? 

> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Western Meadowlark still present
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 09:30:52 -0400
The Western Meadowlark was still there and singing between 8-9 a.m. Its
pattern (at least for the hour I was there) seems to be to sing actively
for 5-10 minutes, then move and be quiet for 10-15 minutes, then sing
again. So if you arrive and hear/see nothing, be patient.

The bird moved around quite a bit from fencepost to fencepost at the far
southern and western sides of the field. Definitely bring a scope if you
have one.

-- 
Miriam Lawrence
Monkton
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Gary Chapin <gchapin1 AT ROCHESTER.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 06:34:23 -0400
The bird is actively singing from a distant fence post this morning. 

Gary Chapin
Ticonderoga, NY

> On Jun 26, 2015, at 5:57 AM, Ron Payne  wrote:
> 
> I'd also like to thank Ted, Quing and Allan for getting the info about this 
bird out so quickly. I got to see and hear it yesterday afternoon. 

>  
> Like with the Harris's Sparrow, I have created a stakeout Hotspot in eBird 
for people to use. You can see it at the following link: 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/hotspot/L3750231
>  
> If you would like to merge your sighting into the hotspot, instructions on 
how to do so can be found on the eBird website here: 

> http://bit.ly/1Lw5bhc
> 
> --
> Ron Payne
> Middlebury, VT
> 
> On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:09:53 -0400, Josh Phillips  wrote:
> 
> The Western Meadowlark was still present from 5:15 to 5:30 this evening, 
moving along the electric fence line to the west of the gravel farm road that 
leads south from the parking spot and singing regularly. 

> Many thanks as always to everyone for the updates, and to Ted, Qing, and 
Allan for the report! 

> 
> Josh Phillips
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 05:57:54 -0400
I'd also like to thank Ted, Quing and Allan for getting the info about
this bird out so quickly. I got to see and hear it yesterday afternoon. 
 
Like with the Harris's Sparrow, I have created a stakeout Hotspot in
eBird for people to use. You can see it at the following link:
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/hotspot/L3750231
 
If you would like to merge your sighting into the hotspot, instructions
on how to do so can be found on the eBird website here:
http://bit.ly/1Lw5bhc

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:09:53 -0400, Josh Phillips  wrote:

The Western Meadowlark was still present from 5:15 to 5:30 this
evening, moving along the electric fence line to the west of the gravel
farm road that leads south from the parking spot and singing regularly.

Many thanks as always to everyone for the updates, and to Ted, Qing,
and Allan for the report!

Josh Phillips
Subject: Mansfield
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 22:25:31 -0400
A Tuesday evening visit by VCE to the Mansfield ridgeline saw subdued 
avian activity, probably a result of both strong winds and the fact that 
most birds are now on nests, but the light show was one of the most 
spectacular I've ever seen up there. The leading edge of a cold front 
ushered in winds of 20-30 and a medley of swirling clouds that at times 
bathed the Nose in light that was nothing short of transcendent. The 
dusk chorus of thrushes and white-throats was subdued, and we caught 
only 5 birds in our 15 mist nets.

Dawn found the ridgeline smothered in clouds and winds still strong, 
temperatures in the high 40s. Vocal activity was again light. We opened 
our nets and caught another 15 birds, the most surprising of which was a 
yearling male Rose-breasted Grosbeak. Nearly every female of the 6 
species we netted had a well-developed incubation/brood patch, 
indicating that nesting is in full swing. So far in June, we've captured 
24 Bicknell's Thrushes, 9 of them new birds, 15 old friends (birds 
banded in previous years). The operative sex ratio still seems to be 
~2:1, with 16 males and 8 females to date.

Still not a red squirrel to be found anywhere, though plenty of snowshoe 
hares.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Josh Phillips <jdp AT SCRIBERULE.ORG>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:09:53 -0400
The Western Meadowlark was still present from 5:15 to 5:30 this evening, moving 
along the electric fence line to the west of the gravel farm road that leads 
south from the parking spot and singing regularly. 


Many thanks as always to everyone for the updates, and to Ted, Qing, and Allan 
for the report! 


Josh Phillips
Subject: BB Cuckoo Union St Brandon, Jun 25, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 17:08:59 +0000
Of interest was a BB Cuckoo emerging from waist high growth---possible nest 
site. 

Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2015 1:04:17 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Jun 25, 2015 

Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jun 25, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.5 mile(s) 
39 species 

Turkey Vulture 1 
Wilson's Snipe 1 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 3 
Mourning Dove 4 
Black-billed Cuckoo 1 bird flew up from ground , possible nest site. 
Belted Kingfisher 1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 3 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 
Alder Flycatcher 1 
Willow Flycatcher 1 
Great Crested Flycatcher 1 
Eastern Kingbird 2 
Yellow-throated Vireo 1 
Warbling Vireo 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 5 
Tree Swallow 1 
Barn Swallow 13 
Cliff Swallow 1 
White-breasted Nuthatch 1 
House Wren 1 
Veery 2 
American Robin 5 
Gray Catbird 5 
European Starling 7 
Cedar Waxwing 2 
Ovenbird 2 
Northern Waterthrush 1 
Common Yellowthroat 4 
Yellow Warbler 4 
Song Sparrow 3 
Swamp Sparrow 1 
Scarlet Tanager 1 
Indigo Bunting 1 
Bobolink 5 
Red-winged Blackbird 16 
Common Grackle 1 
Brown-headed Cowbird 2 
American Goldfinch 5 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24048042 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 11:46:42 -0400
As of 11:30 it was still there and singing.

Isis Erb

On Thursday, June 25, 2015, UVM  wrote:

> It was still being seen/heard as of about 10:15 AM, when I left the site.
> Scott Moreical
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jun 25, 2015, at 9:10 AM, Eugenia Cooke  > wrote:
> >
> > Anyone know if it will be around late morning/mid-day? Heading up from
> > Rutland.
> >> On Jun 25, 2015 8:58 AM, "Allan Strong" >
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Glad to hear the bird is still around this morning.
> >>
> >> Here are a couple pictures:
> >>
> >>
> 
http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2900_zpsdvzxp9hi.jpg.html 

> >>
> >>
> 
http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2891_zps8yaedblf.jpg.html 

> >>
> >> And a video:
> >> http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/wfb130/pages/WEME/MVI_2898.MP4
> >>
> >>> On 6/24/2015 9:15 PM, Allan Strong wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Ted Murin and Qing Ren found a Western Meadowlark on Lake Rd. in
> >>> Charlotte. Take Greenbush Road west and south out of Shelburne and
> take a
> >>> right on Lake Rd. Pull off in the gravel parking lot about 200 yards
> west
> >>> of the intersection on the south side of Lake Rd. The bird is in the
> >>> pasture on the south side of the road.
> >>>
> >>> I called the owner of the field who said no problem for birders to pull
> >>> off in the little gravel parking area, but please don't venture into
> the
> >>> field or down the dirt track. He's got cattle grazing out in the
> field. The
> >>> bird is quite visible and audible from the road.
> >>>
> >>> I'll post a video tomorrow.
> >>>
> >>> Good luck...no reason to believe the bird won't sick around.
> >>>
> >>> Allan
> >> --
> >> **************************************************
> >> Allan M. Strong
> >> Rubenstein School of Env and Natural Resources
> >> 200L Aiken Center
> >> 81 Carrigan Drive
> >> Burlington, VT 05405
> >> 802-656-2910
> >> **************************************************
> >>
>
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 10:45:17 -0400
It was still being seen/heard as of about 10:15 AM, when I left the site.  
Scott Moreical

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 25, 2015, at 9:10 AM, Eugenia Cooke  wrote:
> 
> Anyone know if it will be around late morning/mid-day? Heading up from
> Rutland.
>> On Jun 25, 2015 8:58 AM, "Allan Strong"  wrote:
>> 
>> Glad to hear the bird is still around this morning.
>> 
>> Here are a couple pictures:
>> 
>> 
http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2900_zpsdvzxp9hi.jpg.html 

>> 
>> 
http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2891_zps8yaedblf.jpg.html 

>> 
>> And a video:
>> http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/wfb130/pages/WEME/MVI_2898.MP4
>> 
>>> On 6/24/2015 9:15 PM, Allan Strong wrote:
>>> 
>>> Ted Murin and Qing Ren found a Western Meadowlark on Lake Rd. in
>>> Charlotte. Take Greenbush Road west and south out of Shelburne and take a
>>> right on Lake Rd. Pull off in the gravel parking lot about 200 yards west
>>> of the intersection on the south side of Lake Rd. The bird is in the
>>> pasture on the south side of the road.
>>> 
>>> I called the owner of the field who said no problem for birders to pull
>>> off in the little gravel parking area, but please don't venture into the
>>> field or down the dirt track. He's got cattle grazing out in the field. The
>>> bird is quite visible and audible from the road.
>>> 
>>> I'll post a video tomorrow.
>>> 
>>> Good luck...no reason to believe the bird won't sick around.
>>> 
>>> Allan
>> --
>> **************************************************
>> Allan M. Strong
>> Rubenstein School of Env and Natural Resources
>> 200L Aiken Center
>> 81 Carrigan Drive
>> Burlington, VT 05405
>> 802-656-2910
>> **************************************************
>> 
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 06:10:40 -0700
Anyone know if it will be around late morning/mid-day? Heading up from
Rutland.
On Jun 25, 2015 8:58 AM, "Allan Strong"  wrote:

> Glad to hear the bird is still around this morning.
>
> Here are a couple pictures:
>
> 
http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2900_zpsdvzxp9hi.jpg.html 

>
> 
http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2891_zps8yaedblf.jpg.html 

>
> And a video:
> http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/wfb130/pages/WEME/MVI_2898.MP4
>
> On 6/24/2015 9:15 PM, Allan Strong wrote:
>
>> Ted Murin and Qing Ren found a Western Meadowlark on Lake Rd. in
>> Charlotte. Take Greenbush Road west and south out of Shelburne and take a
>> right on Lake Rd. Pull off in the gravel parking lot about 200 yards west
>> of the intersection on the south side of Lake Rd. The bird is in the
>> pasture on the south side of the road.
>>
>> I called the owner of the field who said no problem for birders to pull
>> off in the little gravel parking area, but please don't venture into the
>> field or down the dirt track. He's got cattle grazing out in the field. The
>> bird is quite visible and audible from the road.
>>
>> I'll post a video tomorrow.
>>
>> Good luck...no reason to believe the bird won't sick around.
>>
>> Allan
>>
>>
> --
> **************************************************
> Allan M. Strong
> Rubenstein School of Env and Natural Resources
> 200L Aiken Center
> 81 Carrigan Drive
> Burlington, VT 05405
> 802-656-2910
> **************************************************
>
Subject: Re: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 08:58:15 -0400
Glad to hear the bird is still around this morning.

Here are a couple pictures:

http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2900_zpsdvzxp9hi.jpg.html 


http://s1353.photobucket.com/user/WFBRubenstein/media/WEME/IMG_2891_zps8yaedblf.jpg.html 


And a video:
http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/wfb130/pages/WEME/MVI_2898.MP4

On 6/24/2015 9:15 PM, Allan Strong wrote:
> Ted Murin and Qing Ren found a Western Meadowlark on Lake Rd. in Charlotte. 
Take Greenbush Road west and south out of Shelburne and take a right on Lake 
Rd. Pull off in the gravel parking lot about 200 yards west of the intersection 
on the south side of Lake Rd. The bird is in the pasture on the south side of 
the road. 

>
> I called the owner of the field who said no problem for birders to pull off 
in the little gravel parking area, but please don't venture into the field or 
down the dirt track. He's got cattle grazing out in the field. The bird is 
quite visible and audible from the road. 

>
> I'll post a video tomorrow.
>
> Good luck...no reason to believe the bird won't sick around.
>
> Allan
>

-- 
**************************************************
Allan M. Strong
Rubenstein School of Env and Natural Resources
200L Aiken Center
81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
**************************************************
Subject: Western Meadowlark present
From: Zac Cota <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 07:23:45 -0400
Western Meadowlark still present this morning in Charlotte. If you park in the 
gravel area first described, look in the south field towards the farm to the 
west. Often perching on fence posts. Singing nearly nonstop. Larry clarfeld 
witnessed a scuffle between this bird and an eastern meadowlark. Definitely 
worth going for. 


Zac Cota

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Western Meadowlark! (Charlotte, private property)
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 21:15:07 -0400
Ted Murin and Qing Ren found a Western Meadowlark on Lake Rd. in Charlotte. 
Take Greenbush Road west and south out of Shelburne and take a right on Lake 
Rd. Pull off in the gravel parking lot about 200 yards west of the intersection 
on the south side of Lake Rd. The bird is in the pasture on the south side of 
the road. 


I called the owner of the field who said no problem for birders to pull off in 
the little gravel parking area, but please don't venture into the field or down 
the dirt track. He's got cattle grazing out in the field. The bird is quite 
visible and audible from the road. 


I'll post a video tomorrow.

Good luck...no reason to believe the bird won't sick around.

Allan

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Bald Eagles
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 19:04:35 -0400
It looks like we've got a nesting pair of Bald Eagles on Lake Rescue in
Ludlow this year.  There's a photo on our Lake Rescue Association Facebook
page.

-- 
Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
36 Laurel Ledge Court
Stamford, CT 06903
973-441-1115
Subject: Re: Nestling Merlin at wildlife rescue
From: Kenny Pallis <kpallis6 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:47:40 -0400
Hi,
I am new to the area and just joined the VTBIRD list, but I would like to
make a donation and am interested in reading your book.  What is the
address that I can send the donation to.  Thanks.

Kenny Pallis

On Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 3:43 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:

> Hi all, NorthStream Wildlife Rescue in Monkton recently admitted a
> displaced nestling Merlin chick. No parents or nest has been found in the
> area. The little falcon chick is thriving and consumes about eight fuzzy
> mice per day. I know I have met many of you through the 16 years I have
> been rehabilitating wildlife. If you care to make a donation towards food
> for the little Merlin, donations of $25 and up will get a signed copy of my
> book, The Squirrel Diaries, Tales from a Wildlife Rehabilitator. Please
> email me for our address or call 802-236-3541. Thanks so much!
>
> P.S. Yesterday, we released a Great Horned Owl back in its home territory.
> It was found at the bottom of a quarry pit unable to fly away due to a
> broad winged hawk repeatedly attacking it and bringing it down.
>
Subject: Re: Nestling Merlin at wildlife rescue
From: eve ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:48:05 -0400
Hi Helen,

What is your snail mail address? I will send a donation, and certainly am 
interested in your book! 

Keep up the good work!  The birds appreciate you, as do I / we.
On 2015-06-24, at 3:43 PM, H Nicolay wrote:

> Hi all, NorthStream Wildlife Rescue in Monkton recently admitted a
> displaced nestling Merlin chick. No parents or nest has been found in the
> area. The little falcon chick is thriving and consumes about eight fuzzy
> mice per day. I know I have met many of you through the 16 years I have
> been rehabilitating wildlife. If you care to make a donation towards food
> for the little Merlin, donations of $25 and up will get a signed copy of my
> book, The Squirrel Diaries, Tales from a Wildlife Rehabilitator. Please
> email me for our address or call 802-236-3541. Thanks so much!
> 
> P.S. Yesterday, we released a Great Horned Owl back in its home territory.
> It was found at the bottom of a quarry pit unable to fly away due to a
> broad winged hawk repeatedly attacking it and bringing it down.
> 

Eve Ticknor

Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

"We find beauty not in the thing itself, but in the pattern of shadows, the 
light and the darkness, that one thing against another creates." J. Tanazaki 

Subject: Nestling Merlin at wildlife rescue
From: H Nicolay <sqrlma AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:43:45 -0400
Hi all, NorthStream Wildlife Rescue in Monkton recently admitted a
displaced nestling Merlin chick. No parents or nest has been found in the
area. The little falcon chick is thriving and consumes about eight fuzzy
mice per day. I know I have met many of you through the 16 years I have
been rehabilitating wildlife. If you care to make a donation towards food
for the little Merlin, donations of $25 and up will get a signed copy of my
book, The Squirrel Diaries, Tales from a Wildlife Rehabilitator. Please
email me for our address or call 802-236-3541. Thanks so much!

P.S. Yesterday, we released a Great Horned Owl back in its home territory.
It was found at the bottom of a quarry pit unable to fly away due to a
broad winged hawk repeatedly attacking it and bringing it down.
Subject: Harriers
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:39:48 -0400
We noted a scarcity of harriers this year. Has something occurred on the 
wintering grounds? 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Bird Fest: Reception This Friday Kicks Off Month Long Event
From: Nancy Carter <revnacarter AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:07:06 -0400
Bird Fest in Ticonderoga will feature artwork and special events
Times of Ti

Ticonderoga — Ticonderoga Arts will hold a Bird Fest a month-long beginning
Friday, June 26. It will include a major show of bird-themed artwork and
several special events at its Downtown Gallery on 119 Montcalm St in
Ticonderoga. Included in the show will be work of artists from Ticonderoga,
Hague, Middlebury, Saratoga Springs, and more. All events and admission to
the gallery are free of charge. Most art will be for sale.

The opening reception happens on Friday, June 26, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Enjoy food and beverages and meet the artists. Come see images that contain
birds by photographers Nancy A. Carter, Glen Chapman, Brooke Conklin, and
Gary Tobler ; painters Joyce Cleveland, Mary Lower, Barbara Nelson, Joan
Pulling, Helen Ruddock, and Tom Ryan; quilter Maletta Hourigan and wood
carver Bob Wotton. In addition hands-on displays and activities will be
available including an activity paper on owls for children, a display of
bird feeders on loan from Aubuchon Hardware, and samples of knitted bird
“knests” with information on how to make these for orphan birds and send
them to wildlife rehabilitators.

Three presentations will be given on Tuesdays at the Downtown Gallery....

Read more at:

http://www.timesofti.com/news/2015/jun/14/bird-fest-ticonderoga-will-feature-artwork-and-spe/ 

Subject: National Park BioBlitz
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 11:47:01 -0400
We'd love to have you join us for the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National
Historical Park BioBlitz 2015 on July 11th.

Part scientific endeavor, part festival, and part education, the 2015
BioBlitz at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park will bring
together leading scientists, naturalists, and community members of all ages
to find and document as many species as possible in one day at the park as
part of the Vermont Atlas of Life.

And we'll be tracking everthing we find on our live database at
http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mbrnhp-bioblitz-2015. And of course all
of the data will be instantly shared with iNaturalist Vermont, a project of
the Vermont Atlas of LIfe (
http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/vermont-atlas-of-life).

Festivities for the public begin at 7am. Come at anytime. We'll be
headquartered at the Forest Center building near route 12.

Tentative Schedule of Events (we can add your work here too!)

Scheduled Events - All events start at the Forest Center (BioBlitz
 Headquarters)
• 7 - 9am Birds (meet at the Forest Center). The park is home to over 140
species. How many can we find in one day?
• 9 –11am Rock Walls (meet at the Forest Center). Explore old walls and
help document every living thing we find among these historic walls.
• 10-12pm – Streams (meet at the Forest Center). From salamanders to water
striders, the park’s waterways have a rich diversity of life. Help explore
these waterways to document the biodiversity of these clear mountain
streams.
• 12-1pm Lunch Bring your own lunch and join us at the Forest Center.
• 1 – 3pm Old Logs (meet at the Forest Center). Join us to discover what is
hidden within and beneath old logs on the forest floor. From fungi to
invertebrates or even a salamander, we’ll find and document them all.
• 1 – 4pm Mega-Transect (meet at the Forest Center). Join us as we walk
across the entire park documenting everything that is found – from trees to
bees and everything between. This will be a rigorous hike full of
discovery.
• 2 – 4pm Pogue Pond (meet at the Forest Center). Using nets, buckets and
our cameras, help document the life in the waters of this historic pond.
• 3 – 5pm Trees and Trunks (meet at the Forest Center). There’s a lot of
life living on a tree. We’ll explore and photo-document all of it. From
insects to lichens and more, how many species can we find living on a tree?

On-going Events at BioBlitz Headquarters at the Forest Center
• Summer Junior Ranger Adventure (ages 6-12) – Complete hands-on activities
that will help you learn and explore the diversity of the Park’s habitats
and creatures. Earn a Summer Junior Ranger Badge and certificate. For
participating in this special adventure, you will also receive a
BioBlitz Junior
Ranger prize!
• iNaturalist app and web site training and help.
• See amazing insects and other critters up close as experts work to
determine their identification.

Note: Schedule of events subject to change. Please check back before
BioBlitz day.
____________________________
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


Subject: Two fledgling fish crows in Leddy Park
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 00:47:33 -0400
The Fish Crows I have been observing this spring in Leddy Park in Burlington
recently fledged two young. The fledglings have raspier voices, bright red
mouth linings, and cannot fly yet. Late this afternoon, I watched them as
they sat perched in a pine adjacent to the pine with the nest. They were
awkward, and worked to keep their balance by flapping their wings. They and
their parents called back and forth to each other for most of the hour I
watched them. The adult birds flew around them and perched nearby. I believe
there was some feeding going on but I did not see it. However, the adults
continually flew near the young and perched beside them. 

 

Michele Patenaude

172 Woodbury Road

Burlington, VT 05408

802-862-4085

 
Subject: pine siskins
From: Eric Wood <ericw5 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 21:50:55 -0400
Two pine siskins at the sunflower feeder early this evening, here in Jericho. 
Unusual to see them this time of year. 

-Eric
Subject: Re: snipe on a wire
From: Kaye Danforth <danforthpainting AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 19:11:06 -0400
I often drive that stretch of road and sometimes see interesting birds perching 
on wires there. In addition to Snipe, this spring there was an Upland Sandpiper 
standing on the wire, and just a few feet away was perched an American Kestral. 
Not only was it strange to see the Sandpiper up there, I can only imagine what 
the Kestral thought of it too. 


Kaye in Hinesburg

On Jun 22, 2015, at 4:35 PM, Liz Lee wrote:

> While drivng on Oak Hill Rd. in Williston this morning, I was looking at 
birds on the wire by the Isham Farm. Along with the black bird and the swallow 
was a Wilson's snipe. He looked pretty funny up there. 

> 
> Liz
Subject: snipe on a wire
From: Liz Lee <lizl AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:35:13 -0400
While drivng on Oak Hill Rd. in Williston this morning, I was looking at 
birds on the wire by the Isham Farm.  Along with the black bird and the 
swallow was a Wilson's snipe.  He looked pretty funny up there.

Liz
Subject: Re: Celebrating Town Forest with eBird Hotspots
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 14:55:18 -0400
I forgot to mention that we owe thanks to Bridget Butler for prompting
us to do this. We've already received quite a few hotspot suggestions
as a result, so please keep them coming.

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:09:06 -0400, Ron Payne  wrote:

       In 1915 the state of Vermont passed a law which allowed towns to
acquire forest land for public benefit leading to the creation of over
300 town forests across the state. One hundred years later the State is
celebrating the centennial of this legislation by recognizing the value
town forests have in our communities. These include providing forest
products, creating places for recreation and preserving habitat for
wildlife. Here at Vermont eBird, we would also like to recognize these
important properties and would like to encourage birders to visit and
report their sightings from them. And to facilitate the sharing of bird
data collected there, we would like to promote the creation of eBird
Hotspots for them.
 
But since there are such a large number of Town Forests in the state,
and not all of them are open to uses such as bird watching, we would
like to appeal to local knowledge of the Vermont birding community to
help with the creation these hotspots.
 
Here is how you can help. First research the town forests in your area
and find out if they have public access. The Vermont Community Forest
website has a map of town forests that can help you get started
(http://bit.ly/1THYONE). Once you have found a forest and you are
allowed to visit it, go birding at the town forest. Then submit a
checklist from there by finding the correct location on the map, and
checking the box next to “Suggest as a Birding HotSpot?”
 
If you already have submitted checklists from a town forest that
doesn't yet have a hotspot, you can suggest it by following these
instructions on the eBird website: http://bit.ly/1LfVfup
 
If you have checklists for a Town Forest that already has a hotspot,
you can merge them into the hotspot by following these instructions on
the eBird website: http://bit.ly/1Lw5bhc
 
And the final and most important step is to keep visiting town forests
and submitting checklists from them so that we can create a pool of
data that shows how important town forest habitat is to the birds!
 
Ron Payne, Ian Worley and Kent McFarland
Vermont eBird hotspot managers

Vermont eBird is administered by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies.
Subject: Celebrating Town Forest with eBird Hotspots
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:09:06 -0400
In 1915 the state of Vermont passed a law which allowed towns to acquire forest 
land for public benefit leading to the creation of over 300 town forests across 
the state. One hundred years later the State is celebrating the centennial of 
this legislation by recognizing the value town forests have in our communities. 
These include providing forest products, creating places for recreation and 
preserving habitat for wildlife. Here at Vermont eBird, we would also like to 
recognize these important properties and would like to encourage birders to 
visit and report their sightings from them. And to facilitate the sharing of 
bird data collected there, we would like to promote the creation of eBird 
Hotspots for them. 

 
But since there are such a large number of Town Forests in the state, and not 
all of them are open to uses such as bird watching, we would like to appeal to 
local knowledge of the Vermont birding community to help with the creation 
these hotspots. 

 
Here is how you can help. First research the town forests in your area and find 
out if they have public access. The Vermont Community Forest website has a map 
of town forests that can help you get started (http://bit.ly/1THYONE). Once you 
have found a forest and you are allowed to visit it, go birding at the town 
forest. Then submit a checklist from there by finding the correct location on 
the map, and checking the box next to “Suggest as a Birding HotSpot?” 

 
If you already have submitted checklists from a town forest that doesn't yet 
have a hotspot, you can suggest it by following these instructions on the eBird 
website: http://bit.ly/1LfVfup 

 
If you have checklists for a Town Forest that already has a hotspot, you can 
merge them into the hotspot by following these instructions on the eBird 
website: http://bit.ly/1Lw5bhc 

 
And the final and most important step is to keep visiting town forests and 
submitting checklists from them so that we can create a pool of data that shows 
how important town forest habitat is to the birds! 

 
Ron Payne, Ian Worley and Kent McFarland
Vermont eBird hotspot managers

Vermont eBird is administered by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies.
Subject: - Long Trail south Brandon Gap, Jun 20, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:38:32 +0000
HERE IS THE LIST FROM sATURDAY'S HIKE. 
sUE wETMORE 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 9:30:27 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Long Trail south Brandon Gap, Jun 20, 2015 

Long Trail south Brandon Gap, Addison, Vermont, US 
Jun 20, 2015 7:45 AM - 11:45 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
4.0 mile(s) 
17 species 

Hairy Woodpecker 1 
Blue-headed Vireo 2 
Red-eyed Vireo 9 
Winter Wren 3 ONE SINGING, ONE AGITATED, ONE CARRYING FOOD 
Swainson's Thrush 5 ALL SINGING, ONE SEEN THIS SECTION OF LONG TRAIL HAS HAD 
HIGH COUNTS IN THE PAST. 

Hermit Thrush 2 
American Robin 2 PAIR 
Ovenbird 9 
Magnolia Warbler 1 
Blackburnian Warbler 1 
Blackpoll Warbler 2 
Black-throated Blue Warbler 8 
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2 
Black-throated Green Warbler 8 
Canada Warbler 1 
Dark-eyed Junco 1 
Purple Finch 1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24006150 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Swainson's thrush
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:52:22 -0400
Today I purposes to find Swainson's thrush. So I headed to Brandon Gap and took 
the Long Trail south. Initially it was red-eyed vireos and ovenbirds but not 
much else. Perhaps the early start and cool temperatures were the cause. 
However soon I heard a thrush, was it ? Yes the lovely song of Swainson's 
wafted thru the woodland. In total five were along the trail with one allowing 
me to see it. Not to be outdone Hermit thrush dropped into view and I did hear 
its melody as well. 

Nearly at my turn around point I found myself in a flash mob of the following: 
Blackburnian, yellow-rumped, black-throated blue and green, & blackpoll 
warblers, juncos, winter wren all which were either highly incensed that I had 
intruded or were busy gathering food for nestlings. 

A purple finch sang to be followed by a Magnolia warbler----a Canada warbler 
pair also expressed concern at my presence. Winter wrens sang their complicated 
melody and finally a hairy woodpecker added a drum roll. 

What a great day to be out in our beautiful woods.
Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod
Subject: Common Gallinule at Charcoal Creek
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 12:51:33 -0400
After a pleasant morning walk at the Missisquoi NWR led by Ken Copenhaver and 
Julie Filiberti, I stopped by Charcoal Creek and spotted a Common Gallinule 
across from the pull off on route 78 swimming about 10 yards from shore. Also, 
I found the Northern Mockingbird reported by others on the lawn at 94 Campbell 
Bay Road. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Mansfield hosts Bicknell descendants
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 21:44:14 -0400
It was a special honor for VCE to host the grandson and 
great-great-grandson of Eugene P. Bicknell on Mt. Mansfield Wednesday 
evening and Thursday morning. Eugene Bicknell Doggett and his grandson 
Edward "Teddy" Bicknell Doggett both enjoyed close encounters with the 
bird that their forebear discovered 134 years ago on Slide Mt. in the 
Catskills. Overall, avian activity was quieter than during the past two 
weeks, as nesting is in full swing, but we mist-netted 21 birds, 
including 4 Bicknell's Thrush. The experience created indelible memories 
for all of us.

Read more on the VCE blog at 
http://vtecostudies.org/blog/bicknell-legacy-shines-on-mt-mansfield/.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Bobolink field visit tomorrow - rubber boots are best
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 20:59:29 -0400
Hi All,

If you are planning on coming for the Bobolink Field visit tomorrow, I just 
spoke with the Warner's who let me know that the paths are on the soggy side 
from all of the rain. So, waterproof boots are the footwear du jour. 


Hope to see you tomorrow!

Allan

Once again, The Bobolink Project had another successful year, thanks in large 
part to your support. This year, we were able to set aside 540 acres as habitat 
for breeding Bobolinks. In appreciation of your generosity, we will be hosting 
a field walk on Saturday, June 20 at 8:30. 


The walk will take place at the Warner Farm in Bridport, VT at 8:30 AM and is 
open to all...regardless of whether or not you pledged. I'll be joining the 
Warners for a guided tour around their farm and we'll have a chance to see 
conservation in action and talk about the issues facing Bobolinks and other 
grassland birds. They have a wonderful population of breeding Bobolinks and 
we've found other interesting birds such as a Lawrence's Warbler and an albino 
Tree Swallow. There is no fee or signup required for this walk--just come on 
out! 


The Warner Farm is located at:  847 Mountain Road, Bridport, VT 05734
---Directions are below, or check out the link to Google maps:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/847+Mountain+Rd,+Bridport,+VT+05734/ AT 44.025917,-73.278206,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x4cb55faa3a397fb9:0xb8bd29ffd193d74 


Thank you again for your generous support of the Bobolink Project, and we look 
forward to seeing many of you next Saturday! 


Allan

Directions:

>From the north:
Take 22A south out of Vergennes. Continue south to Addison and follow 22A for 
4.0 miles south of the intersection with Rt. 17. Turn left (east) on Town Line 
Rd. At the T, take a right on East St. In 0.4 miles, take your first left on 
Mountain Rd. Look for 847 Mountain Rd. on your left in 0.85 miles. 


>From Shoreham (south):
Drive north on 22A 2.5 miles north of the (northernmost) intersection with Rt. 
125. Turn right (west) on Town Line Rd. At the T, take a right on East St. In 
0.4 miles, take your first left on Mountain Rd. Look for 847 Mountain Rd. on 
your left in 0.85 miles. 


>From Middlebury:
Take 125 west out of town. Just after 125 turns north and crosses the Lemon 
Fair River, take a right on Snake Mountain Road. At the 4-way intersection (1.8 
miles), take a left on Mountain Rd. Look for 847 Mountain Rd. on your right in 
1.3 miles. 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Thrushes
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:37:33 -0400
A choir of angels couldn't have been more thrilling than the trio I heard above 
the Falls of Lana near 

L.Dunmore.
First a hermit thrush, then two wood thrushes and finally a veery filled the 
woods with song. 

Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Cliff swallows
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 10:50:35 -0400
A nice discovery this morning was seven active nests of cliff swallows on the 
former Dean Farm in Brandon. 

Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: June 19, 2015 at 10:42:43 AM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Dean Farm, Brandon, Jun 19, 2015
> 
> Dean Farm, Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jun 19, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 21 species
> 
> Canada Goose  8
> Wood Duck  2
> Mallard  7     6 ducklings 1 female
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Wilson's Snipe  5
> Eastern Phoebe  2
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  2
> American Crow  2
> Barn Swallow  7
> Cliff Swallow  14     7 nests all active on long barn
> House Wren  1
> Marsh Wren  2
> American Robin  1
> Yellow Warbler  2
> Swamp Sparrow  2
> Indigo Bunting  1
> Bobolink  5
> Red-winged Blackbird  13
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> Common Grackle  6
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23970518 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: 1 New Google Message
From: Susan Werntgen <swerntgen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 08:47:57 -0600
*   [image:

https://encrypted-tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRch5X9-KDdWzW_WZw76xp0yj6jZTzniUyL9d0wjhz01mApiXNuki0s10Y] 

Google Drive*. Keep everything. Share anything.

Google Drive: create, share, and keep all your stuff in one place.

View the document I uploaded for you using Google docs CLICK HERE
 to sign in
for your easy access.

Google®
Subject: Kestrels
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 07:52:04 -0400
Exciting news, at least for me! The Kestrel pair are indeed nesting in our 
box!!! I've been watching their activity over the last couple of weeks and 
suspected that they might be using the box. Day before yesterday I 'thought' I 
saw the female exiting but couldn't be sure. The box is a good 150 to 175 yards 
from the house. This morning I zeroed in on the male perched on the wire and 
immediately the female landed next to him. She flew and I managed to move to 
scope to the box in time to catch her entering. Whoo Hoo!!! 


The other exciting news is that there are three Peregrine chicks in the area 
that are 'seconds' from flying. 


Mundi
North Pownal


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of 
morality by religion. 

Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
Subject: Re: forecasting snow
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 20:57:02 -0400
I had a few Pine Siskins on Mt. Mansfield yesterday too.
Kent

____________________________

On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:07 PM, Scott Sainsbury  wrote:

> Pine Siskin at the feeder tonight.  Winter must be close by!
>
>
> Scott
> Moretown
>
Subject: forecasting snow
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 19:07:12 -0400
Pine Siskin at the feeder tonight.  Winter must be close by!


Scott 
Moretown
Subject: CANCELLED: Mad Birder Lincoln Peak Bicknell's Thrush Bird Walk for June 20,2015
From: Jeanne Elias <moosewoman AT MADRIVER.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 06:41:08 -0400
> 
> Hello Birders
> It turns out Sugarbush is not opening their lifts until June 29th this year, 
so the lift will not be open for our walk on Saturday. It is a looooong steep 
climb that would take hours, so we are canceling. We are researching whether to 
reschedule in mid July and will keep folks posted. Sorry for the inconvenience. 

> Jeannie Elias
> Mad Birders
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Black Vulture, Brattleboro, 6/17
From: Mike Resch <mresch8702 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 06:39:07 -0400
On Wednesday afternoon (6/17) I saw 1 Black Vulture with 2 Turkey Vultures 
along the Connecticut River about a mile south of downtown Brattleboro. I first 
spotted the birds at 4:45 PM as I was driving north in Hindsale, NH on Rt 119 - 
thank goodness there was a wide shoulder so I could pull off. All three 
eventually made their way north up the river before disappearing out of view 
near the Rt 119 bridge over the river. The Black Vulture spent time both in VT 
and NH during this time. 

    
A Black Vulture was seen in this general area on the 9th - maybe that was the 
same bird as mine today. 

    
  
Mike Resch   
www.statebirding.blogspot.com   
Pepperell, MA 
Subject: swallows
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 17:24:12 -0400
At least 3 Tree Swallows fledged this morning after several years absence from 
my property in Lincoln. One at a time, they appeared at the entrance, watched 
and waited for something like ten minutes, then dropped towards the ground, 
swooped up just in time, and were off. Success! 


Jean Arrowsmith
Subject: Indigo bunting Pearl St., Brandon, Jun 17, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 12:33:24 +0000
A nice morning in Brandon. 
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2015 8:10:52 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Pearl St., Brandon, Jun 17, 2015 

Pearl St., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jun 17, 2015 6:00 AM - 8:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
40 species 

Wood Duck 1 
Mallard 2 
Great Blue Heron 1 
Green Heron 1 
Mourning Dove 7 
Belted Kingfisher 1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1 
Downy Woodpecker 2 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 
Northern Flicker 2 
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1 
Eastern Kingbird 3 
Warbling Vireo 1 
Red-eyed Vireo 6 
Blue Jay 2 
American Crow 7 
Tree Swallow 6 
Barn Swallow 3 
Black-capped Chickadee 2 
White-breasted Nuthatch 1 
House Wren 4 
Carolina Wren 1 
Eastern Bluebird 4 male seen feeding 2 fledglings 
Wood Thrush 1 
American Robin 8 
Gray Catbird 9 one seen carrying food 
European Starling 5 
Cedar Waxwing 8 
Ovenbird 1 
Common Yellowthroat 4 
Chipping Sparrow 4 
Song Sparrow 4 
Swamp Sparrow 1 
Northern Cardinal 2 
Indigo Bunting 1 
Bobolink 1 
Red-winged Blackbird 11 
Baltimore Oriole 1 
House Finch 2 
American Goldfinch 3 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23940714 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Correction - Mad Birders seek Leader for Bicknell Thrush Lincoln Peak walk on Saturday June 20th in Fayston
From: Jeanne Elias <moosewoman AT MADRIVER.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 21:11:39 -0400
Correction: the walk is at Sugarbush South on Lincoln Peak...but we still need 
a leader! 


Sent from Outlook


> On Jun 16, 2015, at 8:50 PM, Jeanne Elias  wrote:
> 
> Hi Birders
> Due to unexpected circumstances the Mad Birders' Annual walk to see and hear 
Bicknell's Thrush atop Mt. Ellen in Fayston is in search of a leader! We need a 
birder to take charge of guiding folks on this wonderful walk which includes a 
ride up the chairlift at Sugarbush North Ski Area in the Mad River Valley. The 
walk is scheduled to occur from 9:30 until noon this coming Saturday June 20th. 
If you might be able to fill in as the leader, please email me at the earliest 
opportunity. 

> Thanks
> Jeannie Elias
> Mad Birders
> _______________________________________________
> madbirders mailing list
> madbirders AT lists.madbirders.org
> http://lists.madbirders.org/mailman/listinfo/madbirders
Subject: Mad Birders seek leader for Bicknell's Thrush Mt. Ellen Walk on Saturday June 20th
From: Jeanne Elias <moosewoman AT MADRIVER.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 20:53:34 -0400
Hi Birders
Due to unexpected circumstances the Mad Birders' Annual walk to see and hear 
Bicknell's Thrush atop Mt. Ellen in Fayston is in search of a leader! We need a 
birder to take charge of guiding folks on this wonderful walk which includes a 
ride up the chairlift at Sugarbush North Ski Area in the Mad River Valley. The 
walk is scheduled to occur from 9:30 until noon this coming Saturday June 20th. 
If you might be able to fill in as the leader, please email me at the earliest 
opportunity. 

Thanks
Jeannie Elias
Mad Birders
Subject: Re: Cedar waxwings redstart
From: Janet Warren <jwarren AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 05:57:05 -0400
We planted a few shad trees in front of our porch so that we could watch birds 
take the fruit. We were wondering a few days ago how the waxwings can spend so 
much time here. Don’t they have young somewhere? Do they fill their crop and 
take fruit to the hatchlings? Perhaps there are 100’s of them in the area, 
and the five or ten that we see are constantly changing. 


We also have barn swallows in our barn, and a few years ago, around the time 
that the barn residents had half grown nestlings, a pair built a nest in a 
corner under the eaves of our house. This year, a pair arrived June first and 
began to work on that old nest and perform the usual bonding rituals (“baby 
talk” at the nest, chasing, etc). There is no sign yet (two weeks later) of 
anyone brooding. Are they just playing house? 


We saw a female redstart a few days ago here on South Bingham street 

Janet Warren Cornwall 
> On Jun 15, 2015, at 3:29 PM, Martha McClintock  
wrote: 

> 
> Went down on Sunday to see the new Long Trail bridge over the Winooski
> River in Jonesville and to hike the new section.  Along the side of the
> river was a cherry/shad tree with fruit and many cedar waxwings that were
> fun to view as they were at eye level and no more than 10 yards away.
> Two waxwings sat side by side on a branch, passing a single berry back and
> forth between eachother for a minute or so.  Bonding behavior?
> The woods and river bank were alive with birds...even mid-day on a bright
> sunny day.  Definitely worth an early morning trip.
> Martha
> (Usually birding in) Westford
Subject: Cedar waxwings
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 15:29:22 -0400
Went down on Sunday to see the new Long Trail bridge over the Winooski
River in Jonesville and to hike the new section.  Along the side of the
river was a cherry/shad tree with fruit and many cedar waxwings that were
fun to view as they were at eye level and no more than 10 yards away.
Two waxwings sat side by side on a branch, passing a single berry back and
forth between eachother for a minute or so.  Bonding behavior?
The woods and river bank were alive with birds...even mid-day on a bright
sunny day.  Definitely worth an early morning trip.
Martha
(Usually birding in) Westford