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Updated on Thursday, August 21 at 05:13 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black-and Crimson Oriole,©Barry Kent Mackay

21 Aug Flight Plans [Patti Haynes ]
21 Aug West Rutland Marsh [Sue ]
21 Aug Moose Bog: Palm Warblers [tfberriman ]
20 Aug My Sibley guide [Michele Patenaude ]
20 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
20 Aug Re: Nighthawks [kkturtledude ]
20 Aug Nighthawks [Patti Haynes ]
20 Aug Warblers [Sue ]
20 Aug Ruddy Turnstone in Charlotteg [Jim Mead ]
19 Aug Re: Nighthawk [Connie Youngstrom ]
19 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
19 Aug Nighthawk [Sue ]
19 Aug Bicknell's Thrush t-shirt [Mark Tower ]
19 Aug good butterfly place [Maeve Kim ]
19 Aug Re: nighthawks [Ron Payne ]
18 Aug Shelburne Bay [Michele Patenaude ]
18 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count. [Don Clark ]
18 Aug nighthawks [Bob Budliger ]
18 Aug Re: Bald Eagle in Shelburne [Scott Sainsbury ]
18 Aug Re: Bald Eagle in Shelburne [Joyce Werntgen ]
18 Aug Bald Eagle in Shelburne [Ryan Morra ]
17 Aug Westminster Station Nighthawk Count [Don Clark ]
17 Aug eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Aug 16, 2014 [Randy Schmidt ]
17 Aug nighthawks [Don Clark ]
17 Aug - Wright Park, Middlebury Aug 16, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
17 Aug Birdy roadsides in western Addison County ..... ["Ian A. Worley" ]
16 Aug Bobolinks [Liz Lackey ]
16 Aug Sedge wren [Sue ]
16 Aug Re: Evening Grosbeak Gallery [Evergreen Erb ]
15 Aug Evening Grosbeak Gallery [cynthia crawford ]
15 Aug Fwd: eBird Report - Ward Hill Duxbury, Aug 15, 2014 [Pat Folsom ]
15 Aug Lincoln's Sp- Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 14, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
14 Aug Warblers [Sue Wetmore ]
14 Aug eagles [Jean Harrison ]
13 Aug Re: Willet at Shelburne Bay Wed afternoon [Jim Mead ]
13 Aug Willet at Shelburne Bay Wed afternoon [Larry Haugh ]
13 Aug Bird Walks at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center [Bruce MacPherson ]
13 Aug Re: Carolina Wren [Veer Frost ]
13 Aug Birding by canoe [Kathy Leonard ]
12 Aug Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
12 Aug Carolina Wren [Bill & Jeanne Prue ]
12 Aug 2014 eBird taxonomy updated [Kent McFarland ]
11 Aug OCAS Monthly Wildlife Walk [Ron Payne ]
10 Aug sedge wren- Creek Rd., Middlebury, Aug 9, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
9 Aug Re: VTBIRD Digest - 6 Aug 2014 to 7 Aug 2014 (#2014-219) ID BOTTOM OF BIRD'S FOOT [marcus5495 ]
9 Aug App Gap Osprey [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
9 Aug Sedge wren [Sue Wetmore ]
9 Aug Osprey [Walter Medwid ]
8 Aug Re: Sedge Wrens and Circus! [Alison Wagner ]
8 Aug Carolina wren [Sue Wetmore ]
8 Aug merlin feast [Janet Warren ]
7 Aug Albino MODO, shorebirds, and others ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
7 Aug Great Egret in North Bennington [David Traver Adolphus ]
7 Aug Unsubscribe ["Mary Jo Child's" ]
7 Aug Sedge Wrens nesting [UVM ]
7 Aug Louisiana waterthrush singing ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
7 Aug Re: VTBIRD Digest - 5 Aug 2014 to 6 Aug 2014 (#2014-218) [Jean Arrowsmith ]
7 Aug Carolina Wren nest [Liz Lackey ]
7 Aug Merlin feast i.d. help [Liz Lackey ]
7 Aug Look Up in Montpelier [Bryan Pfeiffer ]
7 Aug Louisiana Waterthrush [Linda Gionti ]
6 Aug Sedge Wrens-Creek Rd., Middlebury [David Hof ]
6 Aug Mansfield wrap-up [Chris Rimmer ]
6 Aug Grosbeaks [Sue Wetmore ]
5 Aug Fairfax VT Bird [Carole Babyak ]
4 Aug Re: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long) [Julie Filiberti ]
4 Aug Re: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long) [Nancy Goodrich ]
4 Aug Re: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long) [Jane Stein ]
4 Aug Egrets [Sue Wetmore ]
4 Aug Re: Merlins in Burlington and thoughts on American Kestrels [Jane Stein ]
4 Aug Merlins in Burlington and thoughts on American Kestrels [Eric Hynes ]
4 Aug More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long) [Allan Strong ]
3 Aug Re: Ten perched Kestrels and a submarine Wood Duck youngster .. Weybridge [Allan Matthew Strong ]
3 Aug Goshawk eyeball-to-eyeball [Maeve Kim ]
3 Aug Bitterns - Union St Brandon, Aug 2, 2014 [Sue Wetmore ]
3 Aug Victory Blowdown revisit: Rusty, Black-backed Woodpeckers [tfberriman ]

Subject: Flight Plans
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:46:54 -0400
 Young Canada Geese are in flight training along Rt 100 in the Mad River
Valley. I watched several squadrons practicing takeoffs and formations near
the Turner Farm on my way to and from school today.

Patti
Moretown
Subject: West Rutland Marsh
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 16:53:06 -0400
Today the monthly walk around the marsh had hundreds of red-winged blackbirds 
and grackles streaming out like a river from the cattails. Truly a spectacle of 
migration! 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Moose Bog: Palm Warblers
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 06:53:35 -0400
Large number of Palm Warblers moving through. I think last year at about
this same time frame I had 20 or so. Yesterday conservative number was 32.

As most everyone notices it is relatively quiet this time of year as it
seems many breeders have already started south and we await those further
north to pass on through.

Stumbling upon those migrating passerines becomes a bit of luck. Leaves are
changing in the Kingdom!

 

Tom Berriman

 

 

Moose Bog Trail, Essex, US-VT

Aug 20, 2014 8:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Protocol: Traveling

3.0 mile(s)

20 species

 

Great Blue Heron  1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1

Black-backed Woodpecker  2

Northern Flicker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  1

Blue-headed Vireo  1

Gray Jay  2

Blue Jay  4

Black-capped Chickadee  7

Boreal Chickadee  2

Red-breasted Nuthatch  5

Brown Creeper  1

Golden-crowned Kinglet  4

Hermit Thrush  3

American Robin  2

Magnolia Warbler  2

Palm Warbler  32     Large flock migrating through.

Yellow-rumped Warbler  5

White-throated Sparrow  5

Dark-eyed Junco  3

 

 
Subject: My Sibley guide
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:20:03 -0400
To the birder who found my Sibley Guide on the road near the Chittenden County 
Humane Society -- thank you very much. I had left the guide on my car's hood 
and drove away, not noticing that it was still on my hood but had fallen off. 
You drove it all the way to my doorstep. So kind of you. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 20:44:10 -0400
Another great night after a slow start. Total for the evening was 504  
with two large groups of 138 (6:35) & 168 (7:50). The latter boiling  
up over the trees and passing overhead for the grand finale.
Good numbers of swallows (barn & tree) but very few swifts tonight.  
The resident Merlin made an appearance & a juv. bald Eagle made a few  
passes.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Re: Nighthawks
From: kkturtledude <kkturtledude AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 20:26:56 -0400
I had about 20 nighthawks tonight over Hanover. They are definitely building 
up. 


Cheers,
Kyle Kittelberger
Hanover, NH


Sent from my Galaxy S®III

-------- Original message --------
From: Patti Haynes
Date:08/20/2014 8:13 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nighthawks
Hi Mad Birders near and far, This is the time of year to be on the lookout for Common Nighthawks as they move south. I was lucky enough to observe one late this afternoon as it did its crazy flight over Moretown Village. Patti
Subject: Nighthawks
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 20:13:51 -0400
Hi Mad Birders near and far,

This is the time of year to be on the lookout for Common Nighthawks as they
move south. I was lucky enough to observe one late this afternoon as it did
its crazy flight over Moretown Village.

Patti
Subject: Warblers
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 09:08:23 -0400
This morning I found a Wilson's warbler, black and white and chestnut-sided 
feeding in low bushes by Otter Creek. 

I have an exhibit of bird photos at the Mt. Independence Museum thru Oct. 19th. 


Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone in Charlotteg
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 06:50:51 -0400
Hello all,

I'm at the Charlotte Town Beach and just
saw a Ruddy Turnstone with 1 Greater Yellowlegs 
on the spit in front of Holmes Creek. They took
flight and flew east over the trees and I haven't
seen them since. That was about 10 minutes ago. 
Right now there are 3 Least Sandpipers on the spit. 

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Nighthawk
From: Connie Youngstrom <conniey AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 21:07:05 -0400
Wow!!

Sent from my iPad

Connie

> On Aug 19, 2014, at 7:52 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> Tonight between 7:00 and 7:30 I had 54 c. nighthawks fly by . The largest 
number I have seen here. 

> They were speeding by.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 20:27:02 -0400
A warm evening and a big flying ant hatch set off the first big  
flight of the season with 389 birds in 2 3/4 hours. The largest group  
had 100 birds.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: Nighthawk
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 19:52:55 -0400
Tonight between 7:00 and 7:30 I had 54 c. nighthawks fly by . The largest 
number I have seen here. 

They were speeding by.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Bicknell's Thrush t-shirt
From: Mark Tower <markdt7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 12:56:08 -0400
Hello Vermont birders,
 
 I was recently visiting the northern New England mountains and got to see the 
Bicknell's Thrush a couple times. It was a great experience! I wanted to 
purchase a thrush themed t-shirt or hat, particularly one that helped support 
their conservation. I have scoured the internet for the better part of 2 months 
now, and the only thing I can come up with is an old reference to the 
Killington Bicknell's Thrush Research Project shirt in a Vermont Birds listserv 
email (back in '06)! Crazy, I know. Is there any way to get one of these 
t-shirts? Or does anyone know of another shirt/hat out there? 

 
Respectfully,
 
Mark Tower
Lexington, KY
 		 	   		  
Subject: good butterfly place
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 08:10:56 -0400
Good morning, everyone - Yesterday I walked at a new-to-me place, Round Pond 
State Park and Nature Area in South Hero. I think it might be a great birding 
place during fall and spring migration, but I was particularly struck by the 
number and variety of butterflies. We saw at least ten species (including a 
stunning Giant Swallowtail with a big chunk missing from one wing). About half 
way between the road and the lake, there's a large field full of goldenrod and 
other flowers, with a mowed path around the perimeter. That's where most of the 
butterflies were, with others on the shale beach and along the woods paths. 


The number of frogs was also astounding - and we watched a Northern Water Snake 
sunning and digesting a big lump of something. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: nighthawks
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 07:11:48 -0400
I also had two Nighthawks over Otter View Park in Middlebury last night. 

  --
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:36:42 -0400, Bob Budliger  wrote:
Two Common Nighthawks flew overhead at 6:40 PM as I sat sipping wine on
> the porch in Morrisville. Good way to bird !
>
> Bob Budliger
>
>
Subject: Shelburne Bay
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 23:41:51 -0400
Highlights of my trip to Shelburne Bay this afternoon  include 5 Lesser
Yellowlegs, two Semipalmated Sandpipers  and a large raft of Double-crested
Cormorants, estimate 500 individuals. 

 

 

Michele Patenaude

172 Woodbury Road

Burlington, VT 05408

802-862-4085

 
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count.
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 21:21:07 -0400
Only eight birds this evening. Flybys included Gt Blue Heron, Gt  
Egret, 2 Merlins, 2 Redtails, 2 Herring Gulls

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: nighthawks
From: Bob Budliger <b8hooter AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:36:42 -0400
Two Common Nighthawks flew overhead at 6:40 PM as I sat sipping wine on 
the porch in Morrisville. Good way to bird !

Bob Budliger
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle in Shelburne
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:26:33 -0400
Had one lazily circling southward over our farm along the Mad River yesterday.
And a feisty Kestrel going after our hood's teenage gang of trouble-making Blue 
Jays this morning. The Rock Pigs and Mourning Doves panicked. But the resident 
family of Crows sat in the front row, and watched, clearly unconcerned that 
there was any threat to them. (I rather think they enjoyed seeing the Blue Jays 
harassed) 

Scott
Moretown

On Aug 18, 2014, at 10:11 AM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:

> We spotted a pair of Bald Eagles at Wrightsville Reservoir while kayaking 
there on Saturday. One of the pair landed at the top of a large dead tree and 
waited patiently while we got great looks at him with our binos.....very nice 
treat on a rainy afternoon's glide on the water! 

> 
> Joyce Werntgen
> Montpelier
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 18, 2014, at 10:05 AM, Ryan Morra  wrote:
>> 
>> Multiple sightings of a big, beautiful, mature Bald Eagle along the shores
>> of Shelburne Farms near the Inn and the Coach Barn at the end of the week
>> and this weekend.
>> 
>> - Ryan Morra
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> *Ryan Morra | **Education for Sustainability Partnerships Coordinator &
>> Educator*
>> Shelburne Farms
>> 1611 Harbor Road
>> Shelburne, VT 05482
>> *802.985.0343 (office)*
>> 802.985.8686 (main)
>> 802.373.7440 (cell)
>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle in Shelburne
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:11:14 -0400
We spotted a pair of Bald Eagles at Wrightsville Reservoir while kayaking there 
on Saturday. One of the pair landed at the top of a large dead tree and waited 
patiently while we got great looks at him with our binos.....very nice treat on 
a rainy afternoon's glide on the water! 


Joyce Werntgen
Montpelier

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 18, 2014, at 10:05 AM, Ryan Morra  wrote:
> 
> Multiple sightings of a big, beautiful, mature Bald Eagle along the shores
> of Shelburne Farms near the Inn and the Coach Barn at the end of the week
> and this weekend.
> 
> - Ryan Morra
> 
> 
> -- 
> *Ryan Morra | **Education for Sustainability Partnerships Coordinator &
> Educator*
> Shelburne Farms
> 1611 Harbor Road
> Shelburne, VT 05482
> *802.985.0343 (office)*
> 802.985.8686 (main)
> 802.373.7440 (cell)
> 
> 
Subject: Bald Eagle in Shelburne
From: Ryan Morra <rmorra AT SHELBURNEFARMS.ORG>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:05:16 -0400
Multiple sightings of a big, beautiful, mature Bald Eagle along the shores
of Shelburne Farms near the Inn and the Coach Barn at the end of the week
and this weekend.

- Ryan Morra


-- 
*Ryan Morra | **Education for Sustainability Partnerships Coordinator &
Educator*
Shelburne Farms
1611 Harbor Road
Shelburne, VT 05482
*802.985.0343 (office)*
802.985.8686 (main)
802.373.7440 (cell)

 
Subject: Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 20:17:56 -0400
Slow this evening with only 2 birds passing by late. Lots of Chimney  
Swifts though.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Aug 16, 2014
From: Randy Schmidt <randy AT THEVERMONTBIRDPLACE.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 12:24:35 -0400
Yesterday's walk at Hildene, in many ways matched Ian's earlier report in that 
anywhere there was a shrub wall that had been warmed up, the birding activity 
increased exponentially, with many mixed flocks hunting bugs as they began to 
move. Very entertaining day, with some great views of a just-beginning-to-molt 
male Scarlet Tanager, with his female close by, a newly minted, fall confusing, 
absolutely gorgeous Chestnut-sided Warbler, and quite the raptor activity, 
including 2 Broad-winged hawks, kettling together in what looked like a fairly 
decent practice go at fall migration. Also Eastern Kingbirds in good numbers 
around the house. 


Also had a very nice fly-by by a Great Spangled Fritillary. 

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Aug 16, 2014
> Date: August 17, 2014 11:49:00 AM EDT
> To: randy AT thevermontbirdplace.com
> 
> Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Bennington, US-VT
> Aug 16, 2014 7:01 AM - 11:01 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.6 > 40 species (+1 other taxa) > > Great Blue Heron 2 > Turkey Vulture 3 > Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 > Broad-winged Hawk 3 > Red-tailed Hawk 1 > Mourning Dove 3 > Barred Owl 1 > Chimney Swift 2 > Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 > Belted Kingfisher 1 > Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 > Hairy Woodpecker 1 > Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1 > Peregrine Falcon 1 > Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 > Empidonax sp. 1 > Eastern Phoebe 4 > Great Crested Flycatcher 4 > Eastern Kingbird 8 > Red-eyed Vireo 2 > Blue Jay 3 > American Crow 5 > Common Raven 1 > Barn Swallow 5 > Black-capped Chickadee 8 > Tufted Titmouse 6 > White-breasted Nuthatch 9 > Eastern Bluebird 6 > American Robin 3 > Gray Catbird 2 > Cedar Waxwing 21 > Common Yellowthroat 8 > Blackburnian Warbler 2 > Yellow Warbler 1 > Chestnut-sided Warbler 2 > Black-throated Green Warbler 1 > Song Sparrow 1 > Scarlet Tanager 2 > Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 > Baltimore Oriole 2 > American Goldfinch 9 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19484440 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) >
Subject: nighthawks
From: Don Clark <sapsbks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 09:43:04 -0400
I kicked off the first official Westminster Station Nighthawk count  
last night. Only 7 birds passed by but they are starting. Lots of  
Chimney Swifts & Tree & Barn Swallows and the local Merlin.

Don Clark
Grafton
Subject: - Wright Park, Middlebury Aug 16, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:00:36 +0000
In addition there were two Giant swallowtails fighting over flower nectaring 
rights. 

Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Sunday, August 17, 2014 8:51:02 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Wright Park, Aug 16, 2014 

Wright Park, Addison, US-VT 
Aug 16, 2014 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
16 species 

Canada Goose  3 
Turkey Vulture  2 
Osprey (American)  2 
Chimney Swift  5 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  1 
American Crow  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  2 
American Robin  2 
Gray Catbird  6     one extremely agitated 
Cedar Waxwing  5 
Common Yellowthroat  2 
Song Sparrow  1 
Northern Cardinal  1 
American Goldfinch  12 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19492927 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Birdy roadsides in western Addison County .....
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 08:23:47 -0400
Yesterday (Saturday) Ron Payne and I went a'looking for birds in western 
Bridport, Addison, and Panton.  It was easy to confirm that Lake 
Champlain had few birds, and there were no suitable locations for 
shorebirds anywhere we could find.

However, the roadside hedgerows and thickets were really lively... not 
with migrants, but with youngsters in tie-dyed colors, oldsters in rags 
(two Mockingbirds appear to have been caught in a badminton match and 
mistaken for shuttlecocks), and mixes of all sorts of birds at local 
berry cafeterias and backroad pothole baths.

Busy, busy mixes, such as Eastern Kingbirds, Baltimore Orioles, Scarlet 
Tangers, Robins, Catbirds, Mockingbirds, and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks all 
together, kept us hopping as pre-season training for the warbler and 
finch swarms to come.

Notables included a Nashville Warbler, eight Eastern Meadowlarks, and 
eight Bluebirds at Town House Road in Addison; a Philadelphia Vireo and 
Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid) along Market Road West in Bridport, and a 
couple of Great Egrets and an adult Bald Eagle seen along Dead Creek in 
Panton.

All in all, excluding birds exclusive to Lake Champlain, we tallied 64 
species from eight road segments (each with a separate checklist for 
eBird) that totaled 12.6 miles.  Definitely an entertaining outing.

Below is the checklist from Market Road West in Bridport, as an example.

Ian
=====================
Market Road West, Bridport, Addison, US-VT
Aug 16, 2014 2:04 PM - 3:11 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.7 mile(s)
Comments:     Ron Payne, Ian Worley
33 species (+2 other taxa)

Turkey Vulture  2
Red-tailed Hawk  4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Mourning Dove  5
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  3
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
American Kestrel  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Empidonax sp.  2
Eastern Kingbird  7
Philadelphia Vireo  1     Working from tree to tree at edge of woods by 
road, only slightly above eye height.  Vireo conformation, short tail.  
Short, vireo bill.  Softly colored.  Dull olive wings and back.  Yellow 
chin and throat, soft yellow forward belly, whiter toward rear and 
flanks.  Supercillium whitish; eyeline subtle.  No wing-bars.  No 
spectacles.
Red-eyed Vireo  1     Juvenile.
Blue Jay  6
Tree Swallow  5
Barn Swallow  3
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  3
Northern Mockingbird  2
European Starling  400     Two flocks of 150 and 250 counted by 100s and 
50s.
Cedar Waxwing  7
Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid)  1
Field Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  9

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19492354
Subject: Bobolinks
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 15:57:17 -0400
During my early morning walk I heard the bink, bink calls of the Bobolink. 
Looked up and saw a group of 15 bobolinks flying south down the river valley. 

Migration is heating up.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT
Subject: Sedge wren
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:11:36 -0400
The Sedge Wrens on Creek Rd. were very uncooperative this morning. Only brief 
dashes seen as they skimmed the grass tops. 


Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Evening Grosbeak Gallery
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 09:09:58 -0400
Cynthia.these photos are stunningly beautiful, and I love the variety. Thanks 
so much for sharing them with all of us. Evergreen in Jericho 

Subject: Evening Grosbeak Gallery
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 20:47:29 -0400
We've had a great year here with our resident Evening Grosbeaks. There were
a few weeks when they were sparse, but this past week a new crop has
arrived with an amazing variety of ages and plumage. I created a gallery-
all pictures taken on the same day, and all different individuals as far as
I could tell. Hope you enjoy the show!

http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?p=873

Cynthia Crawford

Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
Photos: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Ward Hill Duxbury, Aug 15, 2014
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 13:16:04 -0400
Three Mad Birders had a great time on Ward Hill this morning.  There was
lots of activity and 8 species of warblers, all moving at once!

Happy birding,
Pat in Waitsfield


Ward Hill Duxbury, Washington, US-VT
Aug 15, 2014 7:00 AM - 8:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.2 mile(s)
Comments:     Fred, Jeannie, and Pat
24 species

Ruffed Grouse  3
Mourning Dove  2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Downy Woodpecker  3
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  3
Black-capped Chickadee  12
Red-breasted Nuthatch  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
American Robin  2
Black-and-white Warbler  3
Common Yellowthroat  12
American Redstart  1
Magnolia Warbler  3
Blackburnian Warbler  8
Chestnut-sided Warbler  10
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  4
Canada Warbler  2
White-throated Sparrow  3
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19474007

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Lincoln's Sp- Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 14, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 11:37:59 +0000
The usually birdy Hollow rd had quieted down but still offers some things of 
interest. 

  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Friday, August 15, 2014 7:35:13 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 14, 2014 

Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, US-VT 
Aug 14, 2014 2:30 PM - 4:45 PM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
27 species 

Mourning Dove  1 
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  4 
Eastern Phoebe  3 
Great Crested Flycatcher  1 
Eastern Kingbird  3 
Red-eyed Vireo  1 
American Crow  2 
Common Raven  1 
Barn Swallow  6 
Black-capped Chickadee  4 
White-breasted Nuthatch  1 
House Wren  3 
Eastern Bluebird  4 
American Robin  8 
Gray Catbird  2 
Cedar Waxwing  9 
Ovenbird  1 
Common Yellowthroat  2 
Yellow Warbler  1 
Eastern Towhee  1 
Field Sparrow  1 
Lincoln's Sparrow  1 
Northern Cardinal  2 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1 
American Goldfinch  3 
House Sparrow  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19473395 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Warblers
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 17:04:20 -0400
TestSent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Sue <2birdvt AT comcast.net>
> Date: August 14, 2014 5:02:33 PM EDT
> Subject: Fwd: Brandon
> 

> 
> 
> 
>> Subject: Brandon
>> 
>> This morning just off Pearl St by the covered bridge I had a Virginia rail 
pop up out of a wet grassy meadow, while Canada, Redstart, Common Yellowthroat 
warblers worked thru the understory. Black and White warblers chased each other 
about and the Catbirds voiced their annoyance. Numerous Song sparrows with 
immatures scolded me while a wren played peekaboo . 

>> A pewee hawked insects and two hummers zipped about the jewel weed .
>> At the small marsh,green heron sat quite still as did the mallards and 
woodies. I turned just in time to see the cause, a lovely, robust coyote dashed 
across the road. 

>> It was a busy morning but the season has definitely turned.
>> Sue Wetmore
>> Sent from my iPod
Subject: eagles
From: Jean Harrison <seajean AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 13:09:28 -0400
Dear Vermont birders,
 On August 12 I saw two juvenile Bald Eagles soaring together over the 
Ottaquechee River in Hartland. On July 24 I saw an adult at the same spot. 

 I see people are posting sightings of Evening Grosbeaks and Common Egrets, so 
I'll report retroactively. 

 August 12 Common Egret on edge of above river in Hartland, and August 6 at 
same river in Quechee. 

    July 17 an Evening Grosbeak at feeder in Hartland.
    It's nice to see all of these.
                    Jean Harrison
                    Hartland

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Re: Willet at Shelburne Bay Wed afternoon
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 18:31:33 -0400
I am at the Shelburne Bay Fishing Access lot and the Willet still here. It is 
feeding along the water's edge of the canoe access ramp next to the big rock. 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 13, 2014, at 5:34 PM, Larry Haugh  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> I happened to run into Bruce MacPherson, who told me that he and Paul 
Wieczoreck had seen a Willet at the boat access this aft. 

> I checked myself prior to 4:30 pm and it flew in (from the east somewhere?), 
to the big rock at about 4:30 pm, after I had been looking around trying to 
find it. 

> I was there at least 15 minutes, and it was both bobbing to itself at the end 
of the rock, and then moving to the watery end of the rocky boat launch nearest 
the big rock. 

> After that not sure where it went.
> Of course it has been raining all day here, and rained the whole time I was 
at the Bay. 

> My cell wasn't functioning for some reason, so I couldn't better spread the 
word at that time. 

> Hopefully it will stick around for some others to see,
> Larry Haugh
> Shelburne, VT
Subject: Willet at Shelburne Bay Wed afternoon
From: Larry Haugh <larry.haugh AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 17:34:36 -0400
Hi all,
I happened to run into Bruce MacPherson, who told me that he and Paul 
Wieczoreck had seen a Willet at the boat access this aft.
I checked myself prior to 4:30 pm and it flew in (from the east 
somewhere?), to the big rock at about 4:30 pm,  after I had been looking 
around trying to find it.
I was there at least 15 minutes, and it was both bobbing to itself at 
the end of the rock, and then moving to the watery end of the rocky boat 
launch nearest the big rock.
After that not sure where it went.
Of course it has been raining all day here, and rained the whole time I 
was at the Bay.
My cell wasn't functioning for some reason, so I couldn't better spread 
the word at that time.
Hopefully it will stick around for some others to see,
Larry Haugh
Shelburne, VT
Subject: Bird Walks at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 11:42:30 -0400

Date: Friday, August 15, 2014
Time: 7:30 A.M.
Location: Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Gov. Chittenden Road, Williston, VT
Leaders: Carl Runge, Bruce MacPherson, and Bill Mercia

The next GMAS bird walk at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center is scheduled for 

Friday, August 15. Over the years we have identified over 130 bird species at 
the COFC, including a variety of waterfowl, grassland birds, wood warblers, and 

flycatchers. The COFC bird checklist is available for viewing and download in 
the Resources section of the GMAS website at:

http://greenmountainaudubon.org

These walks are free and open to the public. Please register in advance, 
however, by sending an e-mail to gmas AT greenmountainaudubon.org. If you are a 
new participant, please 

indicate your level of birding expertise (beginner, intermediate, expert). We 
will meet in the COFC parking lot on Governor Chittenden Road at 7:30 A.M. to 
begin this walk.

Looking forward to seeing some of you there.

Bruce MacPherson on behalf of the GMAS

























 

Subject: Re: Carolina Wren
From: Veer Frost <v_t_frost AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 07:31:12 -0700
Also in NEK! just had a feeder area visit by Carolina Wren (preceded by sweet 
whistles from brush). This must be the individual singing daily (but fewer 
notes to song in the last week). 


---- On Tue, 12 Aug 2014 10:17:26 -0700 Bill & Jeanne Prue 
<wjprue AT JEANNERAECRAFTS.COM> wrote ---- 



Carolina wren in our yard here in Newport, checking out one of the birdhouses. 
Been hearing one off and on for a week but this is a first for our yard! 

 
Jeanne Prue 
Newport 



____________________________________
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Birding by canoe
From: Kathy Leonard <kathyd.leonard AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 08:22:49 -0400
Seen early yesterday morning while canoeing on Nelson Pond in Calais:

1- A great blue heron fishing from the swim ladder of a pontoon boat
2- A spotted sandpiper, bobbing it's tail as it walked the rocks
3- A painted turtle nibbling on a small dead sunfish that was floating on
the surface 

The loons (singles, not a pair) that summer there were not in evidence.
Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 23:13:47 -0400
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday August 16, 2014 on
the Jeep Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the Louie's Landing parking lot located
on Rte 78 approx 3 ½ miles west of Swanton.  From Louie's Landing, we will
drive back the road to the trail head at Mac's Bend.  If you have any
questions, just reply to this email.

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 52 months of walks we have observed 134 species.  Hope to see you
there!

--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: Carolina Wren
From: Bill & Jeanne Prue <wjprue AT JEANNERAECRAFTS.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 13:17:26 -0400
Carolina wren in our yard here in Newport, checking out one of the birdhouses. 
Been hearing one off and on for a week but this is a first for our yard! 


Jeanne Prue
Newport
Subject: 2014 eBird taxonomy updated
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 12:22:47 -0400
The Vermont eBird taxonomy has been updated for 2014. Read all about it at
http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/taxonomy-update-for-2014/.

Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2

[image: VCE Logo] 
  


Subject: OCAS Monthly Wildlife Walk
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 09:28:49 -0400
Thursday, August 14, 7am, Otter Creek Audubon and the Middlebury Area Land 
Trust invite community members to help us survey birds and other wildlife at 
Otter View Park and the Hurd Grassland. Meet at the parking area of Otter View 
Park at the intersection of Weybridge St. and Pulp Mill Bridge Road in 
Middlebury. Birders of all ages and abilities welcome. For more information, 
call 388-1007 or 388-6019. 


For information on all our upcoming events, see the calender on our website:

http://wp.me/Pt0Pq-70

 --
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
Subject: sedge wren- Creek Rd., Middlebury, Aug 9, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 12:37:49 +0000
Here is thecomplete list from yesterday on Creek Rd. 
  
Sue Wetmore 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 8:15:43 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Creek Rd., Middlebury, Aug 9, 2014 

Creek Rd., Middlebury, Addison, US-VT 
Aug 9, 2014 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
19 species 

Mallard  11 
Green Heron  2 
Turkey Vulture  1 
Spotted Sandpiper  2 
Mourning Dove  1 
Yellow-throated Vireo  2     birds were heard singing by Otter Creek. 
Warbling Vireo  3 
Red-eyed Vireo  1 
Barn Swallow  19 
Black-capped Chickadee  1 
White-breasted Nuthatch  1 
Sedge Wren (Northern)  2     bird sang and sat up in view, the other birdf 
made brief appearances. 

American Robin  3 
Gray Catbird  1 
Cedar Waxwing  3 
Yellow Warbler  2 
Song Sparrow  9 
Indigo Bunting  1 
American Goldfinch  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19385995 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 6 Aug 2014 to 7 Aug 2014 (#2014-219) ID BOTTOM OF BIRD'S FOOT
From: marcus5495 <marcus5495 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 21:35:49 +0000
Hi, You might be able to gain some insight into this intriguing question by 
contacting the Birds of Vermont Museum in Richmond.  

  
(Let me add:  I am glad the "victim" was not the male Indigo Bunting that I 
observed at my N. Williston feeders this morning...) 

  
Good luck! 
  
Carol Wagner 
----- Original Message -----

From: "VTBIRD automatic digest system"  
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
Sent: Friday, August 8, 2014 12:00:30 AM 
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 6 Aug 2014 to 7 Aug 2014 (#2014-219) 

There are 10 messages totaling 289 lines in this issue. 

Topics of the day: 

  1. Louisiana Waterthrush 
  2. Look Up in Montpelier 
  3. Merlin feast i.d. help 
  4. Carolina Wren nest 
  5. VTBIRD Digest - 5 Aug 2014 to 6 Aug 2014 (#2014-218) 
  6. Louisiana waterthrush singing 
  7. Sedge Wrens nesting 
  8. Unsubscribe 
  9. Great Egret in North Bennington 
 10. Albino MODO, shorebirds, and others 

---------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 08:15:25 -0400 
From:    Linda Gionti  
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush 

Heard a Louisiana Waterthrush singing along the creek this morning. Also heard 
one a few days ago, but before that not since 6/5. Sweet to be greeted by that 
song again.  - Linda 



Linda Gionti 
Huntington, VT 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 09:12:44 -0400 
From:    Bryan Pfeiffer  
Subject: Look Up in Montpelier 

Greetings, VTBIRDers: 

Upon hearing American Robins "barking" outside my office window here in 
downtown Montpelier, I looked out in time to see a Peregrine Falcon fly 
by just now. 
Meanwhile, here's some news and a slide show from above the Arctic 
Circle (yeah, shorebirds and ptarmigans really do nest up there): 
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2014/08/04/naked-in-norway/ 

Best, 
Bryan 
-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com 
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 10:14:10 -0400 
From:    Liz Lackey  
Subject: Merlin feast i.d. help 

Yesterday a friend and I witnessed a merlin fly to a perch with a bird it had 
just captured.  We watched it eat the whole thing thru our scopes, and were 
absolutely fascinated by the process.  (Can you imagine eating and plucking a 
whole chicken, with just your mouth while standing on its wings?  Granted the 
falcon has a different shaped mouth than ours but also no teeth….) 


We tried to determine what species of bird was being incorporated up the food 
chain into the Merlin.  Thought some of you may be able to help.  The scene 
was located near a farm at the end of Town Line Road off of Greenbush Ave in 
Charlotte/Ferrisburg. 

  
The site the merlin chose to dine was HIGH up on a utility pole so we could 
only see pieces of the prey item’s plumage at times.   All the feathers that 
were plucked seemed to be gray.  All wing feathers seemed gray, tail was gray, 
and I’m pretty sure the vent area was gray based on the feathers that were 
plucked off of it.  Never saw the head.  The feet were YELLOW underneath, and 
the leg seemed dark in front and yellow behind.  Bird was size of 
catbird/starling.  Pretty sure the Merlin was an adult female. 


None of my research in my books, or on photos on line show the color of the 
bottom of a birds foot.  Am wondering if any of you who band birds, or work 
with museum skins know if starlings (or any other gray plumaged species) have 
yellow soles at this time of year.  Or, does yellow in these areas just 
signify a juvenile bird?   


Am thinking the bird was a juvenile starling, but would love to know about the 
yellow undersides of the feet. 


The friend I was with has photos of this event which I can send to anyone who 
would like to see them for i.d. purposes.  They only show the plumage of the 
prey item; we didn’t get a photo of the feet. 


As a person who grew up on a farm and still does home butchering, it was 
fascinating to watch the order of the “deconstruction” process, albeit I 
could only see pieces of the prey at a time.  The Merlin plucked off the 
primaries and secondaries with ease (no scalding first), plucked the vent area 
and one side, and commenced to swallowing good chunks of muscle tissue, and 
organs.  In orderly fashion it worked up the body towards the neck and head. 
 I kept comparing parts of this process to how I do chickens.  Some of the 
similarities are surprising. 


Regrettably we didn’t have access to the base of the power pole to look for 
pieces that may have been dropped. 


Looking forward to info on “them golden slippers”.   

Liz Lackey 
Stowe 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 10:15:42 -0400 
From:    Liz Lackey  
Subject: Carolina Wren nest 

A Carolina Wren nest with 4 eggs laid on July 22, hatched yesterday.    The 
nest is located in the village of Waterbury. 


Liz Lackey 
Stowe, VT 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 10:44:27 -0400 
From:    Jean Arrowsmith  
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 5 Aug 2014 to 6 Aug 2014 (#2014-218) 

Chris --  Of course some of us want to see this!  Thank you so much   
for the great work that you do and for letting us in on it. 

Jean Arrowsmith 

On Aug 7, 2014, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system wrote: 

> There are 3 messages totaling 58 lines in this issue. 
> 
> Topics of the day: 
> 
>  1. Grosbeaks 
>  2. Mansfield wrap-up 
>  3. Sedge Wrens-Creek Rd., Middlebury 
> 
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 
> 
> Date:    Wed, 6 Aug 2014 07:21:23 -0400 
> From:    Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> 
> Subject: Grosbeaks 
> 
> On July 11, 2014 a pair of Evening Grosbeaks were seen and   
> photographed by John McNamara in Soringfield,Vt. 
> I received this information from him yesterday. 
> 
> Sue Wetmore 
> 
> TestSent from my iPod 
> 
> ------------------------------ 
> 
> Date:    Wed, 6 Aug 2014 17:35:30 -0400 
> From:    Chris Rimmer  
> Subject: Mansfield wrap-up 
> 
> This is embarrassingly tardy, but if anyone is interested in VCE's 
> wrap-up summer field trip to Mansfield, now almost two weeks ago, here 
> is a link to our blog post: 
> 
https://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/bird-studies-on-mt-mansfield-23-years-and-counting/ 

> . 
> Avian activity was a far cry from that even two weeks earlier. 
> 
> Chris 
> 
> -- 
> Chris Rimmer 
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies 
> P.O. Box 420 
> Norwich, VT 05055 
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1 
> www.vtecostudies.org 
> 
> ------------------------------ 
> 
> Date:    Wed, 6 Aug 2014 20:56:43 -0400 
> From:    David Hof  
> Subject: Sedge Wrens-Creek Rd., Middlebury 
> 
> Yesterday evening I visited the recently burned field on Creek Rd.   
> in Middlebury where Tyler Pockette recently reported finding good   
> numbers of shorebirds.  I found two Sedge Wrens in the tall grass   
> area in the field.  Both were heard and seen well at the same time.   
> One bird was singing quite persistently despite the frequent heavy   
> showers, and the other bird only produced call notes.  I had my   
> microphone in my car, so I obtained some brief recordings, and   
> managed to get a few crummy photos with a point and shoot camera. 
> 
> Other highlights were an American Bittern that flushed from the tall   
> grass area, a Green Heron that flew in and perched on a snag, and a   
> Yellow-throated Vireo singing in the distance.  Shorebirds yesterday   
> included ~15-20 Least Sandpipers, 3 Solitary Sandpipers, a Wilson's   
> Snipe, and 4 Killdeer.  I also visited this spot last Friday, where   
> I ran into Tyler.  Additional shorebirds that Tyler and I saw that   
> day were 3 Semipalmated Sandpipers and a Semipalmated Plover. 
> 
> Thanks again Tyler for pointing out this great spot! 
> 
> David Hof 
> 
> ------------------------------ 
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 5 Aug 2014 to 6 Aug 2014 (#2014-218) 
> *********************************************************** 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 12:38:29 -0400 
From:    "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net"  
Subject: Louisiana waterthrush singing 

For the last 10 years or so LOWAs have nested or attempted to nest along a 
small stream that runs close to my house in Dummerston. In each of these years 
singing by the male bird usually fades out by late May. However, following this 
period of quiet, the male begins singing again in late July into mid August. 
This is a regular occurrence. Over in Westmoreland, NH, Adam Burnett has also 
reported this late summer singing. This behavior seems to be poorly recorded. 
In fact, many sources claim that LOWA is one of the earliest warblers to head 
south. This is not my experience and it is one of the latest species to sing. I 
suspect that the fact that their later song period has gone unrecorded is 
partly because it occurs very briefly ( a few minutes duration) and early in 
the morning (5.30 am this morning, for example). 


Hector Galbraith, PhD 
National Wildlife Federation 
802 258 4836 
802 222 1916 (cell) 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 12:44:24 -0400 
From:    UVM  
Subject: Sedge Wrens nesting 

Hello, 
Ted Murin and I visited the burned field along Creek Rd. In Middlebury this 
morning, where we found the two Sedge Wrens.  One has a tail, the other one 
doesn't (well at tiny one, but obviously molted). The tailless one was seen 
frequently carrying food  and visiting one site that we presume contained the 
nest.  The one with the tail hung around and interacted with no-tail, and 
seemed to keep a look out.  We did not enter the tall grass area.  I would 
recommend doing the same and maintaining a respectful distance.  They are 
endangered in Vermont. 

Scott Morrical 
smorrica AT uvm.edu 

Sent from my iPhone 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 13:07:09 -0400 
From:    Mary Jo Child's  
Subject: Unsubscribe 

Sent from my iPhone 

> On Aug 7, 2014, at 12:44 PM, UVM  wrote: 
> 
> Hello, 
> Ted Murin and I visited the burned field along Creek Rd. In Middlebury this 
morning, where we found the two Sedge Wrens.  One has a tail, the other one 
doesn't (well at tiny one, but obviously molted). The tailless one was seen 
frequently carrying food  and visiting one site that we presume contained the 
nest.  The one with the tail hung around and interacted with no-tail, and 
seemed to keep a look out.  We did not enter the tall grass area.  I would 
recommend doing the same and maintaining a respectful distance.  They are 
endangered in Vermont. 

> Scott Morrical 
> smorrica AT uvm.edu 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 14:58:29 -0400 
From:    David Traver Adolphus  
Subject: Great Egret in North Bennington 

There from at least 12:45-1:15 PM today. South side of Water Street, 
approx. 42.9259492, -73.2434978 

Lousy celphone pic 
 (I 
took my good camera out of the car this morning!) 

----- 
David B. Traver Adolphus 

------------------------------ 

Date:    Thu, 7 Aug 2014 22:38:47 -0400 
From:    "Scott W. Morrical"  
Subject: Albino MODO, shorebirds, and others 

Dear VTBIRDers, 

In addition to the nesting Sedge Wrens today in Middlebury, Ted Murin   
and I saw some other interesting birds in our travels: 

At the burned field on Creek Rd. in Middlebury, site of the nesting   
Sedge Wrens, shorebirds included 3 Solitary Sandpipers and 16 Least   
Sandpipers. 

1 albino Mourning Dove, with a flock of 45 total Mourning Doves,   
roosting in one dead tree along Bostwick Rd. in Shelburne. 

1 Peregrine Falcon (adult), on the cliff nest site at Mt. Horrid,   
viewed from Brandon Gap. 

1 Northern Mockingbird, in Leicester at intersection of   
Leicester-Whiting and Swinington Hill Roads. 

At Charlotte Town Beach there was a single Hooded Merganser being more   
or less ignored by a flock of Common Mergansers, an immature Caspian   
Tern, and a Least Sandpiper. 

Several fields around the Brandon area had good-sized flocks of   
Eastern Kingbirds. 

And lots of other entertaining birds. 

Cheers, 

Scott Morrical, 
South Burlington 
 

------------------------------ 

End of VTBIRD Digest - 6 Aug 2014 to 7 Aug 2014 (#2014-219) 
*********************************************************** 
Subject: App Gap Osprey
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 15:57:32 -0400
While crossing the App Gap yesterday morning at 11:30 I was surprised to
see an Osprey flying low through the gap from East to West. I was able to
stop at the top parking area and get a few shots of it above the tree line
before it dipped back down. Interesting to see firsthand that we humans
aren't the only ones using the natural gaps to cross the Greens. Link to
the checklist with picture below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19380206

-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
Starksboro, VT 05487
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Sedge wren
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 14:13:29 -0400
Sedge wrens were present and easily seen along Creek Rd. In Middlebury this 
morning. One bird sat up singing and then would hide in the grasses. 

At Brilyea Access in Dead Creek two Caspian terns were fishing in the large 
pond. 


Sue Wetmore
Subject: Osprey
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 14:02:13 -0400
Five osprey circled over our house for some 20 minutes....lots of
vocalizing so assume some young birds among the five. Also one red tail
earlier in the day. From Derby.
Subject: Re: Sedge Wrens and Circus!
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 12:21:19 -0400
Thanks to Scott Morrical's post and Circus Cyaneus's hunt, we were able to 
locate the Sedge Wrens in Middlebury this morning.  Persistence, quietness 
and patience paid off for three happy Madbirders (Zac Cota-Weaver, Pat 
Folsom and me) that spent 2 hours this morning enjoying the birds along the 
entire length of Creek Road.  We started off traveling slowly,  when ( close 
to Three Mile Bridge Road) we spotted two Northern Harriers in a field on 
the east side of the road.  We stopped to enjoy them when Zac and I heard 
the distinct buzzy call of a Sedge Wren.  We listened for a few minutes but 
didn't hear any more vocalizations, so we moved on.  We also enjoyed hearing 
& seeing Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Yellow-throated Vireos, and many other 
species before returning to the first spot.  There were 2 Solitary 
Sandpipers and at least 3 Least-peeps in a wet area in front of the Sedge 
Wrens, and they kept us occupied while we waited for the wrens to vocalize 
again and lead us to get on them.  For the first thirty minutes or so, we 
did have several glimpses of the wrens, but nothing worth writing home 
about.  They were in the tall vegetation, fairly far back from the road and 
they moved around only occasionally;  just enough to keep us hopeful.  But 
then....at around 10:20.... as we were just talking about how it was getting 
to be siesta time for birds,  a wren flew from the tall grasses (furthest 
back in the field) and landed along the edge of the tall grass much closer 
to us.  It perched and sang and gave Zac the lifer-look he was waiting for! 
It had a lovely tail! In addition to the birds, we met up with Bruce 
Peterson.  He mentioned seeing Kestrels on Three Mile Bridge Road and 
thought there may be a natural nesting cavity at the unoccupied (?) house 
surrounded by corn fields.

Ali
Huntington



-----Original Message----- 
From: UVM
Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2014 12:44 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sedge Wrens nesting

Hello,
Ted Murin and I visited the burned field along Creek Rd. In Middlebury this 
morning, where we found the two Sedge Wrens.  One has a tail, the other one 
doesn't (well at tiny one, but obviously molted). The tailless one was seen 
frequently carrying food  and visiting one site that we presume contained 
the nest.  The one with the tail hung around and interacted with no-tail, 
and seemed to keep a look out.  We did not enter the tall grass area.  I 
would recommend doing the same and maintaining a respectful distance.  They 
are endangered in Vermont.
Scott Morrical
smorrica AT uvm.edu

Sent from my iPhone 
Subject: Carolina wren
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 09:37:43 -0400
I have an extremely vocal Carolina wren tea-kettling away in the yard. No doubt 
looking for a towhee tea party. 

Sue Wetmore
Brandon

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: merlin feast
From: Janet Warren <jwarren AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 06:08:37 -0400
I have an alarming number of young starlings in my area and they are a 
beautiful tan or reddish brown color, so unfortunately the merlin hadn't caught 
one of them. They have a reputation of being very dirty, but a few years ago an 
ice filled gutter fell off of our house, dragging the face board off and 
exposing the cavities that starlings had been using for years. They were 
completely clean, and had only grass in them. 

Subject: Albino MODO, shorebirds, and others
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 22:38:47 -0400
Dear VTBIRDers,

In addition to the nesting Sedge Wrens today in Middlebury, Ted Murin  
and I saw some other interesting birds in our travels:

At the burned field on Creek Rd. in Middlebury, site of the nesting  
Sedge Wrens, shorebirds included 3 Solitary Sandpipers and 16 Least  
Sandpipers.

1 albino Mourning Dove, with a flock of 45 total Mourning Doves,  
roosting in one dead tree along Bostwick Rd. in Shelburne.

1 Peregrine Falcon (adult), on the cliff nest site at Mt. Horrid,  
viewed from Brandon Gap.

1 Northern Mockingbird, in Leicester at intersection of  
Leicester-Whiting and Swinington Hill Roads.

At Charlotte Town Beach there was a single Hooded Merganser being more  
or less ignored by a flock of Common Mergansers, an immature Caspian  
Tern, and a Least Sandpiper.

Several fields around the Brandon area had good-sized flocks of  
Eastern Kingbirds.

And lots of other entertaining birds.

Cheers,

Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Subject: Great Egret in North Bennington
From: David Traver Adolphus <proscriptus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 14:58:29 -0400
There from at least 12:45-1:15 PM today. South side of Water Street,
approx. 42.9259492, -73.2434978

Lousy celphone pic
 (I
took my good camera out of the car this morning!)

-----
David B. Traver Adolphus
Subject: Unsubscribe
From: "Mary Jo Child's" <mjcdodie AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 13:07:09 -0400
Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 7, 2014, at 12:44 PM, UVM  wrote:
> 
> Hello,
> Ted Murin and I visited the burned field along Creek Rd. In Middlebury this 
morning, where we found the two Sedge Wrens. One has a tail, the other one 
doesn't (well at tiny one, but obviously molted). The tailless one was seen 
frequently carrying food and visiting one site that we presume contained the 
nest. The one with the tail hung around and interacted with no-tail, and seemed 
to keep a look out. We did not enter the tall grass area. I would recommend 
doing the same and maintaining a respectful distance. They are endangered in 
Vermont. 

> Scott Morrical
> smorrica AT uvm.edu
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sedge Wrens nesting
From: UVM <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 12:44:24 -0400
Hello,
Ted Murin and I visited the burned field along Creek Rd. In Middlebury this 
morning, where we found the two Sedge Wrens. One has a tail, the other one 
doesn't (well at tiny one, but obviously molted). The tailless one was seen 
frequently carrying food and visiting one site that we presume contained the 
nest. The one with the tail hung around and interacted with no-tail, and seemed 
to keep a look out. We did not enter the tall grass area. I would recommend 
doing the same and maintaining a respectful distance. They are endangered in 
Vermont. 

Scott Morrical
smorrica AT uvm.edu

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Louisiana waterthrush singing
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 12:38:29 -0400
For the last 10 years or so LOWAs have nested or attempted to nest along a 
small stream that runs close to my house in Dummerston. In each of these years 
singing by the male bird usually fades out by late May. However, following this 
period of quiet, the male begins singing again in late July into mid August. 
This is a regular occurrence. Over in Westmoreland, NH, Adam Burnett has also 
reported this late summer singing. This behavior seems to be poorly recorded. 
In fact, many sources claim that LOWA is one of the earliest warblers to head 
south. This is not my experience and it is one of the latest species to sing. I 
suspect that the fact that their later song period has gone unrecorded is 
partly because it occurs very briefly ( a few minutes duration) and early in 
the morning (5.30 am this morning, for example). 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
National Wildlife Federation
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (cell)
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 5 Aug 2014 to 6 Aug 2014 (#2014-218)
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 10:44:27 -0400
Chris --  Of course some of us want to see this!  Thank you so much  
for the great work that you do and for letting us in on it.

Jean Arrowsmith

On Aug 7, 2014, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system wrote:

> There are 3 messages totaling 58 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>  1. Grosbeaks
>  2. Mansfield wrap-up
>  3. Sedge Wrens-Creek Rd., Middlebury
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 6 Aug 2014 07:21:23 -0400
> From:    Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
> Subject: Grosbeaks
>
> On July 11, 2014 a pair of Evening Grosbeaks were seen and  
> photographed by John McNamara in Soringfield,Vt.
> I received this information from him yesterday.
>
> Sue Wetmore
>
> TestSent from my iPod
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 6 Aug 2014 17:35:30 -0400
> From:    Chris Rimmer 
> Subject: Mansfield wrap-up
>
> This is embarrassingly tardy, but if anyone is interested in VCE's
> wrap-up summer field trip to Mansfield, now almost two weeks ago, here
> is a link to our blog post:
> 
https://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/bird-studies-on-mt-mansfield-23-years-and-counting/ 

> .
> Avian activity was a far cry from that even two weeks earlier.
>
> Chris
>
> -- 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> P.O. Box 420
> Norwich, VT 05055
> 802-649-1431 ext. 1
> www.vtecostudies.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 6 Aug 2014 20:56:43 -0400
> From:    David Hof 
> Subject: Sedge Wrens-Creek Rd., Middlebury
>
> Yesterday evening I visited the recently burned field on Creek Rd.  
> in Middlebury where Tyler Pockette recently reported finding good  
> numbers of shorebirds.  I found two Sedge Wrens in the tall grass  
> area in the field.  Both were heard and seen well at the same time.   
> One bird was singing quite persistently despite the frequent heavy  
> showers, and the other bird only produced call notes.  I had my  
> microphone in my car, so I obtained some brief recordings, and  
> managed to get a few crummy photos with a point and shoot camera.
>
> Other highlights were an American Bittern that flushed from the tall  
> grass area, a Green Heron that flew in and perched on a snag, and a  
> Yellow-throated Vireo singing in the distance.  Shorebirds yesterday  
> included ~15-20 Least Sandpipers, 3 Solitary Sandpipers, a Wilson's  
> Snipe, and 4 Killdeer.  I also visited this spot last Friday, where  
> I ran into Tyler.  Additional shorebirds that Tyler and I saw that  
> day were 3 Semipalmated Sandpipers and a Semipalmated Plover.
>
> Thanks again Tyler for pointing out this great spot!
>
> David Hof
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 5 Aug 2014 to 6 Aug 2014 (#2014-218)
> ***********************************************************
Subject: Carolina Wren nest
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 10:15:42 -0400
A Carolina Wren nest with 4 eggs laid on July 22, hatched yesterday. The nest 
is located in the village of Waterbury. 


Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT
Subject: Merlin feast i.d. help
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz AT PWSHIFT.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 10:14:10 -0400
Yesterday a friend and I witnessed a merlin fly to a perch with a bird it had 
just captured. We watched it eat the whole thing thru our scopes, and were 
absolutely fascinated by the process. (Can you imagine eating and plucking a 
whole chicken, with just your mouth while standing on its wings? Granted the 
falcon has a different shaped mouth than ours but also no teeth.) 


We tried to determine what species of bird was being incorporated up the food 
chain into the Merlin. Thought some of you may be able to help. The scene was 
located near a farm at the end of Town Line Road off of Greenbush Ave in 
Charlotte/Ferrisburg. 

 
The site the merlin chose to dine was HIGH up on a utility pole so we could 
only see pieces of the prey items plumage at times. All the feathers that were 
plucked seemed to be gray. All wing feathers seemed gray, tail was gray, and 
Im pretty sure the vent area was gray based on the feathers that were plucked 
off of it. Never saw the head. The feet were YELLOW underneath, and the leg 
seemed dark in front and yellow behind. Bird was size of catbird/starling. 
Pretty sure the Merlin was an adult female. 


None of my research in my books, or on photos on line show the color of the 
bottom of a birds foot. Am wondering if any of you who band birds, or work with 
museum skins know if starlings (or any other gray plumaged species) have yellow 
soles at this time of year. Or, does yellow in these areas just signify a 
juvenile bird? 


Am thinking the bird was a juvenile starling, but would love to know about the 
yellow undersides of the feet. 


The friend I was with has photos of this event which I can send to anyone who 
would like to see them for i.d. purposes. They only show the plumage of the 
prey item; we didnt get a photo of the feet. 


As a person who grew up on a farm and still does home butchering, it was 
fascinating to watch the order of the deconstruction process, albeit I could 
only see pieces of the prey at a time. The Merlin plucked off the primaries and 
secondaries with ease (no scalding first), plucked the vent area and one side, 
and commenced to swallowing good chunks of muscle tissue, and organs. In 
orderly fashion it worked up the body towards the neck and head. I kept 
comparing parts of this process to how I do chickens. Some of the similarities 
are surprising. 


Regrettably we didnt have access to the base of the power pole to look for 
pieces that may have been dropped. 


Looking forward to info on them golden slippers.  

Liz Lackey
Stowe
Subject: Look Up in Montpelier
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan AT BRYANPFEIFFER.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 09:12:44 -0400
Greetings, VTBIRDers:

Upon hearing American Robins "barking" outside my office window here in 
downtown Montpelier, I looked out in time to see a Peregrine Falcon fly 
by just now.
Meanwhile, here's some news and a slide show from above the Arctic 
Circle (yeah, shorebirds and ptarmigans really do nest up there):
http://bryanpfeiffer.com/2014/08/04/naked-in-norway/

Best,
Bryan
-- 
bryan AT bryanpfeiffer.com
http://www.bryanpfeiffer.com
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 08:15:25 -0400
Heard a Louisiana Waterthrush singing along the creek this morning. Also heard 
one a few days ago, but before that not since 6/5. Sweet to be greeted by that 
song again. - Linda 



Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT
Subject: Sedge Wrens-Creek Rd., Middlebury
From: David Hof <davehof2002 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 20:56:43 -0400
Yesterday evening I visited the recently burned field on Creek Rd. in 
Middlebury where Tyler Pockette recently reported finding good numbers of 
shorebirds. I found two Sedge Wrens in the tall grass area in the field. Both 
were heard and seen well at the same time. One bird was singing quite 
persistently despite the frequent heavy showers, and the other bird only 
produced call notes. I had my microphone in my car, so I obtained some brief 
recordings, and managed to get a few crummy photos with a point and shoot 
camera. 


Other highlights were an American Bittern that flushed from the tall grass 
area, a Green Heron that flew in and perched on a snag, and a Yellow-throated 
Vireo singing in the distance. Shorebirds yesterday included ~15-20 Least 
Sandpipers, 3 Solitary Sandpipers, a Wilson's Snipe, and 4 Killdeer. I also 
visited this spot last Friday, where I ran into Tyler. Additional shorebirds 
that Tyler and I saw that day were 3 Semipalmated Sandpipers and a Semipalmated 
Plover. 


Thanks again Tyler for pointing out this great spot!

David Hof 
Subject: Mansfield wrap-up
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 17:35:30 -0400
This is embarrassingly tardy, but if anyone is interested in VCE's 
wrap-up summer field trip to Mansfield, now almost two weeks ago, here 
is a link to our blog post: 

https://vtecostudies.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/bird-studies-on-mt-mansfield-23-years-and-counting/. 

Avian activity was a far cry from that even two weeks earlier.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: Grosbeaks
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 07:21:23 -0400
On July 11, 2014 a pair of Evening Grosbeaks were seen and photographed by John 
McNamara in Soringfield,Vt. 

I received this information from him yesterday.

Sue Wetmore

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Fairfax VT Bird
From: Carole Babyak <owllo AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 14:35:13 -0400
I am from NE Ohio. I visited Fairfax, Vermont last week. - July 28 - Aug 1. A 
bird was singing very loud, high up in birch and hemlock trees, (a ravine) 
every morning. I never saw it. 


The call was an 8 syllable ta, followed by bubbles and a distinctive trill at 
the end. I've listened to Cornell birds audio library for birds I am not 
familiar with and refreshed familiar ones but found nothing similar. 


 I thought it was a warbler? Hermit Thrush were calling in this ravine and I 
identified everything else by call except for this one??? 


 

I'd appreciate help.    I will be visiting again in this area.

Thanks  Carole Babyak
 
Subject: Re: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long)
From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 13:31:55 -0400
Thank you, Allan, for a layman's explanation of the statistics behind the BBS 
data. I did not hit delete and, in fact, enjoyed learning and understanding 
what the columns of numbers represented. My Prob/Stats education was far too 
many years ago and I very much appreciated the easy explanation. 

Julie Filiberti
Fairfax

Sent from my iPhone
Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 4, 2014, at 9:59 AM, Allan Strong  wrote:
> 
> I had a couple folks ask for more information on how one interprets the data 
from the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). Don't be shy about hitting the delete key 
if this isn't of interest. 

> 
> Here is a quick primer:
> 
> The Breeding Bird Survey is a set of roadside counts, all consisting of 50 
stops (point counts) that are conducted at 0.5 mile intervals. The point counts 
are 3 min long where observers record all the birds that they see and hear 
during that time. Nearly all the data from the ~2900 routes are collected by 
volunteers and VT's data are collected by folks who are on this listserve. 
(Thank You!!) 

> 
> On this page, you have the opportunity to look at the BBS data for any 
species. 

> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/specl12.html
> 
> If you click on a species...such as American Kestrel, you get data on 
population trends for a variety of regions. Some are states (e.g., Vermont, 
down at the bottom) whereas others are for regions that pool data from a 
variety of locations. 

> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/atlasa12.pl?03600&1&12
> 
> The trend data are based on the "route" or a set of 50 stops as a sampling 
unit. US Geological Survey provides summaries for two periods...one is the 
entire period of record 1966-2012, and the other for the ten years 2002-2012. 

> 
> The data that are provided for any region (i.e., columns on the web page) 
are: 

> N: the sample size (number of routes)
> Trend: % change per year
> 95% CI: Since trend is an estimate, this gives the upper and lower bounds (or 
confidence interval, CI) on the trend. 

> 
> Since we are typically concerned about whether or not a species is increasing 
or decreasing, we can look to see whether or not the 95% confidence interval 
(CI) includes 0 within the range. 0 would be the indication that there is no 
change in the species' abundance. Again, using American Kestrel in Vermont as 
an example, the trend is negative (-1.55% decline per year), but the 95% 
confidence interval ranges from +0.35%/year to -3.51% per year. Since zero 
indicates no trend, so the range of our estimate includes "no change." In 
statistical terms, we would be testing whether or not the slope of the trend 
line is significantly different from 0. So, in this case, it is not. 

> 
> If you look down just a couple lines to American Kestrel in the United 
States, the trend estimate is -0.97% decline per year, with the 95% confidence 
interval between -0.71 and -1.23% per year. Because 0 is not included in this 
interval, it is therefore "statistically significant." In other words, we are 
confident that the estimate of the trend does not include 0 and kestrels are 
indeed declining in the US. 

> 
> For any of the regions for which there is an estimate of kestrel trends, you 
can click on that region and see the graph. Like: 

> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s03600US.png (American Kestrels for 
the US) 

> The Y-axis (vertical) shows the average number of individual detected per 
route. This gives you some idea about the relative abundance of a particular 
species for any given area. 

> 
> Kestrels are relatively rare, so compare the Y-axis to Red-winged Blackbird 
in the US: 

> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s04980US.png
> Interestingly, the trends for the two species are nearly identical, but since 
RWBL are so much more abundant, we tend not to worry about their population. 

> 
> It is always worth remembering that these trends are population indices. We 
don't really know the total population of American Kestrels but the assumption 
is that the distribution of the BBS routes is sufficiently representative that 
it tells us something about how the population is changing over time. 

> 
> Probably more than you needed to know, but hopefully of interest to some.
> 
> Allan
> 
> 
> -- 
> 
> *******************************************************************
> Allan M. Strong
> University of Vermont
> The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
> 220L Aiken Center
> 
> 81 Carrigan Drive
> Burlington, VT 05405
> 802-656-2910
> *******************************************************************
Subject: Re: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long)
From: Nancy Goodrich <nancyg3219 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:25:32 -0400
Thank you for a clear explanation, and thanks to all the volunteer
data-collectors and surveyers; we are blessed!
Nancy, Shelburne


On Mon, Aug 4, 2014 at 9:59 AM, Allan Strong  wrote:

> I had a couple folks ask for more information on how one interprets the
> data from the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS).  Don't be shy about hitting the
> delete key if this isn't of interest.
>
> Here is a quick primer:
>
> The Breeding Bird Survey is a set of roadside counts, all consisting of 50
> stops (point counts) that are conducted at 0.5 mile intervals.  The point
> counts are 3 min long where observers record all the birds that they see
> and hear during that time.  Nearly all the data from the ~2900 routes are
> collected by volunteers and VT's data are collected by folks who are on
> this listserve.  (Thank You!!)
>
> On this page, you have the opportunity to look at the BBS data for any
> species.
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/specl12.html
>
> If you click on a species...such as American Kestrel, you get data on
> population trends for a variety of regions.  Some are states (e.g.,
> Vermont, down at the bottom) whereas others are for regions that pool data
> from a variety of locations.
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/atlasa12.pl?03600&1&12
>
> The trend data are based on the "route" or a set of 50 stops as a sampling
> unit.  US Geological Survey provides summaries for two periods...one is the
> entire period of record 1966-2012, and the other for the ten years
> 2002-2012.
>
> The data that are provided for any region (i.e., columns on the web page)
> are:
> N: the sample size (number of routes)
> Trend: % change per year
> 95% CI: Since trend is an estimate, this gives the upper and lower bounds
> (or confidence interval, CI) on the trend.
>
> Since we are typically concerned about whether or not a species is
> increasing or decreasing, we can look to see whether or not the 95%
> confidence interval (CI)  includes 0 within the range.  0 would be the
> indication that there is no change in the species' abundance. Again, using
> American Kestrel in Vermont as an example, the trend is negative (-1.55%
> decline per year), but the 95% confidence interval ranges from +0.35%/year
> to -3.51% per year.  Since zero indicates no trend, so the range of our
> estimate includes "no change."  In statistical terms, we would be testing
> whether or not the slope of the trend line is significantly different from
> 0.  So, in this case, it is not.
>
> If you look down just a couple lines to American Kestrel in the United
> States, the trend estimate is -0.97% decline per year, with the 95%
> confidence interval between -0.71 and  -1.23% per year. Because 0 is not
> included in this interval, it is therefore "statistically significant."  In
> other words, we are confident that the estimate of the trend does not
> include 0 and kestrels are indeed declining in the US.
>
> For any of the regions for which there is an estimate of kestrel trends,
> you can click on that region and see the graph.  Like:
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s03600US.png  (American
> Kestrels for the US)
> The Y-axis (vertical) shows the average number of individual detected per
> route.  This gives you some idea about the relative abundance of a
> particular species for any given area.
>
> Kestrels are relatively rare, so compare the Y-axis to Red-winged
> Blackbird in the US:
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s04980US.png
> Interestingly, the trends for the two species are nearly identical, but
> since RWBL are so much more abundant, we tend not to worry about their
> population.
>
> It is always worth remembering that these trends are population indices.
>  We don't really know the total population of American Kestrels but the
> assumption is that the distribution of the BBS routes is sufficiently
> representative that it tells us something about how the population is
> changing over time.
>
> Probably more than you needed to know, but hopefully of interest to some.
>
> Allan
>
>
> --
>
> *******************************************************************
> Allan M. Strong
> University of Vermont
> The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
> 220L Aiken Center
>
> 81 Carrigan Drive
> Burlington, VT 05405
> 802-656-2910
> *******************************************************************
>
Subject: Re: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long)
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 10:49:37 -0400
Thanks very much, Allan.


Jane
(Shoreham)




On 8/4/2014 9:59 AM, Allan Strong wrote:
> I had a couple folks ask for more information on how one interprets the
> data from the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS).  Don't be shy about hitting
> the delete key if this isn't of interest.
>
> Here is a quick primer:
>
> The Breeding Bird Survey is a set of roadside counts, all consisting of
> 50 stops (point counts) that are conducted at 0.5 mile intervals.  The
> point counts are 3 min long where observers record all the birds that
> they see and hear during that time.  Nearly all the data from the ~2900
> routes are collected by volunteers and VT's data are collected by folks
> who are on this listserve.  (Thank You!!)
>
> On this page, you have the opportunity to look at the BBS data for any
> species.
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/specl12.html
>
> If you click on a species...such as American Kestrel, you get data on
> population trends for a variety of regions.  Some are states (e.g.,
> Vermont, down at the bottom) whereas others are for regions that pool
> data from a variety of locations.
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/atlasa12.pl?03600&1&12
>
> The trend data are based on the "route" or a set of 50 stops as a
> sampling unit.  US Geological Survey provides summaries for two
> periods...one is the entire period of record 1966-2012, and the other
> for the ten years 2002-2012.
>
> The data that are provided for any region (i.e., columns on the web
> page) are:
> N: the sample size (number of routes)
> Trend: % change per year
> 95% CI: Since trend is an estimate, this gives the upper and lower
> bounds (or confidence interval, CI) on the trend.
>
> Since we are typically concerned about whether or not a species is
> increasing or decreasing, we can look to see whether or not the 95%
> confidence interval (CI)  includes 0 within the range.  0 would be the
> indication that there is no change in the species' abundance. Again,
> using American Kestrel in Vermont as an example, the trend is negative
> (-1.55% decline per year), but the 95% confidence interval ranges from
> +0.35%/year to -3.51% per year.  Since zero indicates no trend, so the
> range of our estimate includes "no change."  In statistical terms, we
> would be testing whether or not the slope of the trend line is
> significantly different from 0.  So, in this case, it is not.
>
> If you look down just a couple lines to American Kestrel in the United
> States, the trend estimate is -0.97% decline per year, with the 95%
> confidence interval between -0.71 and  -1.23% per year. Because 0 is not
> included in this interval, it is therefore "statistically significant."
> In other words, we are confident that the estimate of the trend does not
> include 0 and kestrels are indeed declining in the US.
>
> For any of the regions for which there is an estimate of kestrel trends,
> you can click on that region and see the graph.  Like:
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s03600US.png  (American
> Kestrels for the US)
> The Y-axis (vertical) shows the average number of individual detected
> per route.  This gives you some idea about the relative abundance of a
> particular species for any given area.
>
> Kestrels are relatively rare, so compare the Y-axis to Red-winged
> Blackbird in the US:
> http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s04980US.png
> Interestingly, the trends for the two species are nearly identical, but
> since RWBL are so much more abundant, we tend not to worry about their
> population.
>
> It is always worth remembering that these trends are population
> indices.  We don't really know the total population of American Kestrels
> but the assumption is that the distribution of the BBS routes is
> sufficiently representative that it tells us something about how the
> population is changing over time.
>
> Probably more than you needed to know, but hopefully of interest to some.
>
> Allan
>
>
Subject: Egrets
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 10:45:54 -0400
Five Great Egrets were seen this morning on Rt 73 west of Brandon near Otter 
Creek. 


Sue Wetmore

TestSent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Merlins in Burlington and thoughts on American Kestrels
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 10:44:33 -0400
Thrilling to have Merlins using more urban locations.  I learned fairly 
recently that there's also a good number of kestrels nesting in places 
like cornice holes in Manhattan.

Kestrel nestboxes are a nice idea, but they do need to be maintained, 
and since they should be 15-20 feet high, this is much harder than with 
lower bluebird boxes you can reach from the ground.

I assisted a raptor bander/researcher for some years in monitoring and 
maintaining dozens of kestrel boxes in SE Mass. and was given a nestbox 
as a farewell gift when I moved, but have never put it up because of 
those difficulties.

Unless well placed, kestrel boxes will mostly be occupied by starlings 
and/or squirrels.  Even if they're perfectly placed, kestrels will 
frequently pass them by if they're occupied by starlings, which usually 
set up housekeeping before kestrels do.  You'd think it would be no 
problem for kestrels to evict nesting starlings, but they don't often do 
it, perhaps because starling nests are so filthy and flea-infested, 
they'd make a lousy nesting place for any other creature.

(Other critters we found using the nestboxes included flying squirrels 
and once a group of very cranky screech owl owlets!)

I'd urge anybody who's intrigued by the idea of putting up a kestrel 
nestbox to first spend some time on Google to research both placement 
and maintenance issues.

Kestrels (and other birds) of course have to manage on their own in 
natural nesting places, but if we humans put up boxes to entice them to 
nest, seems to me we have an obligation to make sure they're safely 
placed and maintained in good condition.

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 8/4/2014 9:59 AM, Eric Hynes wrote:
> Hello Vermont Birders:
>
> I moved a month ago from Hinesburg to the Old North End in Burlington, just
> off Battery Park. My backyard habitat has changed dramatically as you can
> imagine but one of the surprising highlights has been breeding Merlins
> somewhere nearby.
>
> I see an adult Merlin hunting about three days a week on average, either
> from my yard or over at Battery Park. About a week ago, two fledglings were
> staying close to an adult, moving from tree to tree in my yard. I often see
> one of the adults flying toward the lake so I suspect the nest they took
> over is somewhere below Battery Park.
>
> Two days ago, a Merlin passed through the yard with an American Robin
> fledgling in its talons and an adult American Robin screaming after it.
>
> Yesterday's prey item lost its tail as the adult Merlin flew overhead en
> route to a fledgling waiting somewhere nearby. Here is a photo of the
> latest meal's tail. Not a particularly challenging quiz but if you want to
> make a guess:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/emhimages/14824118461/
>
> While American Kestrel populations are headed in the wrong direction;
> Merlins nesting in urban/suburban settings is a promising trend.
>
> The decline of American Kestrels is depressing but in the Champlain Valley
> of Vermont, they would greatly benefit from a nest box campaign (hint
> hint). As North America's only cavity nesting falcon, nest site potential
> is one of or THE limiting factor. There is no reason why they couldn't
> benefit as much as say Eastern Bluebirds have from all the boxes that have
> been offered. The habitat is there, just not enough snags, flicker
> cavities, etc.
>
> Good birding,
> Eric
> .....................
> Eric Hynes
> Hinesburg, VT
> ---------------------
> Field Guides Birding Tours
> www.fieldguides.com
> http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4716 / Virus Database: 3986/7979 - Release Date: 08/04/14
>
Subject: Merlins in Burlington and thoughts on American Kestrels
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 09:59:16 -0400
Hello Vermont Birders:

I moved a month ago from Hinesburg to the Old North End in Burlington, just
off Battery Park. My backyard habitat has changed dramatically as you can
imagine but one of the surprising highlights has been breeding Merlins
somewhere nearby.

I see an adult Merlin hunting about three days a week on average, either
from my yard or over at Battery Park. About a week ago, two fledglings were
staying close to an adult, moving from tree to tree in my yard. I often see
one of the adults flying toward the lake so I suspect the nest they took
over is somewhere below Battery Park.

Two days ago, a Merlin passed through the yard with an American Robin
fledgling in its talons and an adult American Robin screaming after it.

Yesterday's prey item lost its tail as the adult Merlin flew overhead en
route to a fledgling waiting somewhere nearby. Here is a photo of the
latest meal's tail. Not a particularly challenging quiz but if you want to
make a guess:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/emhimages/14824118461/

While American Kestrel populations are headed in the wrong direction;
Merlins nesting in urban/suburban settings is a promising trend.

The decline of American Kestrels is depressing but in the Champlain Valley
of Vermont, they would greatly benefit from a nest box campaign (hint
hint). As North America's only cavity nesting falcon, nest site potential
is one of or THE limiting factor. There is no reason why they couldn't
benefit as much as say Eastern Bluebirds have from all the boxes that have
been offered. The habitat is there, just not enough snags, flicker
cavities, etc.

Good birding,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Hinesburg, VT
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
Subject: More on Breeding Bird Survey data (long)
From: Allan Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 09:59:08 -0400
I had a couple folks ask for more information on how one interprets the 
data from the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS).  Don't be shy about hitting 
the delete key if this isn't of interest.

Here is a quick primer:

The Breeding Bird Survey is a set of roadside counts, all consisting of 
50 stops (point counts) that are conducted at 0.5 mile intervals.  The 
point counts are 3 min long where observers record all the birds that 
they see and hear during that time.  Nearly all the data from the ~2900 
routes are collected by volunteers and VT's data are collected by folks 
who are on this listserve.  (Thank You!!)

On this page, you have the opportunity to look at the BBS data for any 
species.
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/specl12.html

If you click on a species...such as American Kestrel, you get data on 
population trends for a variety of regions.  Some are states (e.g., 
Vermont, down at the bottom) whereas others are for regions that pool 
data from a variety of locations.
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/atlasa12.pl?03600&1&12

The trend data are based on the "route" or a set of 50 stops as a 
sampling unit.  US Geological Survey provides summaries for two 
periods...one is the entire period of record 1966-2012, and the other 
for the ten years 2002-2012.

The data that are provided for any region (i.e., columns on the web 
page) are:
N: the sample size (number of routes)
Trend: % change per year
95% CI: Since trend is an estimate, this gives the upper and lower 
bounds (or confidence interval, CI) on the trend.

Since we are typically concerned about whether or not a species is 
increasing or decreasing, we can look to see whether or not the 95% 
confidence interval (CI)  includes 0 within the range.  0 would be the 
indication that there is no change in the species' abundance. Again, 
using American Kestrel in Vermont as an example, the trend is negative 
(-1.55% decline per year), but the 95% confidence interval ranges from 
+0.35%/year to -3.51% per year.  Since zero indicates no trend, so the 
range of our estimate includes "no change."  In statistical terms, we 
would be testing whether or not the slope of the trend line is 
significantly different from 0.  So, in this case, it is not.

If you look down just a couple lines to American Kestrel in the United 
States, the trend estimate is -0.97% decline per year, with the 95% 
confidence interval between -0.71 and  -1.23% per year. Because 0 is not 
included in this interval, it is therefore "statistically significant."  
In other words, we are confident that the estimate of the trend does not 
include 0 and kestrels are indeed declining in the US.

For any of the regions for which there is an estimate of kestrel trends, 
you can click on that region and see the graph.  Like:
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s03600US.png  (American 
Kestrels for the US)
The Y-axis (vertical) shows the average number of individual detected 
per route.  This gives you some idea about the relative abundance of a 
particular species for any given area.

Kestrels are relatively rare, so compare the Y-axis to Red-winged 
Blackbird in the US:
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/graphs12/s04980US.png
Interestingly, the trends for the two species are nearly identical, but 
since RWBL are so much more abundant, we tend not to worry about their 
population.

It is always worth remembering that these trends are population 
indices.  We don't really know the total population of American Kestrels 
but the assumption is that the distribution of the BBS routes is 
sufficiently representative that it tells us something about how the 
population is changing over time.

Probably more than you needed to know, but hopefully of interest to some.

Allan


-- 

*******************************************************************
Allan M. Strong
University of Vermont
The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
220L Aiken Center

81 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-2910
*******************************************************************
Subject: Re: Ten perched Kestrels and a submarine Wood Duck youngster .. Weybridge
From: Allan Matthew Strong <astrong AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 20:48:56 -0400
Hi Jane,

This is the link to the Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas results (-26% from  
first atlas):
http://www.vtecostudies.org/vbba/accounts/AMKE.html

This is the link to the Breeding Bird Survey (non-significant -1.55%  
decline per year 1966-2012 in Vermont):
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/atlasa12.pl?03600&1&12

Keep in mind that the Atlas data are expressed as change in  
distribution (change in number of blocks over time) whereas the  
Breeding Bird Survey data are based on abundance (number of birds  
detected per 50-stop route)

Allan

Quoting Jane Stein :

> Does anybody have any data on the actual health of the Kestrel  
> population hereabouts?  I see them perched on telephone wires about  
> every mile or less on my regular route from Shoreham up to  
> Middlebury, and around town, etc.  Yet I hear very gloomy reports  
> from raptor banders, hawkwatchers and researchers around the country  
> about the decline in the Kestrel population over the last 10 years,  
> generally speculatively attributed to West Nile and the resurgent  
> Cooper's hawk predation, or both.
>
> Are we exempt from that here?  We sure have great Kestrel nesting  
> and hunting territory, so I guess if they were going to flourish  
> anywhere, it would be here.
>
> I particularly love that in mid to late summer, the Kestrel  
> territories suddenly have 3 or 4 or more birds where there had only  
> been two before.  There's one spot in town where I've twice now  
> counted seven -- two adults, a full clutch of five offspring -- by  
> August.
>
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
>
>
> On 8/1/2014 11:31 PM, Ian A. Worley wrote:
>> The number of Kestrels in the pasture north of Lemon Fair Road and east
>> of the Lemon Fair River has now grown to 10.  They, plus the presence of
>> a Northern Harrier, may account for the absence of the several dozen
>> Barn and Tree Swallows that had accumulated over the last 10 days or so.
>>
>> I accidentally startled a juvenile Wood Duck swimming on the river. It
>> dove out of sight, and finally surfaced 80-100 feet upstream after 30-45
>> seconds under water.
>>
>> Ian
>> ===============
>> Lemon Fair Road, Weybridge, Addison, US-VT
>> Aug 1, 2014 6:49 PM - 7:21 PM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 1.1 mile(s)
>> Comments:     There have been several dozen barn and tree swallows
>> around the last few days.  Their absence may be accounted for by the
>> presence of the 10 American Kestrels and the Northern Harrier.
>>
>> 13 species
>>
>> Wood Duck  1     I accidentally startled this juvenile as it swam on the
>> river.  It dove underwater and did not surface for 30-45 seconds,
>> whereupon it surfaced 80-100 feet away.
>> Great Blue Heron  1
>> Green Heron  2
>> Northern Harrier  1
>> Mourning Dove  1
>> Belted Kingfisher  1
>> American Kestrel  10     Nine on fence posts and one on tree branch ...
>> all in view at one time in the large pasture north of the road. Mix of
>> adults and juveniles.
>> American Crow  6
>> Barn Swallow  5
>> Red-winged Blackbird  3
>> Common Grackle  1
>> American Goldfinch  1
>> House Sparrow  4
>>
>> View this checklist online at
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19302640
>>
>>
>> -----
>> No virus found in this message.
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 2014.0.4716 / Virus Database: 3986/7954 - Release Date: 07/31/14
Subject: Goshawk eyeball-to-eyeball
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 14:20:37 -0400
A bit north of the intersection of Route 17 and Lake Street in Addison (just 
north of the town garages where all the sand is piled), I noticed a bird on the 
side of the road. A pick-up truck coming toward me blocked my view of the bird 
after the first second, but my first impression was Ruffed Grouse because it 
was brown and I got a glimpse of a striped tail. However, the bird looked like 
it might have been bigger than a grouse and the shape just didnt fit. I pulled 
into a driveway, turned around and stopped several car lengths from the bird. 
It was clearly a hawk, not a grouse. I got my binoculars on it and couldnt see 
any sign of prey in its talons, so I assumed it had been hit by a car. I eased 
the car closer, trying to remember the names of rehabilitators in the area. 


It was a big hawk, as big as or bigger than a harrier. There were strong brown 
streaks on the buffy breast. The birds tail was very long and banded in dark 
brown and lighter brown. There was a pale streak over the eye and some sort of 
brown shape behind and below the eye, but I didnt study its head as much as I 
should have because I noticed that the right wing appeared to be dragging. I 
kept inching the car forward and finally stopped opposite the hawk but in the 
other lane. The wing that I thought was dragging was brown and sort of mottled 
or speckled near the shoulder, with a smoother brownish-gray color closer to 
the end. 


The hawk and I stared at each other. I wondered if I could throw a blanket over 
the bird and, if I did manage that, what I should do next. Maybe it was better 
to get stay put, keep the bird from being run over, and call someone. I dug my 
cellphone out with one hand, the bird and I still maintaining eye contact. 


Then suddenly it smoothly took to the air and flew off, looking perfectly 
healthy and capable of anything. I considered juvenile Coopers Hawk, but the 
huge wingspan when it flew, combined with the colors on the breast, wing and 
head, convinced me it was a juvenile Northern Goshawk. 


I wonder if it had been stunned by a vehicle  or if it had been hunting and 
was just too stubborn and too inexperienced to move away from the road. 
Whatever the reason for its being there, it gave me an extraordinary close-up 
experience! 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Bitterns - Union St Brandon, Aug 2, 2014
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 13:13:12 -0400
Four of us searched for the Sedge wren but were unsuccessful. However we did 
have a good day. 

Sue Wetmore
Ian Worley
Ron Payne
Zach Cota-Weaver
TestSent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: August 3, 2014 11:18:36 AM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Aug 2, 2014
> 

> Union St Brandon, Rutland, US-VT
> Aug 2, 2014 6:30 AM - 10:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 46 species
> 
> Wood Duck  22
> American Black Duck  1
> Mallard  11
> American Bittern  2
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Green Heron  4
> Northern Harrier  1
> Red-tailed Hawk  1
> Virginia Rail  4
> Least Sandpiper  3
> Mourning Dove  2
> Chimney Swift  2
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
> Belted Kingfisher  2
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  2
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
> Eastern Phoebe  8
> Great Crested Flycatcher  2
> Eastern Kingbird  7
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  1
> American Crow  4
> Common Raven  2
> Tree Swallow  8
> Barn Swallow  2
> Black-capped Chickadee  3
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  5
> House Wren  1
> Eastern Bluebird  1
> American Robin  14
> Gray Catbird  3
> Cedar Waxwing  9
> Black-and-white Warbler  2
> Common Yellowthroat  8
> American Redstart  5
> Song Sparrow  15
> Swamp Sparrow  8
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Red-winged Blackbird  60
> American Goldfinch  7
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19315665 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Victory Blowdown revisit: Rusty, Black-backed Woodpeckers
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 07:49:39 -0400
Matt Aeberhard and I revisited the Victory Blowdown yesterday and most
species I reported 2 days ago were still there to be found along with
several new ones. A  juvenile Palm Warbler caught our attention indicating
possible breeding in the area.

We had 4 Black-backed Woodpeckers after  doing a bit of bush-whacking
through a bumper crop of wild raspberries now growing throughout the
Blowdown. Of interest was Red-breasted Nuthatches (2 different ones) we
observed "flycatching" bugs from tree top perches.

An American Bittern foraged just across the road from the entrance trail . 

 

Spending a short time along the "Pipeline west" we found 2 Merlins (best
guess was an adult and juvenile) as there was plenty of interaction between
the two as they flew after one another and called to each other. Also a 5th
Black-backed was heard calling from the woods.

Mosquitoes were still annoying. 

 

The abundance of species preferring, visiting, foraging these 10 to 30 acre
openings in these Northeast Kingdom woodlands  as I have been seeing in
Victory at the Blowdown and the clearing along the Roger's Creek Trail
always amazes me! What was interesting (for this time of year) was how
little activity or bird song we found when we were away from these
"openings"  just 100-300 yards away.

 

Tom Berriman

 

Victory, 2010 blowdown, Essex, US-VT

Aug 2, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Protocol: Traveling

2.0 mile(s)

34 species

 

American Bittern  1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2

Downy Woodpecker  2

Hairy Woodpecker  1

Black-backed Woodpecker  4

Northern Flicker  2

Olive-sided Flycatcher  1

Blue-headed Vireo  2

Blue Jay  7

Black-capped Chickadee  5

Red-breasted Nuthatch  9

Winter Wren  2

Golden-crowned Kinglet  7

Veery  1

Swainson's Thrush  3

Hermit Thrush  3

American Robin  2

Cedar Waxwing  5

Nashville Warbler  2

Mourning Warbler  1

Common Yellowthroat  5

American Redstart  1

Northern Parula  1

Magnolia Warbler  3

Chestnut-sided Warbler  1

Black-throated Blue Warbler  2

Palm Warbler  1

Yellow-rumped Warbler  4

Canada Warbler  1

Song Sparrow  1

White-throated Sparrow  8

Rusty Blackbird  1

Purple Finch  5