Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
Vermont Birds

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Thursday, July 30 at 02:50 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Dunlin,©Julie Zickefoose

30 Jul Another Tennessee warbler, and house wren in Montpelier [Tom Slayton ]
30 Jul More on Buying Binoculard [Larry and Mona Rogers ]
30 Jul Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier [Chip Darmstadt ]
30 Jul Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier [Alison Wagner ]
30 Jul Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier [Kent McFarland ]
30 Jul Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier [Chip Darmstadt ]
29 Jul Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier [Patti Haynes ]
29 Jul Fwd: [NHBirds] Optics Fair-Save the Date [Bob Crowley ]
29 Jul Junco [Sue ]
29 Jul NEK: Moose Bog [tfberriman ]
29 Jul Re: more wrens this year? [Marcia Baker ]
29 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Ken Copenhaver ]
29 Jul Re: more wrens this year? [Bonnie Dundas ]
29 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [hilke breder ]
29 Jul Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier [Larry Clarfeld ]
29 Jul Re: more wrens this year? [Martha McClintock ]
29 Jul Re: more wrens this year? [Evergreen Erb ]
29 Jul Re: more wrens this year? [Patrick Phillips ]
29 Jul more wrens this year? [Maeve Kim ]
29 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [hilke breder ]
29 Jul Re: Wren [John Snell ]
29 Jul Wren [Sue ]
29 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Michele Patenaude ]
29 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Valerie Biebuyck ]
28 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Scott Sainsbury ]
28 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Jane Stein ]
29 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Jonathan Comeau ]
28 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Pat Folsom ]
28 Jul Re: Shopping for Binoculars [Susan Fogleman ]
28 Jul Shopping for Binoculars [Ken Copenhaver ]
28 Jul Re: Osprey [Ron Payne ]
28 Jul Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours [Frances Delwiche ]
28 Jul Osprey [Sue ]
28 Jul NEK: Yellow-billed Cuckoo [tfberriman ]
27 Jul Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours [Graham Bates ]
27 Jul Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours [Nancy Mitiguy ]
27 Jul Survey on Exotic Birds [John Sutton ]
26 Jul Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours [Susan Werntgen ]
26 Jul Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Ian Clark ]
26 Jul Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Isis Erb ]
26 Jul Re: bird hikes list now available!! [Ken Copenhaver ]
26 Jul Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
26 Jul Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Isis Erb ]
26 Jul Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours [Mark Paul ]
26 Jul Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Ian Clark ]
26 Jul Off Topic - Details about puffin tours [Ian Clark ]
24 Jul Re: bird hikes list now available!! [Sarah Fellows ]
24 Jul Louisiana Waterthrush [Linda Gionti ]
24 Jul Vireos - Goshen, [Sue ]
24 Jul Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera [John Snell ]
24 Jul Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Joe Cuoco ]
23 Jul Re: bird hikes list now available!! [Maeve Kim ]
23 Jul Re: bird hikes list now available!! [Sue ]
23 Jul Re: bird hikes list now available!! [Kent McFarland ]
23 Jul Re: bird hikes list now available!! [Scott Sainsbury ]
23 Jul bird hikes list now available!! [Maeve Kim ]
23 Jul Puffin Pix [Martha Pfeiffer ]
22 Jul Mansfield banding [Chris Rimmer ]
22 Jul NEK/Moose Bog [Alison Wagner ]
22 Jul Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Richard ]
22 Jul Re: NEK: Moose Bog Trail: Both Crossbills [Ron Payne ]
22 Jul Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera [tfberriman ]
22 Jul Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera [Scott Sainsbury ]
22 Jul NEK: Moose Bog Trail: Both Crossbills [tfberriman ]
22 Jul Suggestions for mid-range camera [Joe Cuoco ]
22 Jul TONIGHT in W. Rutland "The Lost Bird Project" Showing [Marian McDonald ]
22 Jul Off Topic - Puffin Pix [Ian Clark ]
22 Jul Palm warbler - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 22, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]
22 Jul Sandpiper question [Larry and Mona Rogers ]
21 Jul Re: Sandpipers Question [Stephen Antell ]
21 Jul Re: Stumped by call [Roo Slagle ]
21 Jul Birding Canada [Sue ]
21 Jul Re: Nova Scotia [G M ARCHAMBAULT ]
21 Jul Re: Nova Scotia [Kim Likakis ]
21 Jul Re: Nova Scotia [Bob Crowley ]
21 Jul Northern Waterthrush- Brandon, Jul 21, 2015 [Sue Wetmore ]

Subject: Another Tennessee warbler, and house wren in Montpelier
From: Tom Slayton <slayton.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 15:45:48 -0400
Good looks this morning at a Tennessee warbler, hopping around in the crab
tree outside my study window. No binoculars needed! 5 feet away. Maybe
Tennessees are migrating thru now, in view of the one banded at North
Branch Nature Center recently. This one didn't linger. Back in May I heard
one singing nearby.

  And to add to the house wren discussion, have had one singing mightily in
our neighborhood for weeks. Saw him a few days ago. Others have been
reported around town by friends. They do seem more numerous this year.

Tom Slayton
Terrace Street
 Montpelier
Subject: More on Buying Binoculard
From: Larry and Mona Rogers <4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 10:28:41 -0400
               The Optics Fair in Newburyport on 8/15 sounds like a good
deal.  If you can wait until the third weekend in September, you might want
to hit the Cape Cod Birding Festival in Hyannis .  Mona and I are going.
There are always a slew of vendors at these affairs.

                              Larry
Subject: Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 09:10:52 -0400
Was it molting :)!


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Alison Wagner
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2015 9:06 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier

I had a "Life Yard" Tennessee in my garden last week....a surprise and joy to 
see! 


Ali
Huntington

-----Original Message-----
From: Kent McFarland
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2015 9:01 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier

Chris Rimmer has hundred of detailed records of this species during this time 
molt migrating with details about molt status. We put some of the information 
in the Birds of North America account when we wrote it (see below). It is a 
really fascinating phenomena. We've speculated that it might be birds that have 
failed and left early up north, but no one really knows. 


Kent

Birds of North America excerpt:

Some adults regularly depart northern breeding grounds (and appear south of 
breeding range) in early to mid-Jul. May be the only Nearctic-Neotropical 
migrant to regularly overlap its southward migration with its main period of 
flight-feather molt. Some adults remain on boreal breeding grounds through the 
completion of Prebasic molt, suggesting that factors other than food supply 
dictate scheduling of both molt and migration. 


Earliest fall migrants, or postbreeding dispersers, regularly appear south of 
breeding range in early to mid-Jul. Early dates include 16 Jul in S. 

Dakota (Tallman 1993), 13 Jul in s. Minnesota (Janssen 1987), 10 Jul in 
Illinois (Chapel 1992), 2 and 4 Jul in Massachusetts (Veit and Petersen 1993), 
and 22 Jul in sw. Pennsylvania (Leberman 1976). In New York, 31 reports in late 
Jun and Jul away from Adirondack Mtns. (Levine 1998). Data from banded birds 
(Leberman 1976, Cooke 1979, CCR), combined with a high proportion of singing 
males among reported early summer Tennessee Warblers, suggest that all, or 
nearly all, migrants encountered before Aug are adults. At Prince Edward Point, 
Ontario, numbers of adults peaked about 30 d earlier than immatures (Cooke 
1979); in New Jersey and W. Virginia, migration of both age classes was nearly 
synchronous (Murray 1966, Hall 1981). No consistent geographic differences in 
age ratios of fall migrants. 

Proportions of adults in banded and tower-killed samples ranged from 5% in 
coastal Virginia (n = 368; Stewart 1986), to 13% at Long Point, Ontario (n = 
1,059; Dunn and Nol 1980), to 18% in Vermont (n= 265; CCR and KPM), to 19% in 
coastal Massachusetts (n = 42; T. Lloyd-Evans pers. comm.), to 29% in W. 
Virginia (n = 3,191; Hall 1981), to 31% in coastal New Jersey (n = 59;Murray 
1966), to 95% in Illinois (n = 22; Brewer and Ellis 1958). 



____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2





On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 8:43 AM, Chip Darmstadt < 
chip AT northbranchnaturecenter.org> wrote: 


> It was also really interesting to see this warbler in the process of 
> actively molting its flight feathers (inner primaries). Apparently 
> Tennessee Warblers are one of the few songbird species that molt 
> flight feathers while they migrate.
> Happy Birding,
> Chip
>
>
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> North Branch Nature Center
> (802) 229-6206
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti 
> Haynes
> Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 6:53 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
>
> Wonderful news at the NBNC!!! I heard and saw a few Tennessee Warblers 
> in my yard this spring, and am delighted to hear that you found a 
> south bound migrant!
>
> On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 11:27 AM, Larry Clarfeld 
> wrote:
>
> > Hi VTBirders,
> >
> > A Tennessee Warbler was a nice surprise this past Monday at North 
> > Branch Nature Center. It was one of 36 birds banded during our MAPS
> monitoring.
> > Other highlights included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a first for us 
> > despite hearing them pretty regularly. Some photos are posted here:
> >
> > http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/
> >
> > Our last banding session of the season will be this Saturday, August 
> > 1, and all are welcome to come observe. Details below.
> >
> > Best,
> > Larry
> >
> > *Bird Banding Demonstration*
> > Saturday, August 1, anytime from 6:30 to 11 a.m.
> > Get a behind the scenes glimpse of banding in action. We catch, 
> > measure and band a variety of songbirds to study their survivorship 
> > and reproductive success. A rare chance to see beautiful birds up close.
> >
> 
Subject: Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 09:05:37 -0400
I had a "Life Yard" Tennessee in my garden last week....a surprise and joy 
to see!

Ali
Huntington

-----Original Message----- 
From: Kent McFarland
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2015 9:01 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier

Chris Rimmer has hundred of detailed records of this species during this
time molt migrating with details about molt status. We put some of the
information in the Birds of North America account when we wrote it (see
below). It is a really fascinating phenomena. We've speculated that it
might be birds that have failed and left early up north, but no one really
knows.

Kent

Birds of North America excerpt:

Some adults regularly depart northern breeding grounds (and appear south of
breeding range) in early to mid-Jul. May be the only Nearctic-Neotropical
migrant to regularly overlap its southward migration with its main period
of flight-feather molt. Some adults remain on boreal breeding grounds
through the completion of Prebasic molt, suggesting that factors other than
food supply dictate scheduling of both molt and migration.

Earliest fall migrants, or postbreeding dispersers, regularly appear south
of breeding range in early to mid-Jul. Early dates include 16 Jul in S.
Dakota (Tallman 1993), 13 Jul in s. Minnesota (Janssen 1987), 10 Jul in
Illinois (Chapel 1992), 2 and 4 Jul in Massachusetts (Veit and Petersen
1993), and 22 Jul in sw. Pennsylvania (Leberman 1976). In New York, 31
reports in late Jun and Jul away from Adirondack Mtns. (Levine 1998). Data
from banded birds (Leberman 1976, Cooke 1979, CCR), combined with a high
proportion of singing males among reported early summer Tennessee Warblers,
suggest that all, or nearly all, migrants encountered before Aug are
adults. At Prince Edward Point, Ontario, numbers of adults peaked about 30
d earlier than immatures (Cooke 1979); in New Jersey and W. Virginia,
migration of both age classes was nearly synchronous (Murray 1966, Hall
1981). No consistent geographic differences in age ratios of fall migrants.
Proportions of adults in banded and tower-killed samples ranged from 5% in
coastal Virginia (n = 368; Stewart 1986), to 13% at Long Point, Ontario (n
= 1,059; Dunn and Nol 1980), to 18% in Vermont (n= 265; CCR and KPM), to
19% in coastal Massachusetts (n = 42; T. Lloyd-Evans pers. comm.), to 29%
in W. Virginia (n = 3,191; Hall 1981), to 31% in coastal New Jersey (n =
59;Murray 1966), to 95% in Illinois (n = 22; Brewer and Ellis 1958).


____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2





On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 8:43 AM, Chip Darmstadt <
chip AT northbranchnaturecenter.org> wrote:

> It was also really interesting to see this warbler in the process of
> actively molting its flight feathers (inner primaries). Apparently
> Tennessee Warblers are one of the few songbird species that molt flight
> feathers while they migrate.
> Happy Birding,
> Chip
>
>
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> North Branch Nature Center
> (802) 229-6206
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
> Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 6:53 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
>
> Wonderful news at the NBNC!!! I heard and saw a few Tennessee Warblers in
> my yard this spring, and am delighted to hear that you found a south bound
> migrant!
>
> On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 11:27 AM, Larry Clarfeld 
> wrote:
>
> > Hi VTBirders,
> >
> > A Tennessee Warbler was a nice surprise this past Monday at North
> > Branch Nature Center. It was one of 36 birds banded during our MAPS
> monitoring.
> > Other highlights included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a first for us
> > despite hearing them pretty regularly. Some photos are posted here:
> >
> > http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/
> >
> > Our last banding session of the season will be this Saturday, August
> > 1, and all are welcome to come observe. Details below.
> >
> > Best,
> > Larry
> >
> > *Bird Banding Demonstration*
> > Saturday, August 1, anytime from 6:30 to 11 a.m.
> > Get a behind the scenes glimpse of banding in action. We catch,
> > measure and band a variety of songbirds to study their survivorship
> > and reproductive success. A rare chance to see beautiful birds up close.
> >
> 
Subject: Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 09:01:32 -0400
Chris Rimmer has hundred of detailed records of this species during this
time molt migrating with details about molt status. We put some of the
information in the Birds of North America account when we wrote it (see
below). It is a really fascinating phenomena. We've speculated that it
might be birds that have failed and left early up north, but no one really
knows.

Kent

Birds of North America excerpt:

Some adults regularly depart northern breeding grounds (and appear south of
breeding range) in early to mid-Jul. May be the only Nearctic-Neotropical
migrant to regularly overlap its southward migration with its main period
of flight-feather molt. Some adults remain on boreal breeding grounds
through the completion of Prebasic molt, suggesting that factors other than
food supply dictate scheduling of both molt and migration.

Earliest fall migrants, or postbreeding dispersers, regularly appear south
of breeding range in early to mid-Jul. Early dates include 16 Jul in S.
Dakota (Tallman 1993), 13 Jul in s. Minnesota (Janssen 1987), 10 Jul in
Illinois (Chapel 1992), 2 and 4 Jul in Massachusetts (Veit and Petersen
1993), and 22 Jul in sw. Pennsylvania (Leberman 1976). In New York, 31
reports in late Jun and Jul away from Adirondack Mtns. (Levine 1998). Data
from banded birds (Leberman 1976, Cooke 1979, CCR), combined with a high
proportion of singing males among reported early summer Tennessee Warblers,
suggest that all, or nearly all, migrants encountered before Aug are
adults. At Prince Edward Point, Ontario, numbers of adults peaked about 30
d earlier than immatures (Cooke 1979); in New Jersey and W. Virginia,
migration of both age classes was nearly synchronous (Murray 1966, Hall
1981). No consistent geographic differences in age ratios of fall migrants.
Proportions of adults in banded and tower-killed samples ranged from 5% in
coastal Virginia (n = 368; Stewart 1986), to 13% at Long Point, Ontario (n
= 1,059; Dunn and Nol 1980), to 18% in Vermont (n= 265; CCR and KPM), to
19% in coastal Massachusetts (n = 42; T. Lloyd-Evans pers. comm.), to 29%
in W. Virginia (n = 3,191; Hall 1981), to 31% in coastal New Jersey (n =
59;Murray 1966), to 95% in Illinois (n = 22; Brewer and Ellis 1958).


____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2





On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 8:43 AM, Chip Darmstadt <
chip AT northbranchnaturecenter.org> wrote:

> It was also really interesting to see this warbler in the process of
> actively molting its flight feathers (inner primaries). Apparently
> Tennessee Warblers are one of the few songbird species that molt flight
> feathers while they migrate.
> Happy Birding,
> Chip
>
>
> Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
> North Branch Nature Center
> (802) 229-6206
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
> Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 6:53 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
>
> Wonderful news at the NBNC!!! I heard and saw a few Tennessee Warblers in
> my yard this spring, and am delighted to hear that you found a south bound
> migrant!
>
> On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 11:27 AM, Larry Clarfeld 
> wrote:
>
> > Hi VTBirders,
> >
> > A Tennessee Warbler was a nice surprise this past Monday at North
> > Branch Nature Center. It was one of 36 birds banded during our MAPS
> monitoring.
> > Other highlights included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a first for us
> > despite hearing them pretty regularly. Some photos are posted here:
> >
> > http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/
> >
> > Our last banding session of the season will be this Saturday, August
> > 1, and all are welcome to come observe. Details below.
> >
> > Best,
> > Larry
> >
> > *Bird Banding Demonstration*
> > Saturday, August 1, anytime from 6:30 to 11 a.m.
> > Get a behind the scenes glimpse of banding in action. We catch,
> > measure and band a variety of songbirds to study their survivorship
> > and reproductive success. A rare chance to see beautiful birds up close.
> >
>
Subject: Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 08:43:09 -0400
It was also really interesting to see this warbler in the process of actively 
molting its flight feathers (inner primaries). Apparently Tennessee Warblers 
are one of the few songbird species that molt flight feathers while they 
migrate. 

Happy Birding,
Chip


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 6:53 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier

Wonderful news at the NBNC!!! I heard and saw a few Tennessee Warblers in my 
yard this spring, and am delighted to hear that you found a south bound 
migrant! 


On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 11:27 AM, Larry Clarfeld 
wrote:

> Hi VTBirders,
>
> A Tennessee Warbler was a nice surprise this past Monday at North 
> Branch Nature Center. It was one of 36 birds banded during our MAPS 
monitoring. 

> Other highlights included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a first for us 
> despite hearing them pretty regularly. Some photos are posted here:
>
> http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/
>
> Our last banding session of the season will be this Saturday, August 
> 1, and all are welcome to come observe. Details below.
>
> Best,
> Larry
>
> *Bird Banding Demonstration*
> Saturday, August 1, anytime from 6:30 to 11 a.m.
> Get a behind the scenes glimpse of banding in action. We catch, 
> measure and band a variety of songbirds to study their survivorship 
> and reproductive success. A rare chance to see beautiful birds up close.
>
Subject: Re: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 18:52:55 -0400
Wonderful news at the NBNC!!! I heard and saw a few Tennessee Warblers in
my yard this spring, and am delighted to hear that you found a south bound
migrant!

On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 11:27 AM, Larry Clarfeld 
wrote:

> Hi VTBirders,
>
> A Tennessee Warbler was a nice surprise this past Monday at North Branch
> Nature Center. It was one of 36 birds banded during our MAPS monitoring.
> Other highlights included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a first for us despite
> hearing them pretty regularly. Some photos are posted here:
>
> http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/
>
> Our last banding session of the season will be this Saturday, August 1, and
> all are welcome to come observe. Details below.
>
> Best,
> Larry
>
> *Bird Banding Demonstration*
> Saturday, August 1, anytime from 6:30 to 11 a.m.
> Get a behind the scenes glimpse of banding in action. We catch, measure and
> band a variety of songbirds to study their survivorship and reproductive
> success. A rare chance to see beautiful birds up close.
>
Subject: Fwd: [NHBirds] Optics Fair-Save the Date
From: Bob Crowley <crbob AT FAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 17:13:38 -0400
-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: 	[NHBirds] Optics Fair-Save the Date
Date: 	Wed, 29 Jul 2015 20:28:09 +0000 (UTC)
From: 	Bird Watcher's Supply 
Reply-To: 	birdwsg AT comcast.net
To: 	New Hampshire Birds 



SAVE THE DATE!
We would like to invite everyone to our FREE Optics Fair on Saturday, August 
15, 2015 from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at Bird Watcher?s Supply & Gift at the Route 
1 Traffic Circle in Newburyport. Representatives from Zeiss, Swarovski, Pentax, 
Opticron, Nikon, and Manfrotto (tripods) will feature their latest products and 
answer all of your questions. At our Optics Fair, everyone will receive 
exceptional discounts on binoculars, scopes and tripods in all price ranges. 
Once again, there are incredible savings of up to 20% from Swarovski, 
additional rebates of up to $150 from Zeiss, and instant rebates from 
Pentax/Ricoh and Nikon will be available! Many of these savings are going on 
right now! Details, including Swarovski sale prices, can be found on our 
website: www.birdwatcherssupplyandgift.com 


You will save even more on that Optics Fair weekend, August 15 & 16, as it 
likely to be the 2015 Tax Free Holiday Weekend in Massachusetts. If the state 
legislature decides against it, we will give you an additional discount to 
offset the tax! (In that way, it will be like buying in New Hampshire!) We 
will, of course, accept orders anytime before then and process them on that 
weekend. 


We will also be happy to accept donations of used optics in good working order 
for the Birders' Exchange, a program of the American Birding Association which 
provides new and used optics for educators and naturalists in Central and South 
America. More information is available on their website: 
www.americanbirding.org/bex 


Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift is celebrating 20 years of serving the birding 
community. We are a proud, long-time supporter of Mass Audubon, including 
Bird-a-thon, The Superbowl of Birding, and the MAS Ipswich River WS Annual 
Audubon Nature Festival. We also support the Brookline Bird Club, Essex County 
Greenbelt, the Cape Ann Birding Festival, and the Cape Cod Birding Festival. We 
pass along sightings in support of the Massbird, NHBirds, PlumIslandBirds, 
CapeCodBirds communities as well. 


Again, the Optics Fair is FREE, No pre-registration, just come and enjoy!
We hope to see you at our Optics Fair on Saturday, August 15th!

Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
978-462-0775
www.birdwatcherssupplyandgift.com
Celebrating 20 years of service to the birding community!
Like us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/birdwatcherssupply
SAVE THE DATE: OPTICS FAIR - SATURDAY AUGUST 15, 2015!

-- 
To Change your e-mail delivery settings (digest, daily, no mail) visit:
https://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/subscribe?hl=en
---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"NHBirds" group. 

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to nhbirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

To post to this group, send email to nhbirds AT googlegroups.com.
Visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Junco
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 15:54:50 -0400
A lone junco was present at the top of cool Killington peak this morning. 
Also a tree swallow glided by the gondola platform at the base.
Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod
Subject: NEK: Moose Bog
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 15:19:40 -0400
Elinor Osborn, Louanne Nielson and I spent 5 hours on the moose bog trail.
Good looks at White-winged Crossbill and Boreal Chickadees. Also Caught a
Female Moose and youngster (first year) in the bog splashing about,
foraging. We heard Crossbill species all along the trail so do not have a
count as we weren't sure how many or if same birds more than once.  Friday
Dave Govatski, Mary Boulanger and I worked on the trail and had pretty much
the same species but did pick up a male Spruce Grouse in the rains. Bugs
were at a minimum.

 

Moose Bog Trail, Essex, Vermont, US

Jul 29, 2015 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.0 mile(s)

31 species

 

Great Blue Heron  1

Broad-winged Hawk  1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1

Hairy Woodpecker  2

Black-backed Woodpecker  2

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  2

Blue-headed Vireo  4

Gray Jay  3

Blue Jay  1

Common Raven  1

Black-capped Chickadee  5

Boreal Chickadee  3

Red-breasted Nuthatch  4

Brown Creeper  2

Winter Wren  2

Golden-crowned Kinglet  2

Hermit Thrush  X

American Robin  1

Cedar Waxwing  X

Nashville Warbler  1

Common Yellowthroat  2

Magnolia Warbler  2

Palm Warbler  5

Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

Canada Warbler  2

Song Sparrow  1

Swamp Sparrow  1

White-throated Sparrow  4

Dark-eyed Junco  4

Red Crossbill  X

White-winged Crossbill  X

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Re: more wrens this year?
From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:20:18 -0400
We have our first pair in the wren house we put up a year ago. Looking forward 
to seeing the little ones fledge, if I am lucky! 


Marcia in Brownsville

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 29, 2015, at 10:50 AM, Martha McClintock  
wrote: 

> 
> I also have noticed more house wrens around this year than I typically see
> but it is a totally unscientific observation.  On the same note, I feel
> like I am seeing fewer great blue herons than usual.  Please, someone tell
> me that my observation is incorrect!
> 
> Martha
> 
>> On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 9:48 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
>> 
>> Has anyone else noticed House Wrens all over the place this year? I’ve
>> been finding them in places I’ve never seen or heard them before.
>> 
>> My yard hosted two pairs this year, one of which had two broods.
>> 
>> Maeve Kim
>> Jericho Center
>> 
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 12:28:36 -0400
Hi Hilke,

I guess it would be worth a try!  I didn't even try to find them in the
burnt van.  All I have is my insurance claim as proof.  I have replacement
cost on my homeowners policy, so I should be pretty well covered anyway.

Thanks,
--Ken

On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 7:00 AM, hilke breder  wrote:

> Ken, you should call Nikon and see if they will replace them. They have
> this program that for $20 you get damaged Nikons repaired or replaced. Last
> summer I fell into a pond with my high-end Nikons. I mailed them to Nikon,
> and being unreparable, was sent a new pair. If you have proof that yours
> were damaged in a fire this may work for you too.
>
> Hilke Breder
> Brattleboro
>
> On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver 
> wrote:
>
> > I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
> > couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased
> in
> > 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
> > I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
> > suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several
> brands
> > in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
> > Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
> > to be able to compare them side by side.
> >
> > I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds
> Unlimited
> > stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually
> Swarovski)
> > and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
> > Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
> >
> > Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent
> experience
> > with what they typically have on display in the store?
> >
> > Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Ken Copenhaver
> >
>
Subject: Re: more wrens this year?
From: Bonnie Dundas <kinglet AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:49:42 -0400
Here in Bennington at our house, we usually have several pair nesting and 
singing up a storm. This year they were late coming back and then didn't 
linger. A pair showed up in late June but are quieter than I have ever 
noticed. They are still carrying food to the nest box. Again, we are usually 
amused to watch a male feeding two nests of babies but not this year. I'm 
glad they are brightening up yards elsewhere in the state.
Bonnie Dundas

-----Original Message----- 
From: Maeve Kim
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 9:48 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] more wrens this year?

Has anyone else noticed House Wrens all over the place this year? Ive been 
finding them in places Ive never seen or heard them before.

My yard hosted two pairs this year, one of which had two broods.

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center 
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: hilke breder <htbreder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:35:28 -0400
Ken, here is the link to the Nikon Binocular Repair Warranty:
http://www.birdwatching-bliss.com/nikon-binoculars-repair.html


On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 7:00 AM, hilke breder  wrote:

> Ken, you should call Nikon and see if they will replace them. They have
> this program that for $20 you get damaged Nikons repaired or replaced. Last
> summer I fell into a pond with my high-end Nikons. I mailed them to Nikon,
> and being unreparable, was sent a new pair. If you have proof that yours
> were damaged in a fire this may work for you too.
>
> Hilke Breder
> Brattleboro
>
> On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver 
> wrote:
>
>> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
>> couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
>> 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
>> I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
>> suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several
>> brands
>> in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
>> Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
>> to be able to compare them side by side.
>>
>> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
>> stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually
>> Swarovski)
>> and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
>> Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
>>
>> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent
>> experience
>> with what they typically have on display in the store?
>>
>> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Ken Copenhaver
>>
>
>
Subject: Tennessee Warbler banded in Montpelier
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 11:27:45 -0400
Hi VTBirders,

A Tennessee Warbler was a nice surprise this past Monday at North Branch
Nature Center. It was one of 36 birds banded during our MAPS monitoring.
Other highlights included a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a first for us despite
hearing them pretty regularly. Some photos are posted here:

http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/

Our last banding session of the season will be this Saturday, August 1, and
all are welcome to come observe. Details below.

Best,
Larry

*Bird Banding Demonstration*
Saturday, August 1, anytime from 6:30 to 11 a.m.
Get a behind the scenes glimpse of banding in action. We catch, measure and
band a variety of songbirds to study their survivorship and reproductive
success. A rare chance to see beautiful birds up close.
Subject: Re: more wrens this year?
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 10:50:46 -0400
I also have noticed more house wrens around this year than I typically see
but it is a totally unscientific observation.  On the same note, I feel
like I am seeing fewer great blue herons than usual.  Please, someone tell
me that my observation is incorrect!

Martha

On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 9:48 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> Has anyone else noticed House Wrens all over the place this year? I’ve
> been finding them in places I’ve never seen or heard them before.
>
> My yard hosted two pairs this year, one of which had two broods.
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
Subject: Re: more wrens this year?
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 10:20:48 -0400
Theyre everywhere, theyre everywhere.singing up a noisy storm! Evergreen, 
also in Jericho 

Subject: Re: more wrens this year?
From: Patrick Phillips <phillipspatj AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 09:56:39 -0400
I have always had house wrens in Colchester, but this year I have probably
three times the usual number.
Pat Phillips

On Wednesday, July 29, 2015, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> Has anyone else noticed House Wrens all over the place this year? I’ve
> been finding them in places I’ve never seen or heard them before.
>
> My yard hosted two pairs this year, one of which had two broods.
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
Subject: more wrens this year?
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 09:48:02 -0400
Has anyone else noticed House Wrens all over the place this year? Ive been 
finding them in places Ive never seen or heard them before. 


My yard hosted two pairs this year, one of which had two broods. 

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: hilke breder <htbreder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 07:00:11 -0400
Ken, you should call Nikon and see if they will replace them. They have
this program that for $20 you get damaged Nikons repaired or replaced. Last
summer I fell into a pond with my high-end Nikons. I mailed them to Nikon,
and being unreparable, was sent a new pair. If you have proof that yours
were damaged in a fire this may work for you too.

Hilke Breder
Brattleboro

On Tue, Jul 28, 2015 at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver  wrote:

> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
> couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
> 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
> I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
> suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
> in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
> Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
> to be able to compare them side by side.
>
> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
> stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
> and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
> Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
>
> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent experience
> with what they typically have on display in the store?
>
> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
>
> Thanks,
> Ken Copenhaver
>
Subject: Re: Wren
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 06:18:47 -0400
Yes, the male of the pair in our yard, with a nest and at least one young one, 
is singing constantly, beginning at 4:30am. Hard to believe so much sound comes 
from that little bird! 


Still learning to see,

John Snell


http://www.eyeimagein.com
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com

On Jul 29, 2015, at 6:06 AM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:

> The Carolina wren in my backyard is singing again.
> Sue Wetmore 
> 
> Sent from my iPod
Subject: Wren
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 06:06:02 -0400
The Carolina wren in my backyard is singing again.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 00:47:58 -0400
I agree. I have been working with Eagle Optics for years. They are most 
accommodating. They repaired a tripod for me free of charge, one that I had not 
purchased from them. 


Most stores don't carry a selection of binoculars because people come in, try 
them all, and then go online and get them cheaper than the store can offer. 
I've heard this from several proprietors. 


Eagle Optics will let you try several pairs for 30 days until you decide. Just 
send them back in good condition. 


They are very knowledgeable. They know their products and will help you select 
equipment which will meet your needs and price range. I believe they have a 
lifetime guarantee and will repair or replace them for life, I use their Ranger 
ED, 8 x 42. My back-up pair, are my old Eagle Optics Ranger 10 x 42. 


Very good folks. 

Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Jul 28, 2015, at 9:15 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
> 
> Totally endorse this. I've never heard a single complaint about Eagle Optics 
in more than 25 years of birding, either. I believe strongly in supporting 
local stores, but if you don't know what you want and/or there aren't any 
within many miles that have or can do what you need... 

> 
> Also, the sales staff are incredibly knowledgeable, and Eagle doesn't pay 
them by commission, they're salaried. (Or at least used to be, but I don't know 
why they'd change). That's big in my book, both for the sales people and for 
customers. I've actually had them direct me to less expensive equipment than I 
thought I needed. How often does that happen? This is a very good and very 
ethical outfit. 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
>> On 7/28/2015 7:34 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>> Ken,
>> 
>> I really believe your best bet is Eagle Optics
>> (www.eagleoptics.com).  They carry all those brands, and will ship
>> you three (maybe more?) so you can compare them under the birding
>> circumstances with which you are most familiar/comfortable.  Of
>> course you will have provided a credit card number so that if you
>> don't return any of the bins you'll be charged for them.  I have
>> never heard anyone complain about their service, and the expeditious
>> rate at which you'll receive the shipment.
>> 
>> Best, Susan Fogleman  (I have no interest/connection with Eagle
>> Optics other than that of very satisfied customer) Campton  NH
>> 
>>> On Jul 28, 2015, at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver wrote:
>>> 
>>> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames
>>> a couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model,
>>> purchased in 2001, and I would like to replace them with another
>>> high-end binocular. I'm sure this has been discussed before, but
>>> does anyone have any suggestions of where to go to actually hold
>>> and look through several brands in the same store?  I'm probably
>>> interested in Swarovski (of course), Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly
>>> Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want to be able to compare
>>> them side by side.
>>> 
>>> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds
>>> Unlimited stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand
>>> (usually Swarovski) and usually one other, such as Vortex or
>>> Pentax.  I also called Bird Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with
>>> similar results.
>>> 
>>> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent
>>> experience with what they typically have on display in the store?
>>> 
>>> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you
>>> prefer.
>>> 
>>> Thanks, Ken Copenhaver
>> 
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Valerie Biebuyck <valbieb AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 00:14:15 -0400
Hi, Ken --

Eagle Optics is fantastic, and several birders have already recommended them in 
response to your query. Eagle Optics will send you several pairs (not sure what 
the maximum number is). You can try them in the field, pick the one you want, 
and return the rest within thirty days. Be sure to keep all the packaging to 
make this process easier. 


I did a lot of research, talked to other birders, read articles and customer 
reviews on Amazon.com, B & H Photo and Video, and Eagle Optics. I narrowed it 
down to Swarovski 8 x 42 and Canon IS WP 10 x 42 (Image Stabilized and 
Waterproof) and had Eagle Optics send both with a credit card purchase. After 
trying both pairs in the field, and in spite of the fantastic Swarovski 
warranty, there was no question that the Canon was my choice. The image 
stabilization feature completely removes the "shake" that inevitably comes with 
a magnification of ten. They are bulkier and heavier than I would prefer 
(although I got used to this pretty quickly), they require two AA batteries 
that need to be replaced after a few days of birding several hours a day, the 
cover to the battery compartment is a bit cumbersome, and the barrels adjust a 
little differently because of the space in which the image stabilizer resides, 
but the image quality is so fantastic that I don't mind. I believe that t! 

 he image stabilization feature is proprietary to Canon, so none of the other 
"big name" binocular manufactures offers this, but I highly recommend giving 
them a try. Also, the waterproof feature allows them to be completely submerged 
(for removing sand and salt, for example), and eliminates concern about having 
them in the field during a sudden rainstorm. 


Good luck finding the best pair for you!

Val Biebuyck
Rutland

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2015, at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver  wrote:
> 
> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
> couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
> 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
> I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
> suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
> in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
> Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
> to be able to compare them side by side.
> 
> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
> stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
> and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
> Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
> 
> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent experience
> with what they typically have on display in the store?
> 
> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
> 
> Thanks,
> Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 22:30:34 -0400
The Wild Birds store at the Lab of Ornithology usually has a wide selection of 
bins and scopes. And a great venue for comparison trial. You can call 
“Walt” there and see what he’s got. Eagle option is good too of course. 
But if you’re looking to take a road trip, this could be a good bins and 
birds option. 

Scott
Moretown



> On Jul 28, 2015, at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver  wrote:
> 
> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
> couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
> 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
> I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
> suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
> in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
> Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
> to be able to compare them side by side.
> 
> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
> stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
> and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
> Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
> 
> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent experience
> with what they typically have on display in the store?
> 
> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
> 
> Thanks,
> Ken Copenhaver
> 
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:15:24 -0400
Totally endorse this.  I've never heard a single complaint about Eagle 
Optics in more than 25 years of birding, either.  I believe strongly in 
supporting local stores, but if you don't know what you want and/or 
there aren't any within many miles that have or can do what you need...

Also, the sales staff are incredibly knowledgeable, and Eagle doesn't 
pay them by commission, they're salaried.  (Or at least used to be, but 
I don't know why they'd change).  That's big in my book, both for the 
sales people and for customers.  I've actually had them direct me to 
less expensive equipment than I thought I needed.  How often does that 
happen?  This is a very good and very ethical outfit.

Jane
(Shoreham)

On 7/28/2015 7:34 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
> Ken,
>
> I really believe your best bet is Eagle Optics
> (www.eagleoptics.com).  They carry all those brands, and will ship
> you three (maybe more?) so you can compare them under the birding
> circumstances with which you are most familiar/comfortable.  Of
> course you will have provided a credit card number so that if you
> don't return any of the bins you'll be charged for them.  I have
> never heard anyone complain about their service, and the expeditious
> rate at which you'll receive the shipment.
>
> Best, Susan Fogleman  (I have no interest/connection with Eagle
> Optics other than that of very satisfied customer) Campton  NH
>
> On Jul 28, 2015, at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver wrote:
>
>> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames
>> a couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model,
>> purchased in 2001, and I would like to replace them with another
>> high-end binocular. I'm sure this has been discussed before, but
>> does anyone have any suggestions of where to go to actually hold
>> and look through several brands in the same store?  I'm probably
>> interested in Swarovski (of course), Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly
>> Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want to be able to compare
>> them side by side.
>>
>> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds
>> Unlimited stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand
>> (usually Swarovski) and usually one other, such as Vortex or
>> Pentax.  I also called Bird Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with
>> similar results.
>>
>> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent
>> experience with what they typically have on display in the store?
>>
>> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you
>> prefer.
>>
>> Thanks, Ken Copenhaver
>
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Jonathan Comeau <harrier22 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 00:54:58 +0000
I'd reccomend The Freeport Wild Bird Supply in Freeport, ME. Good
selection of binoculars, fantastic service. I bought my spotting scope
and tripod from them, and couldn't ask for friendlier service. They've
also got a nice feeder area to test drive binoculars.
 
Jonathan

On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 18:59:33 -0400, Ken Copenhaver  wrote:

       I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
couple of weekends ago). They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
in the same store? I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon. Since I wear glasses, I really want
to be able to compare them side by side.

I doubt if there is anyplace in VT. I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax. I also called Bird
Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.

Several people have suggested Cabela's. Does anyone have recent experience
with what they typically have on display in the store?

Any and all suggestions are welcome! Reply off-list if you prefer.

Thanks,
Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:46:13 -0400
I was going to suggest what Susan said.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Susan Fogleman" 
To: "VT Bird" 
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2015 5:34:33 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Shopping for Binoculars

Ken,

I really believe your best bet is Eagle Optics (www.eagleoptics.com). They 
carry all those brands, and will ship you three (maybe more?) so you can 
compare them under the birding circumstances with which you are most 
familiar/comfortable. Of course you will have provided a credit card number so 
that if you don't return any of the bins you'll be charged for them. I have 
never heard anyone complain about their service, and the expeditious rate at 
which you'll receive the shipment. 


Best,
Susan Fogleman (I have no interest/connection with Eagle Optics other than that 
of very satisfied customer) 

Campton  NH

On Jul 28, 2015, at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver wrote:

> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
> couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
> 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
> I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
> suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
> in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
> Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
> to be able to compare them side by side.
> 
> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
> stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
> and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
> Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
> 
> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent experience
> with what they typically have on display in the store?
> 
> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
> 
> Thanks,
> Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:34:33 -0400
Ken,

I really believe your best bet is Eagle Optics (www.eagleoptics.com). They 
carry all those brands, and will ship you three (maybe more?) so you can 
compare them under the birding circumstances with which you are most 
familiar/comfortable. Of course you will have provided a credit card number so 
that if you don't return any of the bins you'll be charged for them. I have 
never heard anyone complain about their service, and the expeditious rate at 
which you'll receive the shipment. 


Best,
Susan Fogleman (I have no interest/connection with Eagle Optics other than that 
of very satisfied customer) 

Campton  NH

On Jul 28, 2015, at 6:59 PM, Ken Copenhaver wrote:

> I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
> couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
> 2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
> I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
> suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
> in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
> Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
> to be able to compare them side by side.
> 
> I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
> stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
> and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
> Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.
> 
> Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent experience
> with what they typically have on display in the store?
> 
> Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.
> 
> Thanks,
> Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Shopping for Binoculars
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 18:59:33 -0400
I lost my good Nikon binoculars in a fire (my van went up in flames a
couple of weekends ago).  They were the high-end Nikon model, purchased in
2001, and I would like to replace them with another high-end binocular.
I'm sure this has been discussed before, but does anyone have any
suggestions of where to go to actually hold and look through several brands
in the same store?  I'm probably interested in Swarovski (of course),
Zeiss, or Leica, and possibly Nikon.  Since I wear glasses, I really want
to be able to compare them side by side.

I doubt if there is anyplace in VT.  I called several Wild Birds Unlimited
stores in NH and MA, and they each have one major brand (usually Swarovski)
and usually one other, such as Vortex or Pentax.  I also called Bird
Watchers General Store on Cape Cod with similar results.

Several people have suggested Cabela's.  Does anyone have recent experience
with what they typically have on display in the store?

Any and all suggestions are welcome!  Reply off-list if you prefer.

Thanks,
Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Osprey
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 15:09:41 -0400
I noticed that too but haven't seen any birds on it. Did you?

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 12:56:59 -0400, Sue  wrote:

       A new osprey nest seen on a power pole by the Leicester River in 
Salisbury, Rt7. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours
From: Frances Delwiche <frnywds15 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 13:10:55 -0400
In that case, if you still want to see puffins and aren't too fussy about which 
species they are, and if you don't mind a wee flight across the country, then I 
would highly recommend that you visit Haystack Rock off Cannon Beach, 80 miles 
west of (the other) Portland, on the Oregon Coast. There you can literally walk 
to within feet of a vast seabird paradise, no boat ride required! Last year, I 
observed many pelagic species at close range, including many Tufted Puffins. 

Fran
Subject: Osprey
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 12:56:59 -0400
A new osprey nest seen on a power pole by the Leicester River in Salisbury, 
Rt7. 


Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: NEK: Yellow-billed Cuckoo
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 08:44:43 -0400
Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the Lyndonville address this morning.

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours
From: Graham Bates <batesg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 07:30:11 -0400
One more post on this non-VT topic...if you don't have a lot of time and
still want to see puffins, my folks and I have done the boat tour to
Eastern Egg Rock out of Boothbay harbor twice, and both times got great
views of puffins, black guillemots, arctic terns, and roseate terns...along
with gannets and other sea birds. The best part is it's a 2 hour boat ride
(total), so you are back in time for lunch. Photographing the birds is
tough because you are on a moving boat the entire time, but if you want to
see puffins, it's a great tour. Good views of the coast as well, along with
seals and dolphins.

We went out with http://www.boothbayboattrips.com/

Graham

On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 2:36 PM, Ian Clark  wrote:

> First, thank you everyone for all the kind words about my puffin photos. If
> you missed the original post, I recently made it to Machias Seal Island to
> see the puffins and put some pix up at:
> http://www.ianclark.com/critters/puffins.php/
>
>
>
> Folks had several questions about seeing the puffins, I'm going to try to
> answer them all at once. If I miss something, feel free to email me again.
>
>
>
> Atlantic puffins nest on rocky shores of islands as far south as northern
> Maine. The largest colony of puffins in the US is on Machias Seal Island.
> The island is about 10 miles southeast of Cutler, ME in very northeastern
> Maine. The island is something like 14 acres at high tide and is home to a
> colony of roughly 6-8,000 puffins. There is a large colony of razorbills;
> we
> heard estimates of slightly larger than and slightly smaller than the
> puffin
> colony. Either way, there were lots of razorbills. Also making their home
> on
> the island are smaller colonies of common murres, arctic terns and common
> terns.
>
>
>
> The island is disputed territory between Canada and the US. Canada
> maintains
> the lighthouse on the island and most of the researchers that visit the
> island are from Atlantic Laboratory for Avian Research at the University of
> New Brunswick. Access for other visitor is tightly controlled.
>
> There are two charter companies allowed to land; Bold Coast Charters out of
> Cutler, ME: http://www.boldcoast.com/msi.htm and a Canadian operator out
> of
> Grand Manan
> http://www.seawatchtours.com/puffins-and-machias-seal-island.html. Each is
> allowed to land not more than 15 people, and for not longer than three
> hours. Both tour operators intend to land on the island on every trip, but
> that is weather dependent. Your trip may be cancelled entirely, or you may
> travel out and circle the island without going ashore if the seas prevent a
> safe landing.
>
>
>
> We went with Captain Andy Patterson of Bold Coast on July 15 and again on
> July 17. Bold Coast uses the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot lobster boat without
> the gear to catch lobsters to get to the island. There isn't a dock at
> either end of the trip. You get to and from the Barbara Frost by skiff. On
> the island, the skiff brings you alongside a concrete walkway into the
> water
> and you hop out. Not for the mobility impaired. Expect to get your shoes
> and
> pants wet. If you suffer from motion sickness, expect to suffer on the ride
> out and back.
>
>
>
> With the number of visitors limited, tickets sell out well in advance. Make
> your reservations in the winter - I'd suggest having them by early
> February.
> We paid $120 each per trip.
>
>
>
> Once on the island, you'll be herded to a patio outside the light keeper's
> cottage for a final briefing. There is a one-hole outhouse available here
> (and a head on the boat). You'll be split into groups of three or four and
> escorted to a blind.
>
>
>
> The blinds are simple plywood boxes, they vary in size. Best guess for the
> two we were in is about 30" wide by 6 foot long by 7 foot tall. Enough room
> for three of us with too many cameras, but we did bump each other often.
> There are 'windows' in each side of the blind, simply holes cut in the
> plywood. There are plywood covers over each; you slide the cover up to view
> or to stick your lens out. My 400mm F2.8 was slightly too large for a
> couple
> openings, I had to swap places with my blindmate. You'll be in the blind
> only an hour and 90 minutes.
>
>
>
> There were ~35 puffins within easy photo range on the first day, along with
> several dozen razorbills. On our second day, there were probably only 20
> puffins coming and going within reasonable photo range, with maybe 120
> razorbills and a handful of common murres.
>
> Going home is more or less the reverse of going out. You'll go back to the
> patio, then to the walkway to board the skiff and take the skiff to the
> Barbara Frost. If there's time, visibility and good weather, Andy may take
> you to see if the seals are basking on Gull Rock and/or for a cruise around
> the island. Our first day was too foggy to bother, the second day we found
> eight seals, then had good looks at hundreds of common murres and dozens of
> terns.
>
>
>
> There are hotels in greater Machias. We found the Sunset Point RV park in
> Lubec. One of us camped, the other two shared an apartment owned by the
> park. I didn't find much about hotels online; I'd suggest calling the
> chamber of commerce. There were several hotels, lots of B&Bs, cottages and
> campgrounds around that I didn't find online. There are restaurants in
> Machias and Lubec.
>
>
>
> For photos, a 200mm lens was sufficient. I had a 540mm that was nice for
> very tight headshots, but very much overkill.
>
>
>
> If you're flying into Maine, there is a modest airport in Bangor. Your best
> bet is probably Portland, ME. It might be worth checking fares into
> Manchester, NH. You might save enough to justify the extra drive.
>
> There are lots of natural areas in greater Culter, with lots of
> opportunities for birding. We didn't find many shorebirds around, probably
> due to the extreme tides. There are whale watching tours out of Lubec. We
> went and saw several dolphins, five or six minke whales, eagles, seals and
> sea birds. The Old Sow whirlpool in the Bay of Fundy is a popular part of
> the tour. The flow around three islands comes together and churns the water
> impressively. The northeastern most point of the contiguous US is in West
> Quoddy, ME, about 20 miles north of Cutler and has an accessible
> lighthouse.
>
>
>
>
> A quick disclaimer: my expertise is limited to what I learned while
> planning
> my one trip to greater Culter. Your mileage may vary. If you follow my
> advice and end up getting eaten by a squid, don't come crying to me.
>
>
>
> But, if I didn't answer your question(s), feel free to ask again.
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours
From: Nancy Mitiguy <nmitiguy AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 06:45:54 -0400
Going to Margarets? Congratulations on your DECAMPMENT! Goodbye second floor! 
Well, for now. Things are going here1/4 deck done, floor going in tomorrow. 
Gutter Guy, dont know when. Ill be decamping tomorrow to a river (too much 
noise with 2 saws going). Im pretty sure I heard a black-billed cuckoo Sat. N. 


On Jul 26, 2015, at 9:07 PM, Susan Werntgen  wrote:

> For those who may be interested, Road Scholar offers a birding trip to Lubec, 
Maine in May and August. I did the May trip and highly recommend! Seas were too 
rough to land on Machias Seal Island but we saw a multitude of birds. Captain 
Andy was superb. 

> 
> https://www.roadscholar.org/n/program/summary.aspx?did=1-7L8465
> 
> Check it out.
> 
> Thanks for the fabulous photos Ian!
> 
> Susan Werntgen
> Moretown
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jul 26, 2015, at 2:36 PM, Ian Clark  wrote:
>> 
>> First, thank you everyone for all the kind words about my puffin photos. If
>> you missed the original post, I recently made it to Machias Seal Island to
>> see the puffins and put some pix up at:
>> http://www.ianclark.com/critters/puffins.php/ 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Folks had several questions about seeing the puffins, I'm going to try to
>> answer them all at once. If I miss something, feel free to email me again.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Atlantic puffins nest on rocky shores of islands as far south as northern
>> Maine. The largest colony of puffins in the US is on Machias Seal Island.
>> The island is about 10 miles southeast of Cutler, ME in very northeastern
>> Maine. The island is something like 14 acres at high tide and is home to a
>> colony of roughly 6-8,000 puffins. There is a large colony of razorbills; we
>> heard estimates of slightly larger than and slightly smaller than the puffin
>> colony. Either way, there were lots of razorbills. Also making their home on
>> the island are smaller colonies of common murres, arctic terns and common
>> terns. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> The island is disputed territory between Canada and the US. Canada maintains
>> the lighthouse on the island and most of the researchers that visit the
>> island are from Atlantic Laboratory for Avian Research at the University of
>> New Brunswick. Access for other visitor is tightly controlled. 
>> 
>> There are two charter companies allowed to land; Bold Coast Charters out of
>> Cutler, ME: http://www.boldcoast.com/msi.htm and a Canadian operator out of
>> Grand Manan
>> http://www.seawatchtours.com/puffins-and-machias-seal-island.html. Each is
>> allowed to land not more than 15 people, and for not longer than three
>> hours. Both tour operators intend to land on the island on every trip, but
>> that is weather dependent. Your trip may be cancelled entirely, or you may
>> travel out and circle the island without going ashore if the seas prevent a
>> safe landing.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> We went with Captain Andy Patterson of Bold Coast on July 15 and again on
>> July 17. Bold Coast uses the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot lobster boat without
>> the gear to catch lobsters to get to the island. There isn't a dock at
>> either end of the trip. You get to and from the Barbara Frost by skiff. On
>> the island, the skiff brings you alongside a concrete walkway into the water
>> and you hop out. Not for the mobility impaired. Expect to get your shoes and
>> pants wet. If you suffer from motion sickness, expect to suffer on the ride
>> out and back. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> With the number of visitors limited, tickets sell out well in advance. Make
>> your reservations in the winter - I'd suggest having them by early February.
>> We paid $120 each per trip. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Once on the island, you'll be herded to a patio outside the light keeper's
>> cottage for a final briefing. There is a one-hole outhouse available here
>> (and a head on the boat). You'll be split into groups of three or four and
>> escorted to a blind. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> The blinds are simple plywood boxes, they vary in size. Best guess for the
>> two we were in is about 30" wide by 6 foot long by 7 foot tall. Enough room
>> for three of us with too many cameras, but we did bump each other often.
>> There are 'windows' in each side of the blind, simply holes cut in the
>> plywood. There are plywood covers over each; you slide the cover up to view
>> or to stick your lens out. My 400mm F2.8 was slightly too large for a couple
>> openings, I had to swap places with my blindmate. You'll be in the blind
>> only an hour and 90 minutes. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> There were ~35 puffins within easy photo range on the first day, along with
>> several dozen razorbills. On our second day, there were probably only 20
>> puffins coming and going within reasonable photo range, with maybe 120
>> razorbills and a handful of common murres. 
>> 
>> Going home is more or less the reverse of going out. You'll go back to the
>> patio, then to the walkway to board the skiff and take the skiff to the
>> Barbara Frost. If there's time, visibility and good weather, Andy may take
>> you to see if the seals are basking on Gull Rock and/or for a cruise around
>> the island. Our first day was too foggy to bother, the second day we found
>> eight seals, then had good looks at hundreds of common murres and dozens of
>> terns. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> There are hotels in greater Machias. We found the Sunset Point RV park in
>> Lubec. One of us camped, the other two shared an apartment owned by the
>> park. I didn't find much about hotels online; I'd suggest calling the
>> chamber of commerce. There were several hotels, lots of B&Bs, cottages and
>> campgrounds around that I didn't find online. There are restaurants in
>> Machias and Lubec. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> For photos, a 200mm lens was sufficient. I had a 540mm that was nice for
>> very tight headshots, but very much overkill. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> If you're flying into Maine, there is a modest airport in Bangor. Your best
>> bet is probably Portland, ME. It might be worth checking fares into
>> Manchester, NH. You might save enough to justify the extra drive. 
>> 
>> There are lots of natural areas in greater Culter, with lots of
>> opportunities for birding. We didn't find many shorebirds around, probably
>> due to the extreme tides. There are whale watching tours out of Lubec. We
>> went and saw several dolphins, five or six minke whales, eagles, seals and
>> sea birds. The Old Sow whirlpool in the Bay of Fundy is a popular part of
>> the tour. The flow around three islands comes together and churns the water
>> impressively. The northeastern most point of the contiguous US is in West
>> Quoddy, ME, about 20 miles north of Cutler and has an accessible lighthouse.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> A quick disclaimer: my expertise is limited to what I learned while planning
>> my one trip to greater Culter. Your mileage may vary. If you follow my
>> advice and end up getting eaten by a squid, don't come crying to me. 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> But, if I didn't answer your question(s), feel free to ask again.
>> 
>> 
Subject: Survey on Exotic Birds
From: John Sutton <suttonjoh AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 05:54:28 -0400
Hi everyone,

A colleague of mine, Corey Callaghan, has just completed his masters thesis
titled "The Diet of the Purple Swamphen in south Florida and Invasion
Pathways of Nonnative Avian Species in Florida". For the second chapter of
his thesis which was theoretically based, Corey attempted to use eBird data
on the 15 established nonnative avian species in Florida. Throughout this
research many questions were stimulated in both regards to how eBirders
enter exotic birds into eBird and how that affects his modeling and, more
generally, how birders view exotic birds and what this means from a
conservation perspective. This has led Corey to design this survey in an
attempt to get a better grasp of birders' views on exotic birds. He is
asking fellow birders to take a quick 2 minute survey, and also possibly
pass the link along to birding friends.

Survey 

Many thanks, in anticipation.

John Sutton
Corinth, Orange Co.
Subject: Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours
From: Susan Werntgen <swerntgen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 21:07:29 -0400
For those who may be interested, Road Scholar offers a birding trip to Lubec, 
Maine in May and August. I did the May trip and highly recommend! Seas were too 
rough to land on Machias Seal Island but we saw a multitude of birds. Captain 
Andy was superb. 


https://www.roadscholar.org/n/program/summary.aspx?did=1-7L8465

Check it out.

Thanks for the fabulous photos Ian!

Susan Werntgen
Moretown

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 26, 2015, at 2:36 PM, Ian Clark  wrote:
> 
> First, thank you everyone for all the kind words about my puffin photos. If
> you missed the original post, I recently made it to Machias Seal Island to
> see the puffins and put some pix up at:
> http://www.ianclark.com/critters/puffins.php/ 
> 
> 
> 
> Folks had several questions about seeing the puffins, I'm going to try to
> answer them all at once. If I miss something, feel free to email me again.
> 
> 
> 
> Atlantic puffins nest on rocky shores of islands as far south as northern
> Maine. The largest colony of puffins in the US is on Machias Seal Island.
> The island is about 10 miles southeast of Cutler, ME in very northeastern
> Maine. The island is something like 14 acres at high tide and is home to a
> colony of roughly 6-8,000 puffins. There is a large colony of razorbills; we
> heard estimates of slightly larger than and slightly smaller than the puffin
> colony. Either way, there were lots of razorbills. Also making their home on
> the island are smaller colonies of common murres, arctic terns and common
> terns. 
> 
> 
> 
> The island is disputed territory between Canada and the US. Canada maintains
> the lighthouse on the island and most of the researchers that visit the
> island are from Atlantic Laboratory for Avian Research at the University of
> New Brunswick. Access for other visitor is tightly controlled. 
> 
> There are two charter companies allowed to land; Bold Coast Charters out of
> Cutler, ME: http://www.boldcoast.com/msi.htm and a Canadian operator out of
> Grand Manan
> http://www.seawatchtours.com/puffins-and-machias-seal-island.html. Each is
> allowed to land not more than 15 people, and for not longer than three
> hours. Both tour operators intend to land on the island on every trip, but
> that is weather dependent. Your trip may be cancelled entirely, or you may
> travel out and circle the island without going ashore if the seas prevent a
> safe landing.
> 
> 
> 
> We went with Captain Andy Patterson of Bold Coast on July 15 and again on
> July 17. Bold Coast uses the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot lobster boat without
> the gear to catch lobsters to get to the island. There isn't a dock at
> either end of the trip. You get to and from the Barbara Frost by skiff. On
> the island, the skiff brings you alongside a concrete walkway into the water
> and you hop out. Not for the mobility impaired. Expect to get your shoes and
> pants wet. If you suffer from motion sickness, expect to suffer on the ride
> out and back. 
> 
> 
> 
> With the number of visitors limited, tickets sell out well in advance. Make
> your reservations in the winter - I'd suggest having them by early February.
> We paid $120 each per trip. 
> 
> 
> 
> Once on the island, you'll be herded to a patio outside the light keeper's
> cottage for a final briefing. There is a one-hole outhouse available here
> (and a head on the boat). You'll be split into groups of three or four and
> escorted to a blind. 
> 
> 
> 
> The blinds are simple plywood boxes, they vary in size. Best guess for the
> two we were in is about 30" wide by 6 foot long by 7 foot tall. Enough room
> for three of us with too many cameras, but we did bump each other often.
> There are 'windows' in each side of the blind, simply holes cut in the
> plywood. There are plywood covers over each; you slide the cover up to view
> or to stick your lens out. My 400mm F2.8 was slightly too large for a couple
> openings, I had to swap places with my blindmate. You'll be in the blind
> only an hour and 90 minutes. 
> 
> 
> 
> There were ~35 puffins within easy photo range on the first day, along with
> several dozen razorbills. On our second day, there were probably only 20
> puffins coming and going within reasonable photo range, with maybe 120
> razorbills and a handful of common murres. 
> 
> Going home is more or less the reverse of going out. You'll go back to the
> patio, then to the walkway to board the skiff and take the skiff to the
> Barbara Frost. If there's time, visibility and good weather, Andy may take
> you to see if the seals are basking on Gull Rock and/or for a cruise around
> the island. Our first day was too foggy to bother, the second day we found
> eight seals, then had good looks at hundreds of common murres and dozens of
> terns. 
> 
> 
> 
> There are hotels in greater Machias. We found the Sunset Point RV park in
> Lubec. One of us camped, the other two shared an apartment owned by the
> park. I didn't find much about hotels online; I'd suggest calling the
> chamber of commerce. There were several hotels, lots of B&Bs, cottages and
> campgrounds around that I didn't find online. There are restaurants in
> Machias and Lubec. 
> 
> 
> 
> For photos, a 200mm lens was sufficient. I had a 540mm that was nice for
> very tight headshots, but very much overkill. 
> 
> 
> 
> If you're flying into Maine, there is a modest airport in Bangor. Your best
> bet is probably Portland, ME. It might be worth checking fares into
> Manchester, NH. You might save enough to justify the extra drive. 
> 
> There are lots of natural areas in greater Culter, with lots of
> opportunities for birding. We didn't find many shorebirds around, probably
> due to the extreme tides. There are whale watching tours out of Lubec. We
> went and saw several dolphins, five or six minke whales, eagles, seals and
> sea birds. The Old Sow whirlpool in the Bay of Fundy is a popular part of
> the tour. The flow around three islands comes together and churns the water
> impressively. The northeastern most point of the contiguous US is in West
> Quoddy, ME, about 20 miles north of Cutler and has an accessible lighthouse.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> A quick disclaimer: my expertise is limited to what I learned while planning
> my one trip to greater Culter. Your mileage may vary. If you follow my
> advice and end up getting eaten by a squid, don't come crying to me. 
> 
> 
> 
> But, if I didn't answer your question(s), feel free to ask again.
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Ian Clark <recipes AT IANCLARK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:55:21 -0400
Oops, yes you are correct. It is Sigma & Tamron. I told you I probably wasn't 
the best source ;) 


You're also correct about wanting a fast lens with your extender. First the 
1.4x cuts your max aperture a full stop; the 2x eats up two stops. Second, the 
focusing on the 7D II is limited with extenders - it can't use all the focus 
points. IIRC, with some lenses with smaller than F2.8 max aperture, it fails 
completely. Best check the manual before buying. 


I handhold my 7D II with battery grip, with the 400mm F2.8 with the 1.4x 
extender in my kayak. I haven't weighed this setup, but I'd bet it was 12+ 
pounds. The image stabilization is amazing, I wouldn't have thought I'd get 
away with what I do. That said, there are days where 60-70% of my shots go in 
the trash on the first pass because they weren't sharp. Unless you're a big 
guy, handholding something like this is going to be very tough. 


And a last thought, you may be able to rent some of this gear from someplace 
like http://www.borrowlenses.com. Never used them, but it might be worth 
spending a few bucks to take a lens for a week long test drive before shelling 
out to buy it. 



-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Isis Erb
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2015 5:18 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera

Ian -

Did you mean Sigma and Tamron for the 150-600mm? I'm not sure if Tokina has a 
new 150-600mm out, whereas Sigma and Tamron both do. Sigma offers two - 
Contemporary and Sport, at about $1000 difference. Basic upshot - Sport is 
totally weather sealed while Contemporary isn't. Some difference in the 
materials used for each lens - hence the almost two pound difference. 


I'm waffling on an extender because I don't have a really fast lens, and from 
what I've read and heard you really want at least an f/4 to be able to get the 
most out of the extender - unless it is a bright, sunny day and your subject is 
exposed versus in the foliage. 


Having gone through the whole buying a new camera and lens fairly recently, and 
spending months doing my research I second Ian's suggestion of buying from a 
reputable company that will allow you to return it. I also use B&H and have 
been very happy with them. I have the Canon 7D Mark II with a 400mm f/5.6 and 
love it. Of course I'd have loved to get a faster lens, and even longer, but I 
simply don't have the money. And I went with the 400mm over the Sigma Sport 
150-600mm because of the weight. But that is my issue 

- I've read that lots of folks have no problem doing hand-held shots of birds 
with a 7+ pound setup... So it all comes down to what you want, what you feel 
you can live with, what you think you'll need down the road, and of course what 
your budget is. Its so very easy to overspend so quickly you won't even notice 
it until the bill arrives! And there will still always be more that sounds 
perfect for what you want. 


Just my 2¢ - and I have hardly any real life photography experience, so take 
all this with a large grain of salt or something. Happy hunting & enjoy those 
birds! 

~Isis

On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 3:18 PM, Ian Clark  wrote:

> Hi -
>
> Sorry, been away a couple days. Missed the first part of the 
> discussion, what sort of budget are we talking about?
>
> I'm probably not much help. Years ago, I figured out that no one makes 
> a perfect camera or lens. I've got enough invested in Canon gear so 
> that I'm stuck with them. When I need to replace something, I usually 
> just ask B&H what the new model is and buy it. Sad, eh?
>
> That said, a few thoughts:
>
> Put your money in your lenses. A sharp lens on a lower end camera will 
> give you better results than a cheap lens on the fanciest camera. 
> DSLRs have come a long, long way. Every time I spend a few minutes 
> looking at the lower end models, I'm amazed at what they pack in for 
> the $$. You may do well to step up a model or two from the most basic 
> if your budget allows. After that, there's a notable jump in dollars 
> needed to get to the higher-end cameras.
>
> If you're thinking of doing a lot of photography down the road, there 
> are advantages of sticking with Canon. And, I've heard rumors of 
> people getting images with Nikons, but, of course, remain suspicious. 
> Canon & Nikon make more specialized gear than the other manufactures, 
> they probably have an off-the-shelf solution to whatever you're trying 
> to do. And, if you pay your protection $$ to their Profession 
> Services, they take very good care of you when you need something 
> serviced or a loaner.
>
> Now, having suggested sticking with the big names, I'll contradict 
> myself.... Sigma and Tokina have 150-600mm lenses in the $1,000-1,200 
> range (higher than mid-range?). I've got friends with both of those. 
> The images they're getting are wonderful. And nearly impossible to 
> tell apart from the images I get with my Canon 400mm F2.8 for which I 
> paid more than ten times as much :(
>
> For birding, you can't buy a long enough lens. 300mm is probably the 
> minimum.
>
> I've never been a fan of extenders. With my 400mm, I bought Canon's 
> latest 1.4x and have to say it is wonderful - can't see any loss of 
> quality with it. Probably incrementally slower to focus, but not 
> noticeable in the field shooting birds or sports. I went back and 
> bought Canon's latest 2x. It is a huge improvement over the earlier 
> extenders, but is obviously slower to focus and nowhere near as sharp 
> at longer distances. The 2x is painfully slow to focus with my earlier 
> cameras - with an EOS 50D  it focuses quickly enough for landscapes, 
> but useless for sports and wildlife. Much, much better on my 5D II and 
> 7D II bodies. I'd be very cautious using an extender with anything but the 
top of the line zooms or prime long glass. 

>
> The best advice I can give is to buy the gear from somewhere that will 
> let you return it. Buy it and try it. If it does what you want, you win.
>
> irc
>
>
> ----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of 
> tfberriman
> Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:08 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
>
> I bet Ian Clark can give you all the advice you need on a Canon DSLR 
> and lenses. He will tell you what will work and what not to waste your 
> money on for nature photography. Contact him through his earlier post.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
Subject: Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:33:10 -0400
Jeff,

Sigma recently released a 1.4 and a 2.0 extender for both their
Contemporary and Sport 150-600mm lens - for the Canon, Nikon, or Sigma
mount.

Hope that helps. They run between $400-$500.

Happy Shooting,
Isis

On Sunday, July 26, 2015, Jeffrey Sonshine 
wrote:

> Ian,
>
> Thanks for your valuable info on cameras and lenses.  I've been interested
> in the Sigma 150-600mm lens.  Will a 1.4 extender work with that lens?  i
> suppose it depends on what camera body i end up with.
>
> Jeff
> On Jul 26, 2015 3:18 PM, "Ian Clark" >
> wrote:
>
> > Hi -
> >
> > Sorry, been away a couple days. Missed the first part of the discussion,
> > what sort of budget are we talking about?
> >
> > I'm probably not much help. Years ago, I figured out that no one makes a
> > perfect camera or lens. I've got enough invested in Canon gear so that
> I'm
> > stuck with them. When I need to replace something, I usually just ask B&H
> > what the new model is and buy it. Sad, eh?
> >
> > That said, a few thoughts:
> >
> > Put your money in your lenses. A sharp lens on a lower end camera will
> give
> > you better results than a cheap lens on the fanciest camera. DSLRs have
> > come
> > a long, long way. Every time I spend a few minutes looking at the lower
> end
> > models, I'm amazed at what they pack in for the $$. You may do well to
> step
> > up a model or two from the most basic if your budget allows. After that,
> > there's a notable jump in dollars needed to get to the higher-end
> cameras.
> >
> > If you're thinking of doing a lot of photography down the road, there are
> > advantages of sticking with Canon. And, I've heard rumors of people
> getting
> > images with Nikons, but, of course, remain suspicious. Canon & Nikon make
> > more specialized gear than the other manufactures, they probably have an
> > off-the-shelf solution to whatever you're trying to do. And, if you pay
> > your
> > protection $$ to their Profession Services, they take very good care of
> you
> > when you need something serviced or a loaner.
> >
> > Now, having suggested sticking with the big names, I'll contradict
> > myself.... Sigma and Tokina have 150-600mm lenses in the $1,000-1,200
> range
> > (higher than mid-range?). I've got friends with both of those. The images
> > they're getting are wonderful. And nearly impossible to tell apart from
> the
> > images I get with my Canon 400mm F2.8 for which I paid more than ten
> times
> > as much :(
> >
> > For birding, you can't buy a long enough lens. 300mm is probably the
> > minimum.
> >
> > I've never been a fan of extenders. With my 400mm, I bought Canon's
> latest
> > 1.4x and have to say it is wonderful - can't see any loss of quality with
> > it. Probably incrementally slower to focus, but not noticeable in the
> field
> > shooting birds or sports. I went back and bought Canon's latest 2x. It
> is a
> > huge improvement over the earlier extenders, but is obviously slower to
> > focus and nowhere near as sharp at longer distances. The 2x is painfully
> > slow to focus with my earlier cameras - with an EOS 50D  it focuses
> quickly
> > enough for landscapes, but useless for sports and wildlife. Much, much
> > better on my 5D II and 7D II bodies. I'd be very cautious using an
> extender
> > with anything but the top of the line zooms or prime long glass.
> >
> > The best advice I can give is to buy the gear from somewhere that will
> let
> > you return it. Buy it and try it. If it does what you want, you win.
> >
> > irc
> >
> >
> > ----Original Message-----
> > From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu ] On
> Behalf Of tfberriman
> > Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:08 PM
> > To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
> > Subject: [VTBIRD] Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
> >
> > I bet Ian Clark can give you all the advice you need on a Canon DSLR and
> > lenses. He will tell you what will work and what not to waste your money
> on
> > for nature photography. Contact him through his earlier post.
> >
> >
> >
> > Tom Berriman
> >
>
Subject: Re: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:39:38 -0400
Hi Maeve,

Great job on the Bird Hikes List!  Great resource.  I happen to have walked
3 of them just in the past 5 days while camping at Maidstone State Park:
Moose Bog, Peanut Dam Rd, and the North Branch Trail loop (felt like more
than 4 miles!).

Two suggestions for my area, for a future edition:

Franklin County Airport: Walk the gravel road outside the south and west
fences of the airport.  Best in June and early July.  By day: Grasshopper
and Vesper Sparrow easily seen; Field Sparrow usually heard.  By
evening/night: Whip-poor-will and Woodcock reliable to the north of the
airport.

Mud Creek WMA (Alburgh): Hike on a former railroad bed through the marsh.
Many ducks during spring migration can be viewed at close range.  Virginia
Rail possible.  Closed during duck hunting season.  (More info is probably
available from other sources.)

--Ken

On Thu, Jul 23, 2015 at 11:15 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks for
> birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The
> list is now up on the North Branch Nature Center website!
>
> Here are two links:
>
> to "resources" page:
> http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html
>
> to the pdf:
>
> http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf
>
> The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought – and I’m
> sure there are many more ideas out there that could be added. Eventually,
> there might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos, maps, etc.
> directly, but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC or to me.
>
> There’s plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds
> leave, so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations!
>
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:09:42 -0400
Ian,

Thanks for your valuable info on cameras and lenses.  I've been interested
in the Sigma 150-600mm lens.  Will a 1.4 extender work with that lens?  i
suppose it depends on what camera body i end up with.

Jeff
On Jul 26, 2015 3:18 PM, "Ian Clark"  wrote:

> Hi -
>
> Sorry, been away a couple days. Missed the first part of the discussion,
> what sort of budget are we talking about?
>
> I'm probably not much help. Years ago, I figured out that no one makes a
> perfect camera or lens. I've got enough invested in Canon gear so that I'm
> stuck with them. When I need to replace something, I usually just ask B&H
> what the new model is and buy it. Sad, eh?
>
> That said, a few thoughts:
>
> Put your money in your lenses. A sharp lens on a lower end camera will give
> you better results than a cheap lens on the fanciest camera. DSLRs have
> come
> a long, long way. Every time I spend a few minutes looking at the lower end
> models, I'm amazed at what they pack in for the $$. You may do well to step
> up a model or two from the most basic if your budget allows. After that,
> there's a notable jump in dollars needed to get to the higher-end cameras.
>
> If you're thinking of doing a lot of photography down the road, there are
> advantages of sticking with Canon. And, I've heard rumors of people getting
> images with Nikons, but, of course, remain suspicious. Canon & Nikon make
> more specialized gear than the other manufactures, they probably have an
> off-the-shelf solution to whatever you're trying to do. And, if you pay
> your
> protection $$ to their Profession Services, they take very good care of you
> when you need something serviced or a loaner.
>
> Now, having suggested sticking with the big names, I'll contradict
> myself.... Sigma and Tokina have 150-600mm lenses in the $1,000-1,200 range
> (higher than mid-range?). I've got friends with both of those. The images
> they're getting are wonderful. And nearly impossible to tell apart from the
> images I get with my Canon 400mm F2.8 for which I paid more than ten times
> as much :(
>
> For birding, you can't buy a long enough lens. 300mm is probably the
> minimum.
>
> I've never been a fan of extenders. With my 400mm, I bought Canon's latest
> 1.4x and have to say it is wonderful - can't see any loss of quality with
> it. Probably incrementally slower to focus, but not noticeable in the field
> shooting birds or sports. I went back and bought Canon's latest 2x. It is a
> huge improvement over the earlier extenders, but is obviously slower to
> focus and nowhere near as sharp at longer distances. The 2x is painfully
> slow to focus with my earlier cameras - with an EOS 50D  it focuses quickly
> enough for landscapes, but useless for sports and wildlife. Much, much
> better on my 5D II and 7D II bodies. I'd be very cautious using an extender
> with anything but the top of the line zooms or prime long glass.
>
> The best advice I can give is to buy the gear from somewhere that will let
> you return it. Buy it and try it. If it does what you want, you win.
>
> irc
>
>
> ----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of tfberriman
> Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:08 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
>
> I bet Ian Clark can give you all the advice you need on a Canon DSLR and
> lenses. He will tell you what will work and what not to waste your money on
> for nature photography. Contact him through his earlier post.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
Subject: Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:17:47 -0400
Ian -

Did you mean Sigma and Tamron for the 150-600mm? I'm not sure if Tokina has
a new 150-600mm out, whereas Sigma and Tamron both do. Sigma offers two -
Contemporary and Sport, at about $1000 difference. Basic upshot - Sport is
totally weather sealed while Contemporary isn't. Some difference in the
materials used for each lens - hence the almost two pound difference.

I'm waffling on an extender because I don't have a really fast lens, and
from what I've read and heard you really want at least an f/4 to be able to
get the most out of the extender - unless it is a bright, sunny day and
your subject is exposed versus in the foliage.

Having gone through the whole buying a new camera and lens fairly recently,
and spending months doing my research I second Ian's suggestion of buying
from a reputable company that will allow you to return it. I also use B&H
and have been very happy with them. I have the Canon 7D Mark II with a
400mm f/5.6 and love it. Of course I'd have loved to get a faster lens, and
even longer, but I simply don't have the money. And I went with the 400mm
over the Sigma Sport 150-600mm because of the weight. But that is my issue
- I've read that lots of folks have no problem doing hand-held shots of
birds with a 7+ pound setup... So it all comes down to what you want, what
you feel you can live with, what you think you'll need down the road, and
of course what your budget is. Its so very easy to overspend so quickly you
won't even notice it until the bill arrives! And there will still always be
more that sounds perfect for what you want.

Just my 2¢ - and I have hardly any real life photography experience, so
take all this with a large grain of salt or something. Happy hunting &
enjoy those birds!
~Isis

On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 3:18 PM, Ian Clark  wrote:

> Hi -
>
> Sorry, been away a couple days. Missed the first part of the discussion,
> what sort of budget are we talking about?
>
> I'm probably not much help. Years ago, I figured out that no one makes a
> perfect camera or lens. I've got enough invested in Canon gear so that I'm
> stuck with them. When I need to replace something, I usually just ask B&H
> what the new model is and buy it. Sad, eh?
>
> That said, a few thoughts:
>
> Put your money in your lenses. A sharp lens on a lower end camera will give
> you better results than a cheap lens on the fanciest camera. DSLRs have
> come
> a long, long way. Every time I spend a few minutes looking at the lower end
> models, I'm amazed at what they pack in for the $$. You may do well to step
> up a model or two from the most basic if your budget allows. After that,
> there's a notable jump in dollars needed to get to the higher-end cameras.
>
> If you're thinking of doing a lot of photography down the road, there are
> advantages of sticking with Canon. And, I've heard rumors of people getting
> images with Nikons, but, of course, remain suspicious. Canon & Nikon make
> more specialized gear than the other manufactures, they probably have an
> off-the-shelf solution to whatever you're trying to do. And, if you pay
> your
> protection $$ to their Profession Services, they take very good care of you
> when you need something serviced or a loaner.
>
> Now, having suggested sticking with the big names, I'll contradict
> myself.... Sigma and Tokina have 150-600mm lenses in the $1,000-1,200 range
> (higher than mid-range?). I've got friends with both of those. The images
> they're getting are wonderful. And nearly impossible to tell apart from the
> images I get with my Canon 400mm F2.8 for which I paid more than ten times
> as much :(
>
> For birding, you can't buy a long enough lens. 300mm is probably the
> minimum.
>
> I've never been a fan of extenders. With my 400mm, I bought Canon's latest
> 1.4x and have to say it is wonderful - can't see any loss of quality with
> it. Probably incrementally slower to focus, but not noticeable in the field
> shooting birds or sports. I went back and bought Canon's latest 2x. It is a
> huge improvement over the earlier extenders, but is obviously slower to
> focus and nowhere near as sharp at longer distances. The 2x is painfully
> slow to focus with my earlier cameras - with an EOS 50D  it focuses quickly
> enough for landscapes, but useless for sports and wildlife. Much, much
> better on my 5D II and 7D II bodies. I'd be very cautious using an extender
> with anything but the top of the line zooms or prime long glass.
>
> The best advice I can give is to buy the gear from somewhere that will let
> you return it. Buy it and try it. If it does what you want, you win.
>
> irc
>
>
> ----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of tfberriman
> Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:08 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
>
> I bet Ian Clark can give you all the advice you need on a Canon DSLR and
> lenses. He will tell you what will work and what not to waste your money on
> for nature photography. Contact him through his earlier post.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
Subject: Re: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours
From: Mark Paul <mrpbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 15:20:11 -0400
and if the smell of diesel exacerbates your motion sickness, don't waste
your time.
I never got my head out of a bucket for the entire trip.


On Sun, Jul 26, 2015 at 2:36 PM, Ian Clark  wrote:

> First, thank you everyone for all the kind words about my puffin photos. If
> you missed the original post, I recently made it to Machias Seal Island to
> see the puffins and put some pix up at:
> http://www.ianclark.com/critters/puffins.php/
>
>
>
> Folks had several questions about seeing the puffins, I'm going to try to
> answer them all at once. If I miss something, feel free to email me again.
>
>
>
> Atlantic puffins nest on rocky shores of islands as far south as northern
> Maine. The largest colony of puffins in the US is on Machias Seal Island.
> The island is about 10 miles southeast of Cutler, ME in very northeastern
> Maine. The island is something like 14 acres at high tide and is home to a
> colony of roughly 6-8,000 puffins. There is a large colony of razorbills;
> we
> heard estimates of slightly larger than and slightly smaller than the
> puffin
> colony. Either way, there were lots of razorbills. Also making their home
> on
> the island are smaller colonies of common murres, arctic terns and common
> terns.
>
>
>
> The island is disputed territory between Canada and the US. Canada
> maintains
> the lighthouse on the island and most of the researchers that visit the
> island are from Atlantic Laboratory for Avian Research at the University of
> New Brunswick. Access for other visitor is tightly controlled.
>
> There are two charter companies allowed to land; Bold Coast Charters out of
> Cutler, ME: http://www.boldcoast.com/msi.htm and a Canadian operator out
> of
> Grand Manan
> http://www.seawatchtours.com/puffins-and-machias-seal-island.html. Each is
> allowed to land not more than 15 people, and for not longer than three
> hours. Both tour operators intend to land on the island on every trip, but
> that is weather dependent. Your trip may be cancelled entirely, or you may
> travel out and circle the island without going ashore if the seas prevent a
> safe landing.
>
>
>
> We went with Captain Andy Patterson of Bold Coast on July 15 and again on
> July 17. Bold Coast uses the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot lobster boat without
> the gear to catch lobsters to get to the island. There isn't a dock at
> either end of the trip. You get to and from the Barbara Frost by skiff. On
> the island, the skiff brings you alongside a concrete walkway into the
> water
> and you hop out. Not for the mobility impaired. Expect to get your shoes
> and
> pants wet. If you suffer from motion sickness, expect to suffer on the ride
> out and back.
>
>
>
> With the number of visitors limited, tickets sell out well in advance. Make
> your reservations in the winter - I'd suggest having them by early
> February.
> We paid $120 each per trip.
>
>
>
> Once on the island, you'll be herded to a patio outside the light keeper's
> cottage for a final briefing. There is a one-hole outhouse available here
> (and a head on the boat). You'll be split into groups of three or four and
> escorted to a blind.
>
>
>
> The blinds are simple plywood boxes, they vary in size. Best guess for the
> two we were in is about 30" wide by 6 foot long by 7 foot tall. Enough room
> for three of us with too many cameras, but we did bump each other often.
> There are 'windows' in each side of the blind, simply holes cut in the
> plywood. There are plywood covers over each; you slide the cover up to view
> or to stick your lens out. My 400mm F2.8 was slightly too large for a
> couple
> openings, I had to swap places with my blindmate. You'll be in the blind
> only an hour and 90 minutes.
>
>
>
> There were ~35 puffins within easy photo range on the first day, along with
> several dozen razorbills. On our second day, there were probably only 20
> puffins coming and going within reasonable photo range, with maybe 120
> razorbills and a handful of common murres.
>
> Going home is more or less the reverse of going out. You'll go back to the
> patio, then to the walkway to board the skiff and take the skiff to the
> Barbara Frost. If there's time, visibility and good weather, Andy may take
> you to see if the seals are basking on Gull Rock and/or for a cruise around
> the island. Our first day was too foggy to bother, the second day we found
> eight seals, then had good looks at hundreds of common murres and dozens of
> terns.
>
>
>
> There are hotels in greater Machias. We found the Sunset Point RV park in
> Lubec. One of us camped, the other two shared an apartment owned by the
> park. I didn't find much about hotels online; I'd suggest calling the
> chamber of commerce. There were several hotels, lots of B&Bs, cottages and
> campgrounds around that I didn't find online. There are restaurants in
> Machias and Lubec.
>
>
>
> For photos, a 200mm lens was sufficient. I had a 540mm that was nice for
> very tight headshots, but very much overkill.
>
>
>
> If you're flying into Maine, there is a modest airport in Bangor. Your best
> bet is probably Portland, ME. It might be worth checking fares into
> Manchester, NH. You might save enough to justify the extra drive.
>
> There are lots of natural areas in greater Culter, with lots of
> opportunities for birding. We didn't find many shorebirds around, probably
> due to the extreme tides. There are whale watching tours out of Lubec. We
> went and saw several dolphins, five or six minke whales, eagles, seals and
> sea birds. The Old Sow whirlpool in the Bay of Fundy is a popular part of
> the tour. The flow around three islands comes together and churns the water
> impressively. The northeastern most point of the contiguous US is in West
> Quoddy, ME, about 20 miles north of Cutler and has an accessible
> lighthouse.
>
>
>
>
> A quick disclaimer: my expertise is limited to what I learned while
> planning
> my one trip to greater Culter. Your mileage may vary. If you follow my
> advice and end up getting eaten by a squid, don't come crying to me.
>
>
>
> But, if I didn't answer your question(s), feel free to ask again.
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Ian Clark <recipes AT IANCLARK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 15:18:30 -0400
Hi -

Sorry, been away a couple days. Missed the first part of the discussion,
what sort of budget are we talking about?

I'm probably not much help. Years ago, I figured out that no one makes a
perfect camera or lens. I've got enough invested in Canon gear so that I'm
stuck with them. When I need to replace something, I usually just ask B&H
what the new model is and buy it. Sad, eh? 

That said, a few thoughts:

Put your money in your lenses. A sharp lens on a lower end camera will give
you better results than a cheap lens on the fanciest camera. DSLRs have come
a long, long way. Every time I spend a few minutes looking at the lower end
models, I'm amazed at what they pack in for the $$. You may do well to step
up a model or two from the most basic if your budget allows. After that,
there's a notable jump in dollars needed to get to the higher-end cameras. 

If you're thinking of doing a lot of photography down the road, there are
advantages of sticking with Canon. And, I've heard rumors of people getting
images with Nikons, but, of course, remain suspicious. Canon & Nikon make
more specialized gear than the other manufactures, they probably have an
off-the-shelf solution to whatever you're trying to do. And, if you pay your
protection $$ to their Profession Services, they take very good care of you
when you need something serviced or a loaner. 

Now, having suggested sticking with the big names, I'll contradict
myself.... Sigma and Tokina have 150-600mm lenses in the $1,000-1,200 range
(higher than mid-range?). I've got friends with both of those. The images
they're getting are wonderful. And nearly impossible to tell apart from the
images I get with my Canon 400mm F2.8 for which I paid more than ten times
as much :( 

For birding, you can't buy a long enough lens. 300mm is probably the
minimum. 

I've never been a fan of extenders. With my 400mm, I bought Canon's latest
1.4x and have to say it is wonderful - can't see any loss of quality with
it. Probably incrementally slower to focus, but not noticeable in the field
shooting birds or sports. I went back and bought Canon's latest 2x. It is a
huge improvement over the earlier extenders, but is obviously slower to
focus and nowhere near as sharp at longer distances. The 2x is painfully
slow to focus with my earlier cameras - with an EOS 50D  it focuses quickly
enough for landscapes, but useless for sports and wildlife. Much, much
better on my 5D II and 7D II bodies. I'd be very cautious using an extender
with anything but the top of the line zooms or prime long glass. 

The best advice I can give is to buy the gear from somewhere that will let
you return it. Buy it and try it. If it does what you want, you win. 

irc


----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of tfberriman
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:08 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera

I bet Ian Clark can give you all the advice you need on a Canon DSLR and
lenses. He will tell you what will work and what not to waste your money on
for nature photography. Contact him through his earlier post.

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Off Topic - Details about puffin tours
From: Ian Clark <recipes AT IANCLARK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 14:36:48 -0400
First, thank you everyone for all the kind words about my puffin photos. If
you missed the original post, I recently made it to Machias Seal Island to
see the puffins and put some pix up at:
http://www.ianclark.com/critters/puffins.php/ 



Folks had several questions about seeing the puffins, I'm going to try to
answer them all at once. If I miss something, feel free to email me again.



Atlantic puffins nest on rocky shores of islands as far south as northern
Maine. The largest colony of puffins in the US is on Machias Seal Island.
The island is about 10 miles southeast of Cutler, ME in very northeastern
Maine. The island is something like 14 acres at high tide and is home to a
colony of roughly 6-8,000 puffins. There is a large colony of razorbills; we
heard estimates of slightly larger than and slightly smaller than the puffin
colony. Either way, there were lots of razorbills. Also making their home on
the island are smaller colonies of common murres, arctic terns and common
terns. 

 

The island is disputed territory between Canada and the US. Canada maintains
the lighthouse on the island and most of the researchers that visit the
island are from Atlantic Laboratory for Avian Research at the University of
New Brunswick. Access for other visitor is tightly controlled. 

There are two charter companies allowed to land; Bold Coast Charters out of
Cutler, ME: http://www.boldcoast.com/msi.htm and a Canadian operator out of
Grand Manan
http://www.seawatchtours.com/puffins-and-machias-seal-island.html. Each is
allowed to land not more than 15 people, and for not longer than three
hours. Both tour operators intend to land on the island on every trip, but
that is weather dependent. Your trip may be cancelled entirely, or you may
travel out and circle the island without going ashore if the seas prevent a
safe landing.



We went with Captain Andy Patterson of Bold Coast on July 15 and again on
July 17. Bold Coast uses the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot lobster boat without
the gear to catch lobsters to get to the island. There isn't a dock at
either end of the trip. You get to and from the Barbara Frost by skiff. On
the island, the skiff brings you alongside a concrete walkway into the water
and you hop out. Not for the mobility impaired. Expect to get your shoes and
pants wet. If you suffer from motion sickness, expect to suffer on the ride
out and back. 



With the number of visitors limited, tickets sell out well in advance. Make
your reservations in the winter - I'd suggest having them by early February.
We paid $120 each per trip. 



Once on the island, you'll be herded to a patio outside the light keeper's
cottage for a final briefing. There is a one-hole outhouse available here
(and a head on the boat). You'll be split into groups of three or four and
escorted to a blind. 



The blinds are simple plywood boxes, they vary in size. Best guess for the
two we were in is about 30" wide by 6 foot long by 7 foot tall. Enough room
for three of us with too many cameras, but we did bump each other often.
There are 'windows' in each side of the blind, simply holes cut in the
plywood. There are plywood covers over each; you slide the cover up to view
or to stick your lens out. My 400mm F2.8 was slightly too large for a couple
openings, I had to swap places with my blindmate. You'll be in the blind
only an hour and 90 minutes. 



There were ~35 puffins within easy photo range on the first day, along with
several dozen razorbills. On our second day, there were probably only 20
puffins coming and going within reasonable photo range, with maybe 120
razorbills and a handful of common murres. 

Going home is more or less the reverse of going out. You'll go back to the
patio, then to the walkway to board the skiff and take the skiff to the
Barbara Frost. If there's time, visibility and good weather, Andy may take
you to see if the seals are basking on Gull Rock and/or for a cruise around
the island. Our first day was too foggy to bother, the second day we found
eight seals, then had good looks at hundreds of common murres and dozens of
terns. 



There are hotels in greater Machias. We found the Sunset Point RV park in
Lubec. One of us camped, the other two shared an apartment owned by the
park. I didn't find much about hotels online; I'd suggest calling the
chamber of commerce. There were several hotels, lots of B&Bs, cottages and
campgrounds around that I didn't find online. There are restaurants in
Machias and Lubec. 

 

For photos, a 200mm lens was sufficient. I had a 540mm that was nice for
very tight headshots, but very much overkill. 



If you're flying into Maine, there is a modest airport in Bangor. Your best
bet is probably Portland, ME. It might be worth checking fares into
Manchester, NH. You might save enough to justify the extra drive. 

There are lots of natural areas in greater Culter, with lots of
opportunities for birding. We didn't find many shorebirds around, probably
due to the extreme tides. There are whale watching tours out of Lubec. We
went and saw several dolphins, five or six minke whales, eagles, seals and
sea birds. The Old Sow whirlpool in the Bay of Fundy is a popular part of
the tour. The flow around three islands comes together and churns the water
impressively. The northeastern most point of the contiguous US is in West
Quoddy, ME, about 20 miles north of Cutler and has an accessible lighthouse.




A quick disclaimer: my expertise is limited to what I learned while planning
my one trip to greater Culter. Your mileage may vary. If you follow my
advice and end up getting eaten by a squid, don't come crying to me. 



But, if I didn't answer your question(s), feel free to ask again.

 
Subject: Re: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 21:57:37 -0400
> On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:49 AM, Kent McFarland  
wrote: 

> 
> I didn't see this listed, although I may have missed it....
> http://ebird.org/content/vt/bird-walks/
> THis is a page I try to keep up to date for regularly occurring Vermont
> eBird monitoring walks. Some of these have years and years of data now.
> If anyone has more, or has corrections, please let me know.
> 
> Kent
> 
> ____________________________
> 
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Thu, Jul 23, 2015 at 11:39 AM, Scott Sainsbury <
> scott AT beaconassociates.com> wrote:
> 
>> Hi all,
>> What Maeve didn’t say was that she and Larry Clarfeld did all the work on
>> this project.  Many many thanks to them!  And to North Branch for hosting
>> the site.
>> I hope this becomes a great resource for birders and all who love the
>> outdoors.
>> Scott
>> Moretown
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:15 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
>>> 
>>> A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks
>> for birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The
>> list is now up on the North Branch Nature Center website!
>>> 
>>> Here are two links:
>>> 
>>> to "resources" page:
>> http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html
>>> 
>>> to the pdf:
>>> 
>>> 
>> http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf
>>> 
>>> The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought – and
>> I’m sure there are many more ideas out there that could be added.
>> Eventually, there might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos,
>> maps, etc. directly, but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC
>> or to me.
>>> 
>>> There’s plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds
>> leave, so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations!
>>> 
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>> 
>> 
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:08:26 -0400
This morning some movement in the birch outside my desk window caught my eye. 
Didn't have bins at the ready, but could see the white supercilium, streaked 
breast and its stubby tail was bobbing up and down, slowly. It was doing its 
call note but not singing. After so many days earlier this spring/summer of 
hearing them sing loudly, but not seeing them, it was a pleasant surprise to 
get a good look at this louisiana waterthrush without even trying! 


Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT
Subject: Vireos - Goshen,
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:08:27 -0400
Mostly red-eyed vireos singing
others were present but quiet.
The Canada goose / mallard odd couple were gliding about the reservoir .
Two species of wild orchids and a munching monarch caterpillar added to the 
scene. 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: July 24, 2015 at 2:09:04 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Goshen, Jul 24, 2015
> 
> Goshen, Addison, Vermont, US
> Jul 24, 2015 8:50 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     birds seen along road to Goshen Dam
> 12 species
> 
> Canada Goose  1     goose in the company of a female mallard
> Mallard  1
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Northern Flicker  2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Blue Jay  1
> Winter Wren  1
> Hermit Thrush  3     one juvenile seen as well as the adult carrying food.
> American Robin  6
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Song Sparrow  1
> Scarlet Tanager  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24365689 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:32:36 -0400
A couple more thoughts. Ive not used the Canon package but do use a high-end 
digital Pentax with a 1.5x extender and a 50-300 zoom. I find it far easier to 
use only the zoom and shoot RAW images at 15megapixel. That allows me to simply 
blow up the middle of the image in software, with excellent results. I find the 
extender to push the weight of the lens so far out it is difficult to use it on 
a tripod and, even more of a problem, with the extender a good deal more light 
is required for good photos. The zoom is reasonably fast (f5.6) and, with 
Pentax version of stabilization, I can easily handhold images down to 1/60th 
second. 


Still learning to see,

John


http://www.eyeimagein.com
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com

On Jul 24, 2015, at 12:41 PM, Joe Cuoco  wrote:

> thank you
> 
> Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
> 973-332-6532
> jcuoco AT msn.com
> 
>> Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:19:52 -0400
>> From: raharlow AT COMCAST.NET
>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Suggestions for mid-range camera
>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>> 
>> No, my camera is the 5D MK III, but I do have the 75-300 with a 1.4 
>> extender, and that is one hell of a lens with or without the extender. 
>> You can't go wrong with that lens!!
>> 
>> Dick Harlow
>> Middlebury, VT
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On 7/22/15 14:38, Joe Cuoco wrote:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Canon EOS Rebel T5 Digital SLR Camera Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS II Lens Canon 
EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens 2.2X Telephoto 0.43X Wide Angle Lenses Does anyone 
have any experience with the camera listed above 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
>>> 973-332-6532
>>> jcuoco AT msn.com
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>  		 	   		
> 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Joe Cuoco <jcuoco AT MSN.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:41:24 -0400
thank you

Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
973-332-6532
jcuoco AT msn.com
 
> Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:19:52 -0400
> From: raharlow AT COMCAST.NET
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Suggestions for mid-range camera
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> No, my camera is the 5D MK III, but I do have the 75-300 with a 1.4 
> extender, and that is one hell of a lens with or without the extender. 
> You can't go wrong with that lens!!
> 
> Dick Harlow
> Middlebury, VT
> 
> 
> 
> On 7/22/15 14:38, Joe Cuoco wrote:
> >
> >
> > Canon EOS Rebel T5 Digital SLR Camera Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS II Lens Canon 
EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens 2.2X Telephoto 0.43X Wide Angle Lenses Does anyone 
have any experience with the camera listed above 

> >
> >
> > Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
> > 973-332-6532
> > jcuoco AT msn.com
> >   
> >
> >   
> >   		 	   		
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 12:45:47 -0400
I wasnt clear. The new list isnt about organized walks and doesnt add to 
Kents excellent list at all. Its about places to walk or hike for birding. 
The original impetus was to share locations for a different kind of birding 
than driving to locations where specific birds have been reported by others. 
Its for people who want to spend several hours in nature without targeting a 
specific species. 


Maeve Kim, Jericho Center


On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:49 AM, Kent McFarland  
wrote: 


> I didn't see this listed, although I may have missed it....
> http://ebird.org/content/vt/bird-walks/
> THis is a page I try to keep up to date for regularly occurring Vermont
> eBird monitoring walks. Some of these have years and years of data now.
> If anyone has more, or has corrections, please let me know.
> 
> Kent
> 
> ____________________________
> 
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Thu, Jul 23, 2015 at 11:39 AM, Scott Sainsbury <
> scott AT beaconassociates.com> wrote:
> 
>> Hi all,
>> What Maeve didnt say was that she and Larry Clarfeld did all the work on
>> this project.  Many many thanks to them!  And to North Branch for hosting
>> the site.
>> I hope this becomes a great resource for birders and all who love the
>> outdoors.
>> Scott
>> Moretown
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:15 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
>>> 
>>> A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks
>> for birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The
>> list is now up on the North Branch Nature Center website!
>>> 
>>> Here are two links:
>>> 
>>> to "resources" page:
>> http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html
>>> 
>>> to the pdf:
>>> 
>>> 
>> http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf
>>> 
>>> The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought  and
>> Im sure there are many more ideas out there that could be added.
>> Eventually, there might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos,
>> maps, etc. directly, but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC
>> or to me.
>>> 
>>> Theres plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds
>> leave, so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations!
>>> 
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 11:57:37 -0400
Well done! Thanks so much.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

> On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:39 AM, Scott Sainsbury  
wrote: 

> 
> Hi all,
> What Maeve didn’t say was that she and Larry Clarfeld did all the work on 
this project. Many many thanks to them! And to North Branch for hosting the 
site. 

> I hope this becomes a great resource for birders and all who love the 
outdoors. 

> Scott
> Moretown
> 
> 
> 
>> On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:15 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
>> 
>> A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks for 
birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The list is 
now up on the North Branch Nature Center website! 

>> 
>> Here are two links:
>> 
>> to "resources" page: 
http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html 

>> 
>> to the pdf:
>> 
>> http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf
>> 
>> The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought – and 
I’m sure there are many more ideas out there that could be added. Eventually, 
there might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos, maps, etc. 
directly, but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC or to me. 

>> 
>> There’s plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds 
leave, so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations! 

>> 
>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>> 
Subject: Re: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 11:49:31 -0400
I didn't see this listed, although I may have missed it....
http://ebird.org/content/vt/bird-walks/
THis is a page I try to keep up to date for regularly occurring Vermont
eBird monitoring walks. Some of these have years and years of data now.
If anyone has more, or has corrections, please let me know.

Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2





On Thu, Jul 23, 2015 at 11:39 AM, Scott Sainsbury <
scott AT beaconassociates.com> wrote:

> Hi all,
> What Maeve didn’t say was that she and Larry Clarfeld did all the work on
> this project.  Many many thanks to them!  And to North Branch for hosting
> the site.
> I hope this becomes a great resource for birders and all who love the
> outdoors.
> Scott
> Moretown
>
>
>
> > On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:15 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> >
> > A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks
> for birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The
> list is now up on the North Branch Nature Center website!
> >
> > Here are two links:
> >
> > to "resources" page:
> http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html
> >
> > to the pdf:
> >
> >
> http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf
> >
> > The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought – and
> I’m sure there are many more ideas out there that could be added.
> Eventually, there might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos,
> maps, etc. directly, but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC
> or to me.
> >
> > There’s plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds
> leave, so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations!
> >
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >
>
Subject: Re: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 11:39:40 -0400
Hi all,
What Maeve didnt say was that she and Larry Clarfeld did all the work on this 
project. Many many thanks to them! And to North Branch for hosting the site. 

I hope this becomes a great resource for birders and all who love the outdoors.
Scott
Moretown



> On Jul 23, 2015, at 11:15 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
> A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks for 
birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The list is 
now up on the North Branch Nature Center website! 

> 
> Here are two links:
> 
> to "resources" page: 
http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html 

> 
> to the pdf:
> 
> http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf
> 
> The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought  and Im 
sure there are many more ideas out there that could be added. Eventually, there 
might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos, maps, etc. directly, 
but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC or to me. 

> 
> Theres plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds 
leave, so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations! 

> 
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> 
Subject: bird hikes list now available!!
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 11:15:36 -0400
A few months ago, Scott Sainsbury suggested a list of hikes and walks for 
birding, and many people sent him info about their favorite places. The list is 
now up on the North Branch Nature Center website! 


Here are two links:

to "resources" page: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/birdresources.html

to the pdf:

http://northbranchnaturecenter.org/downloads/bird%20walks%20and%20hikes.pdf

The list turned out much more comprehensive that anyone thought  and Im sure 
there are many more ideas out there that could be added. Eventually, there 
might be a site to which birders can post ideas, photos, maps, etc. directly, 
but for now additions and corrections can be sent NBNC or to me. 


Theres plenty of good weather left before the snow flies and the birds leave, 
so I hope this joint effort inspires people to try out new locations! 


Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
Subject: Puffin Pix
From: Martha Pfeiffer <kmpfeiffer AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 12:58:34 +0000
Thank you, Ian, for posting the link to your Puffin, et al, photos.  So 
beautiful. Cheers,  Martha 

Subject: Mansfield banding
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 20:17:25 -0400
VCE wrapped up our June-July banding season on Mansfield yesterday. Lots 
of juveniles and molting adults, and non-local wanderers from lower 
elevations. We captured 49 birds overall. For the season, we netted 43 
Bicknell's Thrushes (42 adults, 1 juvenile). Exactly half of all adult 
captures were of birds banded in a previous year (only 37% of 2014 
captures were returning birds). Even more interesting is the ratio of 
males to females. During the first 20 years of our banding, the sex 
ratio averaged 2.2 males for every female. Last summer that ratio held, 
as only 13 of 43 known-sex adults were females (a 2.3:1 ratio). This 
summer, we caught 41 known-sex adults, and 15 were female, a ratio of 
1.7:1. I'm sure that's not even close to being statistically 
significant, but it's encouraging.

For a wrap-up of our final summer visit, check the VCE blog at 
http://vtecostudies.org/blog/summer-banding-on-mansfield-ends-with-a-flourish/.

Chris

-- 
Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
P.O. Box 420
Norwich, VT 05055
802-649-1431 ext. 1
www.vtecostudies.org
Subject: NEK/Moose Bog
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 19:30:00 -0400
Fellow Birders,

I had a great visit with a friend on Bald Hill Pond last week and upon leaving, 
I felt even though it was late afternoon, a 25 mile drive to Moose Bog was in 
order. I decided to "power walk" to the bog, and only stop if I heard or saw a 
bird worthy of my attention (instead of searching for boreal species). No 
sooner had I stepped out of the car when I found a BOREAL CHICKADEE! I walked 
to the bog as fast as I could to keep from being eaten alive by mosquitoes. At 
the bog, I found a BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER. Nice. Walking back down the trail, 
I gave in and started scouring the mossy forest for a possible grouse. No luck. 
I did hear incessant begging coming from some trees, however, and wondered if 
it may have been more woodpeckers. I got to the road and walked to the wetland 
where there is always good visibility and satisfying calm, with an occasional 
boreal sighting tossed in for good flavor. It was pretty quiet there and no 
Gray Jays were seen floating among the trees so I turned to head back to my 
car. Within a few minutes I saw a brownish form along the edge of the woods and 
road. Bins revealed a female SPRUCE GROUSE, and...next came her chick! I'd 
describe it to be the size and camouflage coloration of a cantaloupe. SWEET! 
Eventually they headed back into the cover of the woods and I walked as slowly 
and quietly as possible to where I thought they disappeared. I peeked into the 
woods and my eyes locked with the mother hen’s, just a few feet away, 
standing on a mossy knoll! I felt like an expected guest! She casually turned 
away and disappeared and I waited with eager anticipation to see if any babies 
followed her... 


If you enjoy extremely quiet ponds for birding by (paddle) boat, Bald Hill is 
wonderful (and a hike to a fire tower is accessible on a WMA parking 
area)...and Moose Bog is just a short drive beyond! 


Get out there to enjoy those babies!!

Ali Wagner
Huntington
Subject: Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Richard <raharlow AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:19:52 -0400
No, my camera is the 5D MK III, but I do have the 75-300 with a 1.4 
extender, and that is one hell of a lens with or without the extender. 
You can't go wrong with that lens!!

Dick Harlow
Middlebury, VT



On 7/22/15 14:38, Joe Cuoco wrote:
>
>
> Canon EOS Rebel T5 Digital SLR Camera Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS II Lens Canon EF 
75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens 2.2X Telephoto 0.43X Wide Angle Lenses Does anyone 
have any experience with the camera listed above 

>
>
> Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
> 973-332-6532
> jcuoco AT msn.com
>   
>
>   
>   		 	   		
Subject: Re: NEK: Moose Bog Trail: Both Crossbills
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 15:20:48 -0400
I once watched a Philadelphia Vireo with a Caterpillar. It
carefully clipped around the head, then grabbed it by the skin at the
neck and whipped it inside out like a sock ejecting the innards, and
then it ate what remained. 

--
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT

On Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:50:50 -0400, tfberriman  wrote:

       Ken Copenhaver and I birded the Moose Bog Trail this morning . Lots of
activity going on and an excellent cone crop. Both Crossbill species were
there while A Palm Warbler was feeding fledglings. Ken pointed out a
Magnolia Warbler with small caterpillar in its beak squeeze the "inners" out
of the insect before eating it. Possibly because it had waste matter in it
or it was bitter?? Never saw a warbler do this before.

Jul 22, 2015 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.0 mile(s)

33 species

Canada Goose 4

Broad-winged Hawk 2

Hairy Woodpecker 1

Black-backed Woodpecker 2

Northern Flicker 2

Olive-sided Flycatcher 1

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 2

Blue-headed Vireo 3

Gray Jay 4

Blue Jay 1

Common Raven 1

Black-capped Chickadee 5

Red-breasted Nuthatch 5

Brown Creeper 3

Winter Wren 2

Golden-crowned Kinglet 4

Swainson's Thrush 2

Hermit Thrush 5

Cedar Waxwing X

Nashville Warbler 2

Common Yellowthroat 4

Magnolia Warbler 4

Blackburnian Warbler 1

Black-throated Blue Warbler 1

Palm Warbler 4 Adult carrying food , feeding fledgling

Canada Warbler 2

Song Sparrow 1

White-throated Sparrow 4

Dark-eyed Junco 3

Purple Finch X

Red Crossbill X probably 3 or 4 birds

White-winged Crossbill 1

American Goldfinch 1

Tom Berriman
Subject: Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 15:07:40 -0400
I bet Ian Clark can give you all the advice you need on a Canon DSLR and
lenses. He will tell you what will work and what not to waste your money on
for nature photography. Contact him through his earlier post.

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Re: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:53:43 -0400
Nope. But I would comment that doublers (the 2.2x) often dont work well with 
zoom lenses. If the objective is to get higher power from the 75-300, Id check 
that out. Also, many zooms loose some resolution at max zoom. I have an 
equivalent Nikon lens, and find that to be a problem. I do best by backing off 
a bit from 300. That limits how well I can do vs. someone with a dedicated 
400mm or greater lens. But its a very versatile set up. 

Scott
Moretown



> On Jul 22, 2015, at 2:38 PM, Joe Cuoco  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Canon EOS Rebel T5 Digital SLR Camera Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS II Lens Canon EF 
75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens 2.2X Telephoto 0.43X Wide Angle Lenses Does anyone 
have any experience with the camera listed above 

> 
> 
> Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
> 973-332-6532
> jcuoco AT msn.com
> 
> 
> 
> 		 	   		  
> 
Subject: NEK: Moose Bog Trail: Both Crossbills
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:50:50 -0400
Ken Copenhaver and I birded the Moose Bog Trail this morning .  Lots of
activity going on and an excellent cone crop. Both Crossbill species were
there while A Palm Warbler was feeding fledglings. Ken pointed out a
Magnolia Warbler with small caterpillar in its beak squeeze the "inners" out
of the insect before eating it. Possibly because it had waste matter in it
or it was bitter?? Never saw a warbler do this before. 

 

Jul 22, 2015 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Protocol: Traveling

3.0 mile(s)

33 species

 

Canada Goose  4

Broad-winged Hawk  2

Hairy Woodpecker  1

Black-backed Woodpecker  2

Northern Flicker  2

Olive-sided Flycatcher  1

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  2

Blue-headed Vireo  3

Gray Jay  4

Blue Jay  1

Common Raven  1

Black-capped Chickadee  5

Red-breasted Nuthatch  5

Brown Creeper  3

Winter Wren  2

Golden-crowned Kinglet  4

Swainson's Thrush  2

Hermit Thrush  5

Cedar Waxwing  X

Nashville Warbler  2

Common Yellowthroat  4

Magnolia Warbler  4

Blackburnian Warbler  1

Black-throated Blue Warbler  1

Palm Warbler  4     Adult carrying food , feeding fledgling

Canada Warbler  2

Song Sparrow  1

White-throated Sparrow  4

Dark-eyed Junco  3

Purple Finch  X

Red Crossbill  X     probably 3 or 4 birds

White-winged Crossbill  1

American Goldfinch  1

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Suggestions for mid-range camera
From: Joe Cuoco <jcuoco AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:38:14 -0400


 Canon EOS Rebel T5 Digital SLR Camera Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS II Lens Canon EF 
75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Lens 2.2X Telephoto 0.43X Wide Angle Lenses Does anyone 
have any experience with the camera listed above 



Joseph M. Cuoco CRA
973-332-6532
jcuoco AT msn.com
 

 
 		 	   		  
Subject: TONIGHT in W. Rutland "The Lost Bird Project" Showing
From: Marian McDonald <marianmcd1000 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 13:53:54 -0400
Tonight Rutland County Audubon will present a showing of "The Lost Bird" 
Project" on Wednesday, July 22, at 7 p.m. at The Carving Studio, 636 Marble 
St., West Rutland. Free and open to all. 


The compelling documentary is of a sculptor's quest to create and place large 
sculptures of extinct species at the places the birds were last seen. 



http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2015/7/9/the-lost-bird-project-july-22.html 

Subject: Off Topic - Puffin Pix
From: Ian Clark <recipes AT IANCLARK.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 12:09:11 -0400
Good Morning:

Not many puffins in the Upper Valley this year, but you may be interested in
some of the pix I got last week when I ventured to Macias Seal Island off
Cutler, ME. There are pix of puffins, more puffins, additional puffins,
razorbills by the quarter ton and cameos from common murres, arctic terns
and even a couple seals. Take a look:
http://www.ianclark.com/critters/puffins.php
Subject: Palm warbler - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 22, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:52:00 +0000
A surprise of Palm warbler feeding near Chestnut-sided warblers. Brown thrasher 
feeding on chokecherry----not choking though. 

Sue Wetmore 

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 10:49:11 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Jul 22, 2015 

Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jul 22, 2015 8:15 AM - 10:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.0 mile(s) 
32 species 

Turkey Vulture  5     feeding on dead fish dumped in road 
Mourning Dove  1 
Downy Woodpecker  2 
Northern Flicker  3 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1 
Alder Flycatcher  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  5 
Blue Jay  1 
American Crow  1 
Barn Swallow  1 
Black-capped Chickadee  4 
Veery  1 
Hermit Thrush  1 
Wood Thrush  1 
American Robin  8 
Gray Catbird  4 
Brown Thrasher  1     feeding on chokecherries 
Cedar Waxwing  4 
Ovenbird  2 
Common Yellowthroat  3 
Yellow Warbler  1 
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2 
Palm Warbler  1     yellow throat, rusty cap, yellow breast with rufous 
streaks, white outer tail feathers, tail pumping. 

Eastern Towhee  2 
Chipping Sparrow  2 
Field Sparrow  2 
Song Sparrow  1 
Scarlet Tanager  1 
Northern Cardinal  2 
Indigo Bunting  1 
American Goldfinch  2 
House Sparrow  1 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24345092 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt) 
Subject: Sandpiper question
From: Larry and Mona Rogers <4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 09:05:25 -0400
               We've done the ferry from Portland to Yarmouth several times.
The northbound trip used to be at night - not much birding.  The daytime
return trips have 

yielded two life birds for us: Great and Cory's  Shearwaters,  lots of
gannets and a couple of hump-backed whales..

               The marshes on the east side of Yarmouth are good for
shorebirds.  We got our first Black-Bellied Plover there.

 

               Larry and Mona
Subject: Re: Sandpipers Question
From: Stephen Antell <santellvt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 16:30:32 -0400
You should be able to see petrels, shearwaters and gannets from the ferry
with other species like fulmar, jaegers, phalaropes and skuas possible.
Make sure to take warm clothes and use sun screen.

Steve Antell

On Tuesday, July 21, 2015, Joan Collins  wrote:

> Hi Martha,
>
> I can't comment on Minas Basin in NS or Shepody Bay in NB, but I can
> recommend a remarkable place for shorebirds that we visited in Nova Scotia
> (it was later August in 2001 or 2002).  Our family stayed at the
> northern-most point in Cape Breton (Cape Breton is gorgeous!).  On our
> drive back (eventually to the Adirondacks), we spent a day at Point Michaud
> (southern-most area of Cape Breton).  (It is a Birdlife International
> Important Bird and Biodiversity Area.)  We made this decision after I
> noticed that the Nova Scotia Bird Society holds a shorebird field trip to
> this location the 3rd Saturday of August every year.  I hiked on the beach
> around the huge bay - it took a long time....and then, the tide went out!
> All the water in the bay disappeared but left puddles everywhere.  So I
> could walk out into the bay that I had just circumnavigated.  I was in my
> bathing suit and I just sat down in the middle of the bay (on beautiful
> sand) completely surrounded by shorebirds - it was !
>  a remarkable experience!  I sat quietly and the shorebirds foraged all
> around me.  It was quite memorable!  I know this would be a longer drive
> for you, but this location came to mind right away when I read your post.
> I hope you enjoy your trip in August!
>
> Joan Collins
> Editor, New York Birders
> Long Lake, NY
> (315) 244-7127 cell
> (518) 624-5528 home
> http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/
> http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu ] On Behalf
> Of Martha McClintock
> Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 7:57 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Sandpipers Question
>
> Please forgive this off-topic request.
>
> Bill and I would like to plan a last minute shorebird trip to Nova
> Scotia/New Brunswick during the first week of August (would like to go
> later but need to get it in before high school football starts)  If anyone
> could answer these questions...
>
> 1. We are thinking of taking the ferry from Portland to Yarmouth.  Would
> we see pelagic birds during the trip in any numbers?
>
> 2. It seems like the two most recommended sites for shorebird viewing are
> Minas Basin in Nova Scotia and Shepody Bay in New Brunswick. Is there one
> that you would recommend over the other?
>
> Thanks in advance and answer off VTBirds, please.
>
> Martha McClintock
>
Subject: Re: Stumped by call
From: Roo Slagle <roospin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:58:56 -0400
Did you figure it out? I was thinking waterthrush.

On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 7:30 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:

> Titmice have an astonishing variety of calls and songs. Go to
> xeno-canto.org, type in Tufted Titmouse, and scroll down to song XC33585.
> Is that similar to what you’ve been hearing?
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
>
> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:21 AM, Walter Medwid  wrote:
>
> > I have been unable to id this bird visually or by call. The song is a
> > series of strong notes...6,7 or 8 repeated but not rapidly; the notes are
> > similar sounding; there is a break between calls of a minute or two;
> > habitat is wooded along a brook with some wooded wetland. The calling
> > started in the last 10 days and continues this morning. I've gone through
> > keys to pin this down but no luck. I've identified 98 species this year
> > from the general area but this one has me stumped. If anyone has a
> > suggestion or two I'd welcome any. Location is Derby; within sight of
> > Memphremagog.
>
Subject: Birding Canada
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:22:51 -0400
Mary's Point in New Brunswick is what I meant to say not the one in 
Newfoundland . 

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Nova Scotia
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 14:45:33 +0000
May I just add that, for a few hours more driving, Ile Bonaventure has the 
best, and I believe the largest, colony of Northern Gannet.  It helps if you 
speak a little French in the fine restaurants on the mainland.  The nearby 
wetlands are productive.  Accessible by comfortable, frequent ferry,  Ile 
Bonaventure has the better views of nesting Gannets, viewed from immediately 
above, and the nests are evenly distributed with geometric precision on a 
plateau at your feet, instead of on cliffs.  Also, you may be lucky enough to 
have a storm-petrel land in front of you on the path through the forest to the 
viewpoint., as we did.  On the mainland, warblers and Alder Flycatchers are 
easily found.  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama  



 On Tuesday, July 21, 2015 9:34 AM, Kim Likakis  wrote: 

   

 Sorry in advance, fear we're getting OT, but this (Cape St Mary) is an
amazing place. After visiting on foot we approached it from the sea aboard
this French vessel we were on, then turned and steamed directly away from
it. I will never forget standing at the stern watching this huge
outcropping, stark white with gannets, recede in sunny mist while a
never-ending line of provision-laden birds streamed past both sides of the
boat, low over the water back to the cliffs. Astonishing.

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 9:59 AM, Bob Crowley  wrote:

> This is in Newfoundland and a must see place to go for Gannets, Puffins
> and Murres close up. If you are in Newfoundland you have to go here when
> the birds are on the nests.
>
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
>
> On 7/21/2015 9:37 AM, Sue wrote:
>
>> Below is a link to Cape St. Mary on the Avalon Peninsular in NS. It is a
>> remarkable spot.
>> Sue Wetmore
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>
>>> http://www.env.gov.nl.ca/env/parks/wer/r_csme/directions.html
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>
> --
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham. NH
>



Subject: Re: Nova Scotia
From: Kim Likakis <kim.likakis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:34:26 -0400
Sorry in advance, fear we're getting OT, but this (Cape St Mary) is an
amazing place. After visiting on foot we approached it from the sea aboard
this French vessel we were on, then turned and steamed directly away from
it. I will never forget standing at the stern watching this huge
outcropping, stark white with gannets, recede in sunny mist while a
never-ending line of provision-laden birds streamed past both sides of the
boat, low over the water back to the cliffs. Astonishing.

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 9:59 AM, Bob Crowley  wrote:

> This is in Newfoundland and a must see place to go for Gannets, Puffins
> and Murres close up. If you are in Newfoundland you have to go here when
> the birds are on the nests.
>
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
>
> On 7/21/2015 9:37 AM, Sue wrote:
>
>> Below is a link to Cape St. Mary on the Avalon Peninsular in NS. It is a
>> remarkable spot.
>> Sue Wetmore
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>
>>> http://www.env.gov.nl.ca/env/parks/wer/r_csme/directions.html
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>
> --
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham. NH
>
Subject: Re: Nova Scotia
From: Bob Crowley <crbob AT FAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 09:59:31 -0400
This is in Newfoundland and a must see place to go for Gannets, Puffins 
and Murres close up. If you are in Newfoundland you have to go here when 
the birds are on the nests.

Bob Crowley
Chatham, NH

On 7/21/2015 9:37 AM, Sue wrote:
> Below is a link to Cape St. Mary on the Avalon Peninsular in NS. It is a 
remarkable spot. 

> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
>>
>> http://www.env.gov.nl.ca/env/parks/wer/r_csme/directions.html
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPod

-- 
Bob Crowley
Chatham. NH
Subject: Northern Waterthrush- Brandon, Jul 21, 2015
From: Sue Wetmore <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 13:50:24 +0000
Here's the list from my walk. 
Sue Wetmore 
----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net 
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 9:47:37 AM 
Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Jul 21, 2015 

Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US 
Jul 21, 2015 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
1.5 mile(s) 
29 species 

Wild Turkey  13     two hens with poults 
Great Blue Heron  1 
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4 
Mourning Dove  5 
Belted Kingfisher  1 
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1 
Merlin  1 
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1 
Eastern Phoebe  1 
Great Crested Flycatcher  1 
Warbling Vireo  1 
Red-eyed Vireo  3 
Blue Jay  1 
Barn Swallow  11 
Cliff Swallow  4     two nestlings peeking out of nest 
House Wren  2 
Eastern Bluebird  2 
American Robin  7 
Gray Catbird  4 
Northern Waterthrush  1     singing 
Common Yellowthroat  9 
American Redstart  2 
Song Sparrow  3 
Swamp Sparrow  1 
Northern Cardinal  2 
Red-winged Blackbird  11 
Baltimore Oriole  1 
American Goldfinch  2 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24334773 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)