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Updated on Tuesday, January 24 at 12:38 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Tanager

24 Jan Bathroom birding in Brookfield on a snow day ["Paula A.Gills" ]
24 Jan Catbird [Liz Lee ]
23 Jan Visitors Seeking Bird Guides [Randolph Schmidt ]
23 Jan Re: Remove me! [Horace Shaw ]
23 Jan Rutland County Audubon West Rutland Marsh Monitoring Walk - Jan 28 [Susan Elliott ]
23 Jan Re: Remove me! [Elisabeth Kulas ]
23 Jan Remove me! [Marie Couture ]
23 Jan Crowing? [stowelulu ]
23 Jan NEK Report: N. Flicker, Black-backed Woodpeckers [tfberriman ]
23 Jan Pine Grosbeaks (Ripton) and Northern Goshawk (Lincoln) [Ian Worley ]
23 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Ryan Tomazin ]
22 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Elisabeth Kulas ]
22 Jan Bald Eagles at Sandbar State Park [Frank Rounds ]
22 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Jean Harrison ]
22 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Kate Olgiati ]
22 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Geoffrey Gardner ]
22 Jan Taiwan: Birding on the Beautiful Island-a GMAS Program [Bruce MacPherson ]
22 Jan Glaucous and Iceland Gulls, Sandbar SP [Larry Clarfeld ]
20 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Sue ]
20 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Eve Ticknor ]
20 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Jane Stein ]
20 Jan Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [H Nicolay ]
21 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Patti Haynes ]
21 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Barbara Brosnan ]
21 Jan A needle in a haystack (also a Tufted Duck) [Spencer Hardy ]
20 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Jane Stein ]
21 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Thomas Barber ]
20 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Anna Autilio ]
20 Jan Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls [Ken Copenhaver ]
21 Jan Re: Snowy on Young Island [James Sherwonit ]
21 Jan Snowy owl on Young Island [Poleysgmavt ]
21 Jan Re: Murder of Crows [Elisabeth Kulas ]
21 Jan Murder of Crows [Linda M Verchereau ]
20 Jan Tufted Duck at the Champlain Bridge [Bruce MacPherson ]
20 Jan Snowy on Young Island [David Capen ]
17 Jan Together for Birds Petition [Steve Holmer ]
16 Jan Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver ]
16 Jan Snowy Owl plus Northern Shrike [David Capen ]
15 Jan southern CA birding, lodging [Maeve Kim ]
15 Jan Re: Snowy Owl - Young Island YES [Poleysgmavt ]
15 Jan Re: Bald Eagle Survey [Laura Tobin ]
14 Jan Re: Bald Eagle Survey [Charlie Browne ]
14 Jan Re: Bald Eagle Survey [Bruce MacPherson ]
14 Jan Re: Grand Isle addendum [Scott Sainsbury ]
14 Jan Bald Eagle Survey [tfberriman ]
14 Jan Bohemian Waxwings- Milton [Elizabeth Alton ]
14 Jan Grand Isle addendum [Scott Morrical ]
14 Jan Snowy Owl - Young Island YES [Scott Morrical ]
13 Jan SNOWY OWL on Young Island [David Hoag ]
12 Jan 2016 VT eBird County Quest Awards [Kent McFarland ]
12 Jan Fwd: Birdwalks [Barbara Powers ]
12 Jan Calling all Youth Birders for the Superbowl of Birding! [Kenneth Benton ]
12 Jan Bohemian Waxwings [Veer Frost ]
11 Jan Neck Pain Relief from a Fellow VT Birder [Tobin Schneider ]
10 Jan Re: Help needed. [Marcia Baker ]
10 Jan Re: Help needed. ["White's Construction" ]
10 Jan trying again: [VTBIRD] Pectoral Sandpiper behavior research story [Veer Frost ]
10 Jan Pectoral Sandpiper behavior research story [Veer Frost ]
9 Jan Lake Champlain Islands/St. Albans CBC (VTCS) Count Summary [Ken Copenhaver ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [Marcia Baker ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. ["White's Construction" ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [bakermlb ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [Jane Stein ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [Marcia Baker ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [Jason Hill ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [Marcia Baker ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [Taj Schottland ]
9 Jan Re: Help needed. [MARIE HEMEON ]
9 Jan Help needed. [Marcia Baker ]
8 Jan so many raptors! [Evergreen Erb ]
8 Jan singing [Veer Frost ]
7 Jan Long-eared Owl in Charlotte [Jim Mead ]
5 Jan Re: Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles [Pat Folsom ]
5 Jan Re: Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles [Susan Elliott ]
5 Jan An Evening of Bird Tails [Rich Kelley ]
4 Jan 2016 Photo Big Year summary [Martha Pfeiffer ]

Subject: Bathroom birding in Brookfield on a snow day
From: "Paula A.Gills" <paulagills AT TDS.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 12:29:33 -0500
Glanced out the window and saw a flock of approximately 30 plump birds fly into 
tall trees far in the backyard, so got my scope, set it up and enjoyed the BOWA 
feeding at the lower trees not visible then popping back up. A little yellow 
visible through the fog and falling snow as well as crests and that customary 
plumpness. We have not yet seen much of the freezing rain expected--mostly fog, 
snow and sleet so far... 


Paula Gills
Brookfield
Subject: Catbird
From: Liz Lee <lizl AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 08:59:41 -0500
Much to my surprise, there was a gray catbird in a tree outside my 
window briefly this morning.  I tried to get a picture, but it didn't 
come out on my phone.  It may be that it has been around, but I haven't 
been home much in daylight hours.  Hopefully it will return for another 
viewing, but it was pretty close to the house and the field markings 
were unmistakable.

Liz Lee

Hinesburg
Subject: Visitors Seeking Bird Guides
From: Randolph Schmidt <randy AT THEVERMONTBIRDPLACE.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 17:47:17 -0500
Had a very nice visit here at the store with a Chinese couple from Shenzhen who 
are staying in Bennington for the next month. They came in asking for a bird 
guide, and in particular, they were interested in owls (they mentioned snowy - 
but after speaking with them - owls and other birds all seemed to be of 
interest to them) . I spent some time showing them the state map and where 
there were some areas around here. I will get in touch with them for our 
monthly walk at Hildene as well, however if anyone might be interested in 
birding with them I have the following contact information. 


You can contact Alex by email at hfpan2 AT vip.sina.com

They have rented a car and I did show and explain some driving distances around 
the state to them. 


Best, 

Randy Schmidt
The Vermont Bird Place
Manchester Center, VT 
Subject: Re: Remove me!
From: Horace Shaw <horaceshaw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 18:58:01 +0000
Laughed out loud!

Horace
Now of Syracuse NY. (Still lurking on this great, knowledgeable, and
entertaining list)


On Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at 10:31 AM Elisabeth Kulas 
wrote:

> To those who were upset or offended by the political twist, I extend my
> deepest apologies. It was I who took it there and I did not ever intend to
> upset anyone.
>
>
>
> Elisabeth Kulas
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
> > On Jan 23, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Marie Couture 
> wrote:
>
> >
>
> > Please remove me from your VTBIRD list!
>
> > Name: Marie Couture
>
> > Endlesssummer54 AT hotmail.com
>
> >
>
> > Thank you
>
> >
>
> > Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® 4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>
> >
>
>
Subject: Rutland County Audubon West Rutland Marsh Monitoring Walk - Jan 28
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 18:42:17 +0000
Join Rutland County Audubon for its monthly monitoring walk around West Rutland 
Marsh on Saturday, January 28. Go the whole 3.7 mile route or go halfway. Meet 
at the West Rutland Price Chopper parking lot at 8 a.m. 

Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
Subject: Re: Remove me!
From: Elisabeth Kulas <ekulas AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 10:29:56 -0500
To those who were upset or offended by the political twist, I extend my deepest 
apologies. It was I who took it there and I did not ever intend to upset 
anyone. 


Elisabeth Kulas 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 23, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Marie Couture  
wrote: 

> 
> Please remove me from your VTBIRD list!
> Name: Marie Couture
> Endlesssummer54 AT hotmail.com
> 
> Thank you
> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® 4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
> 
Subject: Remove me!
From: Marie Couture <endlesssummer54 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 14:39:45 +0000
Please remove me from your VTBIRD list!
Name: Marie Couture
Endlesssummer54 AT hotmail.com

Thank you

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Note® 4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Crowing?
From: stowelulu <stowelulu AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 09:33:16 -0500
Is this a moderated list serve?
Charlotte and Tom

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: NEK Report: N. Flicker, Black-backed Woodpeckers
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 08:52:52 -0500
It's so weird to hear a Northern Flicker call in late January but I still
have one coming to suet at the Lyndonville home along with 2 dozen Evening
Grosbeaks.

Out at Victory (Roger's Creek/Lee's Hill Trail) on Friday I had 3
Black-backed Woodpeckers and 3 Gray Jays. 

Already the Black-backed, Hairy, Downy & Pileated are drumming anxious to
start something new.

At the White's shopping center in Lyndonville 8 Pine Grosbeaks foraging on
crab apple trees.

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Pine Grosbeaks (Ripton) and Northern Goshawk (Lincoln)
From: Ian Worley <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 06:25:23 -0500
Yesterday Ron Payne and I spent three an a half hours in Ripton and 
Lincoln, often in fog or dense fog, traveling back roads in search of birds.

Hightlights of the trip were seven Pine Grosbeaks foraging buds in the 
upper canopy of spruce in woods along the lane leading to the Robert 
Frost cabin in Ripton, and an interacting Northern Goshawk and Raven in 
dense fog on the roadside in a wooded section of West Hill Road in Lincoln.

Birds were very scarce, seemingly even moreso than our similar outings 
in recent years.  In addition to the birds noted above, we encountered 
over the 3.5 hours:

Black-capped Chickadee  ---- 35
Blue Jay ---- 6
White-breasted Nuthatch ---- 2
Hairy Woodpecker ---- 2
Downy Woodpecker ---- 1
Northern Cardinal ---- 1
European Starling ---- 36 (at a small farm just as we were leaving Lincoln)

Ian
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 02:30:31 +0000
Wow, I counted just over 45,000 crows on a CBC in Wheeling, WV, last month. 
Maybe I didn't see what I thought...hmm. 




Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Elisabeth Kulas 
 

Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2017 9:23 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

Brilliant!

Elisabeth Kulas
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2017, at 4:12 PM, Jean Harrison  wrote:
>
> Laughing out loud!  Thanks for this accurate news post.  Jean Harrison
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Geoffrey Gardner
> Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2017 7:05 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows
>
> From:  Trumprules AT USAllc.com
> Reply to: Vermont bird list-posting 
> Date: Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:14 AM
> To: Vermont bird list-posting 
> Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
>
> The White House Whoknew?-Truenews  Service has looked into the totally fake
> news reports (see below) that a significant and very large number off crows
> were flying in Montpelier, VT yesterday afternoon, January 21, 2017. Some
> large black birds were seen in Vermonts capitol but there is not any
> evidence of any kind whatsoever that these were crows or there was an
> unusual and big group of them, whatever they were. It is very bad enough
> when the media invents false news stories to rundown the American Presidency
> and the President Himself who won the election by one of the greatest
> landslides ever in all of human history. But it is ridiculous and so very
> dangerous  be American citizens, whether some of them are legally present in our
> country or not, falsely make up stories so the media will repeat them for
> reasons of their own. There is no basis in factuality of any kind for these
> misleading reports about a very big number of black birds in Vermont. Donald
> J. Trump, the American (Trumprules AT USAllc.com) President said about all of
> this today, Murder is right. All Americans know what that means for people
> who go around so sadly making up false stories about how legitimate our
> elections are. And they have a totally accurate idea how many illegals were
> standing around in the snow in VT yesterday and every day. Im not saying
> all these people are for the birds. But we know a lot of them are. Very sad,
> sad."
>
>
> From:  Vermont bird List-posting  on behalf of Barbara
> Brosnan 
> Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
> Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 7:56 PM
> To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
> Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows
>
> Go Crows!!!
>
> Barbara B.
> Weybridge
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
> Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 6:56 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows
>
> More likely they were joining in!!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas 
> wrote:
>>
>> Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier
> today for the women's match?
>>
>> Elisabeth Kulas
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau 
> wrote:
>>>
>>> Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious
> and noisy.
>>>
>>> Linda in Montpelier
>>>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________________________________________ You can
> remove yourself from this mailing list at any time by sending an email to
> uv-affinitygroup-unsubscribe AT lists.riseup.net. List information:
> https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/uv-affinitygroup
>
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Elisabeth Kulas <ekulas AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 21:23:30 -0500
Brilliant!

Elisabeth Kulas 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2017, at 4:12 PM, Jean Harrison  wrote:
> 
> Laughing out loud!  Thanks for this accurate news post.  Jean Harrison
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Geoffrey Gardner
> Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2017 7:05 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows
> 
> From:  Trumprules AT USAllc.com
> Reply to: Vermont bird list-posting 
> Date: Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:14 AM
> To: Vermont bird list-posting 
> Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
> 
> The White House Whoknew?-Truenews  Service has looked into the totally fake
> news reports (see below) that a significant and very large number off crows
> were flying in Montpelier, VT yesterday afternoon, January 21, 2017. Some
> large black birds were seen in Vermont¹s capitol but there is not any
> evidence of any kind whatsoever that these were crows or there was an
> unusual and big group of them, whatever they were. It is very bad enough
> when the media invents false news stories to rundown the American Presidency
> and the President Himself who won the election by one of the greatest
> landslides ever in all of human history. But it is ridiculous and so very
> dangerous ‹dangerous‹ when isolated private individuals who may or may 
not 

> be American citizens, whether some of them are legally present in our
> country or not, falsely make up stories so the media will repeat them for
> reasons of their own. There is no basis in factuality of any kind for these
> misleading reports about a very big number of black birds in Vermont. Donald
> J. Trump, the American (Trumprules AT USAllc.com) President said about all of
> this today, ³Murder is right. All Americans know what that means for people
> who go around so sadly making up false stories about how legitimate our
> elections are. And they have a totally accurate idea how many illegals were
> standing around in the snow in VT yesterday and every day. I¹m not saying
> all these people are for the birds. But we know a lot of them are. Very sad,
> sad."
> 
> 
> From:  Vermont bird List-posting  on behalf of Barbara
> Brosnan 
> Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
> Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 7:56 PM
> To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
> Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows
> 
> Go Crows!!!
> 
> Barbara B.
> Weybridge
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
> Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 6:56 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows
> 
> More likely they were joining in!!
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas 
> wrote:
>> 
>> Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier
> today for the women's match?
>> 
>> Elisabeth Kulas
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau 
> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious
> and noisy.
>>> 
>>> Linda in Montpelier
>>> 
> 
> 
> 
> ___________________________________________________________________ You can
> remove yourself from this mailing list at any time by sending an email to
> uv-affinitygroup-unsubscribe AT lists.riseup.net. List information:
> https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/uv-affinitygroup
> 
Subject: Bald Eagles at Sandbar State Park
From: Frank Rounds <frankrounds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 19:33:49 -0500
Around noon today I stopped at the Sandbar State Park to check for eagles. My 
wife and I as well as my daughter and her boyfriend were on our way to look for 
the Snowy Owl on Young's Island. I saw two eagles on the ice in front of the 
sandbar, but as I scanned further with my scope I saw a whole lot more way out 
on another sheet of ice, at least 13 from what I could tell. 


We got back in the car and drove to the mid-point pull off of the sandbar 
crossing and scoped from there. We counted 18 bald eagles on the ice, plus the 
two that we had seen closer to the beach, plus one in a tree beyond the 18 
birds on the ice sheet. I've never seen 21 bald eagles at once, though I've 
heard of it in Alaska etc. 


We were also successful with the Snowy Owl on Youngs Island, great views of the 
bird facing away from us and sideways to us as it repositioned a couple times. 
It was predominantly white, I didn't observe any grey but it was never facing 
us directly. 

Several red-tailed hawks were seen on the drive as well as a brief look at a 
very dark morph rough legged hawk flying over the car. 


There were also hundreds of gulls on the ice, too far away to ID aside from 
GBBG, and hundreds of common mergs in the open water as well. I didn't try to 
scope for rarities or odd balls as we were just going for the "trophy" raptors 
today. 

Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Jean Harrison <seajean AT CRUZIO.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 13:12:17 -0800
Laughing out loud!  Thanks for this accurate news post.  Jean Harrison

-----Original Message----- 
From: Geoffrey Gardner
Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2017 7:05 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

From:  Trumprules AT USAllc.com
Reply to: Vermont bird list-posting 
Date: Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:14 AM
To: Vermont bird list-posting 
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows

The White House Whoknew?-Truenews  Service has looked into the totally fake
news reports (see below) that a significant and very large number off crows
were flying in Montpelier, VT yesterday afternoon, January 21, 2017. Some
large black birds were seen in Vermont¹s capitol but there is not any
evidence of any kind whatsoever that these were crows or there was an
unusual and big group of them, whatever they were. It is very bad enough
when the media invents false news stories to rundown the American Presidency
and the President Himself who won the election by one of the greatest
landslides ever in all of human history. But it is ridiculous and so very
dangerous ‹dangerous‹ when isolated private individuals who may or may not
be American citizens, whether some of them are legally present in our
country or not, falsely make up stories so the media will repeat them for
reasons of their own. There is no basis in factuality of any kind for these
misleading reports about a very big number of black birds in Vermont. Donald
J. Trump, the American (Trumprules AT USAllc.com) President said about all of
this today, ³Murder is right. All Americans know what that means for people
who go around so sadly making up false stories about how legitimate our
elections are. And they have a totally accurate idea how many illegals were
standing around in the snow in VT yesterday and every day. I¹m not saying
all these people are for the birds. But we know a lot of them are. Very sad,
sad."


From:  Vermont bird List-posting  on behalf of Barbara
Brosnan 
Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 7:56 PM
To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

Go Crows!!!

Barbara B.
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 6:56 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

More likely they were joining in!!

Sent from my iPhone

>  On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas 
wrote:
>
>  Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier
today for the women's match?
>
>  Elisabeth Kulas
>  Sent from my iPhone
>
>>  On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau 
>> 
wrote:
>>
>>  Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious
and noisy.
>>
>>  Linda in Montpelier
>>



___________________________________________________________________ You can
remove yourself from this mailing list at any time by sending an email to
uv-affinitygroup-unsubscribe AT lists.riseup.net. List information:
https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/uv-affinitygroup
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Kate Olgiati <Grackle2 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 16:11:27 +0000
You go, crows!


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Geoffrey Gardner 
 

Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2017 3:05 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

From:  Trumprules AT USAllc.com
Reply to: Vermont bird list-posting 
Date: Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:14 AM
To: Vermont bird list-posting 
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows

The White House Whoknew?-Truenews  Service has looked into the totally fake
news reports (see below) that a significant and very large number off crows
were flying in Montpelier, VT yesterday afternoon, January 21, 2017. Some
large black birds were seen in Vermonts capitol but there is not any
evidence of any kind whatsoever that these were crows or there was an
unusual and big group of them, whatever they were. It is very bad enough
when the media invents false news stories to rundown the American Presidency
and the President Himself who won the election by one of the greatest
landslides ever in all of human history. But it is ridiculous and so very
dangerous  on behalf of Barbara
Brosnan 
Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 7:56 PM
To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

Go Crows!!!

Barbara B.
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 6:56 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

More likely they were joining in!!

Sent from my iPhone

>  On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas 
wrote:
>
>  Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier
today for the women's match?
>
>  Elisabeth Kulas
>  Sent from my iPhone
>
>>  On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau 
wrote:
>>
>>  Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious
and noisy.
>>
>>  Linda in Montpelier
>>



___________________________________________________________________ You can
remove yourself from this mailing list at any time by sending an email to
uv-affinitygroup-unsubscribe AT lists.riseup.net. List information:
https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/uv-affinitygroup
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Geoffrey Gardner <geoffrey323 AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 10:05:01 -0500
From:  Trumprules AT USAllc.com
Reply to: Vermont bird list-posting 
Date: Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:14 AM
To: Vermont bird list-posting 
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows

The White House Whoknew?-Truenews  Service has looked into the totally fake
news reports (see below) that a significant and very large number off crows
were flying in Montpelier, VT yesterday afternoon, January 21, 2017. Some
large black birds were seen in Vermonts capitol but there is not any
evidence of any kind whatsoever that these were crows or there was an
unusual and big group of them, whatever they were. It is very bad enough
when the media invents false news stories to rundown the American Presidency
and the President Himself who won the election by one of the greatest
landslides ever in all of human history. But it is ridiculous and so very
dangerous dangerous when isolated private individuals who may or may not
be American citizens, whether some of them are legally present in our
country or not, falsely make up stories so the media will repeat them for
reasons of their own. There is no basis in factuality of any kind for these
misleading reports about a very big number of black birds in Vermont. Donald
J. Trump, the American (Trumprules AT USAllc.com) President said about all of
this today, Murder is right. All Americans know what that means for people
who go around so sadly making up false stories about how legitimate our
elections are. And they have a totally accurate idea how many illegals were
standing around in the snow in VT yesterday and every day. Im not saying
all these people are for the birds. But we know a lot of them are. Very sad,
sad."


From:  Vermont bird List-posting  on behalf of Barbara
Brosnan 
Reply-To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 7:56 PM
To:  Vermont bird List-posting 
Subject:  Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

Go Crows!!!

Barbara B.
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 6:56 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

More likely they were joining in!!

Sent from my iPhone

>  On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas 
wrote:
>  
>  Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier
today for the women's match?
>  
>  Elisabeth Kulas 
>  Sent from my iPhone
>  
>>  On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau 
wrote:
>>  
>>  Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious
and noisy.  
>>  
>>  Linda in Montpelier
>>  



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Subject: Taiwan: Birding on the Beautiful Island-a GMAS Program
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 09:48:47 -0500
Taiwan: Birding on the Beautiful Island

Speaker: Hank Kaestner

Date: Thursday, January 26, 2017

Time: 6:30 P.M.

Location: Pierson Library, Shelburne, VT

Taiwan, the beautiful island, is a bird-watchers' paradise, but seldom visited 
by American birders. Almost 30 species are endemic to the island, including 2 
spectacular pheasants and a large blue magpie. On Thursday evening, January 26, 
join Hank Kaestner and the Green Mountain Audubon Society, for an evening full 
of the birds, history, geography, culture, and cuisine of Taiwan. 


The Pierson Library is located on route 7 (Shelburne Road) in Shelburne 
village. This program is free and open to the public. Free parking is available 
on site. For further information visit our website at: 



http://greenmountainaudubon.org


Bruce MacPherson
GMAS
Subject: Glaucous and Iceland Gulls, Sandbar SP
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 00:03:35 -0500
Hi VTBirders,

A large flock (~450) of gulls was congregating on the ice edge at Sandbar
State Park in Milton this afternoon. The size of the flock was estimated
counting by 10's while the whole flock was roosting, but gulls were
continuing to arrive throughout the ~90 min. count. My focus was on
identifying and documenting some of the "white-winged gulls" that were
present.

The flock was extremely distant but after careful observation via spotting
scope, I was able to ID 2 Glaucous and 1 Iceland Gulls (all juvenile). The
whole flock took flight several times, and it was then that these rarities
were most easily spotted. I was able to take a crude digiscoped video of
the Iceland that shows how these birds can disappear into the flock when at
rest, but the white wing tips pop out when in flight:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQhoxZm_-CE&feature=youtu.be

Ebird checklist, along with a few terrible photos, available here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33828243

Good birding,
Larry Clarfeld
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:57:15 -0500
Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
> 
> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
> article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the road.
> The article is also online.
> 
> Helena Nicolay
> Wildlife rehabilitator
> Monkton, Vermont
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 21:13:00 -0500
What is the address for this blog?
> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> 
> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem.
> Sue Wetmore
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
>> 
>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
>> article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the road.
>> The article is also online.
>> 
>> Helena Nicolay
>> Wildlife rehabilitator
>> Monkton, Vermont

Eve Ticknor
Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

The bad news is time flies.
The good news is you’re the pilot.
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 21:23:57 -0500
https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/



On 1/20/2017 9:13 PM, Eve Ticknor wrote:
> What is the address for this blog?
>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>
>> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem.
>> Sue Wetmore
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
>>> article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the road.
>>> The article is also online.
>>>
>>> Helena Nicolay
>>> Wildlife rehabilitator
>>> Monkton, Vermont
>
> Eve Ticknor
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
> Canada
> res: 613-925-5528
> cell: 613-859-9545
>
> The Blue Nest
> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
> U S A
> res: 518-963-7404
> cell: 518-524-7377
>
> http://aquavisions.me
>
> The bad news is time flies.
> The good news is you’re the pilot.
>
Subject: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: H Nicolay <sqrlma AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:36:56 -0500
Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the road.
The article is also online.

Helena Nicolay
Wildlife rehabilitator
Monkton, Vermont
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 18:56:22 -0500
More likely they were joining in!!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas  wrote:
> 
> Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier 
today for the women's match? 

> 
> Elisabeth Kulas 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious and 
noisy. 

>> 
>> Linda in Montpelier
>> 
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 19:56:39 -0500
Go Crows!!!

Barbara B.
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Patti Haynes
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2017 6:56 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Murder of Crows

More likely they were joining in!!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:28 PM, Elisabeth Kulas 
wrote:
> 
> Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier
today for the women's match?
> 
> Elisabeth Kulas 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau 
wrote:
>> 
>> Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious
and noisy.  
>> 
>> Linda in Montpelier
>> 
Subject: A needle in a haystack (also a Tufted Duck)
From: Spencer Hardy <curlewsandpiper17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 19:32:12 -0500
This morning I joined Don Jones, Ali Wagner, and Zac Cota for some birding 
along the southern portion of Lake Champlain. 


We started at the Champlain Bridge where a small crowd was enjoying crystal 
clear views of the male Tufted Duck among several thousand other waterfowl 
(including 3 Redhead). Yet, the most unexpected find of the day came later. 


At the Tri-town Water Plant, we found 4 White-winged Scoters, which was 
exciting enough, but one of the birds had a foot-long wire trailing behind. A 
quick google search and an email to a project coordinator tracked down some 
more information. It was an adult female that was banded and fit with a 
transmitter near Forestville, Quebec this past August. The researcher was able 
to show me the location of the bird today (within a few hundred yards) and said 
that it has been on Lake Champlain all winter. Only one of 75 they have put 
transmitters on since 2010! 


More info on the project:

http://seaduckjv.org/science-resources/atlantic-and-great-lakes-sea-duck-migration-study/ 
. 



Other highlights included 14 Common Loon, 5 Northern Harrier, and a Peregrine 
Falcon. 


Overall, 42 species for mid-january isn’t bad, thought it felt more like 
March with temperature in the 40’s and hardly any snow in sight. 


Spencer Hardy,
Middlebury VT
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 21:59:59 -0500
We certainly haven't had much in the way of snow cover here in the lower 
valley this winter, never mind a tough ice layer.  But I also have not 
been seeing Barred Owls out and about, never mind as road kill.

There was one winter a few years ago -- 5 or 6 years? -- when this 
problem of ice cover was obvious-- a couple of hard layers of ice with 2 
or 3 inches of snow in between-- and Barred Owls were everywhere in the 
daytime and beginning to drop like flies from starvation by spring. 
That was a horrible sight.

There's been nothing like that this year, or in other years really.

Jane
(Shoreham)

On 1/20/2017 9:46 PM, Thomas Barber wrote:
> Hi All,
>
>
> Has anyone else noticed that this story - about barred owls starving
> and getting hit by cars - hits the birding news every year. Each time
> it is presented as something out of the ordinary, yet it happens
> every year. there has been little snow cover to hide rodents here in
> the Champlain Valley this year, but the owls are still appearing.
>
>
> I am more inclined to think that each year beginning in January or
> early February, the adult owls that have established territories kick
> the young out in preparation for mating season. Lacking a territory
> of their own, these young forage far and wide looking for food. And
> roadsides are a great place to do this. Red-tailed hawks and other
> predators also find roadsides convenient.
>
>
> If barred owls starving every winter is indeed the cause of this
> annual appearance, I would like to see some science.
>
>
> Tom
>
>
> ________________________________ From: Vermont Birds
>  on behalf of Jane Stein
>  Sent: Friday, January 20, 2017 9:23 PM To:
> VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Article on flurry of
> injured Barred owls
>
> https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/
> 
[https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/1-12-17-ruffed-grouse-aspens-049a2566.jpg?w=590] 

>
>  Naturally Curious with Mary Holland | An online resource
> ...
> naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com Poplar (also called
> Aspen) buds are an important winter food source for wildlife, but for
> none as much as the Ruffed Grouse. During the course of a year, a
> Ruffed ...
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 1/20/2017 9:13 PM, Eve Ticknor wrote:
>> What is the address for this blog?
>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>>
>>> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem. Sue
>>> Wetmore
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay 
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent
>>>> wrote an article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are
>>>> getting hit on the road. The article is also online.
>>>>
>>>> Helena Nicolay Wildlife rehabilitator Monkton, Vermont
>>
>> Eve Ticknor Box 2206 Prescott, On  K0E 1T0 Canada res:
>> 613-925-5528 cell: 613-859-9545
>>
>> The Blue Nest 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996 U S A res:
>> 518-963-7404 cell: 518-524-7377
>>
>> http://aquavisions.me
> 
[http://aquavisions.me/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/IMG_2744-300x225.jpg] 

>
>  Aquavisions | Photography by Eve Ticknor
> aquavisions.me This has been a strange winter, a delayed winter, with
> nearly no snow in the Willsboro / Essex area. Most of the lake is
> still open, just freezing around the edges.
>
>
>
>>
>> The bad news is time flies. The good news is you're the pilot.
>>
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Thomas Barber <innerimp AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 02:46:13 +0000
Hi All,


Has anyone else noticed that this story - about barred owls starving and 
getting hit by cars - hits the birding news every year. Each time it is 
presented as something out of the ordinary, yet it happens every year. there 
has been little snow cover to hide rodents here in the Champlain Valley this 
year, but the owls are still appearing. 



I am more inclined to think that each year beginning in January or early 
February, the adult owls that have established territories kick the young out 
in preparation for mating season. Lacking a territory of their own, these young 
forage far and wide looking for food. And roadsides are a great place to do 
this. Red-tailed hawks and other predators also find roadsides convenient. 



If barred owls starving every winter is indeed the cause of this annual 
appearance, I would like to see some science. 



Tom


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of Jane Stein 
 

Sent: Friday, January 20, 2017 9:23 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Article on flurry of injured Barred owls

https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/

[https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/1-12-17-ruffed-grouse-aspens-049a2566.jpg?w=590] 


Naturally Curious with Mary Holland | An online resource 
... 

naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com
Poplar (also called Aspen) buds are an important winter food source for 
wildlife, but for none as much as the Ruffed Grouse. During the course of a 
year, a Ruffed ... 







On 1/20/2017 9:13 PM, Eve Ticknor wrote:
> What is the address for this blog?
>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>
>> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem.
>> Sue Wetmore
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
>>> article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the road.
>>> The article is also online.
>>>
>>> Helena Nicolay
>>> Wildlife rehabilitator
>>> Monkton, Vermont
>
> Eve Ticknor
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
> Canada
> res: 613-925-5528
> cell: 613-859-9545
>
> The Blue Nest
> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
> U S A
> res: 518-963-7404
> cell: 518-524-7377
>
> http://aquavisions.me

[http://aquavisions.me/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/IMG_2744-300x225.jpg] 


Aquavisions | Photography by Eve Ticknor
aquavisions.me
This has been a strange winter, a delayed winter, with nearly no snow in the 
Willsboro / Essex area. Most of the lake is still open, just freezing around 
the edges. 




>
> The bad news is time flies.
> The good news is you're the pilot.
>
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Anna Autilio <ara73 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 21:46:17 -0500
The Vermont Institute of Natural Science saw 71 Barred Owls in the
rehabilitation hospital in 2016, with about 2/3 of those since October. All
five birds so far in 2017 have been Barreds as well.

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 9:23 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:

> https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/
>
>
>
> On 1/20/2017 9:13 PM, Eve Ticknor wrote:
>
>> What is the address for this blog?
>>
>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
>>>
>>> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem.
>>> Sue Wetmore
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
>>>> article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the
>>>> road.
>>>> The article is also online.
>>>>
>>>> Helena Nicolay
>>>> Wildlife rehabilitator
>>>> Monkton, Vermont
>>>>
>>>
>> Eve Ticknor
>> Box 2206
>> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
>> Canada
>> res: 613-925-5528
>> cell: 613-859-9545
>>
>> The Blue Nest
>> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
>> U S A
>> res: 518-963-7404
>> cell: 518-524-7377
>>
>> http://aquavisions.me
>>
>> The bad news is time flies.
>> The good news is you’re the pilot.
>>
>>


-- 
Anna Autilio
(908)-884-3610
ara73 AT cornell.edu
Subject: Re: Article on flurry of injured Barred owls
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:04:36 -0500
The owl situation is the similar in the Adirondacks.  Here is a link to an
interesting thread on Northern NY Birds listserv:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Northern_NY_Birds/conversations/topics/15959;_ylc=X3oDMTJxNDlkbHNhBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzQzMTIwMwRncnBzcElkAzE3MDUwNjU3ODcEbXNnSWQDMTU5NTkEc2VjA2Rtc2cEc2xrA3Ztc2cEc3RpbWUDMTQ4NDkwODQzMA-- 


--Ken Copenhaver

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 9:46 PM, Anna Autilio  wrote:

> The Vermont Institute of Natural Science saw 71 Barred Owls in the
> rehabilitation hospital in 2016, with about 2/3 of those since October. All
> five birds so far in 2017 have been Barreds as well.
>
> On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 9:23 PM, Jane Stein  wrote:
>
> > https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/
> >
> >
> >
> > On 1/20/2017 9:13 PM, Eve Ticknor wrote:
> >
> >> What is the address for this blog?
> >>
> >>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem.
> >>> Sue Wetmore
> >>>
> >>> Sent from my iPod
> >>>
> >>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent wrote an
> >>>> article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are getting hit on the
> >>>> road.
> >>>> The article is also online.
> >>>>
> >>>> Helena Nicolay
> >>>> Wildlife rehabilitator
> >>>> Monkton, Vermont
> >>>>
> >>>
> >> Eve Ticknor
> >> Box 2206
> >> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
> >> Canada
> >> res: 613-925-5528
> >> cell: 613-859-9545
> >>
> >> The Blue Nest
> >> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
> >> U S A
> >> res: 518-963-7404
> >> cell: 518-524-7377
> >>
> >> http://aquavisions.me
> >>
> >> The bad news is time flies.
> >> The good news is you’re the pilot.
> >>
> >>
>
>
> --
> Anna Autilio
> (908)-884-3610
> ara73 AT cornell.edu
>
Subject: Re: Snowy on Young Island
From: James Sherwonit <000001b116d2c19d-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 04:02:50 +0000
 blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px 
#715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white 
!important; } What town is Young Island in, I am in so. burlington, visiting 
from CT. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Friday, January 20, 2017, 10:28 AM, David Capen  wrote:

If you'd rather watch birds than today's premier of the Trump reality show, the 
snowy owl, which has been elusive for most of the week, is perched nicely on 
the old house this morning. It's been there for a couple of hours and may stay 
put for the day if the crows don't pester it. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Snowy owl on Young Island
From: Poleysgmavt <poleys AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 13:13:10 -0500
This morning we checked out Young Island from Grand Isle but saw nothing. After 
a visit to North Hero we stopped to check for the owl again at 12:13 PM on our 
way home and finally spotted it. It was perched on the north end of the house 
roof next to the breech in the center of the roof. It had a very white head 
atop a fairly dark (grayish) body. 

This was our fifth stop. Also saw a band of six male turkeys along The North 
side of Griswold road and three Red-tailed hawks along our way. 


Denis and Maria Poley
Richmond, VT

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Murder of Crows
From: Elisabeth Kulas <ekulas AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 18:28:05 -0500
Maybe reclaiming their territory after thousands descended on Montpelier today 
for the women's match? 


Elisabeth Kulas 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 21, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Linda M Verchereau  
wrote: 

> 
> Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious and 
noisy. 

> 
> Linda in Montpelier
> 
Subject: Murder of Crows
From: Linda M Verchereau <daylilies56 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 18:03:49 -0500
Around 4:30 huge number of crows over downtown Montpelier - rambunctious and 
noisy. 


Linda in Montpelier
Subject: Tufted Duck at the Champlain Bridge
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 19:25:38 -0500
I spent a productive hour at the Champlain Bridge this afternoon scanning the 
thousands of ducks that have accumulated there in the past few weeks. I managed 
to pick out a Tufted Duck that was swimming among a group of scaup and Common 
Goldeneye not too far offshore. There were lots of Mallards and American Black 
Ducks at the bridge as well as a few Bufflehead, Common Mergansers, and 
Ring-necked Ducks. I could have easily missed other rarities that were in the 
groups of ducks further out in the lake.. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Snowy on Young Island
From: David Capen <David.Capen AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:28:53 +0000
If you'd rather watch birds than today's premier of the Trump reality show, the 
snowy owl, which has been elusive for most of the week, is perched nicely on 
the old house this morning. It's been there for a couple of hours and may stay 
put for the day if the crows don't pester it. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Together for Birds Petition
From: Steve Holmer <sholmer AT ABCBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 21:40:14 +0000
Together for Birds Petition 
 


Bird conservation is a core American value, whether inspired by the powerful 
flight of a Bald Eagle or the charisma of a Golden-crowned Kinglet. This value 
is widely supported by citizens of all political persuasions. Now, we face a 
critical moment. The environment was not a major issue in the recent election, 
but decisions made by the incoming Administration and Congress could have 
far-reaching impacts for birds and their habitats. 


That's why we need everyone who cares about birds to join together and sign 
this 
petition 
to protect cornerstone legislation and other top conservation priorities. This 
may be the single best opportunity ever for our community to stand together for 
birds. Please show your support for bird conservation and ensure that the 
progress we have made in recent decades is preserved. 


We will present the petition and signatures to the new Administration and 
Congress on January 23, just after the Inauguration. Please 
sign 
to show your support for bird conservation today! 


Sign the Petition


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


Forward the Petition

Please use Facebook, Twitter (#togetherforbirds) and email to let family, 
friends and colleagues know about this effort to join together in support of 
birds. 

Organizations Can Endorse the Petition

To sign on your organization, please fill in the name in the box provided


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


Organizations, Please Circulate the Petition

Please forward this link to your lists 
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


"TOGETHER FOR BIRDS" PETITION



Dear [Administration and Congress],



We, the undersigned organizations and individuals, represent a broad 
cross-section of the bird conservation community. We aim to build a dialogue 
with the new Administration and Congress to promote the conservation of birds 
and their habitats, which are of fundamental value to the American people. 


More than 60 million Americans care deeply about birds, and bird-related 
recreation contributes more than $36 billion to our economy. Birds also act as 
the "canary in the coal mine" for our environment and provide valuable benefits 
to society, from pollination to pest control. But birds are in trouble, with 
many declining in population or facing extinction. 


We endorse the following priorities to ensure that birds and their habitats 
continue to be effectively conserved for the benefit of all Americans. We ask 
that you please support: 


1. THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: Protect the Act that has helped recover our 
national bird, the Bald Eagle, and other species in trouble. 


2. THE MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT: Safeguard the only law that exists to protect 
most American birds, and support the federal Duck Stamp, one of the nation's 
most successful conservation programs. 


3. FEDERAL FUNDING FOR BIRDS: Maintain and grow essential sources of federal 
support for migratory bird conservation. 


4. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY: Ensure that the EPA can continue its 
vital work to protect people and birds from dangerous pesticides and other 
toxins. 


5. LAND MANAGEMENT FOR BIRDS AND PEOPLE: Ensure that public lands remain 
public, are properly managed for wildlife, and that recreational access is 
maintained. 


We also acknowledge that many other national and state initiatives are of 
critical importance to birds, and that citizens and private enterprise can play 
vital roles in these conservation efforts. 


Let's work together for birds!









Steve Holmer
Vice President of Policy
American Bird Conservancy &
Director, Bird Conservation Alliance
202-888-7490
sholmer AT abcbirds.org

www.abcbirds.org, 
https://abcbirds.org/get-involved/bird-conservation-alliance/, ABC on 
Facebook, 
ABC Videos 

Subject: Monthly Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 20:00:57 -0500
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday January 21, 2017 on
the Maquam/Black Creek Trail.  Meet at 8:00 AM at the refuge parking lot on
Rte 78, about 2.5 miles west of Swanton village.  If you have any
questions, email me at copenhvr AT gmail.com

The monthly walks will gather long-term data on the presence of birds,
their abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will
be entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 81 months of walks we have observed 145 species. Hope to see you
there!


--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
Subject: Snowy Owl plus Northern Shrike
From: David Capen <David.Capen AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 05:19:17 +0000
The Snowy remains on Young Island, but was well hidden in the rocks on Sunday, 
emerging at dusk. While searching for the owl at mid-day, I saw a shrike drop 
from a limb of a large oak tree just north of the lakeside deck at 12 Adams 
Landing Road. The shrike caught a vole, flew into a lilac tree just north of 
the driveway, wedged the hindquarters of the vole between two limbs, and had a 
hearty lunch. Several hours later, I went to inspect the kill, but the shrike 
came from nowhere to let me know that it wasn't finished. 


Dave Capen

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 16, 2017, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

> 
> There are 3 messages totaling 74 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Bald Eagle Survey
>  2. Snowy Owl - Young Island YES
>  3. southern CA birding, lodging
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 15 Jan 2017 12:01:11 -0500
> From:    Laura Tobin 
> Subject: Re: Bald Eagle Survey
> 
> We had 1 mature and 1 juvenile on mostly open water -then we went to
> Comerford  Dam to see Tom and Dave's eagles!  We did have a great sighting
> of three loons near Woodsville, NH.
> 
> On Sat, Jan 14, 2017 at 9:30 PM, Charlie Browne 
> wrote:
> 
>> Great, Tom!  Wynne and I had 2 adults and 1 immature.
>> 
>>> On Jan 14, 2017 2:26 PM, "tfberriman"  wrote:
>>> 
>>> At the Comerford Dam on the Connecticut River with no open water at this
>>> location,  5 Immature Bald Eagles and 3 Adults perched in pine trees
>> along
>>> shoreline at 10:04am today
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Tom Berriman
>>> 
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 15 Jan 2017 15:05:31 -0500
> From:    Poleysgmavt 
> Subject: Re: Snowy Owl - Young Island YES
> 
> We checked out Young Island around noon today but saw no bird life. A scan of 
Bixby Island revealed an adult Bald eagle in a treetop on the east side above 
what appeared to be a large stick nest. 

> Checked out North Hero and on our way home rechecked Young Island about 1:30 
PM. Again we saw no birds. 

> Over the course of the day driving from Richmond through the Islands and home 
we saw a total of 8 Red-tailed hawks. 

> 
> Denis & Maria Poley
> Richmond
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jan 14, 2017, at 11:32 AM, Scott Morrical  wrote:
>> 
>> Hello,
>> The Snowy Owl is visible right now (11:30 AM) perched on a rock on the east 
shore of Young Island, viewable from Adams Landing Rd. in Grand Isle. 

>> Scott Morrical
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 15 Jan 2017 18:02:34 -0500
> From:    Maeve Kim 
> Subject: southern CA birding, lodging
> 
> Hi, everyone - Ive found several good birding places in the general vicinity 
of San Diego north to Escondido and east to the Salton Sea, but Im not finding 
any lodging thats like what Ive found in so many other states (isolated 
cabins or efficiency cottages). Can anyone make any recommendations? 

> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 14 Jan 2017 to 15 Jan 2017 (#2017-15)
> ************************************************************
Subject: southern CA birding, lodging
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 18:02:34 -0500
Hi, everyone - Ive found several good birding places in the general vicinity 
of San Diego north to Escondido and east to the Salton Sea, but Im not finding 
any lodging thats like what Ive found in so many other states (isolated 
cabins or efficiency cottages). Can anyone make any recommendations? 


Thanks!

Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl - Young Island YES
From: Poleysgmavt <poleys AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 15:05:31 -0500
We checked out Young Island around noon today but saw no bird life. A scan of 
Bixby Island revealed an adult Bald eagle in a treetop on the east side above 
what appeared to be a large stick nest. 

Checked out North Hero and on our way home rechecked Young Island about 1:30 
PM. Again we saw no birds. 

Over the course of the day driving from Richmond through the Islands and home 
we saw a total of 8 Red-tailed hawks. 


Denis & Maria Poley
Richmond


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 14, 2017, at 11:32 AM, Scott Morrical  wrote:
> 
> Hello,
> The Snowy Owl is visible right now (11:30 AM) perched on a rock on the east 
shore of Young Island, viewable from Adams Landing Rd. in Grand Isle. 

> Scott Morrical
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle Survey
From: Laura Tobin <bloodrootdesignsvt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 12:01:11 -0500
We had 1 mature and 1 juvenile on mostly open water -then we went to
Comerford  Dam to see Tom and Dave's eagles!  We did have a great sighting
of three loons near Woodsville, NH.

On Sat, Jan 14, 2017 at 9:30 PM, Charlie Browne 
wrote:

> Great, Tom!  Wynne and I had 2 adults and 1 immature.
>
> On Jan 14, 2017 2:26 PM, "tfberriman"  wrote:
>
> > At the Comerford Dam on the Connecticut River with no open water at this
> > location,  5 Immature Bald Eagles and 3 Adults perched in pine trees
> along
> > shoreline at 10:04am today
> >
> >
> >
> > Tom Berriman
> >
>
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle Survey
From: Charlie Browne <ccbrowne63 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 21:30:31 -0500
Great, Tom!  Wynne and I had 2 adults and 1 immature.

On Jan 14, 2017 2:26 PM, "tfberriman"  wrote:

> At the Comerford Dam on the Connecticut River with no open water at this
> location,  5 Immature Bald Eagles and 3 Adults perched in pine trees along
> shoreline at 10:04am today
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle Survey
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:46:58 -0500
Our team (Debbie Duvall, Shirley Zundell, and I) counted 12 Bald Eagles on our 
route from Fort Cassin to Thompsons Point this morning. 


Bruce MacPherson
South  Burlington

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 14, 2017, at 2:26 PM, tfberriman  wrote:
> 
> At the Comerford Dam on the Connecticut River with no open water at this
> location,  5 Immature Bald Eagles and 3 Adults perched in pine trees along
> shoreline at 10:04am today
> 
> 
> 
> Tom Berriman
Subject: Re: Grand Isle addendum
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 17:38:59 -0500
I too had an adult Bald Eagle today — along the upper reaches of the White 
River off Route 100 between Hancock and Granville. Not a place or time of year 
I’ve seen one before. 

Scott Sainsbury
Moretown



> On Jan 14, 2017, at 11:50 AM, Scott Morrical  wrote:
> 
> In addition to the Snowy Owl on Young Island, there is a Bald Eagle on Bixby 
island, and a Red-tailed Hawk in the area. A flock of 30-40 Dark-eyed Juncos 
was near the intersection Moccasin Ave. and West Shore Rd. 

> Scott Morrical
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: Bald Eagle Survey
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 14:26:11 -0500
At the Comerford Dam on the Connecticut River with no open water at this
location,  5 Immature Bald Eagles and 3 Adults perched in pine trees along
shoreline at 10:04am today

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: Bohemian Waxwings- Milton
From: Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 12:07:24 -0500
~ 150 Bohemian Waxwings in our yard in Milton. They are flying from tree to
ground, where they are getting drinks from a small running brook entering
the abandoned beaver pond. They hang around 10-15 minutes, then head west
and disappear and then return 30-60 minutes later to drink again. So
beautiful! First ever we have seen in our yard.

Liz Alton

-- 
Liz Alton:
"Keep a green tree in your heart; perhaps a singing bird will come."
Subject: Grand Isle addendum
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 11:50:02 -0500
In addition to the Snowy Owl on Young Island, there is a Bald Eagle on Bixby 
island, and a Red-tailed Hawk in the area. A flock of 30-40 Dark-eyed Juncos 
was near the intersection Moccasin Ave. and West Shore Rd. 

Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Snowy Owl - Young Island YES
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 11:32:55 -0500
Hello,
The Snowy Owl is visible right now (11:30 AM) perched on a rock on the east 
shore of Young Island, viewable from Adams Landing Rd. in Grand Isle. 

Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: SNOWY OWL on Young Island
From: David Hoag <00000139fcf15d8e-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 15:00:29 -0500
2:30 PM  Friday 13 Jan.    SNOWY-the-unpredictable-OWL 
has returned to its stone cave on Young Island's  east shore. 
It seems to be as cozy and sheltered from the wind as is the  junco 
that sleeps nights in a phoebe nest above my cellar doorway.

d  j hoag, grand isle  
Subject: 2016 VT eBird County Quest Awards
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 17:20:43 -0500
From a Great Horned Owl on Snake Mountain on January 1st, to Long-tailed
Ducks at the South Hero Causeway on December 31st, Vermont birders scoured
fields and fens, mountains and meadows, lakes and lawns to discover as many
species as possible during the 6th annual Vermont eBird County Quest. The
year-long contest pits county versus county, birder against birder — all
engaged in a friendly rivalry for top birding honors. The main idea behind
the year-long Quest is simply to get people out birding, promote
camaraderie, and better document bird life across the state, using Vermont
eBird.

The results are in! What an amazing year for the Vermont eBird County
Quest. See the results on the VCE Blog at:
http://vtecostudies.org/blog/the-2016-vermont-ebird-county-quest-awards/

Congratulations to everyone for a fun year of birding! We hope some of you
will vie for top honors in 2017. Even if you come up short, all of the data
collected in Vermont eBird is valuable for science, education, and
conservation.

The game is afoot!

____________________________

Kent McFarland

Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201


Subject: Fwd: Birdwalks
From: Barbara Powers <barkiepvt AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 22:08:39 +0000
Here are the 2017 dates and times for the monthly birdwalks held at Hildene in 
Manchester, Vermont. We meet at the Welcome Center. All are welcome. 

Barbara Powers
Manchester Center

Subject: Re: Birdwalks


8a.m.

January 14
Feb. 18
March 18

7am:
April 8 and 22
May 13 and 27
June 17
July 15
August 19

8am:
September 16
October 7
November 18
December 9
Subject: Calling all Youth Birders for the Superbowl of Birding!
From: Kenneth Benton <kennethbenton AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:01:08 -0500
Calling all youth birders!

North Branch Nature Center is reaching out to all youth birders in an
effort to put together a team of young birders to represent Vermont at the
14th Annual Superbowl of Birding.  The event, which hosted by Mass
Audubon's Joppa Flats Education Center, is a 12 hour period of birding with
the goal of finding as many species as possible within Rockingham County,
NH and Essex County, MA.  Each species is weighted based on difficulty and
assigned points accordingly. For example: 1 point for Chickadees and 5
points for Dovekies.  The team with the highest point tally wins.  Over the
years, NBNC’s youth and young adult teams have tallied nearly 100 species,
including gems like King Eider, Razorbill, and Snowy Owl, and has won the
Newbie Award (given to the participant tallying the most life birds).

We would be leaving from the nature center in Montpelier at 4 p.m. Friday,
January the 27th and returning late the next night.  We are asking a fee of
$150 for children 12 and under and $165 for anyone over the age of 12.
This fee is to cover the cost of the trip which includes a rental van, gas,
entrance fee, etc...

Please let me know if you would like to have your child join the team and
please pass this along to any young birders you may know!  If you have any
questions, you can reach me at ken AT northbranchnaturecenter.org or by
calling the North Branch Nature Center at 802-229-6206.

Happy Birding!
Ken Benton

--
Ken Benton
Teacher/Naturalist
North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm Street
Montpelier, VT 05602
work: 802-229-6206
cell: 513-505-7484

Naturalist Journey’s Lecture Series

7 pm. At the Unitarian Church of Montpelier

The Rise and Fall of the Timber Rattlesnake.  Author and Naturalist, *Ted
Levin* will discuss a six-year inquiry into the natural and not-so-natural
history of the timber rattlesnake. Ted looks at the biology and the
conservation efforts in New England, to protect timber rattlesnakes, as
well as the misguided attempts to destroy them or to take them home as
a pet.
Subject: Bohemian Waxwings
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 11:54:12 -0500
Flock of 40+ dynamic and jittery in the crabapple, several graceful
swoops away and back, redeeming a dreary midday.
Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
Sent using Hushmail
Subject: Neck Pain Relief from a Fellow VT Birder
From: Tobin Schneider <000001abf5e87550-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 16:32:58 -0500
Hi VT Birders!

I usually lurk on this listserv and take your great advice on where to spot, 
but I thought I would break out of my shell and share a story. 


A year ago, I finally met the love of my life, who also loves birdwatching. We 
went everywhere with our Bushnell Elites by our sides. Unfortunately, the 
birdwatching was short lived last year when I cricked my neck trying to get a 
glimpse of a purple finch. 


A bunch of my friends gave me advice on what to do, but for the last 9 months 
my neck never felt right and the pain was worst right when I awoke. Finally, I 
decided that enough was enough and maybe I needed a new bed. 


For all those in the same position, it is so overwhelming to find a new 
mattress these days. I searched high and low, not knowing if what I was going 
to get was going to be good. Luckily, I finally found a site 
http://www.slumbersearch.com that had a whole bunch of reviews and mattress 
rankings. I just got a new Sapira mattress last month and I can't believe it, 
but my neck pain is almost all gone. If you also have cricked your neck from 
too much birding, I highly advise you to take care and get a new bed if now is 
the time. 


Stay safe and best of luck!
Birdwatcher Tobin
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:20:22 -0500
That was my first thought, but the head was so dark that I decided against it. 
I am now thinking red tailed. Thanks. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 10, 2017, at 8:18 AM, White's Construction  
wrote: 

> 
> Golden Eagle was my second thought after the Rough-legged. It would be more 
turkey sized. The description fits with the big BUT it had a white throat and 
neck. Was somehow in its eating the feathers were squished to the sides 
revealing the underneath down feathers? The white spot on underside of wing and 
tail match the description of an immature golden eagle. Nancy (White's 
Construction) Danby, VT 

> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jane Stein
> Sent: Monday, January 9, 2017 3:09 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Help needed.
> 
> FYI, pretty much all birds will eat carrion if they come across it. 
> I've seen gangs of robins, for example, pecking vigorously at road kill in 
front of my house. 

> 
> Also, what looks black from a distance is likely to be dark brown seen closer 
up or in better light, so when thinking about what this bird might be, don't 
stick to black birds. Some Western Red-tails can indeed be a very dark 
black-brown, and they do show up in VT from time to time. 

> 
> A Golden Eagle is the only NA raptor I know of that would be capable of 
taking down a calf, or would be inclined to try, although with birds, you can 
never say never. The successful ones are generally opportunistic. Fish-eating 
Osprey will happily take squirrels when the opportunity presents itself. 

> 
> I'm stumped by the white patches on what I interpret to mean the primaries, 
too. I have no guesses, unless this is some kind of bilateral leucistic 
feathers. 

> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> 
>> On 1/9/2017 1:23 PM, Jason Hill wrote:
>> I like the way Taj is thinking!!! You also might consider the 
>> abieticola subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk. They can appear really 
>> dark brown/black at times, with a white throat and breast and white 
>> undertail coverts. No white on the wings though.This subspecies, the 
>> northern Red-tailed Hawk, is larger than the average Red-tailed Hawk 
>> as well. Here are some eBird checklists with photos by raptor bander 
>> Bill Chambers. Although Red-tailed Hawks have been observed eating 
>> carrion, could it be that the dead animal is in fact something it 
>> killed? After 30 minutes the carcass could be splayed out and such, 
increasing the apparent size of the prey item. 

>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S26913737
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S21834376
>> 
>> All the best and thanks for the mystery.
>> Jason
>> 
>>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:
>>> 
>>> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's 
>>> only a matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're 
>>> well known for feeding on dead carcasses.
>>> 
>>> -Taj
>>> 
>>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker < 
>>> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in 
>>>> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a 
>>>> newborn calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild 
>>>> turkeys that have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black 
>>>> head, a Snow
>>> White
>>>> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under 
>>>> the tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the 
>>>> wing.  The rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the 
>>>> tail, but there may be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or 
>>>> Sibley that is an exact match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>>>> 
>>>> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor Sent from my iPad
>>>> 
>>>>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
>>>>> 
>>>> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho 
>>>>> down
>>>> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I 
>>>> tallied an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if 
>>>> we traveled
>>> on
>>>> any of the roads we had been on before that day.  Here’s what we 
>>>> saw….all so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are 
>>>> just the
>>> raptors.
>>>>> 
>>>>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>>>>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>>>>> 7 Northern Harriers
>>>>> 8 Ravens
>>>>> 2 Merlins
>>>>> 
>>>>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on 
>>>>> one
>>> of
>>>> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our 
>>>> beautiful state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
>>>>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Taj Schottland
>>> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
>>> National Wildlife Federation
>>> CELL: 802-258-1200
>>> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: "White's Construction" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 08:18:46 -0500
Golden Eagle was my second thought after the Rough-legged. It would be more 
turkey sized. The description fits with the big BUT it had a white throat and 
neck. Was somehow in its eating the feathers were squished to the sides 
revealing the underneath down feathers? The white spot on underside of wing and 
tail match the description of an immature golden eagle. Nancy (White's 
Construction) Danby, VT 


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jane Stein
Sent: Monday, January 9, 2017 3:09 PM
To: VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Help needed.

FYI, pretty much all birds will eat carrion if they come across it. 
I've seen gangs of robins, for example, pecking vigorously at road kill in 
front of my house. 


Also, what looks black from a distance is likely to be dark brown seen closer 
up or in better light, so when thinking about what this bird might be, don't 
stick to black birds. Some Western Red-tails can indeed be a very dark 
black-brown, and they do show up in VT from time to time. 


A Golden Eagle is the only NA raptor I know of that would be capable of taking 
down a calf, or would be inclined to try, although with birds, you can never 
say never. The successful ones are generally opportunistic. Fish-eating Osprey 
will happily take squirrels when the opportunity presents itself. 


I'm stumped by the white patches on what I interpret to mean the primaries, 
too. I have no guesses, unless this is some kind of bilateral leucistic 
feathers. 


Jane
(Shoreham)



On 1/9/2017 1:23 PM, Jason Hill wrote:
> I like the way Taj is thinking!!! You also might consider the 
> abieticola subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk. They can appear really 
> dark brown/black at times, with a white throat and breast and white 
> undertail coverts. No white on the wings though.This subspecies, the 
> northern Red-tailed Hawk, is larger than the average Red-tailed Hawk 
> as well. Here are some eBird checklists with photos by raptor bander 
> Bill Chambers. Although Red-tailed Hawks have been observed eating 
> carrion, could it be that the dead animal is in fact something it 
> killed? After 30 minutes the carcass could be splayed out and such, 
increasing the apparent size of the prey item. 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S26913737
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S21834376
>
>  All the best and thanks for the mystery.
> Jason
>
> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:
>
>> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's 
>> only a matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're 
>> well known for feeding on dead carcasses.
>>
>> -Taj
>>
>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker < 
>> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in 
>>> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a 
>>> newborn calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild 
>>> turkeys that have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black 
>>> head, a Snow
>> White
>>> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under 
>>> the tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the 
>>> wing.  The rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the 
>>> tail, but there may be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or 
>>> Sibley that is an exact match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>>>
>>> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
>>>> 
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho 
>>>> down
>>> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I 
>>> tallied an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if 
>>> we traveled
>> on
>>> any of the roads we had been on before that day.  Here’s what we 
>>> saw….all so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are 
>>> just the
>> raptors.
>>>>
>>>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>>>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>>>> 7 Northern Harriers
>>>> 8 Ravens
>>>> 2 Merlins
>>>>
>>>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on 
>>>> one
>> of
>>> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our 
>>> beautiful state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
>>>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Taj Schottland
>> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> CELL: 802-258-1200
>> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>>
>
>
>
Subject: trying again: [VTBIRD] Pectoral Sandpiper behavior research story
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 07:57:58 -0500
sorry the link caught my name and didn't work, Veer Frost Passumpsic

On January 10, 2017 at 7:55 AM, "Veer Frost"  wrote:From today's
Guardian:


https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jan/10/sandpipers-go-extra-8000-miles-have-sex 

Subject: Pectoral Sandpiper behavior research story
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 07:55:02 -0500
From today's Guardian:


https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jan/10/sandpipers-go-extra-8000-miles-have-sex 

Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
Subject: Lake Champlain Islands/St. Albans CBC (VTCS) Count Summary
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 22:21:55 -0500
Here are the long-delayed results of our Christmas Bird Count:

The Champlain Islands count was held on December 18, 2016.  We had 33
people in the field and 10 people watching feeders.  We logged 4 hours
(13.7 miles) of nocturnal birding; 12.8 hours (11.1 miles) by foot; 54
hours (365 miles) by car; and 20.5 hours watching feeders.

We ended up with 60 count-day species plus 5 count-week species, compared
with a high of 76 count-day species in 2005.  The number was down from the
64 count-day species last year and our 30-year average of 66 count-day
species.

Total number of individual birds was only 9,134, the lowest count since the
circle was moved to its current location in 1987, although counts in the
old circle location were lower.  This low count follows last year's record
high of 95,044, which was due largely to an amazing 84,500 Snow Geese
observed in Point Au Roche, NY.  Low counts can be attributed partly to
early ice in many of the bays, and light to heavy rain in the morning and
light rain or snow in some areas in the afternoon, combined with icy roads,
especially in the morning.

Here are a few highlights:

Bald Eagle – 9                          New high count; previous high was 8
in 2014

Red-bellied Woodpecker – 7      New high count; previous high was 5 in 2015

American Robin – 569               New high count; previous high was 530 in
2011

European Starling – 872            New low count; previous low was 992 in
2013

White-throated Sparrow – 11      New high count; previous high was 8 in 2014

Dark-eyed Junco – 365              New high count; previous high was 299 in
2014

We had just 2 rare misses:

Horned Grebe                           Seen in 27 previous counts

Eastern Screech Owl                Seen in 26 previous counts

The above statistics are based on 30 years of data in our circle's present
location.  Four earlier years (1983 to 1986) when the circle was located
slightly to the north were excluded.  Counts were generally very low in
those first few years compared with later counts.

Thanks to all who participated!

--Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 16:31:31 -0500
I am looking at Sibleys again. Don't think it looked like these pics at all. 
Head was that shape, but very dark. Throat and chest very white, as was the 
undertail. No speckles on the chest. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 9, 2017, at 4:08 PM, White's Construction  
wrote: 

> 
> How about the Rough-legged Hawk? It has a dark head, light throat and dark 
all lower belly band. It has a white and black under wing pattern and under 
tail pattern. Do not have my Sibley's here but I think it is the Juvenile that 
is the darkest, maybe the female. 

> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Marcia Baker
> Sent: Monday, January 9, 2017 12:43 PM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Help needed.
> 
> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in 
Brownsville. It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn calf, 
for the past hour. It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that have been 
parading by the area. It has a rounded black head, a Snow White throat and 
breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the tail. There is also 
a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing. The rest of the bird is black. 
I can see no bands on the tail, but there may be some. I can't find anything in 
Peterson or Sibley that is an exact match. Any help would be very much 
appreciated. 

> 
> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb  wrote:
>> 
>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down to 
Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied an 
impressive number of raptors. We did not double count if we traveled on any of 
the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we saw….all so 
wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors. 

>> 
>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>> 7 Northern Harriers
>> 8 Ravens
>> 2 Merlins
>> 
>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one 
>> of the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our 
>> beautiful state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont, Evergreen 
>> Erb of Jericho
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: "White's Construction" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 16:08:31 -0500
How about the Rough-legged Hawk? It has a dark head, light throat and dark all 
lower belly band. It has a white and black under wing pattern and under tail 
pattern. Do not have my Sibley's here but I think it is the Juvenile that is 
the darkest, maybe the female. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Marcia Baker
Sent: Monday, January 9, 2017 12:43 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Help needed.

There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in 
Brownsville. It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn calf, 
for the past hour. It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that have been 
parading by the area. It has a rounded black head, a Snow White throat and 
breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the tail. There is also 
a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing. The rest of the bird is black. 
I can see no bands on the tail, but there may be some. I can't find anything in 
Peterson or Sibley that is an exact match. Any help would be very much 
appreciated. 


Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb  wrote:
> 
> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down to 
Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied an 
impressive number of raptors. We did not double count if we traveled on any of 
the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we saw….all so 
wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors. 

> 
> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
> 7 Northern Harriers
> 8 Ravens
> 2 Merlins
> 
> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one 
> of the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our 
> beautiful state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont, Evergreen 
> Erb of Jericho
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: bakermlb <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 15:40:44 -0500
    
I am thinking some sort of red tail at this point. It is long gone, as is the 
flesh of the animal.  Thanks  



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Jane Stein  
Date: 01/09/2017  3:08 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Help needed. 

FYI, pretty much all birds will eat carrion if they come across it. 
I've seen gangs of robins, for example, pecking vigorously at road kill 
in front of my house.

Also, what looks black from a distance is likely to be dark brown seen 
closer up or in better light, so when thinking about what this bird 
might be, don't stick to black birds.  Some Western Red-tails can indeed 
be a very dark black-brown, and they do show up in VT from time to time.

A Golden Eagle is the only NA raptor I know of that would be capable of 
taking down a calf, or would be inclined to try, although with birds, 
you can never say never.  The successful ones are generally 
opportunistic.  Fish-eating Osprey will happily take squirrels when the 
opportunity presents itself.

I'm stumped by the white patches on what I interpret to mean the 
primaries, too.  I have no guesses, unless this is some kind of 
bilateral leucistic feathers.

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 1/9/2017 1:23 PM, Jason Hill wrote:
> I like the way Taj is thinking!!! You also might consider the abieticola
> subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk. They can appear really dark brown/black
> at times, with a white throat and breast and white undertail coverts. No
> white on the wings though.This subspecies, the northern Red-tailed Hawk, is
> larger than the average Red-tailed Hawk as well. Here are some eBird
> checklists with photos by raptor bander Bill Chambers. Although Red-tailed
> Hawks have been observed eating carrion, could it be that the dead animal
> is in fact something it killed? After 30 minutes the carcass could be
> splayed out and such, increasing the apparent size of the prey item.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S26913737
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S21834376
>
>  All the best and thanks for the mystery.
> Jason
>
> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:
>
>> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's only a
>> matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're well known
>> for feeding on dead carcasses.
>>
>> -Taj
>>
>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker <
>> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in
>>> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn
>>> calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that
>>> have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black head, a Snow
>> White
>>> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the
>>> tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing.  The
>>> rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the tail, but there may
>>> be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or Sibley that is an exact
>>> match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>>>
>>> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down
>>> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied
>>> an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if we traveled
>> on
>>> any of the roads we had been on before that day.  Here’s what we 
saw….all 

>>> so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the
>> raptors.
>>>>
>>>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>>>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>>>> 7 Northern Harriers
>>>> 8 Ravens
>>>> 2 Merlins
>>>>
>>>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one
>> of
>>> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful
>>> state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
>>>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Taj Schottland
>> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> CELL: 802-258-1200
>> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 15:08:35 -0500
FYI, pretty much all birds will eat carrion if they come across it. 
I've seen gangs of robins, for example, pecking vigorously at road kill 
in front of my house.

Also, what looks black from a distance is likely to be dark brown seen 
closer up or in better light, so when thinking about what this bird 
might be, don't stick to black birds.  Some Western Red-tails can indeed 
be a very dark black-brown, and they do show up in VT from time to time.

A Golden Eagle is the only NA raptor I know of that would be capable of 
taking down a calf, or would be inclined to try, although with birds, 
you can never say never.  The successful ones are generally 
opportunistic.  Fish-eating Osprey will happily take squirrels when the 
opportunity presents itself.

I'm stumped by the white patches on what I interpret to mean the 
primaries, too.  I have no guesses, unless this is some kind of 
bilateral leucistic feathers.

Jane
(Shoreham)



On 1/9/2017 1:23 PM, Jason Hill wrote:
> I like the way Taj is thinking!!! You also might consider the abieticola
> subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk. They can appear really dark brown/black
> at times, with a white throat and breast and white undertail coverts. No
> white on the wings though.This subspecies, the northern Red-tailed Hawk, is
> larger than the average Red-tailed Hawk as well. Here are some eBird
> checklists with photos by raptor bander Bill Chambers. Although Red-tailed
> Hawks have been observed eating carrion, could it be that the dead animal
> is in fact something it killed? After 30 minutes the carcass could be
> splayed out and such, increasing the apparent size of the prey item.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S26913737
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S21834376
>
>  All the best and thanks for the mystery.
> Jason
>
> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:
>
>> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's only a
>> matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're well known
>> for feeding on dead carcasses.
>>
>> -Taj
>>
>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker <
>> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in
>>> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn
>>> calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that
>>> have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black head, a Snow
>> White
>>> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the
>>> tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing.  The
>>> rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the tail, but there may
>>> be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or Sibley that is an exact
>>> match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>>>
>>> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down
>>> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied
>>> an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if we traveled
>> on
>>> any of the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we 
saw….all 

>>> so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the
>> raptors.
>>>>
>>>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>>>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>>>> 7 Northern Harriers
>>>> 8 Ravens
>>>> 2 Merlins
>>>>
>>>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one
>> of
>>> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful
>>> state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
>>>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Taj Schottland
>> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> CELL: 802-258-1200
>> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 13:49:17 -0500
I am leaning toward red tailed. The view is from quite far away. I tried to 
take a photo through my Leicas, but that didn't work. No crest, no red. The 
nearest is red tailed, with belly band further down than usual. Wish I could 
have seen the tail. I am thinking a newborn calf from my neighbors' black 
angus. Probably a coyote got it this morning, so not really carrion. Pretty 
fresh. When the neighbors get home from work, they will let me know if they had 
a newborn calf and I will post. Through the binos it looked like a little calf 
face was most of what was left. Sigh. Thanks for the help. 


Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 9, 2017, at 1:23 PM, Jason Hill  wrote:
> 
> I like the way Taj is thinking!!! You also might consider the abieticola
> subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk. They can appear really dark brown/black
> at times, with a white throat and breast and white undertail coverts. No
> white on the wings though.This subspecies, the northern Red-tailed Hawk, is
> larger than the average Red-tailed Hawk as well. Here are some eBird
> checklists with photos by raptor bander Bill Chambers. Although Red-tailed
> Hawks have been observed eating carrion, could it be that the dead animal
> is in fact something it killed? After 30 minutes the carcass could be
> splayed out and such, increasing the apparent size of the prey item.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S26913737
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S21834376
> 
> All the best and thanks for the mystery.
> Jason
> 
>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:
>> 
>> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's only a
>> matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're well known
>> for feeding on dead carcasses.
>> 
>> -Taj
>> 
>> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker <
>> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>> 
>>> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in
>>> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn
>>> calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that
>>> have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black head, a Snow
>> White
>>> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the
>>> tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing.  The
>>> rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the tail, but there may
>>> be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or Sibley that is an exact
>>> match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>>> 
>>> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>> 
>>>>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
>>>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down
>>> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied
>>> an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if we traveled
>> on
>>> any of the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we 
saw….all 

>>> so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the
>> raptors.
>>>> 
>>>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>>>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>>>> 7 Northern Harriers
>>>> 8 Ravens
>>>> 2 Merlins
>>>> 
>>>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one
>> of
>>> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful
>>> state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
>>>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Taj Schottland
>> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
>> National Wildlife Federation
>> CELL: 802-258-1200
>> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Jason M. Hill, PhD
> Conservation Biologist
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> 802.649.1431 Ext. 212
> http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/
> 
> "The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
> ends in the end."
> -Isaac Brock
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Jason Hill <hill.jason.michael AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 13:23:27 -0500
I like the way Taj is thinking!!! You also might consider the abieticola
subspecies of the Red-tailed Hawk. They can appear really dark brown/black
at times, with a white throat and breast and white undertail coverts. No
white on the wings though.This subspecies, the northern Red-tailed Hawk, is
larger than the average Red-tailed Hawk as well. Here are some eBird
checklists with photos by raptor bander Bill Chambers. Although Red-tailed
Hawks have been observed eating carrion, could it be that the dead animal
is in fact something it killed? After 30 minutes the carcass could be
splayed out and such, increasing the apparent size of the prey item.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S26913737
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S21834376

 All the best and thanks for the mystery.
Jason

On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:

> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's only a
> matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're well known
> for feeding on dead carcasses.
>
> -Taj
>
> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker <
> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>
> > There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in
> > Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn
> > calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that
> > have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black head, a Snow
> White
> > throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the
> > tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing.  The
> > rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the tail, but there may
> > be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or Sibley that is an exact
> > match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
> >
> > Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
> > Sent from my iPad
> >
> > > On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down
> > to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied
> > an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if we traveled
> on
> > any of the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we 
saw….all 

> > so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the
> raptors.
> > >
> > > 47 Red-tailed Hawks
> > > 26 Rough-legged Hawks
> > > 7 Northern Harriers
> > > 8 Ravens
> > > 2 Merlins
> > >
> > > Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one
> of
> > the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful
> > state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
> > > Evergreen Erb of Jericho
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Taj Schottland
> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
> National Wildlife Federation
> CELL: 802-258-1200
> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
>



-- 
Jason M. Hill, PhD
Conservation Biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
802.649.1431 Ext. 212
http://vtecostudies.org/about-us/staff/jason-hill/

"The universe works on a math equation that never even ever really even
ends in the end."
-Isaac Brock
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 13:23:07 -0500
I have seen many on TX, and no, no crest.  Thanks for the idea.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 9, 2017, at 1:14 PM, Taj Schottland  wrote:
> 
> This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's only a
> matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're well known
> for feeding on dead carcasses.
> 
> -Taj
> 
> On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker <
> 00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
> 
>> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in
>> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn
>> calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that
>> have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black head, a Snow White
>> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the
>> tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing.  The
>> rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the tail, but there may
>> be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or Sibley that is an exact
>> match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>> 
>> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>>>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
>>> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down
>> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied
>> an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if we traveled on
>> any of the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we saw….all 

>> so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors.
>>> 
>>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>>> 7 Northern Harriers
>>> 8 Ravens
>>> 2 Merlins
>>> 
>>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one of
>> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful
>> state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
>>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Taj Schottland
> Coastal Adaptation Specialist
> National Wildlife Federation
> CELL: 802-258-1200
> EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: Taj Schottland <tsurfbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 13:14:04 -0500
This is a long shot, but have you considered Crested Caracara? It's only a
matter of time before this species is seen in VT. And they're well known
for feeding on dead carcasses.

-Taj

On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker <
00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in
> Brownsville.  It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn
> calf, for the past hour.  It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that
> have been parading by the area.  It has a rounded black head, a Snow White
> throat and breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the
> tail.  There is also a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing.  The
> rest of the bird is black.  I can see no bands on the tail, but there may
> be some.  I can't find anything in Peterson or Sibley that is an exact
> match.  Any help would be very much appreciated.
>
> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb 
> wrote:
> >
> > Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down
> to Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied
> an impressive number of raptors.  We did not double count if we traveled on
> any of the roads we had been on before that day.  Here’s what we saw….all
> so wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors.
> >
> > 47 Red-tailed Hawks
> > 26 Rough-legged Hawks
> > 7 Northern Harriers
> > 8 Ravens
> > 2 Merlins
> >
> > Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one of
> the same roads last week).  It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful
> state.  Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont,
> > Evergreen Erb of Jericho
>



-- 
Taj Schottland
Coastal Adaptation Specialist
National Wildlife Federation
CELL: 802-258-1200
EMAIL: tsurfbird AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Help needed.
From: MARIE HEMEON <mariekevinhemeon AT MSN.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 18:03:47 +0000
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 9, 2017, at 12:42 PM, Marcia Baker 
<00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 

> 
> There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in 
Brownsville. It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn calf, 
for the past hour. It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that have been 
parading by the area. It has a rounded black head, a Snow White throat and 
breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the tail. There is also 
a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing. The rest of the bird is black. 
I can see no bands on the tail, but there may be some. I can't find anything in 
Peterson or Sibley that is an exact match. Any help would be very much 
appreciated. 

> 
> Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb  wrote:
>> 
>> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down to 
Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied an 
impressive number of raptors. We did not double count if we traveled on any of 
the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we saw….all so 
wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors. 

>> 
>> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
>> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
>> 7 Northern Harriers
>> 8 Ravens
>> 2 Merlins
>> 
>> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one of the 
same roads last week). It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful state. 
Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont, 

>> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
Subject: Help needed.
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 12:42:30 -0500
There is a large raptor in the back field about 150 yards from me in 
Brownsville. It has been feasting on a dead animal, possibly a newborn calf, 
for the past hour. It is just smaller than the wild turkeys that have been 
parading by the area. It has a rounded black head, a Snow White throat and 
breast down to a dark band, and then it is white under the tail. There is also 
a white patch on the middle bottom of the wing. The rest of the bird is black. 
I can see no bands on the tail, but there may be some. I can't find anything in 
Peterson or Sibley that is an exact match. Any help would be very much 
appreciated. 


Marcia Baker in Brownsville, aka West Windsor
Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 8, 2017, at 7:52 PM, Evergreen Erb  wrote:
> 
> Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down to 
Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied an 
impressive number of raptors. We did not double count if we traveled on any of 
the roads we had been on before that day. Here’s what we saw….all so 
wonderful! Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors. 

> 
> 47 Red-tailed Hawks
> 26 Rough-legged Hawks
> 7 Northern Harriers
> 8 Ravens
> 2 Merlins
> 
> Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one of the 
same roads last week). It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful state. 
Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont, 

> Evergreen Erb of Jericho
Subject: so many raptors!
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 8 Jan 2017 19:52:39 -0500
Yesterday (Saturday), on an all day, leisurely drive from Jericho down to 
Shoreham and back, my daughter Isis, friend Raven Davis, and I tallied an 
impressive number of raptors. We did not double count if we traveled on any of 
the roads we had been on before that day. Heres what we saw.all so wonderful! 
Obviously we saw other birds too; these are just the raptors. 


47 Red-tailed Hawks
26 Rough-legged Hawks
7 Northern Harriers
8 Ravens
2 Merlins

Alas, no Eagles or Peregrines (although we had seen Peregrines on one of the 
same roads last week). It was a fun day to be out in our beautiful state. 
Filled with gratitude to live in Vermont, 

Evergreen Erb of Jericho
Subject: singing
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost AT HUSHMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 8 Jan 2017 10:41:18 -0500
Carolina wren just now, and Blackcap chickadee while I was bringing
out the water tray at sunrise earlier, both wonderfully startling at
neg temps.
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Long-eared Owl in Charlotte
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Jan 2017 17:49:30 -0500
Hello all,

I decided to go owling this morning because there was virtually no wind. I 
tallied 8 owls with 5 different species & all in Chittenden County. My first 
stop was at 1:03 a.m. on Pond Rd. in Shelburne, near the one car parking space 
next to the marshy area. I solicited a Northern Saw-whet Owl and got a response 
hearing a whine-like single call about 50' away. I heard the same type of call 
11 minutes later but it was about 200 yards away. My next owl was heard at 2:21 
a.m. about 2 minutes after soliciting an Eastern Screech-Owl while parked in 
the Shelburne Beach parking lot. Its' response was a very subdued trill, likely 
because of its' close proximity to me. My next owl was seen at 2:32 a.m. 
perched on a tree limb on the west side of Greenbush Rd., about 100 yards south 
of Orchard Rd. After spotting it, I stopped my vehicle, got it in my bins and 
saw that it was a Long-eared Owl!! I was only able to observe it for about 10 
seconds before it flew into the woods on the right si! 

 de of the road. My next owl was heard at 3:17 a.m. when I stepped out of my 
vehicle after parking in the Converse Bay parking lot. A Barred Owl sang 
immediately and it was unsolicited. My next owl was another Barred Owl spotted 
 AT  3:36 a.m. while driving north along Orchard Rd. in Shelburne. It was perched 
on a tree limb on the left side of the road. My next owl was yet another Barred 
Owl that flew across Irish Hill Rd. in front of me at 4:34 a.m. My next owl was 
heard at 5:29 a.m. after parking my vehicle at the end of Lagoon Rd. in 
Hinesburg. I listened for about a minute before I heard a Great Horned Owl 
sing. I could just barely hear it as it was quite a distance away. My last owl 
was seen perched on a tree branch while walking back from the Colchester 
Causeway, on the right side of the path at 9:06 a.m. A man was standing in the 
path ahead of me and when I reached him, he showed me the bird. He lives nearby 
and first saw it in his back yard. It then flew to where I saw ! 

 it. He told me that it was the first owl he had ever seen. It too was another 
Barred Owl. 

I don't think I ever had 5 different species of owls during a single owling 
outing. 


Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
Subject: Re: Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles
From: Pat Folsom <pfols AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 2017 14:05:22 -0500
Know it was one day early, but I saw 2 adult Bald Eagles at Shelburne Bay on 
1/3/17. 




----- Original Message -----
From: "Susan Elliott" <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
To: "VT Bird" 
Sent: Thursday, January 5, 2017 1:22:42 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles

Thanks, Mark. Marv and I went out to Bomoseen again today. Here is my eBird 
report: 

Lake Bomoseen - Castleton (2360 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
Jan 5, 2017 10:18 AM - 10:22 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:    from Crystal Beach
1 species

Bald Eagle  2    on Neshobe Island; sitting in white pines

The ice has actually receded and the area where we saw all the eagles on 
Tuesday is now all water. Not in the survey period, but Marv and I saw a Golden 
Eagle near the intersection of Ghost Hollow and Cogman roads in West Haven on 
December 23.  

Sue      From: "LaBarr, Mark" 
 To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, January 4, 2017 9:27 AM
 Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles
   
Hi Sue,
The survey period for the Federal Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Survey starts today 
(Jan. 4). As folks might already know this is an annual survey coordinated by 
Audubon Vermont and the VT Fish and Wildlife Department. There are several 
standardized survey routes as well as unofficial routes across the state that 
are surveyed by volunteers and Audubon staff. That said any sightings of Bald 
Eagles (or Golden Eagles if one is lucky enough to come across one) are welcome 
from now through January 18th. Information should include number of eagles 
(adults and immatures), date, time, and location. Any behavioral information 
(i.e. roosting, direction of flight, feeding, etc.) is welcome as well. 
Information can be sent to Margaret Fowle (mfowle AT audubon.org) or myself 
(mlabarr AT audubon.org). We will be sure to post the results once all the data is 
compiled. Thanks. 


Mark

Mark LaBarr
Audubon Vermont

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Susan Elliott
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 8:41 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles

There were nine eagles again on Lake Bomoseen this morning - one adult and 
seven immatures on the ice and one adult on the highest white pine on Neshobe 
Island. Roy Pilcher reported three adults earlier in the morning which means 
there may have been 10 eagles at one point. 

A Common Loon is still present as well as Common Goldeneyes, Bufflehead, Common 
and Hooded mergansers. 

Sue and Marv Elliott, Steven Lamonde
Subject: Re: Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 2017 18:22:42 +0000
Thanks, Mark. Marv and I went out to Bomoseen again today. Here is my eBird 
report: 

Lake Bomoseen - Castleton (2360 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
Jan 5, 2017 10:18 AM - 10:22 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:    from Crystal Beach
1 species

Bald Eagle  2    on Neshobe Island; sitting in white pines

The ice has actually receded and the area where we saw all the eagles on 
Tuesday is now all water. Not in the survey period, but Marv and I saw a Golden 
Eagle near the intersection of Ghost Hollow and Cogman roads in West Haven on 
December 23.  

Sue      From: "LaBarr, Mark" 
 To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, January 4, 2017 9:27 AM
 Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles
   
Hi Sue,
The survey period for the Federal Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Survey starts today 
(Jan. 4). As folks might already know this is an annual survey coordinated by 
Audubon Vermont and the VT Fish and Wildlife Department. There are several 
standardized survey routes as well as unofficial routes across the state that 
are surveyed by volunteers and Audubon staff. That said any sightings of Bald 
Eagles (or Golden Eagles if one is lucky enough to come across one) are welcome 
from now through January 18th. Information should include number of eagles 
(adults and immatures), date, time, and location. Any behavioral information 
(i.e. roosting, direction of flight, feeding, etc.) is welcome as well. 
Information can be sent to Margaret Fowle (mfowle AT audubon.org) or myself 
(mlabarr AT audubon.org). We will be sure to post the results once all the data is 
compiled. Thanks. 


Mark

Mark LaBarr
Audubon Vermont

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Susan Elliott
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 8:41 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Lake Bomoseen Bald Eagles

There were nine eagles again on Lake Bomoseen this morning - one adult and 
seven immatures on the ice and one adult on the highest white pine on Neshobe 
Island. Roy Pilcher reported three adults earlier in the morning which means 
there may have been 10 eagles at one point. 

A Common Loon is still present as well as Common Goldeneyes, Bufflehead, Common 
and Hooded mergansers. 

Sue and Marv Elliott, Steven Lamonde


   
Subject: An Evening of Bird Tails
From: Rich Kelley <rich AT WESTSWANTON.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 2017 12:54:27 -0500
On behalf of the Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, please
join us for an Evening of Bird Tales
, on Thursday, February
2nd, at the St. Albans Museum's Bliss Room, beginning at 6:30PM.

This free event is a chance to socialize with the Vermont birding
community, and to here some prominent birders share stories of their
birding adventures.

All are welcome, no preregistration is required. Light refreshments
provided.

Please join and share our Facebook event
!


For more information or any questions, please contact
birdtales AT friendofmissisquoi.org
Subject: 2016 Photo Big Year summary
From: Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 2017 16:26:03 +0000
Tyler,
Congratulations on your successful effort and determination to raise money for 
the scholarship fund!I enjoyed all your posts on VTBIRD and followed your 
Flickr contributions as well.  As a matter of fact, I started using your 
Flickr stream as a photographic game to study Vermont birds.  it goes like 
this:   click on photo - try to identify it- then click on the title to see if 
I was correct.   I certainly need the practice on identifying our Vermont 
birds and this was a fun way to do just that.  So, thank you. 


Wishing all VTBIRD list readers and contributors a HAPPY NEW YEAR and HAPPY 
BIRDING in 2017. 

If anyone is in the Playa des Coco - Guanacaste - Costa Rica area during 
January or February, you can contact me by email at KMPFEIFFER AT YAHOO.COM   
Martha Pfeiffer, Dorset