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Updated on Tuesday, May 31 at 07:23 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Field Sparrow,©Barry Kent Mackay

31 May Re: Goldfinch and Dandelions! West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 2016 [Barbara Brosnan ]
31 May Walks [Sue ]
31 May Re: Barn Owl correction [Maeve Kim ]
31 May Re: Barn Owl correction [Eve Ticknor ]
31 May Re: Barn Owl correction [Maeve Kim ]
31 May Barn Owl correction [Bob Budliger ]
31 May Re: barn owls [Maeve Kim ]
30 May barn owls [David Gusakov ]
30 May Great-crested Flycatcher [Barclay Morris ]
30 May Goldfinch and Dandelions! West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 2016 [Roy Pilcher ]
30 May Re: VTBIRD Digest - 28 May 2016 to 29 May 2016 (#2016-146) [Ruth ]
30 May Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls YES [Alison Wagner ]
29 May Rutland County Audubon Century Count [Susan Elliott ]
29 May No. Mockingbird pair in So. Burlington [Scott Morrical ]
29 May Fw: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, May 28, 2016 [Ruth ]
29 May No Subject [Ruth ]
29 May Re: Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No [Jim Phillips ]
29 May Fwd: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, May 29, 2016 [Sue ]
29 May Fwd: eBird Report - Short Swamp Rd., May 29, 2016 [Sue ]
29 May Fwd: eBird Report - Mount Independence, May 28, 2016 [Sue ]
29 May Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No ["Nancy A. Brown" ]
29 May Re: Help with using VTBIRD [Marvin Elliott ]
29 May Help with using VTBIRD [Ruth ]
29 May State of NA Birds 2016 [Fred Nelson ]
28 May Re: Yes, a famale towhee [Jane Stein ]
28 May Yes, a famale towhee [Janet Watton ]
28 May Fw: [VTBIRD] Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners ["Nancy A. Brown" ]
27 May Goldfinch behavior [Ken Copenhaver ]
27 May Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28 [Roy Pilcher ]
27 May Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28 [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
27 May Yes, a towhee female [Jane Stein ]
27 May Birding at Eagle Point [vtfiliberti ]
27 May Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners ["Nancy A. Brown" ]
27 May Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), May 27, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
26 May Hummingbird mating dance [John Snell ]
26 May Re: Magic moment [Eugenia Cooke ]
26 May Bird walk [Sue ]
26 May Tennessee and Blackpoll Warblers on Shelburne Point [Scott Morrical ]
26 May 9-!!!! Bald Eagles [Ruth ]
26 May Fw: River Road Trail at Killington Marsh, May 26, 2016 [Susan Elliott ]
26 May Geprag's Cerulean - no [Miriam Lawrence ]
26 May Re: fledgeling owl? [Susan Elliott ]
25 May fledgeling owl? [Cedar Stanistreet ]
25 May Re: Photos from West Rutland Marsh and Dewey's Pond [Eugenia Cooke ]
25 May Photos from West Rutland Marsh and Dewey's Pond [Jim Block ]
25 May Cerulean [Liz Lee ]
24 May Cerulean Warbler Geprag Park [Patrick Plas ]
24 May Re: E Bird Number Crunching [Sarah Janson ]
24 May Re: E Bird Number Crunching ["Ian A. Worley" ]
24 May Re: E Bird Number Crunching ["Ian A. Worley" ]
24 May Re: E Bird Number Crunching [Jim Guion ]
24 May Re: E Bird Number Crunching ["Ian A. Worley" ]
24 May Re: E Bird Number Crunching [Kent McFarland ]
24 May E Bird Number Crunching [Larry and Mona Rogers ]
24 May Birding on the Waterbury Reservoir [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver ]
23 May Chipman Hill in Middlebury [Chris Rimmer ]
23 May Re: close encounter [Susan Tucker ]
23 May Eagles at Gale Meadows [Ruth ]
23 May Re: Hooded warbler Bennington [Pieter van Loon ]
23 May Re: Mansfield ridgeline [Scott Sainsbury ]
23 May Re: Mansfield ridgeline [Julie Filiberti ]
23 May Bald Eagles and loons at Gale Meadows [Ruth ]
22 May Mansfield ridgeline [Chris Rimmer ]
22 May Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh [Eugenia Cooke ]
22 May PHOTOS from the Third Week of May [Jim Block ]
22 May Owl [Sue ]
22 May Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
22 May Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh [Tyler Pockette ]
22 May Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh [G M ARCHAMBAULT ]
22 May Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh [Tyler Pockette ]
22 May Clay-colored Sparrow [Chip Darmstadt ]
22 May first veery song [Veer Frost ]
22 May Bird-a-thon highlights; [Ruth ]
21 May marsh birds at South Slang and update on barred owl nest on Mt. Philo [Ellie George ]
21 May Essex: 150 Species Plus [tfberriman ]
21 May MT Philo Barred Owl & West HAven Prothonotary ["Nancy A. Brown" ]

Subject: Re: Goldfinch and Dandelions! West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 2016
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 20:17:25 -0400
Hello Roy,
I have seen them weigh down grass stems to eat the seeds. I have noticed that 
Goldfinches perch on branches, twigs, stems on an angle rather than horizontal, 
and they use the higher foot as a hand to secure seeds as they eat. They even 
do this with seeds from the feeder, having taken them to a slanting perch and 
holding the seed to the branch with one foot as they eat. 


Re Goldfinches and dandelions, soon after purchasing our house in Weybridge we 
drove by on a spring afternoon and saw the newly green yard filled with 
dandelions. Then suddenly half of the dandelions took off into the air - 
Goldfinches! We still talk about that vision. 


Barbara B.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Roy Pilcher
Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 8:00 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Goldfinch and Dandelions! West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 
2016 


Following up on previous observations of goldfinch behavior. Note image.

Cheers, Roy Pilcher



-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist 
To: shamwariVT 
Sent: Mon, May 30, 2016 7:56 pm
Subject: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 2016

West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US May 30, 2016 8:15 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Replenishing feeders at kiosk.. All observations made from boardwalk. 

27 species

Canada Goose  3
Wood Duck  1
American Bittern  1     In flight.
Virginia Rail  1     Calling.  May have been two.
Wilson's Snipe  1     Yakking!
Mourning Dove  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Willow Flycatcher  1     Also tape recorded singing.
Eastern Kingbird  2
Warbling Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  2
Barn Swallow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  2
House Wren  1
Marsh Wren  3
Veery  1
Common Yellowthroat  2
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Swamp Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  3
American Goldfinch 4 Eating dandelion seeds having first weighed down the stalk 
to the ground. 


View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29998722 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Walks
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 13:41:09 -0400
This Saturday at Blue Seal on Rt 7 south of Brandon I will do a bird tour of 
the property, from 8:00am. This is especially good for beginners. 


June 11 at the Miller Hill Farm/Nursery , RT 73 east,a bird walk from 
8:00--11:00. 

A variety of habitats can provide a nice group of birds.

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Barn Owl correction
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 07:49:01 -0400
eBird is THE source for answers to questions like this. You don’t have to have 
an account. There are several routes to the same info, but here’s one: Go to 
the home page, choose Explore Data and then choose Bar Charts. Select the state 
you want. Entire Region will give you the broadest picture. Then scroll down to 
find the species you want and click on Map. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center


On May 31, 2016, at 7:43 AM, Eve Ticknor  wrote:

> Does anyone know of Barn Owls closer to the northern parts? I am located near 
Plattsburgh, NY and can drive to various locations but jamaica Bay is a bit far 
for me. 

> Eve
> 
>> On May 31, 2016, at 7:13 AM, Bob Budliger 
<0000009ba2126cb4-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 

>> 
>> The Wallkill River NWR is in Sussex County, NJ where the HQ is located. A 
very small portion of the refuge extends into NY's Orange County. There is a 
Barn Owl nesting in box at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Queens County, NY 
which is easier to view. Still a long way. 

>> 
>> 
>> Bob Budliger
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> Eve Ticknor
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
> Canada
> res: 613-925-5528
> cell: 613-859-9545
> 
> The Blue Nest
> 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
> U S A
> res: 518-963-7404
> cell: 518-524-7377
> 
> http://aquavisions.me
> 
> If you go as far as you can see, you will then see enough to go even farther.
>    - John Wooden
Subject: Re: Barn Owl correction
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 07:43:15 -0400
Does anyone know of Barn Owls closer to the northern parts? I am located near 
Plattsburgh, NY and can drive to various locations but jamaica Bay is a bit far 
for me. 

Eve

> On May 31, 2016, at 7:13 AM, Bob Budliger 
<0000009ba2126cb4-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 

> 
> The Wallkill River NWR is in Sussex County, NJ where the HQ is located. A 
very small portion of the refuge extends into NY's Orange County. There is a 
Barn Owl nesting in box at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Queens County, NY 
which is easier to view. Still a long way. 

> 
> 
> Bob Budliger
> 



Eve Ticknor
Box 2206
Prescott, On  K0E 1T0
Canada
res: 613-925-5528
cell: 613-859-9545

The Blue Nest
24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996
U S A
res: 518-963-7404
cell: 518-524-7377

http://aquavisions.me

If you go as far as you can see, you will then see enough to go even farther.
    - John Wooden
Subject: Re: Barn Owl correction
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 07:41:47 -0400
Thanks, Bob - I was too hasty!

Maeve


On May 31, 2016, at 7:13 AM, Bob Budliger 
<0000009ba2126cb4-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote: 


> The Wallkill River NWR is in Sussex County, NJ where the HQ is located. A 
very small portion of the refuge extends into NY's Orange County. There is a 
Barn Owl nesting in box at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Queens County, NY 
which is easier to view. Still a long way. 

> 
> 
> Bob Budliger
Subject: Barn Owl correction
From: Bob Budliger <0000009ba2126cb4-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 07:13:15 -0400
The Wallkill River NWR is in Sussex County, NJ where the HQ is located. A very 
small portion of the refuge extends into NY's Orange County. There is a Barn 
Owl nesting in box at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Queens County, NY which 
is easier to view. Still a long way. 



Bob Budliger
Subject: Re: barn owls
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 06:06:09 -0400
Good morning, David and other birders - eBird shows a handful of Barn Owl 
sightings in the state, all from the seventies, eighties and nineties. The 
nearest recent sighting (May 11 of this year) was at the Wallkill River 
National Wildlife Refuge, Liberty Marsh, in Sussex County NY. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center



On May 30, 2016, at 9:42 PM, David Gusakov  wrote:

> Having just finished the wonderful book “Barn Owl” by David Chandler, I’d
> love to see or hear one; I never have and am not aware to what degree
> they are present in Vermont.
> 
> Any information would be appreciated…
> 
> David Gusakov
Subject: barn owls
From: David Gusakov <dgusakov AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 21:42:42 -0400
Having just finished the wonderful book “Barn Owl” by David Chandler, I’d
love to see or hear one; I never have and am not aware to what degree
they are present in Vermont.

Any information would be appreciated…

David Gusakov
Subject: Great-crested Flycatcher
From: Barclay Morris <bemorris AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 21:17:52 -0400
We had a pair checking out a nesting box in our front yard this evening. If 
they stick around we should be getting some great photos from the den. Here’s 
hoping 


Barclay
East shore Grand Isle
Subject: Goldfinch and Dandelions! West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 2016
From: Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 19:59:52 -0400
Following up on previous observations of goldfinch behavior. Note image.

Cheers, Roy Pilcher



-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist 
To: shamwariVT 
Sent: Mon, May 30, 2016 7:56 pm
Subject: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 30, 2016

West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 30, 2016 8:15 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Replenishing feeders at kiosk.. All observations made from boardwalk. 

27 species

Canada Goose  3
Wood Duck  1
American Bittern  1     In flight.
Virginia Rail  1     Calling.  May have been two.
Wilson's Snipe  1     Yakking!
Mourning Dove  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Willow Flycatcher  1     Also tape recorded singing.
Eastern Kingbird  2
Warbling Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  2
Barn Swallow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  2
House Wren  1
Marsh Wren  3
Veery  1
Common Yellowthroat  2
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Swamp Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  3
American Goldfinch 4 Eating dandelion seeds having first weighed down the stalk 
to the ground. 


View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29998722 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 28 May 2016 to 29 May 2016 (#2016-146)
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 18:46:34 +0000
Thanks for the report on the Century Run, Sue.  Always fun!   

Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: Vermont Birds  on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest 
system  

Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 12:00 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 28 May 2016 to 29 May 2016 (#2016-146)

There are 12 messages totaling 429 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. State of NA Birds 2016
  2. Help with using VTBIRD (2)
  3. Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No (2)
  4. Fwd: eBird Report - Mount Independence, May 28, 2016
  5. Fwd: eBird Report - Short Swamp Rd., May 29, 2016
  6. Fwd: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, May 29, 2016
  7. 
  8. Fw: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, May 28, 2016
  9. No. Mockingbird pair in So. Burlington
 10. Rutland County Audubon Century Count

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 08:56:16 -0400
From:    Fred Nelson 
Subject: State of NA Birds 2016

This is a quick and useful read on the state of North America’s birds, released 
last week I believe, FYI: 



http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/SoNAB-ENGLISH-web.pdf 
 


------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 17:07:26 +0000
From:    Ruth 
Subject: Help with using VTBIRD

Is Ernie Buford still admin for this list? The VTBIRD info web page is not 
linking to his email. 



My question is how to change receiving VTBIRD in digest form back to 'as send' 
receipt? Thanks to anyone who can help. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 13:49:44 -0400
From:    Marvin Elliott 
Subject: Re: Help with using VTBIRD

Ruth and others,
Go to the vtbird listserv using a Google Search. The right side of the home 
page says options and lists subscribe and unsubscribe. Click and you will see 
the two options given for receiving notifications. I did not go further since I 
do not want to change mine. 

Good luck.
Marv elliott
> On May 29, 2016, at 1:07 PM, Ruth  wrote:
>
> Is Ernie Buford still admin for this list? The VTBIRD info web page is not 
linking to his email. 

>
>
> My question is how to change receiving VTBIRD in digest form back to 'as 
send' receipt? Thanks to anyone who can help. 

>
>
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 14:14:47 -0400
From:    "Nancy A. Brown" 
Subject: Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No

THis morning 7:15 am stop at West Rutland Marsh had no juvenile Saw-whet Owls 
found outside box in apple tree, (yesterday there were 3) . At 11:30 am after 
waiting an hour the Prothonotary at Buckner Preserve in West Haven was heard 
and 2 other birders did get a glimpse of it. It was on the river bank tree 
line, across from the first pond and moving quickly east as it call a dozen 
times. They saw it as it crossed road at east end of pond. 


------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 14:16:23 -0400
From:    Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Mount Independence, May 28, 2016

A nice group of birders hiked the orange trail and found the list below.
Sue Wetmore
Sent from my iPod

> Subject: eBird Report - Mount Independence, May 28, 2016
>
> Mount Independence, Addison, Vermont, US
> May 28, 2016 7:11 AM - 11:11 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.5 mile(s)
> 40 species
>
> Canada Goose  5
> Mallard  2
> Ruffed Grouse  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  1
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Turkey Vulture  6
> Osprey  1
> Ring-billed Gull  5
> Caspian Tern  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3     birds seen and heard along orange trail loop.
> Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)  1
> Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern)  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
> Great Crested Flycatcher  4
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  13
> Blue Jay  17
> American Crow  5
> Common Raven  4     young were begging food with calls.
> Barn Swallow  1
> Black-capped Chickadee  6
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  1
> Hermit Thrush  1
> Wood Thrush  2
> American Robin  8
> Gray Catbird  2
> European Starling  4
> Ovenbird  13
> Black-and-white Warbler  2
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> American Redstart  1
> Pine Warbler  2
> Chipping Sparrow  2
> Scarlet Tanager  3
> Northern Cardinal  4
> Red-winged Blackbird  1
> Common Grackle  7
> Baltimore Oriole  3
> House Finch  1
>
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29971178 

>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 14:20:16 -0400
From:    Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Short Swamp Rd., May 29, 2016

Nice and cool this early. morning.
Sue Wetmore
Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: May 29, 2016 at 1:36:43 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Short Swamp Rd., May 29, 2016
>
> Short Swamp Rd., Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 29, 2016 6:30 AM - 7:10 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 21 species
>
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  3
> Common Raven  1
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> Veery  2
> Hermit Thrush  1
> Gray Catbird  3
> Ovenbird  3
> Northern Waterthrush  3
> Blue-winged Warbler  1     bird a BWWA by plumage and song.
> Black-and-white Warbler  2
> Nashville Warbler  3
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Common Grackle  4
> American Goldfinch  4
>
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29971004 

>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 14:21:08 -0400
From:    Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, May 29, 2016

This walk always provides me with a good variety of species.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: May 29, 2016 at 1:30:04 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, May 29, 2016
>
> Brandon Pearl St, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 29, 2016 5:30 AM - 6:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> 44 species
>
> Wood Duck  1
> Green Heron  1
> Virginia Rail  2
> Killdeer  1
> Wilson's Snipe  1
> Mourning Dove  13
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Phoebe  2
> Great Crested Flycatcher  4
> Eastern Kingbird  4
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  7
> Blue Jay  1
> American Crow  10
> Tree Swallow  7
> Barn Swallow  7
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> House Wren  4
> Carolina Wren  1
> Eastern Bluebird 4 pair looking at natural cavity nest site being bombed by 
tree swallows 

> Veery  1
> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  11
> Gray Catbird  4
> European Starling  4
> Ovenbird  2
> Northern Waterthrush  1
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> American Redstart  5
> Yellow Warbler  6     one bird responded to playing of GWWA song.
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  6
> Song Sparrow  5
> Swamp Sparrow  1
> Northern Cardinal  6
> Red-winged Blackbird  9
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> Common Grackle  1
> Baltimore Oriole  1
> House Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  2
>
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29970913 

>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 14:42:39 -0400
From:    Jim Phillips 
Subject: Re: Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No

The PROW did indeed cross from the far (New York) side to the VT side.
We heard it calling as it moved along, then it stopped calling and we
walked back up the road past the larger pond to the smaller pond.  At
that point we heard it again on the NY side, and saw it fly out onto a
log on the far shore.  It stayed there for a few seconds, and then flew
bank into the woods where we could hear it calling as it moved through
the woods.

5/29/2016 2:14 PM, Nancy A. Brown wrote:
> THis morning 7:15 am stop at West Rutland Marsh had no juvenile Saw-whet Owls 
found outside box in apple tree, (yesterday there were 3) . At 11:30 am after 
waiting an hour the Prothonotary at Buckner Preserve in West Haven was heard 
and 2 other birders did get a glimpse of it. It was on the river bank tree 
line, across from the first pond and moving quickly east as it call a dozen 
times. They saw it as it crossed road at east end of pond. 


------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 18:58:57 +0000
From:    Ruth 
Subject: 

set VTBIRD NODIGEST


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 22:01:59 +0000
From:    Ruth 
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, May 28, 2016

16 folk surveyed the bird populations at Hildene on Sat. Bluebirds were feeding 
young and cardinals 'nest building'? maybe for a 2nd go around? There certainly 
were far more 'heards' than visuals that morning. 


The next walk will be Saturday, June 18. It was great that Jim and Teresa 
Phillips traveled from ? (their now, northern haunts, back to their old 
birding/living grounds to join us. 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 5:37 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, May 28, 2016

Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 28, 2016 6:45 AM - 9:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     70 degrees, sunny
36 species

Canada Goose  2
Ruffed Grouse  1     heard only
Mourning Dove  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Red-eyed Vireo  9
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  9
Tree Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
House Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
Veery  3
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  7
Gray Catbird  4
Ovenbird  8
Black-and-white Warbler  5
Common Yellowthroat  6
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  3
Pine Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
White-throated Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal 2 Female carrying long piece of grass being followed by male 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  3
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29975660 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 22:47:06 +0000
From:    Scott Morrical 
Subject: No. Mockingbird pair in So. Burlington

Hello:


This morning I observed a pair of Northern Mockingbirds near the south end loop 
of Sommerfield Ave., in the Cider Mill development in South Burlington. 



In the same location a Green Heron was perched in a tree and regularly calling 
its bizarre "skyow" call; a second Green Heron occasionally answered from a 
hidden location along the small creek to the south. 



Also nearby, a Willow Flycatcher was calling from the shrubland west of 
Sommerfield x Braeburn in the Cider Mill development. The species has 
apparently been breeding there for the past 2 years or more but alas, the site 
is threatened imminently by new housing construction. 



Scott Morrical,

South Burlington

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 29 May 2016 23:15:38 +0000
From:    Susan Elliott 
Subject: Rutland County Audubon Century Count

Rutland County Audubon had a successful day yesterday for our Century Count - 
100 species. You can read the full report here: 

http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2016/5/29/century-count-xxi.html

Sue Elliott

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 28 May 2016 to 29 May 2016 (#2016-146)
*************************************************************
Subject: Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls YES
From: Alison Wagner <alikatofvt AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 07:48:57 -0400
Good Morrrrrrrrrrrning, VtBIRDers!

Jim Mead and I went on a birders' style rampage yesterday and stopped at 
these two locations as well. Mid day, at the Rutland Marsh, we dipped on the 
Bittern, and thought we had as well with the Saw Whet owlets, but when 
returning to the truck, Jim noticed one chick at the box opening.  We then 
set up the truck with front row seating (pulled into side "road" across the 
street from the box) and had the best lunch ever, tailgating birders' style 
with the family in our scopes.  Over the course of about thirty minutes, we 
concluded we'd seen all three owlets, as subtle differences in facial 
patterns could be noticed, while they "took turns" getting some fresh air 
(and looking at their audience).  Jim commented on how it looked like a 
puppet show at times as heads would quickly disappear, pop up, disappear 
again. Also, it was nice to meet some local folks that came along to 
photograph the Saw Whets.

Later, while viewing a Black Vulture perched near the top of a cliff (much 
white wash where it was), I heard the Prothonotary sing just once;  we did 
not include it in our list as he did not show himself or sing again for us 
both to hear, but we were delighted to know this bird is still around.  Best 
of luck to him in finding a mate, and other birders looking for him!  This 
viewing was at the first area where there is a small pool of water on the 
west side of the road.  The vulture was a target bird for us both, and 
seeing it perched where there was so much white wash left us wondering if it 
was nesting.

Besides these awesome encounters, another highlight of the day was 
hearing/seeing TWO Yellow-billed Cuckoos.  We started our morning at 
Whipstock Hill where we located the first bird.  We had to step along the 
trail gingerly, however,  to avoid a  different species with the highest 
count of  the day:  we  tallyed at least 141 "red efts" of various sizes and 
ages.  (NOTE:  We did not hear or see the coveted Hooded Warbler.)  The one 
bird that held our attention the longest we could not get a handle on it. 
We were intrigued by a songster that sounded like a cross between a 
Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian, but was  very Cerulean-like.  One very 
unsatisfactory glimpse of a busy bird gleaning high in the canopy showed me 
white underneath, no black or fire orange on its throat.  I could not be 
100% sure it was the Cerulean and some things are best let go, so we did. 
Later in the day, we tried again for the Cerulean on our way to the Rutland 
Marsh, hearing many warblers, but not the Cerulean.

Another bird we had to let go, was a likely Orchard Oriole at Ward Marsh 
(northern end).  Sounding too burry to be a Baltimore, Jim managed to get on 
the bird for only a second before it took off.  We heard it a few more 
times, but it was too distant to locate.  An unexpected Bald Eagle eased the 
disappointment.  Perched on a very dead snag, it nearly snapped the branch 
it was perched on when it took flight!  NOTE:  A local kindly stopped to 
suggest to me to be on the alert for Rattlesnakes in this area.  I'm glad we 
stayed on the road!

The second cuckoo was along the Ward Marsh, also seen and heard, close to 
the southern end near/where it joins Buckner Preserve (but before the 
bridge).  As we left Buckner to return home to Chittenden County,  one last 
bird announced its presence.  Jim and I both responded emphatically, 
"PRAIRIE WARBLER!"

Great day, great birding, great friend (thanks, Jim)!

Ali
Huntington



-----Original Message----- 
From: Jim Phillips
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 2:42 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No

The PROW did indeed cross from the far (New York) side to the VT side.
We heard it calling as it moved along, then it stopped calling and we
walked back up the road past the larger pond to the smaller pond.  At
that point we heard it again on the NY side, and saw it fly out onto a
log on the far shore.  It stayed there for a few seconds, and then flew
bank into the woods where we could hear it calling as it moved through
the woods.

5/29/2016 2:14 PM, Nancy A. Brown wrote:
> THis morning 7:15 am stop at West Rutland Marsh had no juvenile Saw-whet 
> Owls found outside box in apple tree, (yesterday there were 3) .  At 11:30 
> am after waiting an hour the Prothonotary at Buckner Preserve in West 
> Haven was heard and 2 other birders did get a glimpse of it. It was on the 
> river bank tree line, across from the first pond and moving quickly east 
> as it call a dozen times.  They saw it as it crossed road at east end of 
> pond. 
Subject: Rutland County Audubon Century Count
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 23:15:38 +0000
Rutland County Audubon had a successful day yesterday for our Century Count - 
100 species. You can read the full report here: 

http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2016/5/29/century-count-xxi.html

Sue Elliott
Subject: No. Mockingbird pair in So. Burlington
From: Scott Morrical <Scott.Morrical AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 22:47:06 +0000
Hello:


This morning I observed a pair of Northern Mockingbirds near the south end loop 
of Sommerfield Ave., in the Cider Mill development in South Burlington. 



In the same location a Green Heron was perched in a tree and regularly calling 
its bizarre "skyow" call; a second Green Heron occasionally answered from a 
hidden location along the small creek to the south. 



Also nearby, a Willow Flycatcher was calling from the shrubland west of 
Sommerfield x Braeburn in the Cider Mill development. The species has 
apparently been breeding there for the past 2 years or more but alas, the site 
is threatened imminently by new housing construction. 



Scott Morrical,

South Burlington
Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, May 28, 2016
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 22:01:59 +0000
16 folk surveyed the bird populations at Hildene on Sat. Bluebirds were feeding 
young and cardinals 'nest building'? maybe for a 2nd go around? There certainly 
were far more 'heards' than visuals that morning. 


The next walk will be Saturday, June 18. It was great that Jim and Teresa 
Phillips traveled from ? (their now, northern haunts, back to their old 
birding/living grounds to join us. 


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 5:37 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, May 28, 2016

Hildene - Lincoln Family Home, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 28, 2016 6:45 AM - 9:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     70 degrees, sunny
36 species

Canada Goose  2
Ruffed Grouse  1     heard only
Mourning Dove  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  3
Eastern Phoebe  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Red-eyed Vireo  9
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  9
Tree Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
House Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
Veery  3
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  7
Gray Catbird  4
Ovenbird  8
Black-and-white Warbler  5
Common Yellowthroat  6
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  3
Pine Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
White-throated Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  3
Northern Cardinal 2 Female carrying long piece of grass being followed by male 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  3
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29975660 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: No Subject
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 18:58:57 +0000
set VTBIRD NODIGEST


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: Re: Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No
From: Jim Phillips <jim AT THEPHILLIPS.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:42:39 -0400
The PROW did indeed cross from the far (New York) side to the VT side.  
We heard it calling as it moved along, then it stopped calling and we 
walked back up the road past the larger pond to the smaller pond.  At 
that point we heard it again on the NY side, and saw it fly out onto a 
log on the far shore.  It stayed there for a few seconds, and then flew 
bank into the woods where we could hear it calling as it moved through 
the woods.

5/29/2016 2:14 PM, Nancy A. Brown wrote:
> THis morning 7:15 am stop at West Rutland Marsh had no juvenile Saw-whet Owls 
found outside box in apple tree, (yesterday there were 3) . At 11:30 am after 
waiting an hour the Prothonotary at Buckner Preserve in West Haven was heard 
and 2 other birders did get a glimpse of it. It was on the river bank tree 
line, across from the first pond and moving quickly east as it call a dozen 
times. They saw it as it crossed road at east end of pond. 

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, May 29, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:21:08 -0400
This walk always provides me with a good variety of species.
Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: May 29, 2016 at 1:30:04 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Brandon Pearl St, May 29, 2016
> 
> Brandon Pearl St, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 29, 2016 5:30 AM - 6:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> 44 species
> 
> Wood Duck  1
> Green Heron  1
> Virginia Rail  2
> Killdeer  1
> Wilson's Snipe  1
> Mourning Dove  13
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Phoebe  2
> Great Crested Flycatcher  4
> Eastern Kingbird  4
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  7
> Blue Jay  1
> American Crow  10
> Tree Swallow  7
> Barn Swallow  7
> Tufted Titmouse  2
> House Wren  4
> Carolina Wren  1
> Eastern Bluebird 4 pair looking at natural cavity nest site being bombed by 
tree swallows 

> Veery  1
> Wood Thrush  1
> American Robin  11
> Gray Catbird  4
> European Starling  4
> Ovenbird  2
> Northern Waterthrush  1
> Common Yellowthroat  3
> American Redstart  5
> Yellow Warbler  6     one bird responded to playing of GWWA song.
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  6
> Song Sparrow  5
> Swamp Sparrow  1
> Northern Cardinal  6
> Red-winged Blackbird  9
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> Common Grackle  1
> Baltimore Oriole  1
> House Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  2
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29970913 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Short Swamp Rd., May 29, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:20:16 -0400
Nice and cool this early. morning.
Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Date: May 29, 2016 at 1:36:43 PM EDT
> To: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
> Subject: eBird Report - Short Swamp Rd., May 29, 2016
> 
> Short Swamp Rd., Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 29, 2016 6:30 AM - 7:10 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 21 species
> 
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  3
> Common Raven  1
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> Veery  2
> Hermit Thrush  1
> Gray Catbird  3
> Ovenbird  3
> Northern Waterthrush  3
> Blue-winged Warbler  1     bird a BWWA by plumage and song.
> Black-and-white Warbler  2
> Nashville Warbler  3
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> Common Grackle  4
> American Goldfinch  4
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29971004 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Mount Independence, May 28, 2016
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:16:23 -0400
A nice group of birders hiked the orange trail and found the list below.
Sue Wetmore 
Sent from my iPod

> Subject: eBird Report - Mount Independence, May 28, 2016
> 
> Mount Independence, Addison, Vermont, US
> May 28, 2016 7:11 AM - 11:11 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.5 mile(s)
> 40 species
> 
> Canada Goose  5
> Mallard  2
> Ruffed Grouse  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  1
> Great Blue Heron  1
> Turkey Vulture  6
> Osprey  1
> Ring-billed Gull  5
> Caspian Tern  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  3     birds seen and heard along orange trail loop.
> Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)  1
> Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern)  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
> Great Crested Flycatcher  4
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  13
> Blue Jay  17
> American Crow  5
> Common Raven  4     young were begging food with calls.
> Barn Swallow  1
> Black-capped Chickadee  6
> Tufted Titmouse  1
> White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  1
> Hermit Thrush  1
> Wood Thrush  2
> American Robin  8
> Gray Catbird  2
> European Starling  4
> Ovenbird  13
> Black-and-white Warbler  2
> Common Yellowthroat  1
> American Redstart  1
> Pine Warbler  2
> Chipping Sparrow  2
> Scarlet Tanager  3
> Northern Cardinal  4
> Red-winged Blackbird  1
> Common Grackle  7
> Baltimore Oriole  3
> House Finch  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29971178 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Sunday 5/29/16 Prothonotary Yes, Saw-whet Owls No
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 14:14:47 -0400
THis morning 7:15 am stop at West Rutland Marsh had no juvenile Saw-whet Owls 
found outside box in apple tree, (yesterday there were 3) . At 11:30 am after 
waiting an hour the Prothonotary at Buckner Preserve in West Haven was heard 
and 2 other birders did get a glimpse of it. It was on the river bank tree 
line, across from the first pond and moving quickly east as it call a dozen 
times. They saw it as it crossed road at east end of pond. 

Subject: Re: Help with using VTBIRD
From: Marvin Elliott <marvelliott61 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 13:49:44 -0400
Ruth and others,
Go to the vtbird listserv using a Google Search. The right side of the home 
page says options and lists subscribe and unsubscribe. Click and you will see 
the two options given for receiving notifications. I did not go further since I 
do not want to change mine. 

Good luck.
Marv elliott
> On May 29, 2016, at 1:07 PM, Ruth  wrote:
> 
> Is Ernie Buford still admin for this list? The VTBIRD info web page is not 
linking to his email. 

> 
> 
> My question is how to change receiving VTBIRD in digest form back to 'as 
send' receipt? Thanks to anyone who can help. 

> 
> 
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
Subject: Help with using VTBIRD
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 17:07:26 +0000
Is Ernie Buford still admin for this list? The VTBIRD info web page is not 
linking to his email. 



My question is how to change receiving VTBIRD in digest form back to 'as send' 
receipt? Thanks to anyone who can help. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: State of NA Birds 2016
From: Fred Nelson <fred.d.nelson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 08:56:16 -0400
This is a quick and useful read on the state of North America’s birds, 
released last week I believe, FYI: 



http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/SoNAB-ENGLISH-web.pdf 
 
Subject: Re: Yes, a famale towhee
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 17:12:50 -0400
If I could, I surely would.  She's a stunningly beautiful bird, with 
that deep chocolate brown and dark red and the elegant long tail.

Jane



On 5/28/2016 2:20 PM, Janet Watton wrote:
> Jane - send her down here to me. My (male) Towhee has been singing here for 
weeks and I don't think he has a bride yet!! 

> Janet Watton
> Randolph Center
>
>
> On May 28, 2016, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

>
>> There are 7 messages totaling 287 lines in this issue.
>>
>> Topics of the day:
>>
>>  1. Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), May 27, 2016
>>  2. Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners
>>  3. Birding at Eagle Point
>>  4. Yes, a towhee female
>>  5. Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28 (2)
>>  6. Goldfinch behavior
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 16:36:05 +0000
>> From:    Susan Elliott 
>> Subject: Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), May 27, 2016
>>
>> Nothing unexpected at Lefferts Pond in Chittenden, but you can't beat it as 
a place to spend a beautiful morning like this. 

>>
>>
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 1.25 mile(s)
>> 48 species
>>
>> Canada Goose  14
>> Mallard  2
>> Ruffed Grouse  1
>> Wild Turkey  1
>> Great Blue Heron  3
>> Bald Eagle  2
>> Broad-winged Hawk  1
>> Spotted Sandpiper  1
>> Mourning Dove  1
>> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
>> Belted Kingfisher  2
>> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
>> Downy Woodpecker  1
>> Northern Flicker  1
>> Alder Flycatcher  4
>> Least Flycatcher  2
>> Eastern Phoebe  1
>> Eastern Kingbird  3
>> Blue-headed Vireo  2
>> Red-eyed Vireo  3
>> Blue Jay  3
>> Black-capped Chickadee  3
>> Red-breasted Nuthatch  5
>> Brown Creeper  4
>> American Robin  5
>> Gray Catbird  1
>> Cedar Waxwing  3
>> Ovenbird  3
>> Northern Waterthrush  4
>> Nashville Warbler  2
>> Common Yellowthroat  7
>> Northern Parula  3
>> Magnolia Warbler  2
>> Blackburnian Warbler  5
>> Yellow Warbler  2
>> Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
>> Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
>> Yellow-rumped Warbler  4
>> Black-throated Green Warbler  2
>> White-throated Sparrow  4
>> Song Sparrow  4
>> Swamp Sparrow  2
>> Scarlet Tanager  1
>> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
>> Red-winged Blackbird  3
>> Common Grackle  3
>> Purple Finch  3
>> American Goldfinch  2
>>
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29935463 

>>
>> Sue and Marv Elliott, Tracey and Millie Busony
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 12:39:01 -0400
>> From:    "Nancy A. Brown" 
>> Subject: Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners
>>
>> An Acadian Flycatcher is at 210 Old Otis Road, Danby Four Corners, South 
Western Rutland County. I located it in the little marsh between 210 and the 
little cemetery inside a stone wall, about .8 mile from Danby Pawlet Rd 
intersection. There is room for several cars at the cemetery, walk back down to 
dip in road over culvert and wait for it's a loud " PSWEET" call. It calls from 
high up ( book say mid-story) Note there are also Alder and Willow Flycatchers 
in the vicinity also. It has been frequenting the clump of large mostly dead 
limb poplars in the middle of the swamp, tops of birches that are higher than 
the alders or the popular that ring the swamp. Small flycather with loud note, 
tri colored underside. Grey upper breast, followed by white and yellow belly. 
Bi colored bill, and long primary wing projection. 

>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 18:35:39 -0400
>> From:    vtfiliberti 
>> Subject: Birding at Eagle Point
>>
>> Birding at Eagle Point
>>
>>
>>
>> Join the Friends of Missisquoi NWR along with the Memphremagog Watershed 
Association for a morning of birding and exploration at the Eagle Point Unit. 

>>
>> Saturday, June 11th at 8:00am
>>
>>
>> Eagle Point, a 420 acre tract of property on the shore of Lake Memphramegog 
near the town of Newport, became part of the Missisquoi NWR in 2010. The Eagle 
Point property consists of a mix of upland and wetland habitats including 
northern hardwood forest, hemlock seepage forest, managed grassland, and a 
diverse wetland complex formed around Hall’s Creek. 

>>
>> Note: there are no facilities on the property.
>>
>>
>>
>> Directions
>>
>> · From East Main Street in Newport (VT5) turn left on Sias Avenue (heading 
north) - .6miles 

>>
>> ·      Sias Avenue turns into Darling Hill Road – 1.6mi
>>
>> ·      Continue straight on North Derby Road – 2.1mi
>>
>> · At the end, make a left Eagle Point Farm Road (T-17) and follow to Eagle 
Point WMA – 1.4 mi 

>>
>>
>> Carpooling from points west
>>
>> Those interested in carpooling have the following options:
>>
>> Meet at 6:00am at the St. Albans Park and Ride
>>
>> Meet at 6:30am at the Enosburg Park and Ride
>>
>>
>>
>> We are planning an optional afternoon of birding in the NEK for those 
interested in making a full day of the trip. 

>>
>>
>> ***Please RSVP to Julie Filiberti (vtfiliberti AT gmail.com) or Ken Copenhaver 
(copenhvr AT gmail.com )with your interest and 
transportation plans. We want to be sure to have your contact information in 
the case of cancellation or changes. 

>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 19:47:51 -0400
>> From:    Jane Stein 
>> Subject: Yes, a towhee female
>>
>> Back on May 9, I thought I caught a brief glimpse of a female Towhee
>> pecking at seeds under my feeder with a couple of RBG males and a host
>> of White-Crowned sparrows.  The whole bunch flushed and I didn't see the
>> possible female Towhee again, so I chalked it up to insufficient
>> caffeine in the system early in the AM since I've not seen or heard a
>> Towhee around these parts since I moved here 10 years ago now.
>>
>> And then today, for the first time since the 9th, there it is again
>> under the feeder and it is absolutely a female Towhee.  But I've had no
>> sight of a male and no sound of its distinctive song, either.  She's
>> been here almost 3 weeks now all by herself?
>>
>> Jane
>> (Shoreham)
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 20:18:21 -0400
>> From:    Jeffrey Sonshine 
>> Subject: Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
>>
>> Sue,
>>
>> If we wanted to catch up with you guys after 6AM do you have an itinerary?
>> Will you start at West Rutland Marsh?  How long do you think you'll be
>> there and then where will you head?  I don't expect exact times but if I
>> arrived at 8AM where might I expect to find people?
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>> On Thu, May 26, 2016 at 7:43 PM, Susan Elliott <
>> 00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> Join Rutland County Audubon this Saturday, May 28, for our annual attempt
>>> to tally 100 species in Rutland County. We meet at the West Rutland Price
>>> Chopper parking lot at 6 a.m. Bring lunch. Stay for the whole day or as
>>> long as you like.
>>> Free and open to all!
>>> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
>> 36 Laurel Ledge Court
>> Stamford, CT 06903
>> 973-441-1115
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 21:13:24 -0400
>> From:    Roy Pilcher 
>> Subject: Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
>>
>> We will be either at or around the marsh and the Pleasant Street power line 
for at least an hour then on to the rest stop on route 4 west. 

>>
>> Cheers, Roy
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Jeffrey Sonshine 
>> To: VTBIRD 
>> Sent: Fri, May 27, 2016 8:18 pm
>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
>>
>> Sue,
>>
>> If we wanted to catch up with you guys after 6AM do you have an itinerary?
>> Will you start at West Rutland Marsh?  How long do you think you'll be
>> there and then where will you head?  I don't expect exact times but if I
>> arrived at 8AM where might I expect to find people?
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>> On Thu, May 26, 2016 at 7:43 PM, Susan Elliott <
>> 00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> Join Rutland County Audubon this Saturday, May 28, for our annual attempt
>>> to tally 100 species in Rutland County. We meet at the West Rutland Price
>>> Chopper parking lot at 6 a.m. Bring lunch. Stay for the whole day or as
>>> long as you like.
>>> Free and open to all!
>>> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
>> 36 Laurel Ledge Court
>> Stamford, CT 06903
>> 973-441-1115
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 23:48:13 -0400
>> From:    Ken Copenhaver 
>> Subject: Goldfinch behavior
>>
>> I watched an interesting American Goldfinch behavior this evening that I
>> don't think I've seen before.  Several goldfinches caught my eye fluttering
>> and hovering momentarily about 6 inches above the lawn.  I realized that
>> while in the air, they would grasp a dandelion stalk with their feet and
>> then settle to the ground and stand on the stalk to hold it down while they
>> ate the seeds.  Five of them performed this routine repeatedly.  I've never
>> noticed birds methodically eating dandelion seeds like this.  Always
>> something new!
>>
>> Ken Copenhaver
>> Fairfax, VT
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> End of VTBIRD Digest - 26 May 2016 to 27 May 2016 (#2016-144)
>> *************************************************************
>
Subject: Yes, a famale towhee
From: Janet Watton <musbird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 14:20:50 -0400
Jane - send her down here to me. My (male) Towhee has been singing here for 
weeks and I don't think he has a bride yet!! 

Janet Watton
Randolph Center


On May 28, 2016, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 


> There are 7 messages totaling 287 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), May 27, 2016
>  2. Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners
>  3. Birding at Eagle Point
>  4. Yes, a towhee female
>  5. Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28 (2)
>  6. Goldfinch behavior
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 16:36:05 +0000
> From:    Susan Elliott 
> Subject: Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), May 27, 2016
> 
> Nothing unexpected at Lefferts Pond in Chittenden, but you can't beat it as a 
place to spend a beautiful morning like this. 

> 
> 
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.25 mile(s)
> 48 species
> 
> Canada Goose  14
> Mallard  2
> Ruffed Grouse  1
> Wild Turkey  1
> Great Blue Heron  3
> Bald Eagle  2
> Broad-winged Hawk  1
> Spotted Sandpiper  1
> Mourning Dove  1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
> Belted Kingfisher  2
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker  1
> Alder Flycatcher  4
> Least Flycatcher  2
> Eastern Phoebe  1
> Eastern Kingbird  3
> Blue-headed Vireo  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  3
> Blue Jay  3
> Black-capped Chickadee  3
> Red-breasted Nuthatch  5
> Brown Creeper  4
> American Robin  5
> Gray Catbird  1
> Cedar Waxwing  3
> Ovenbird  3
> Northern Waterthrush  4
> Nashville Warbler  2
> Common Yellowthroat  7
> Northern Parula  3
> Magnolia Warbler  2
> Blackburnian Warbler  5
> Yellow Warbler  2
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
> Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  4
> Black-throated Green Warbler  2
> White-throated Sparrow  4
> Song Sparrow  4
> Swamp Sparrow  2
> Scarlet Tanager  1
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  3
> Common Grackle  3
> Purple Finch  3
> American Goldfinch  2
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29935463 

> 
> Sue and Marv Elliott, Tracey and Millie Busony
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 12:39:01 -0400
> From:    "Nancy A. Brown" 
> Subject: Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners
> 
> An Acadian Flycatcher is at 210 Old Otis Road, Danby Four Corners, South 
Western Rutland County. I located it in the little marsh between 210 and the 
little cemetery inside a stone wall, about .8 mile from Danby Pawlet Rd 
intersection. There is room for several cars at the cemetery, walk back down to 
dip in road over culvert and wait for it's a loud " PSWEET" call. It calls from 
high up ( book say mid-story) Note there are also Alder and Willow Flycatchers 
in the vicinity also. It has been frequenting the clump of large mostly dead 
limb poplars in the middle of the swamp, tops of birches that are higher than 
the alders or the popular that ring the swamp. Small flycather with loud note, 
tri colored underside. Grey upper breast, followed by white and yellow belly. 
Bi colored bill, and long primary wing projection. 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 18:35:39 -0400
> From:    vtfiliberti 
> Subject: Birding at Eagle Point
> 
> Birding at Eagle Point
> 
> 
> 
> Join the Friends of Missisquoi NWR along with the Memphremagog Watershed 
Association for a morning of birding and exploration at the Eagle Point Unit. 

> 
> Saturday, June 11th at 8:00am
> 
> 
> Eagle Point, a 420 acre tract of property on the shore of Lake Memphramegog 
near the town of Newport, became part of the Missisquoi NWR in 2010. The Eagle 
Point property consists of a mix of upland and wetland habitats including 
northern hardwood forest, hemlock seepage forest, managed grassland, and a 
diverse wetland complex formed around Hall’s Creek. 

> 
> Note: there are no facilities on the property. 
> 
> 
> 
> Directions
> 
> · From East Main Street in Newport (VT5) turn left on Sias Avenue (heading 
north) - .6miles 

> 
> ·      Sias Avenue turns into Darling Hill Road – 1.6mi
> 
> ·      Continue straight on North Derby Road – 2.1mi 
> 
> · At the end, make a left Eagle Point Farm Road (T-17) and follow to Eagle 
Point WMA – 1.4 mi 

> 
> 
> Carpooling from points west
> 
> Those interested in carpooling have the following options:
> 
> Meet at 6:00am at the St. Albans Park and Ride 
> 
> Meet at 6:30am at the Enosburg Park and Ride
> 
> 
> 
> We are planning an optional afternoon of birding in the NEK for those 
interested in making a full day of the trip. 

> 
> 
> ***Please RSVP to Julie Filiberti (vtfiliberti AT gmail.com) or Ken Copenhaver 
(copenhvr AT gmail.com )with your interest and 
transportation plans. We want to be sure to have your contact information in 
the case of cancellation or changes. 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 19:47:51 -0400
> From:    Jane Stein 
> Subject: Yes, a towhee female
> 
> Back on May 9, I thought I caught a brief glimpse of a female Towhee 
> pecking at seeds under my feeder with a couple of RBG males and a host 
> of White-Crowned sparrows.  The whole bunch flushed and I didn't see the 
> possible female Towhee again, so I chalked it up to insufficient 
> caffeine in the system early in the AM since I've not seen or heard a 
> Towhee around these parts since I moved here 10 years ago now.
> 
> And then today, for the first time since the 9th, there it is again 
> under the feeder and it is absolutely a female Towhee.  But I've had no 
> sight of a male and no sound of its distinctive song, either.  She's 
> been here almost 3 weeks now all by herself?
> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 20:18:21 -0400
> From:    Jeffrey Sonshine 
> Subject: Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
> 
> Sue,
> 
> If we wanted to catch up with you guys after 6AM do you have an itinerary?
> Will you start at West Rutland Marsh?  How long do you think you'll be
> there and then where will you head?  I don't expect exact times but if I
> arrived at 8AM where might I expect to find people?
> 
> Jeff
> 
> On Thu, May 26, 2016 at 7:43 PM, Susan Elliott <
> 00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
> 
>> Join Rutland County Audubon this Saturday, May 28, for our annual attempt
>> to tally 100 species in Rutland County. We meet at the West Rutland Price
>> Chopper parking lot at 6 a.m. Bring lunch. Stay for the whole day or as
>> long as you like.
>> Free and open to all!
>> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
> 36 Laurel Ledge Court
> Stamford, CT 06903
> 973-441-1115
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 21:13:24 -0400
> From:    Roy Pilcher 
> Subject: Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
> 
> We will be either at or around the marsh and the Pleasant Street power line 
for at least an hour then on to the rest stop on route 4 west. 

> 
> Cheers, Roy
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jeffrey Sonshine 
> To: VTBIRD 
> Sent: Fri, May 27, 2016 8:18 pm
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
> 
> Sue,
> 
> If we wanted to catch up with you guys after 6AM do you have an itinerary?
> Will you start at West Rutland Marsh?  How long do you think you'll be
> there and then where will you head?  I don't expect exact times but if I
> arrived at 8AM where might I expect to find people?
> 
> Jeff
> 
> On Thu, May 26, 2016 at 7:43 PM, Susan Elliott <
> 00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:
> 
>> Join Rutland County Audubon this Saturday, May 28, for our annual attempt
>> to tally 100 species in Rutland County. We meet at the West Rutland Price
>> Chopper parking lot at 6 a.m. Bring lunch. Stay for the whole day or as
>> long as you like.
>> Free and open to all!
>> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
> 36 Laurel Ledge Court
> Stamford, CT 06903
> 973-441-1115
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 27 May 2016 23:48:13 -0400
> From:    Ken Copenhaver 
> Subject: Goldfinch behavior
> 
> I watched an interesting American Goldfinch behavior this evening that I
> don't think I've seen before.  Several goldfinches caught my eye fluttering
> and hovering momentarily about 6 inches above the lawn.  I realized that
> while in the air, they would grasp a dandelion stalk with their feet and
> then settle to the ground and stand on the stalk to hold it down while they
> ate the seeds.  Five of them performed this routine repeatedly.  I've never
> noticed birds methodically eating dandelion seeds like this.  Always
> something new!
> 
> Ken Copenhaver
> Fairfax, VT
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 26 May 2016 to 27 May 2016 (#2016-144)
> *************************************************************
Subject: Fw: [VTBIRD] Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 06:52:14 -0400
Saturday 6:30 am update bird is still present.   Couple from down country 
says Alder.   ( My normal Alder calls fritz or fritz-bew)  will try to 
record all 3 flycathers to send in with documentation.   This bird is doing 
the same vocalization as the recorded and documented one of 2012, that one 
only stayed for 3 days before moving on.

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Nancy A. Brown" 
Sent: Friday, May 27, 2016 12:39 PM
To: 
Subject: [VTBIRD] Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners

> An Acadian Flycatcher is at 210 Old Otis Road,   Danby Four Corners, South 
> Western Rutland County.   I located it in the little marsh between 210 and 
> the little cemetery inside a stone wall, about .8 mile from Danby Pawlet 
> Rd intersection.  There is room for several cars at the cemetery, walk 
> back down to dip in road over culvert and wait for it's  a loud " PSWEET" 
> call.  It calls from high up ( book say mid-story)  Note there are also 
> Alder and Willow Flycatchers in the vicinity also.     It has been 
> frequenting the clump of large mostly dead limb poplars in the middle of 
> the swamp, tops of birches that are higher than the alders or the popular 
> that ring the swamp.    Small flycather with loud  note,  tri colored 
> underside.  Grey upper breast, followed by white and yellow belly.  Bi 
> colored bill, and long primary wing projection.  Of note the back is green 
> not grey on this individual.
> 
Subject: Goldfinch behavior
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 23:48:13 -0400
I watched an interesting American Goldfinch behavior this evening that I
don't think I've seen before.  Several goldfinches caught my eye fluttering
and hovering momentarily about 6 inches above the lawn.  I realized that
while in the air, they would grasp a dandelion stalk with their feet and
then settle to the ground and stand on the stalk to hold it down while they
ate the seeds.  Five of them performed this routine repeatedly.  I've never
noticed birds methodically eating dandelion seeds like this.  Always
something new!

Ken Copenhaver
Fairfax, VT
Subject: Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
From: Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 21:13:24 -0400
We will be either at or around the marsh and the Pleasant Street power line for 
at least an hour then on to the rest stop on route 4 west. 


Cheers, Roy


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeffrey Sonshine 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Fri, May 27, 2016 8:18 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28

Sue,

If we wanted to catch up with you guys after 6AM do you have an itinerary?
Will you start at West Rutland Marsh?  How long do you think you'll be
there and then where will you head?  I don't expect exact times but if I
arrived at 8AM where might I expect to find people?

Jeff

On Thu, May 26, 2016 at 7:43 PM, Susan Elliott <
00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> Join Rutland County Audubon this Saturday, May 28, for our annual attempt
> to tally 100 species in Rutland County. We meet at the West Rutland Price
> Chopper parking lot at 6 a.m. Bring lunch. Stay for the whole day or as
> long as you like.
> Free and open to all!
> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>



-- 
Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
36 Laurel Ledge Court
Stamford, CT 06903
973-441-1115
Subject: Re: Rutland County Audubon Century Count - May 28
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 20:18:21 -0400
Sue,

If we wanted to catch up with you guys after 6AM do you have an itinerary?
Will you start at West Rutland Marsh?  How long do you think you'll be
there and then where will you head?  I don't expect exact times but if I
arrived at 8AM where might I expect to find people?

Jeff

On Thu, May 26, 2016 at 7:43 PM, Susan Elliott <
00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> Join Rutland County Audubon this Saturday, May 28, for our annual attempt
> to tally 100 species in Rutland County. We meet at the West Rutland Price
> Chopper parking lot at 6 a.m. Bring lunch. Stay for the whole day or as
> long as you like.
> Free and open to all!
> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>



-- 
Jeffrey Sonshine, CFP
36 Laurel Ledge Court
Stamford, CT 06903
973-441-1115
Subject: Yes, a towhee female
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 19:47:51 -0400
Back on May 9, I thought I caught a brief glimpse of a female Towhee 
pecking at seeds under my feeder with a couple of RBG males and a host 
of White-Crowned sparrows.  The whole bunch flushed and I didn't see the 
possible female Towhee again, so I chalked it up to insufficient 
caffeine in the system early in the AM since I've not seen or heard a 
Towhee around these parts since I moved here 10 years ago now.

And then today, for the first time since the 9th, there it is again 
under the feeder and it is absolutely a female Towhee.  But I've had no 
sight of a male and no sound of its distinctive song, either.  She's 
been here almost 3 weeks now all by herself?

Jane
(Shoreham)
Subject: Birding at Eagle Point
From: vtfiliberti <vtfiliberti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 18:35:39 -0400
Birding at Eagle Point

 

Join the Friends of Missisquoi NWR along with the Memphremagog Watershed 
Association for a morning of birding and exploration at the Eagle Point Unit. 


Saturday, June 11th at 8:00am

 
Eagle Point, a 420 acre tract of property on the shore of Lake Memphramegog 
near the town of Newport, became part of the Missisquoi NWR in 2010. The Eagle 
Point property consists of a mix of upland and wetland habitats including 
northern hardwood forest, hemlock seepage forest, managed grassland, and a 
diverse wetland complex formed around Hall’s Creek. 


Note: there are no facilities on the property. 

 

Directions

· From East Main Street in Newport (VT5) turn left on Sias Avenue (heading 
north) - .6miles 


·      Sias Avenue turns into Darling Hill Road – 1.6mi

·      Continue straight on North Derby Road – 2.1mi 

· At the end, make a left Eagle Point Farm Road (T-17) and follow to Eagle 
Point WMA – 1.4 mi 


 
Carpooling from points west

Those interested in carpooling have the following options:

Meet at 6:00am at the St. Albans Park and Ride 

Meet at 6:30am at the Enosburg Park and Ride

 
 
We are planning an optional afternoon of birding in the NEK for those 
interested in making a full day of the trip. 


 
***Please RSVP to Julie Filiberti (vtfiliberti AT gmail.com) or Ken Copenhaver 
(copenhvr AT gmail.com )with your interest and 
transportation plans. We want to be sure to have your contact information in 
the case of cancellation or changes. 
Subject: Acadian Flycatcher Danby FOur Corners
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 12:39:01 -0400
An Acadian Flycatcher is at 210 Old Otis Road, Danby Four Corners, South 
Western Rutland County. I located it in the little marsh between 210 and the 
little cemetery inside a stone wall, about .8 mile from Danby Pawlet Rd 
intersection. There is room for several cars at the cemetery, walk back down to 
dip in road over culvert and wait for it's a loud " PSWEET" call. It calls from 
high up ( book say mid-story) Note there are also Alder and Willow Flycatchers 
in the vicinity also. It has been frequenting the clump of large mostly dead 
limb poplars in the middle of the swamp, tops of birches that are higher than 
the alders or the popular that ring the swamp. Small flycather with loud note, 
tri colored underside. Grey upper breast, followed by white and yellow belly. 
Bi colored bill, and long primary wing projection. 

Subject: Lefferts Pond - Chittenden (55 acres), May 27, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 16:36:05 +0000
Nothing unexpected at Lefferts Pond in Chittenden, but you can't beat it as a 
place to spend a beautiful morning like this. 


     
Protocol: Traveling
1.25 mile(s)
48 species

Canada Goose  14
Mallard  2
Ruffed Grouse  1
Wild Turkey  1
Great Blue Heron  3
Bald Eagle  2
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Mourning Dove  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2
Belted Kingfisher  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Alder Flycatcher  4
Least Flycatcher  2
Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  3
Blue-headed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  3
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Red-breasted Nuthatch  5
Brown Creeper  4
American Robin  5
Gray Catbird  1
Cedar Waxwing  3
Ovenbird  3
Northern Waterthrush  4
Nashville Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  7
Northern Parula  3
Magnolia Warbler  2
Blackburnian Warbler  5
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  4
Black-throated Green Warbler  2
White-throated Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  4
Swamp Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Red-winged Blackbird  3
Common Grackle  3
Purple Finch  3
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29935463 


Sue and Marv Elliott, Tracey and Millie Busony



Subject: Hummingbird mating dance
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 21:01:51 -0400
Earlier this week we watched a male RT Hummer do its pendulum dance—a 20 foot 
arc—for probably a minute and then again. Early evening. Never did see the 
female or any copulation. 



Still learning to see,

John Snell
Montpelier
802-229-1751

http://www.eyeimagein.com
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com
Subject: Re: Magic moment
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 16:19:33 -0700
Delightful. Literally!
On May 26, 2016 7:18 PM, "Carl Runge" <
0000009209546543-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> As I was watering my garden this evening, a male hummingbird flew up to
> the edge of the spray from the hose, flitting back and forth to the spray
> for about 20 sec.  until his thirst was quenched. Very friendly.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Bird walk
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 17:32:57 -0400
A bird walk at Mt. Independence Saturday 28th at 8:00 am.
Park fee applies$5.00
No dogs please.

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Tennessee and Blackpoll Warblers on Shelburne Point
From: Scott Morrical <Scott.Morrical AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 18:48:55 +0000
Greetings,


While running on Shelburne Point this morning, I heard at least three different 
male Tennessee Warblers singing in trees along Harbor Rd. Two were heard 
simultaneously on opposite sides of the road and were possibly counter-singing 
to each other. Also at least three singing male Blackpoll Warblers were heard 
in the same area. Full list on eBird. 



Scott Morrical



South Burlington
Subject: 9-!!!! Bald Eagles
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 18:12:54 +0000
At Gale Meadows this a.m. See account in the notes. It's still exciting for me 
to see a BAEA in VT given the chance 20 years ago. But to see this many in one 
place is just plain AWESOME!! Note the one loon too. 


It doesn't appear that there is any nesting activity. Could this be a family 
unit of 3-5 years or just a group of juveniles, none of whom are breeding yet? 


Can someone please tell me how many known nesting pairs there now are in VT? I 
suspect with Kent's recent posting about how to ferret out answers from e-bird, 
the ans could be found there... but alas, I'm not a very skilled ferret..... 
yet! 


btw - Gale Meadow is a identified Hot Spot.  

Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________________
From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2016 1:41 PM
To: birder_rws AT hotmail.com
Subject: eBird Report - Gale Meadows Pond WMA - Winhall (195 acres), May 26, 
2016 


Gale Meadows Pond WMA - Winhall (195 acres), Bennington, Vermont, US
May 26, 2016 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Kayaking miles!  60 degree, clear, sunny, no breeze.
28 species

Canada Goose  1
Wood Duck  1
Common Merganser  2
Common Loon  1     seen on arrival
Great Blue Heron  1
Bald Eagle 9 2 in adult plumage (altho one showing white feathers in the middle 
of back), at least 3 showing dark eye line (did not observe eye color) and 
yellow bills and very mottled brown and white. 2 very dark headed birds, dark 
bills. Observed 6 in one area for at least 15 min. Prior to that, had 
encountered 2 birds who flew in opposite direction to those 6 perched and 1 
bird, again going in direction away from perched birds and away from first 2 
flyers. 

Spotted Sandpiper  3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1     heard
Eastern Kingbird  2
Red-eyed Vireo  2     heard
Blue Jay  4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow 2 Very surprised that there were only 3 swallows seen flying about 

Black-capped Chickadee  2
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  1
Cedar Waxwing  6
Ovenbird  4
Northern Waterthrush  2
Common Yellowthroat  2
White-throated Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  3
Scarlet Tanager  1
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Baltimore Oriole  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29919705 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
Subject: Fw: River Road Trail at Killington Marsh, May 26, 2016
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 16:12:52 +0000
A nice walk along the back side of Killington Marsh on the River Road Trail was 
productive this morning. Highlight was a Blackpoll Warbler. 


  
Killington Marsh, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 26, 2016 8:30 AM - 11:48 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.75 mile(s)
Comments:    back side of marsh on River Road Loop Trail
41 species

Canada Goose  2
Mallard  1
American Bittern  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Alder Flycatcher  8
Least Flycatcher  3
Red-eyed Vireo  5
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
Winter Wren  2
Veery  1
Hermit Thrush  1
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  1
Ovenbird  3
Northern Waterthrush  3
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  5
American Redstart  2
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  1
Blackburnian Warbler  4
Yellow Warbler  3
Blackpoll Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  4
Black-throated Green Warbler  3
Canada Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  3
Swamp Sparrow  5
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Red-winged Blackbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  2
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29918543 


Sue and Marv Elliott



Subject: Geprag's Cerulean - no
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 10:18:26 -0400
Tried to locate the Cerulean this morning between 8-9 a.m.  Did not hear or
see it, but admittedly was not there long and probably wasn't in the right
place.

How far to the east was the bird located? Are we talking about the small
part of the park that abuts Rt 116?  Here's a map of the park - any
specific guidance would be much appreciated!
http://www.hinesburg.org/documents/hart_trailmap_geprags.pdf)

Did manage to get gorgeous, sunlit looks at (and listens to) Golden-Winged
Warbler. A very loud and visible Indigo Bunting was hanging around in the
same area, and the Common Yellowthroats were putting on quite nice show too.


-Miriam Lawrence
Monkton
Subject: Re: fledgeling owl?
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 02:23:08 +0000
You can always check 
here:http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/subnational2/US-VT-021?yr=cur 


The column on the left doesn't always update as quickly, but if you click on 
the checklists on the right you might find what you are looking for. 

Sue Elliott


      From: Cedar Stanistreet 
 To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2016 9:33 PM
 Subject: [VTBIRD] fledgeling owl?
   
Hi all,

Does anyone know if the young Saw-Whet is still hanging out in the nest box at 
the West Rutland Marsh? I'd love to go over there and look for it this fri. or 
sat., when I have off from work! 

Thanks for any updates! (and feel free to reply to me directly, if you'd rather 
not post to the list). 


Cedar Stanistreet


   
Subject: fledgeling owl?
From: Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 21:33:10 -0400
Hi all,

Does anyone know if the young Saw-Whet is still hanging out in the nest box at 
the West Rutland Marsh? I'd love to go over there and look for it this fri. or 
sat., when I have off from work! 

Thanks for any updates! (and feel free to reply to me directly, if you'd rather 
not post to the list). 


Cedar Stanistreet
Subject: Re: Photos from West Rutland Marsh and Dewey's Pond
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 14:49:11 -0700
Beautiful pictures, Jim! We bird the marsh regularly. Can you give me a
location and time of day for that blue-winged? That is the only one we have
not seen them in the last few weeks. Thanks!
On May 25, 2016 5:43 PM, "Jim Block"  wrote:

I visited West Rutland Marsh and Dewey's Pond Monday and put some photos
here:

http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/05/west-rutland-marsh-and-deweys-pond/



Included are Virginia Rail, Prairie Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler, and a
Yellow Warbler on a nest.  And, oh yes, a Saw-whet Owl chick in a nest box.



Jim
Subject: Photos from West Rutland Marsh and Dewey's Pond
From: Jim Block <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 17:44:11 -0400
I visited West Rutland Marsh and Dewey's Pond Monday and put some photos
here:

http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/05/west-rutland-marsh-and-deweys-pond/ 

 

Included are Virginia Rail, Prairie Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler, and a
Yellow Warbler on a nest.  And, oh yes, a Saw-whet Owl chick in a nest box.

 

Jim
Subject: Cerulean
From: Liz Lee <lizl AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 09:00:07 -0400
Went looking for the reported Cerulean warbler at Geprag's Park this 
morning.  A long time was spent listening to the likely bird with it's 
buzzy ascending song.  It was located in the canopy of the mature 
deciduous trees on the eastern side of the park.  The poor sight-lines 
from the trail and dense canopy made it very hard to find the bird 
visually, so it was never seen.  Perhaps others will have better luck.


Liz Lee
Subject: Cerulean Warbler Geprag Park
From: Patrick Plas <plas.vt AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 18:58:04 -0400
1 male CERW seen and heard at Geprag Park today at 5:45 pm. ID strongly
suspected when initially only heard singing for ~10 min, then finally
confirmed when he allowed for two ~20 second views over an additional 5
min. Blue upperparts, dark breast band, white throat, streaked flanks. Seen
initially at marker 3 on main trail, then slowly headed SE.

-Pat Plas
Subject: Re: E Bird Number Crunching
From: Sarah Janson <sbjanson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:55:39 -0400
Thanks for these breakdowns. It's very interesting.

I like the lists of "Top 10 Reported Birds". Is it correct that the first
cardinal was reported in Vermont in 1933 and it first appeared on the
Vermont Christmas Bird Count in 1960? Now it is on our Top 10 list, which
ever way you compile the numbers. A previous email suggested that these
lists could be called "Trash Birds of Vermont", but I don't think so!
Understanding the population trends and success of our most abundant and
common birds is just as important as our rare ones.

-Sarah Janson

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 2:37 PM, Ian A. Worley  wrote:

> I've added to my list in my previous email the additional species
> necessary to include the top ten most frequently reported species in 2015
> just posted by Jim Guion.  The following numbers are for all years in the
> eBird record, and for all of Vermont.
>
> Number of times reported --
>      Black-capped Chickadee    82,827
>      American Crow     69,421
>      Blue Jay     66,382
>      American Robin     58,447
>      American Goldfinch     54,965
>      Song Sparrow     49,297
>      Mourning Dove     46,244
>      White-breasted Nuthatch     43,389
>      Northern Cardinal     42,610
>      Downy Woodpecker     46,244
>      European Starling     26,396
>      House Sparrow     13,617
>
> Total birds reported ---
>      European Starling     685,346
>      American Crow     542,078
>      Black-capped Chickadee     436,715
>      American Robin     432,461
>      American Goldfinch     327,628
>      Blue Jay     264,858
>      Mourning Dove     193,873
>      Song Sparrow     167,485
>      House Sparrow     109,166
>      Northern Cardinal     91,591
>      White-breasted Nuthatch     71,614
>      Downy Woodpecker     64,021
>
> Any other species you can think of that might have high enough numbers to
> get in either of these lists?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Ian
> ===========================
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 5/24/2016 2:03 PM, Ian A. Worley wrote:
>
>> Number of times reported --
>>      Black-capped Chickadee    82,827
>>      American Crow     69,421
>>      Blue Jay     66,382
>>     American Goldfinch     54,965
>>      Song Sparrow     49,297
>>      European Starling     26,396
>>      House Sparrow     13,617
>>
>> Total birds reported ---
>>      European Starling     685,346
>>      American Crow     542,078
>>      Black-capped Chickadee     436,715
>>      American Goldfinch     327,628
>>      Blue Jay     264,858
>>      Song Sparrow     167,485
>>      House Sparrow     109,166
>>
>
Subject: Re: E Bird Number Crunching
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:37:25 -0400
I've added to my list in my previous email the additional species 
necessary to include the top ten most frequently reported species in 
2015 just posted by Jim Guion.  The following numbers are for all years 
in the eBird record, and for all of Vermont.

Number of times reported --
      Black-capped Chickadee    82,827
      American Crow     69,421
      Blue Jay     66,382
      American Robin     58,447
      American Goldfinch     54,965
      Song Sparrow     49,297
      Mourning Dove     46,244
      White-breasted Nuthatch     43,389
      Northern Cardinal     42,610
      Downy Woodpecker     46,244
      European Starling     26,396
      House Sparrow     13,617

Total birds reported ---
      European Starling     685,346
      American Crow     542,078
      Black-capped Chickadee     436,715
      American Robin     432,461
      American Goldfinch     327,628
      Blue Jay     264,858
      Mourning Dove     193,873
      Song Sparrow     167,485
      House Sparrow     109,166
      Northern Cardinal     91,591
      White-breasted Nuthatch     71,614
      Downy Woodpecker     64,021

Any other species you can think of that might have high enough numbers 
to get in either of these lists?

Cheers,

Ian
===========================







On 5/24/2016 2:03 PM, Ian A. Worley wrote:
> Number of times reported --
>      Black-capped Chickadee    82,827
>      American Crow     69,421
>      Blue Jay     66,382
>     American Goldfinch     54,965
>      Song Sparrow     49,297
>      European Starling     26,396
>      House Sparrow     13,617
>
> Total birds reported ---
>      European Starling     685,346
>      American Crow     542,078
>      Black-capped Chickadee     436,715
>      American Goldfinch     327,628
>      Blue Jay     264,858
>      Song Sparrow     167,485
>      House Sparrow     109,166 
Subject: Re: E Bird Number Crunching
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:03:29 -0400
Larry has this question below:

"At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most commonly reported 
species either by number of E Bird reports containing them, or by total 
count of individuals?  Chickadee, House Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue Jay?"

Here are the numbers for those five species, American Goldfinch, and 
Song Sparrow (which is almost completely absent in winter):

Number of times reported --
      Black-capped Chickadee    82,827
      American Crow     69,421
      Blue Jay     66,382
      American Goldfinch     54,965
      Song Sparrow     49,297
      European Starling     26,396
      House Sparrow     13,617

Total birds reported ---
      European Starling     685,346
      American Crow     542,078
      Black-capped Chickadee     436,715
      American Goldfinch     327,628
      Blue Jay     264,858
      Song Sparrow     167,485
      House Sparrow     109,166

Suggestions for other species that might make this list?

Ian
=================

On 5/24/2016 10:50 AM, Larry and Mona Rogers wrote:
> E Bird is a great success in Vermont. I don’t know how many sightings 
> have been reported over the years – they must run into the thousands. 
> I’m sure Kent could tell us. While E Bird is unsurpassed for finding 
> information on individual species with dates, counts and locations, 
> other data could probably be mined from its vast data base. For 
> instance: • What are the top ten locations in Vermont for generating E 
> Bird reports? I might guess the West Rutland Swamp, Mount Philo, 
> Shelburne Bay, Mount Mansfield, Pearl Street in Brandon, etc., but I 
> really don’t know. The list could be titled “Vermont’s Ten Most Birded 
> Spots”. • Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number 
> of individual species reports? Are there places where over 150 species 
> have been sighted? 100? 75? • Which Vermont birders are the most 
> active E Bird contributors? • What are the ten rarest birds spotted in 
> Vermont? I think of Whooping Crane, Painted Bunting, Black-Tailed 
> Gull, Golden-Crowned Sparrow, the currently visiting Prothonotary 
> Warbler and several others. Selection criteria might be single species 
> sightings from a specific location over a relatively short time 
> interval. • At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most 
> commonly reported species either by number of E Bird reports 
> containing them, or by total count of individuals? Chickadee, House 
> Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue Jay? The list might be called “The Trash 
> Birds of Vermont”. Anyhow, I’m sure other folks could suggest other 
> lists. It might be interesting. Larry the Compulsive Lister Sent from 
> Mail for Windows 10
Subject: Re: E Bird Number Crunching
From: Jim Guion <jim_guion AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 13:47:17 -0400
Hi Larry,

Another compulsive birder/lister here. I know how to get some of these for MA, 
where I live, so here are VT equivalents: 



•	Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number of 
individual species reports?  Are there places where over 150 species 
have been sighted?  100?  75?
-This page, looking on the right hand side and scrolling down, is a composite 
of top counties, top hotspots, top ebirders and has links to see not just the 
top 10, but all of each (this one is for current year): 

http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT?yr=cur&changeDate=Set
-This one is for all years:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT?yr=all&changeDate=Set

-Each of those things individually:
•	Which Vermont birders are the most active E Bird contributors?
-top 100 eBirders for 2016:

http://ebird.org/ebird/top100?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-VT&year=2016 

-top 100 eBirders for all years:

http://ebird.org/ebird/top100?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-VT&year=AAAA 


•	What are the top ten locations in Vermont for generating E Bird 
reports?  I might guess the West Rutland Swamp, Mount Philo, Shelburne 
Bay, Mount Mansfield, Pearl Street in Brandon, etc., but I really don’t 
know.  The list could be titled “Vermont’s Ten Most Birded Spots”.
-all counties for 2016:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT/regions?yr=cur&changeDate=Set
-all counties for all years:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT/regions?yr=all&changeDate=Set

•	Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number of 
individual species reports?  Are there places where over 150 species 
have been sighted?  100?  75?
-top 100 Hotspots for current year:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT/hotspots?yr=cur&changeDate=Set
-top 100 Hotspots for all years:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT/hotspots?yr=all&changeDate=Set

•	At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most commonly reported 
species either by number of E Bird reports containing them, or by total 
count of individuals?  Chickadee, House Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue 
Jay?  The list might be called “The Trash Birds of Vermont”.

-I downloaded the dataset for the species frequency bar chart for Vermont for 
2015, 

loaded it into an Excel spreadsheet and this is what I got. Bear in mind that 
this is 

how many times a species was reported out of all the checklists for 2015, not 
how 

many birds. It also does not account for when everyone goes to see a single 1 
day rarity, etc. 

It would also be interesting to look at it in each season as well as across all 
years. 

Getting total species count requires requesting and downloading a much larger 
data set 

and more time to crunch it.


Vermont, 2015:















 
 
 
  Frequency of observations in the selected location(s).:
 
 
  

  

 
 
  

  

 
 
  Sample Size:
  26648
 
 
  Black-capped Chickadee
  51.0487%
 
 
  Blue Jay
  43.2470%
 
 
  American Crow
  42.5566%
 
 
  American Goldfinch
  33.3334%
 
 
  American Robin
  32.1288%
 
 
  White-breasted Nuthatch
  28.1899%
 
 
  Song Sparrow
  27.9828%
 
 
  Mourning Dove
  24.7971%
 
 
  Downy Woodpecker
  24.4849%
 
 
  Northern Cardinal
  24.3823%
 
 
  Red-winged Blackbird
  21.9032%
 
 
  Mallard
  20.1936%
 
 
  Canada Goose
  18.3733%
 
 
  Tufted Titmouse
  18.3288%
 
 
  Hairy Woodpecker
  17.9217%
 
 
  Dark-eyed Junco
  17.7763%
 
 
  Common Yellowthroat
  16.1976%
 
 
  European Starling
  15.5507%
 
 
  Red-eyed Vireo
  15.3872%
 
 
  Gray Catbird
  15.3224%
 
 
  Eastern Phoebe
  14.5492%
 
 
  Cedar Waxwing
  14.4757%
 
 
  Ring-billed Gull
  13.4553%
 
 
  Common Raven
  12.8698%
 
 
  Common Grackle
  12.1093%
 
 
  Red-breasted Nuthatch
  11.5637%
 
 
  White-throated Sparrow
  11.4914%
 
 
  Great Blue Heron
  10.5668%
 
 
  Northern Flicker
  10.0199%
 
 
  Tree Swallow
  9.6524%
 
 
  Rock Pigeon
  9.4232%
 
 
  House Sparrow
  8.8792%
 
 
  Turkey Vulture
  8.5741%
 
 
  Ovenbird
  8.4564%
 
 
  Belted Kingfisher
  8.4344%
 
 
  Chipping Sparrow
  8.4114%
 
 
  American Tree Sparrow
  8.3676%
 
 
  Yellow-rumped Warbler
  8.3564%
 
 
  Wood Duck
  8.0964%
 
 
  Common Merganser
  7.9303%
 
 
  Red-tailed Hawk
  7.8748%
 
 
  Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  7.7170%
 
 
  Eastern Kingbird
  7.6442%
 
 
  Pileated Woodpecker
  7.4244%
 
 
  Yellow Warbler
  7.1431%
 
 
  Chestnut-sided Warbler
  7.1092%
 
 
  American Redstart
  6.9788%
 
 
  Swamp Sparrow
  6.7797%
 
 
  Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
  6.4813%
 
 
  Red-bellied Woodpecker
  6.4213%
 
 
  American Black Duck
  6.2853%
 
 
  Purple Finch
  6.2530%
 
 
  Hooded Merganser
  6.2112%
 
 
  Barn Swallow
  6.1353%
 
 
  House Finch
  6.1268%
 
 
  Veery
  5.9322%
 
 
  Common Loon
  5.8005%
 
 
  Black-throated Green Warbler
  5.7241%
 
 
  Eastern Wood-Pewee
  5.6933%
 
 
  Warbling Vireo
  5.3950%
 
 
  House Wren
  5.3816%
 
 
  Bald Eagle
  5.3537%
 
 
  Hermit Thrush
  5.0160%
 
 
  Baltimore Oriole
  5.0092%
 
 
  Osprey
  4.9868%
 
 
  Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  4.8553%
 
 
  Double-crested Cormorant
  4.7886%
 
 
  Black-and-white Warbler
  4.6665%
 
 
  Common Goldeneye
  4.6089%
 
 
  Indigo Bunting
  4.3498%
 
 
  Killdeer
  4.3413%
 
 
  Black-throated Blue Warbler
  4.2536%
 
 
  Herring Gull
  4.1006%
 
 
  Common Redpoll
  4.0901%
 
 
  Savannah Sparrow
  4.0584%
 
 
  Pine Siskin
  4.0466%
 
 
  Brown-headed Cowbird
  4.0460%
 
 
  Blue-headed Vireo
  4.0122%
 
 
  Wood Thrush
  3.9523%
 
 
  Great Crested Flycatcher
  3.8816%
 
 
  Scarlet Tanager
  3.8491%
 
 
  Brown Creeper
  3.5832%
 
 
  Least Flycatcher
  3.5828%
 
 
  Eastern Bluebird
  3.5716%
 
 
  Wild Turkey
  3.5448%
 
 
  Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  3.4696%
 
 
  Magnolia Warbler
  3.3986%
 
 
  Blackburnian Warbler
  3.3489%
 
 
  Great Black-backed Gull
  3.1415%
 
 
  Alder Flycatcher
  3.0405%
 
 
  American Kestrel
  2.9714%
 
 
  Northern Harrier
  2.8413%
 
 
  Bobolink
  2.7985%
 
 
  Golden-crowned Kinglet
  2.7190%
 
 
  Winter Wren
  2.6764%
 
 
  Northern Parula
  2.5885%
 
 
  Green-winged Teal
  2.5448%
 
 
  Broad-winged Hawk
  2.4604%
 
 
  Nashville Warbler
  2.4413%
 
 
  Ring-necked Duck
  2.3968%
 
 
  Spotted Sandpiper
  2.3507%
 
 
  Bufflehead
  2.3367%
 
 
  Carolina Wren
  2.2054%
 
 
  Ruffed Grouse
  2.1767%
 
 
  Barred Owl
  2.1233%
 
 
  Pine Warbler
  2.1201%
 
 
  Green Heron
  2.0179%
 
 
  Chimney Swift
  1.9143%
 
 
  Wilson's Snipe
  1.8944%
 
 
  Eastern Towhee
  1.8374%
 
 
  Willow Flycatcher
  1.7606%
 
 
  Sharp-shinned Hawk
  1.6322%
 
 
  Cooper's Hawk
  1.6111%
 
 
  Merlin
  1.5887%
 
 
  Northern Waterthrush
  1.5865%
 
 
  Marsh Wren
  1.4708%
 
 
  White-crowned Sparrow
  1.4507%
 
 
  Horned Grebe
  1.3317%
 
 
  Least Sandpiper
  1.3246%
 
 
  Canada Warbler
  1.3036%
 
 
  Greater Yellowlegs
  1.3015%
 
 
  Field Sparrow
  1.2992%
 
 
  Blackpoll Warbler
  1.2732%
 
 
  Great Egret
  1.2398%
 
 
  Solitary Sandpiper
  1.1997%
 
 
  Brown Thrasher
  1.1868%
 
 
  Snow Goose
  1.1766%
 
 
  Palm Warbler
  1.1696%
 
 
  Peregrine Falcon
  1.1658%
 
 
  Rough-legged Hawk
  1.1064%
 
 
  Northern Pintail
  1.0631%
 
 
  Bonaparte's Gull
  1.0488%
 
 
  Snow Bunting
  1.0429%
 
 
  Caspian Tern
  1.0236%
 
 
  Horned Lark
  1.0154%
 
 
  American Woodcock
  1.0040%
 
 
  Swainson's Thrush
  0.9684%
 
 
  Pied-billed Grebe
  0.9621%
 
 
  Greater Scaup
  0.9617%
 
 
  Lesser Yellowlegs
  0.9314%
 
 
  American Bittern
  0.9219%
 
 
  Yellow-throated Vireo
  0.9117%
 
 
  Bohemian Waxwing
  0.8900%
 
 
  Virginia Rail
  0.8503%
 
 
  Northern Rough-winged Swallow
  0.8457%
 
 
  Lincoln's Sparrow
  0.8179%
 
 
  Tennessee Warbler
  0.8121%
 
 
  Eastern Meadowlark
  0.8056%
 
 
  Northern Mockingbird
  0.7987%
 
 
  Evening Grosbeak
  0.7957%
 
 
  Bank Swallow
  0.7936%
 
 
  Lesser Scaup
  0.7869%
 
 
  Mourning Warbler
  0.7662%
 
 
  Empidonax sp.
  0.7592%
 
 
  Semipalmated Plover
  0.7491%
 
 
  Rusty Blackbird
  0.7277%
 
 
  White-winged Scoter
  0.6851%
 
 
  Cliff Swallow
  0.6743%
 
 
  Red-necked Grebe
  0.6564%
 
 
  Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
  0.6502%
 
 
  Red-shouldered Hawk
  0.6436%
 
 
  gull sp.
  0.5831%
 
 
  Fox Sparrow
  0.5740%
 
 
  Snowy Owl
  0.5632%
 
 
  Blue-winged Teal
  0.5465%
 
 
  Great Horned Owl
  0.5410%
 
 
  Greater/Lesser Scaup
  0.5327%
 
 
  Red-breasted Merganser
  0.5294%
 
 
  Gray Jay
  0.5287%
 
 
  American Wigeon
  0.5268%
 
 
  Eastern Whip-poor-will
  0.5231%
 
 
  Red Crossbill
  0.5207%
 
 
  Common Tern
  0.5142%
 
 
  Red-throated Loon
  0.4983%
 
 
  Wilson's Warbler
  0.4931%
 
 
  Black-backed Woodpecker
  0.4928%
 
 
  Pectoral Sandpiper
  0.4338%
 
 
  Black-billed Cuckoo
  0.4299%
 
 
  Semipalmated Sandpiper
  0.4262%
 
 
  Black-crowned Night-Heron
  0.4214%
 
 
  Common Nighthawk
  0.4159%
 
 
  Louisiana Waterthrush
  0.3970%
 
 
  American Pipit
  0.3692%
 
 
  Purple Martin
  0.3651%
 
 
  sparrow sp.
  0.3580%
 
 
  Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
  0.3574%
 
 
  Gadwall
  0.3529%
 
 
  Barrow's Goldeneye
  0.3479%
 
 
  Bay-breasted Warbler
  0.3436%
 
 
  Black Scoter
  0.3425%
 
 
  Olive-sided Flycatcher
  0.3341%
 
 
  White-winged Crossbill
  0.3243%
 
 
  Cape May Warbler
  0.3240%
 
 
  duck sp.
  0.3231%
 
 
  Northern Shrike
  0.3230%
 
 
  Philadelphia Vireo
  0.3215%
 
 
  Boreal Chickadee
  0.3169%
 
 
  Ruddy Duck
  0.3127%
 
 
  Dunlin
  0.3044%
 
 
  Eastern Screech-Owl
  0.2981%
 
 
  Northern Shoveler
  0.2969%
 
 
  Long-tailed Duck
  0.2962%
 
 
  Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's
  Flycatcher)
  0.2893%
 
 
  Black Tern
  0.2887%
 
 
  Northern Goshawk
  0.2833%
 
 
  Blue-winged Warbler
  0.2783%
 
 
  Bicknell's Thrush
  0.2669%
 
 
  Common Gallinule
  0.2648%
 
 
  Harlequin Duck
  0.2535%
 
 
  Larus sp.
  0.2476%
 
 
  Orchard Oriole
  0.2406%
 
 
  warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)
  0.2406%
 
 
  Vesper Sparrow
  0.2267%
 
 
  Northern Saw-whet Owl
  0.2210%
 
 
  Golden-winged Warbler
  0.2165%
 
 
  Hudsonian Godwit
  0.2028%
 
 
  Prairie Warbler
  0.1980%
 
 
  Grasshopper Sparrow
  0.1958%
 
 
  Accipiter sp.
  0.1845%
 
 
  Least Bittern
  0.1836%
 
 
  Black-bellied Plover
  0.1785%
 
 
  Spruce Grouse
  0.1778%
 
 
  Western Meadowlark
  0.1756%
 
 
  Sora
  0.1749%
 
 
  Surf Scoter
  0.1746%
 
 
  Yellow-billed Cuckoo
  0.1733%
 
 
  Fish Crow
  0.1697%
 
 
  White-rumped Sandpiper
  0.1562%
 
 
  Short-billed Dowitcher
  0.1528%
 
 
  Redhead
  0.1490%
 
 
  Ross's Goose
  0.1469%
 
 
  American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid)
  0.1437%
 
 
  American Coot
  0.1424%
 
 
  Sandhill Crane
  0.1359%
 
 
  Mute Swan
  0.1299%
 
 
  swallow sp.
  0.1221%
 
 
  Hoary Redpoll
  0.1201%
 
 
  Short-eared Owl
  0.1182%
 
 
  Lapland Longspur
  0.1165%
 
 
  Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warbler
  0.1117%
 
 
  Golden Eagle
  0.1087%
 
 
  Sanderling
  0.1040%
 
 
  Baird's Sandpiper
  0.0991%
 
 
  Buteo sp.
  0.0949%
 
 
  Harris's Sparrow
  0.0901%
 
 
  Iceland Gull
  0.0859%
 
 
  Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher
  0.0841%
 
 
  Canvasback
  0.0833%
 
 
  Snowy Egret
  0.0827%
 
 
  Black Vulture
  0.0821%
 
 
  Little Gull
  0.0755%
 
 
  Cackling Goose
  0.0734%
 
 
  passerine sp.
  0.0676%
 
 
  Stilt Sandpiper
  0.0670%
 
 
  Cerulean Warbler
  0.0654%
 
 
  peep sp.
  0.0651%
 
 
  Pine Grosbeak
  0.0647%
 
 
  Brewster's Warbler (hybrid)
  0.0646%
 
 
  Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
  0.0620%
 
 
  blackbird sp.
  0.0576%
 
 
  Cattle Egret
  0.0575%
 
 
  American Golden-Plover
  0.0566%
 
 
  Golden-winged x Blue-winged Warbler
  (hybrid)
  0.0526%
 
 
  Tundra Swan
  0.0518%
 
 
  Surf/Black Scoter
  0.0495%
 
 
  Brant
  0.0486%
 
 
  woodpecker sp.
  0.0454%
 
 
  dabbling duck sp.
  0.0447%
 
 
  Red Phalarope
  0.0425%
 
 
  Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs
  0.0425%
 
 
  Hooded Warbler
  0.0421%
 
 
  Dickcissel
  0.0387%
 
 
  Eurasian Wigeon
  0.0370%
 
 
  Orange-crowned Warbler
  0.0351%
 
 
  Lesser Black-backed Gull
  0.0325%
 
 
  Clay-colored Sparrow
  0.0319%
 
 
  Tufted Duck
  0.0318%
 
 
  Nelson's Sparrow
  0.0315%
 
 
  loon sp.
  0.0312%
 
 
  Glossy Ibis
  0.0292%
 
 
  Ring-necked Pheasant
  0.0288%
 
 
  Townsend's Solitaire
  0.0256%
 
 
  crow sp.
  0.0253%
 
 
  Red-shouldered x Red-tailed Hawk (hybrid)
  0.0246%
 
 
  grouse sp.
  0.0223%
 
 
  teal sp.
  0.0203%
 
 
  vireo sp.
  0.0180%
 
 
  Long-eared Owl
  0.0179%
 
 
  American Black Duck/Mallard
  0.0171%
 
 
  Connecticut Warbler
  0.0170%
 
 
  Catharus sp.
  0.0169%
 
 
  diurnal raptor sp.
  0.0159%
 
 
  Upland Sandpiper
  0.0157%
 
 
  Greater White-fronted Goose
  0.0156%
 
 
  Pink-footed Goose
  0.0155%
 
 
  jaeger sp.
  0.0150%
 
 
  Ruddy Turnstone
  0.0137%
 
 
  Lark Sparrow
  0.0135%
 
 
  Bohemian/Cedar Waxwing
  0.0135%
 
 
  Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid)
  0.0134%
 
 
  Common/Red-breasted Merganser
  0.0134%
 
 
  Glaucous Gull
  0.0128%
 
 
  Black-legged Kittiwake
  0.0127%
 
 
  scoter sp.
  0.0111%
 
 
  Downy/Hairy Woodpecker
  0.0104%
 
 
  owl sp.
  0.0100%
 
 
  Red Knot
  0.0094%
 
 
  Pacific Loon
  0.0092%
 
 
  grebe sp.
  0.0090%
 
 
  Red-necked/Red Phalarope
  0.0085%
 
 
  Mallard (Domestic type)
  0.0084%
 
 
  shorebird sp.
  0.0080%
 
 
  thrush sp.
  0.0079%
 
 
  hummingbird sp.
  0.0077%
 
 
  large shorebird sp.
  0.0074%
 
 
  Red-necked Phalarope
  0.0074%
 
 
  phalarope sp.
  0.0074%
 
 
  Calidris sp.
  0.0068%
 
 
  Wilson's Phalarope
  0.0066%
 
 
  Whimbrel
  0.0064%
 
 
  swan sp.
  0.0063%
 
 
  finch sp.
  0.0063%
 
 
  Sterna sp.
  0.0052%
 
 
  small falcon sp.
  0.0048%
 
 
  Willet
  0.0046%
 
 
  Parasitic Jaeger
  0.0046%
 
 
  Warbling/Philadelphia Vireo
  0.0046%
 
 
  Spizella sp.
  0.0046%
 
 
  Yellow-billed/Black-billed Cuckoo
  0.0045%
 
 
  Northern Gannet
  0.0043%
 
 
  Band-tailed Pigeon
  0.0042%
 
 
  flycatcher sp. (Tyrannidae sp.)
  0.0041%
 
 
  hawk sp.
  0.0033%
 
 
  waterfowl sp.
  0.0031%
 
 
  heron sp.
  0.0031%
 
 
  Sharp-shinned/Cooper's Hawk
  0.0031%
 
 
  Sabine's Gull
  0.0031%
 
 
  Franklin's Gull
  0.0031%
 
 
  Red-headed Woodpecker
  0.0031%
 
 
  Yellow-throated Warbler
  0.0031%
 
 
  Black-bellied Plover/golden-plover sp.
  0.0027%
 
 
  goose sp.
  0.0022%
 
 
  Cackling/Canada Goose
  0.0022%
 







•	What are the ten rarest birds spotted in Vermont?  I think of Whooping
 Crane, Painted Bunting, Black-Tailed Gull, Golden-Crowned Sparrow, the 
currently visiting Prothonotary Warbler and several others.  Selection 
criteria might be single species sightings from a specific location over
 a relatively short time interval.
-The previous bit might help here a little, but it would be better to have a 
much larger data set and more crunching to really get this one right. 


Jim Guion
Arlington, MA

> Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 10:50:20 -0400
> From: 4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET
> Subject: [VTBIRD] E Bird Number Crunching
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> 
> E Bird is a great success in Vermont. I don’t know how many sightings have 
been reported over the years – they must run into the thousands. I’m sure Kent 
could tell us. 

> While E Bird is unsurpassed for finding information on individual species 
with dates, counts and locations, other data could probably be mined from its 
vast data base. For instance: 

> 
> • What are the top ten locations in Vermont for generating E Bird reports? I 
might guess the West Rutland Swamp, Mount Philo, Shelburne Bay, Mount 
Mansfield, Pearl Street in Brandon, etc., but I really don’t know. The list 
could be titled “Vermont’s Ten Most Birded Spots”. 

> • Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number of individual 
species reports? Are there places where over 150 species have been sighted? 
100? 75? 

> •	Which Vermont birders are the most active E Bird contributors?
> • What are the ten rarest birds spotted in Vermont? I think of Whooping 
Crane, Painted Bunting, Black-Tailed Gull, Golden-Crowned Sparrow, the 
currently visiting Prothonotary Warbler and several others. Selection criteria 
might be single species sightings from a specific location over a relatively 
short time interval. 

> • At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most commonly reported 
species either by number of E Bird reports containing them, or by total count 
of individuals? Chickadee, House Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue Jay? The list 
might be called “The Trash Birds of Vermont”. 

> 
> Anyhow, I’m sure other folks could suggest other lists. It might be 
interesting. 

> 
> Larry the Compulsive Lister
> 
> 
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: Re: E Bird Number Crunching
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 11:29:56 -0400
Here are a few answers to Larry's musings.

The "Explore a Region" tool tells us that 199,166 complete checklists 
have been submitted to eBird for Vermont as of 11:01 this morning.

In the "Explore a Region"click on Hotspots and you will find the highest 
number of species at the Dead Creek WMA IBA hotspot (242) and many, many 
hotspots with greater than 150 species reported (and surely there are 
many non-hotspot personal locations and home lists with greater than 150 
species).

The top ten hotspots for species reported are:
Dead Creek WMA IBA
242

Herrick's Cove IBA
226

Dead Creek WMA IBA--Brilyea Access
220

Delta Park IBA
217

Button Bay State Park
206

Charlotte Town Beach
206

Shelburne Bay
205

Retreat Meadows / West River Mouth
202

Lake Runnemede / Evarts Pond - (62 acres) - Paradise Park
198

Missisquoi NWR IBA
195

The Top 100 list (which ONLY includes eBird records) has these 
individuals with the longest species lists:
1     David Hoag     344
2     Craig Provost     319
3     Fred Pratt     318
4     Jim Mead     311

The eBird Top 100 list for eBird checklists has these folks with the 
most eBird submissions of complete checklists:
1     Ian Worley     10379
2     Craig Provost     8214
3     Susan Elliott     6479
4     Ron Payne     5624

(Note that there is not always a correlation between numbers of species 
recorded by a person and numbers of checklists submitted. Vermont 
birders have lots of different interests and thus different birding habits.)

Some of the other categories Larry mentions can be obtained with not too 
much analytical work from eBird.  And others are good projects for 
analysts with a fair amount of time on their hands.

As for other questions to add to the list of curiosities, I'll start the 
additions with these:  I'd love to see a list of individuals according 
to the numbers of years they have been birding in Vermont (we have some 
amazing folks that should be recognized!).  I'd love to discover what 
are the most common ages at which persons started birding.  What are the 
longest, continuously and regularly monitored sites?  What are the 
largest numbers of species discovered on 24 hour "big days"?

Ian

===============================================
On 5/24/2016 10:50 AM, Larry and Mona Rogers wrote:
> E Bird is a great success in Vermont. I don’t know how many sightings have 
been reported over the years – they must run into the thousands. I’m sure 
Kent could tell us. 

> While E Bird is unsurpassed for finding information on individual species 
with dates, counts and locations, other data could probably be mined from its 
vast data base. For instance: 

>
> • What are the top ten locations in Vermont for generating E Bird reports? 
I might guess the West Rutland Swamp, Mount Philo, Shelburne Bay, Mount 
Mansfield, Pearl Street in Brandon, etc., but I really don’t know. The list 
could be titled “Vermont’s Ten Most Birded Spots”. 

> • Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number of 
individual species reports? Are there places where over 150 species have been 
sighted? 100? 75? 

> •	Which Vermont birders are the most active E Bird contributors?
> • What are the ten rarest birds spotted in Vermont? I think of Whooping 
Crane, Painted Bunting, Black-Tailed Gull, Golden-Crowned Sparrow, the 
currently visiting Prothonotary Warbler and several others. Selection criteria 
might be single species sightings from a specific location over a relatively 
short time interval. 

> • At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most commonly reported 
species either by number of E Bird reports containing them, or by total count 
of individuals? Chickadee, House Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue Jay? The list 
might be called “The Trash Birds of Vermont”. 

>
> Anyhow, I’m sure other folks could suggest other lists. It might be 
interesting. 

>
> Larry the Compulsive Lister
>
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
Subject: Re: E Bird Number Crunching
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 11:11:59 -0400
Indeed Larry. It has been wildly successful over the 14 years we've had it,
and it is all because Vermont is filled with a very good team of bird
watchers and naturalists that work together. Thank you everyone.

Many of your questions can easily be queried on Vermont eBIrd. Let me take
a crack at some of these to get you and others going. It is not only fun
collecting the data, but it is a lot of fun looking at it too!

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Larry and Mona Rogers <
4181rogers AT comcast.net> wrote:

>



> E Bird is a great success in Vermont.  I don’t know how many sightings
> have been reported over the years – they must run into the thousands. I’m 

> sure Kent could tell us.
>

​You can see the stats here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT?yr=all

​199,166 checklists submitted and counting. Who is going to get the fabled
200Kth checklist!?
That would represent 385 species of birds, all species every reported from
VT. For sure number of birds counted...it is likely in the millions. ​


>         While E Bird is unsurpassed for finding information on individual
> species with dates, counts and locations, other data could probably be
> mined from its vast data base.  For instance:
>
> •       What are the top ten locations in Vermont for generating E Bird
> reports?  I might guess the West Rutland Swamp, Mount Philo, Shelburne Bay,
> Mount Mansfield, Pearl Street in Brandon, etc., but I really don’t know.
> The list could be titled “Vermont’s Ten Most Birded Spots”.
>

​You can see that here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/subnational1/US-VT/hotspots?yr=all&m=
​


> •       Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number of
> individual species reports?  Are there places where over 150 species have
> been sighted?  100?  75?
>

​Way over. Again, you can see some of that here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT/hotspots?yr=all&m=
​

> •       Which Vermont birders are the most active E Bird contributors?
>

​You can see that for any year or overall in the Top 100 list. Check it out
here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/top100?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-VT&year=2016 

and you can query by county too.
​


> •       What are the ten rarest birds spotted in Vermont?  I think of
> Whooping Crane, Painted Bunting, Black-Tailed Gull, Golden-Crowned Sparrow,
> the currently visiting Prothonotary Warbler and several others.  Selection
> criteria might be single species sightings from a specific location over a
> relatively short time interval.
>

​A little harder, but start with the bar chart here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?reportType=location&bMonth=01&bYear=1900&eMonth=12&eYear=2016&parentState=US-VT&countries=US&states=US-VT&getLocations=states&continue.x=39&continue.y=15&continue=t 

​

> •       At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most commonly
> reported species either by number of E Bird reports containing them, or by
> total count of individuals?  Chickadee, House Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue
> Jay?  The list might be called “The Trash Birds of Vermont”.
>

​Again, the bar chart helps a bit. But sorting by high count here helps get
you that:

http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-VT?yr=all&m=&rank=hc&hs_sortBy=count&hs_o=desc 


There are lots of tools to mess around with like this. I hope you all will
explore the eBird data and share some of your cool findings on the list.
Also, don't forget, the awards page for the Vermont eBird County QUest has
some results too! Check it out at

http://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vermont-county-bird-quest/awards/ 


Happy eBirding,
Kent​


>
>
>
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
>
> 
>
Subject: E Bird Number Crunching
From: Larry and Mona Rogers <4181rogers AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 10:50:20 -0400
 E Bird is a great success in Vermont. I don’t know how many sightings have 
been reported over the years – they must run into the thousands. I’m sure 
Kent could tell us. 

 While E Bird is unsurpassed for finding information on individual species with 
dates, counts and locations, other data could probably be mined from its vast 
data base. For instance: 


• What are the top ten locations in Vermont for generating E Bird reports? I 
might guess the West Rutland Swamp, Mount Philo, Shelburne Bay, Mount 
Mansfield, Pearl Street in Brandon, etc., but I really don’t know. The list 
could be titled “Vermont’s Ten Most Birded Spots”. 

• Which locations in Vermont have generated the largest number of individual 
species reports? Are there places where over 150 species have been sighted? 
100? 75? 

•	Which Vermont birders are the most active E Bird contributors?
• What are the ten rarest birds spotted in Vermont? I think of Whooping 
Crane, Painted Bunting, Black-Tailed Gull, Golden-Crowned Sparrow, the 
currently visiting Prothonotary Warbler and several others. Selection criteria 
might be single species sightings from a specific location over a relatively 
short time interval. 

• At the other end of the spectrum, what are the most commonly reported 
species either by number of E Bird reports containing them, or by total count 
of individuals? Chickadee, House Sparrow, Crow, Starling, Blue Jay? The list 
might be called “The Trash Birds of Vermont”. 


Anyhow, I’m sure other folks could suggest other lists. It might be 
interesting. 


Larry the Compulsive Lister


Sent from Mail for Windows 10
Subject: Birding on the Waterbury Reservoir
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 08:21:00 -0400
Hello all,

If you are looking for a fun and unique birding opportunity this weekend
there are still slots open for the Birding on the Waterbury Reservoir event
this Sunday. We will depart by canoe and kayak from Waterbury Center State
Park at 07:30am and will spend two hours searching for birds around the
reservoir. Participants are invited to bring their own canoe or kayak, or
arrange a discounted rental through Umiak Outfitters. This event is hosted
by the Mad Birders and the Friends of the Waterbury Reservoir, and
preregistration is required. If you are interested, please follow the link
below to sign up. Hope to see some of you there!

Birding on the Waterbury Reservoir

 


-- 
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
17 Elm St Apt. 3
Waterbury, VT 05676
zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
Subject: Chipman Hill in Middlebury
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 22:07:42 -0400
Highlights of a 1.2-mile walk through an abandoned beaver wetland and
nearby hardwood forest off Happy Valley Road in Middlebury (on the lower
eastern slopes of Chipman Hill) were an Olive-sided Flycatcher and apparent
"pure" male Golden-winged Warbler. Neither bird vocalized, but both offered
excellent views at close range. We also heard a Black-billed Cuckoo giving
its guttural, rolling call.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Re: close encounter
From: Susan Tucker <rstucker AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 20:28:22 -0400
What a nice sighting.  I am please to have the common yellowthroat back.  I 
haven't seen him well yet, but he is busy announcing his presence.  Susan

-----Original Message----- 
From: Jean Arrowsmith
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2016 3:19 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] close encounter

Just now I stepped out onto my patio and discovered a female Chestnut-sided 
Warbler huddled against the wall.  My answer to "Are you hurt?" was a hop 
forward then flight into the lilac.  Not much time to observe, but the 
closest look I have ever had to this lovely bird.

Jean Arrowsmith
Lincoln 
Subject: Eagles at Gale Meadows
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 19:29:42 +0000
Today's report from Charlie Davis:

Unbelievable! Watched both adults and three immatures eating something on a 
mudflat, maybe a goose.... There were at least two full size immature flying 
around behind the feast, and I had just left a third over behind the island. So 
seven, possibly eight here!! 




Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: Re: Hooded warbler Bennington
From: Pieter van Loon <boydenvl AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 12:23:55 -0400
Hi,
Thanks for the tip. Any more details on where "the usual place" is for 
those of us who have never been there? Thank you. 
Pieter van Loon

On Mon, 23 May 2016 09:40:53 -0400, JoAnne Russo  wrote:

       Don Clark and I found a hooded warbler at Whipstock Hill WMA in 
the usual place as found in previous years. Should have checked the 
area sooner. Bird flew in, great views, then flew back into the woods. 
Good luck if you try!

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Mansfield ridgeline
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 07:30:43 -0400
Congratulations to VCE on 25 years of dedication to our ridgeline ecosystem!
Many thanks for all you do.
Scott
Moretown





> On May 22, 2016, at 10:08 PM, Chris Rimmer  wrote:
> 
> With apologies for a tardy post, here is a brief update from Mt. Mansfield,
> where Kent McFarland and I spent last Thursday evening and Friday morning
> on our first netting session of 2016. We luckily dodged the thunderstorms
> on Thursday and were able to set up 15 nets. Bird activity was light, but
> we did hear 6 Bicknell's Thrushes sounding off sporadically in the hour
> preceding dusk. Only calls were given - no songs - and they were of
> decidedly low intensity compared to how cranked up they'll be in about 2
> weeks. White-throats and American Robins were the only other species that
> were much in evidence on the ridgeline, and we heard several songs of each.
> The robins were actually in full voice.
> 
> We opened our nets at 5 am to a relatively quiet dawn chorus. Temperatures
> were in the low 40sF, with a light northerly wind. It was clear that not
> all residents are yet back. We heard the same 6 Bicknell's Thrushes, with
> one bird delivering a brief bout of song. Winter Wrens, robins and
> white-throats put on a reasonable vocal show, complemented by a few juncos.
> The Yellow-rumped and Blackpoll Warblers chimed in later, once the air
> warmed, as did 2 Magnolia Warblers. Two Swainson's Thrushes also briefly
> piped up, as did a Blue-headed Vireo (not a breeding resident on the
> ridgeline). Pine Siskins were still scattered about, as were a few Purple
> Finches.
> 
> We netted a total of 18 birds, none of which were in breeding condition:
> 
> Bicknell's Thrush - 2 males (both old friends, including a bird banded as a
> yearling in June of 2011, making him 6 years old)
> Swainson's Thrush - 1
> American Robin - 1 female (no incubation patch yet)
> Blackpoll Warbler - 2 males (including, unbelievably, the champion
> long-distance migrant among the 3 birds that returned with its geolocator
> in 2014! See our blog from last summer about this bird:
> 
http://vtecostudies.org/blog/champion-blackpoll-globe-trotter-returns-to-mansfield/ 

> )
> Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4 (all new birds; 1 male, 3 females)
> Black-throated Blue Warbler - 1 yearling male
> White-throated Sparrow - 5 (3 new, 2 returns from previous years)
> Pine Siskin - 2
> 
> We expect to find the full complement of local residents up there during
> our next visit in early June. This marks VCE's 25th year studying breeding
> birds on Mansfield's ridgeline - some of us just don't know when to quit!
> 
> Chris
> 
> ________________________
> 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x1
> http://vtecostudies.org/
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Mansfield ridgeline
From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 06:41:00 -0400
Hi Chris,
Exciting news! 
I'm wondering if you guys have a schedule yet for your visits over the next 
couple months. Or is it a week by week plan? I'd love to go up again and join 
you for some banding and I know of two of my birding friends that would love to 
join me. 

Just thinking ahead...
Julie

> On May 22, 2016, at 10:08 PM, Chris Rimmer  wrote:
> 
> With apologies for a tardy post, here is a brief update from Mt. Mansfield,
> where Kent McFarland and I spent last Thursday evening and Friday morning
> on our first netting session of 2016. We luckily dodged the thunderstorms
> on Thursday and were able to set up 15 nets. Bird activity was light, but
> we did hear 6 Bicknell's Thrushes sounding off sporadically in the hour
> preceding dusk. Only calls were given - no songs - and they were of
> decidedly low intensity compared to how cranked up they'll be in about 2
> weeks. White-throats and American Robins were the only other species that
> were much in evidence on the ridgeline, and we heard several songs of each.
> The robins were actually in full voice.
> 
> We opened our nets at 5 am to a relatively quiet dawn chorus. Temperatures
> were in the low 40sF, with a light northerly wind. It was clear that not
> all residents are yet back. We heard the same 6 Bicknell's Thrushes, with
> one bird delivering a brief bout of song. Winter Wrens, robins and
> white-throats put on a reasonable vocal show, complemented by a few juncos.
> The Yellow-rumped and Blackpoll Warblers chimed in later, once the air
> warmed, as did 2 Magnolia Warblers. Two Swainson's Thrushes also briefly
> piped up, as did a Blue-headed Vireo (not a breeding resident on the
> ridgeline). Pine Siskins were still scattered about, as were a few Purple
> Finches.
> 
> We netted a total of 18 birds, none of which were in breeding condition:
> 
> Bicknell's Thrush - 2 males (both old friends, including a bird banded as a
> yearling in June of 2011, making him 6 years old)
> Swainson's Thrush - 1
> American Robin - 1 female (no incubation patch yet)
> Blackpoll Warbler - 2 males (including, unbelievably, the champion
> long-distance migrant among the 3 birds that returned with its geolocator
> in 2014! See our blog from last summer about this bird:
> 
http://vtecostudies.org/blog/champion-blackpoll-globe-trotter-returns-to-mansfield/ 

> )
> Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4 (all new birds; 1 male, 3 females)
> Black-throated Blue Warbler - 1 yearling male
> White-throated Sparrow - 5 (3 new, 2 returns from previous years)
> Pine Siskin - 2
> 
> We expect to find the full complement of local residents up there during
> our next visit in early June. This marks VCE's 25th year studying breeding
> birds on Mansfield's ridgeline - some of us just don't know when to quit!
> 
> Chris
> 
> ________________________
> 
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x1
> http://vtecostudies.org/
> 
> 
Subject: Bald Eagles and loons at Gale Meadows
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 03:21:51 +0000
in Winhall (Bondville, VT). While reports have been going into e-bird, here's 
info for those of you not looking there. It's from Charlie Davis who has been a 
Loon Watcher for several years: 



I saw this morning, May 20, (simultaneously) three BAEA - one mature adult and 
two adult size, but still in immature plumage. They were all perched in nearby 
trees, down in the cove where you see Stratton in the distance. At that time, 
they were all moving around every few minutes, presumably looking for 
breakfast, and there may have very well been more of them. Only one loon this 
morning, so the apparent pair on my last visit, were probably still in transit 
to some other place. (Charlie posted in e-bird picture of 3 loons - with a bit 
of interaction. One clearly was an intruder.) 


 I had talked to a lady hauling her kayak out of Gale several weeks ago, and 
she told me about seeing four bald eagles that day, and thought they were 
nesting down where I have seen them on two subsequent outings. I have mostly 
stayed up toward the stumps in past years, but after hearing about the eagles, 
I have been paying closer attention to that end! I think maybe she was right. 
They seem to be favoring several trees around that cove, and if there is a nest 
close enough to spot from the water, I am determined to find It. 


 There was a nest platform at Gale, but Eric Hansen moved that out of there 2-3 
years ago, thinking it might be more productive elsewhere. There are tons of 
good nesting sites, especially down in the stumpy end in the direction of 
Magic. I've been reporting on Gale for the loon count for a number of years, so 
i'm always frustrated by having little if anything to report. Only one loon 
this morning, so the apparent pair on my last visit, were probably still in 
transit to some other place. (Charlie posted in e-bird picture of 3 loons - 
with a bit of interaction. One clearly was an intruder.) The one loon this 
morning circled several times before splashing down, so it very well may have 
come in from elsewhere to do a bit of fishing. 


Is anyone doing an official monitoring of BAEA nests in VT? If so, who? and 
where can I find out where the nests are located? Rumor has it that there is 
one somewhere around Ludlow. 



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: Mansfield ridgeline
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 22:08:28 -0400
With apologies for a tardy post, here is a brief update from Mt. Mansfield,
where Kent McFarland and I spent last Thursday evening and Friday morning
on our first netting session of 2016. We luckily dodged the thunderstorms
on Thursday and were able to set up 15 nets. Bird activity was light, but
we did hear 6 Bicknell's Thrushes sounding off sporadically in the hour
preceding dusk. Only calls were given - no songs - and they were of
decidedly low intensity compared to how cranked up they'll be in about 2
weeks. White-throats and American Robins were the only other species that
were much in evidence on the ridgeline, and we heard several songs of each.
The robins were actually in full voice.

We opened our nets at 5 am to a relatively quiet dawn chorus. Temperatures
were in the low 40sF, with a light northerly wind. It was clear that not
all residents are yet back. We heard the same 6 Bicknell's Thrushes, with
one bird delivering a brief bout of song. Winter Wrens, robins and
white-throats put on a reasonable vocal show, complemented by a few juncos.
The Yellow-rumped and Blackpoll Warblers chimed in later, once the air
warmed, as did 2 Magnolia Warblers. Two Swainson's Thrushes also briefly
piped up, as did a Blue-headed Vireo (not a breeding resident on the
ridgeline). Pine Siskins were still scattered about, as were a few Purple
Finches.

We netted a total of 18 birds, none of which were in breeding condition:

Bicknell's Thrush - 2 males (both old friends, including a bird banded as a
yearling in June of 2011, making him 6 years old)
Swainson's Thrush - 1
American Robin - 1 female (no incubation patch yet)
Blackpoll Warbler - 2 males (including, unbelievably, the champion
long-distance migrant among the 3 birds that returned with its geolocator
in 2014! See our blog from last summer about this bird:

http://vtecostudies.org/blog/champion-blackpoll-globe-trotter-returns-to-mansfield/ 

)
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4 (all new birds; 1 male, 3 females)
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 1 yearling male
White-throated Sparrow - 5 (3 new, 2 returns from previous years)
Pine Siskin - 2

We expect to find the full complement of local residents up there during
our next visit in early June. This marks VCE's 25th year studying breeding
birds on Mansfield's ridgeline - some of us just don't know when to quit!

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x1
http://vtecostudies.org/


Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 15:51:17 -0700
Wonderful to see this life bird yesterday... peering straight at us from
across the street. For all these years we've been wondering what would nest
in that box. Thanks Marv, and we hope everyone stays at a suitable
distance. Beautiful.
On May 22, 2016 6:43 PM, "Marv Elliott" <
0000000de58b8aa5-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu> wrote:

> What a great reward for some effort. I built the box as a Northern Flicker
> box about 10 years ago. When I had no need at home I put it up near the
> marsh kiosk and boardwalk hoping something might use it but knowing it
> looked good there.
> The box has floor dimensions of 7X9 inches, and entrance hole 2.5 inches
> and the hole is about 12 inches up from the floor. The habitat is a birch
> tree with an apple near the base and lots of brush. It is actually an old
> cellar hole filled with brush and surrounded by fencing to provide safety
> for us visitors. The box faces East but mostly so everyone would get the
> chance to observe anything that might use it. It is facing a dirt road and
> across the road are the remnants of various structures abandoned long ago.
> There are numerous aspen trees growing there and nearby trees are mostly
> young deciduous with few conifers for several hundred yards.The box is
> about 20 ft. up in a white birch which grew up in the middle of the cellar
> hole. Its that height because that was as high as my ladder would extend. I
> can recall clearly that it looked very high from up on that ladder looking
> down at the tangle below me and balancing that box and my power screw
> driver.
> This particular sighting is so easy to locate we are now concerned that
> visitors (well meaning and otherwise) will disturb the family. We want
> everyone to see it that asks and in return hope you will respect the owls
> and further call a game warden if you see someone else that is harassing
> wildlife. Our recent excellent experience with the painted bunting tells us
> there are more of us who want to protect birds than those who do not.
> Please help us do that here.
> Please let me know if you have any questions.
> Marv Elliott
> > On May 22, 2016, at 3:28 PM, G M ARCHAMBAULT 
> wrote:
> >
> > Since word is out, out-of-staters who won't be visiting this site might
> appreciate a habitat description of the nest box location.  I would enjoy
> knowing more about the setting of the nest box -- wooded or open, etc.
> Height of the nest box off the ground, direction the entry faces, shaded or
> in the sun, etc.  All this intelligence helps us to expand our knowledge of
> this species, and helps people place nest boxes to attract owls.  Thanks.
> Also, generally the adult will position its day roost within line of sight
> of the nest, so parents might be visible with some scanning of nearby trees
> or tall vegetation (usually an obstructed view).  I've seen Saw-whet young
> in a Wood Duck box in Moraga, CA at the back edge of a meadow, with
> conifers/hardwoods not far away.  At that site, I noticed trampled grass,
> indicating photographers had approached the nest box very closely instead
> of remaining on the trail where sufficiently fine photos were obtainable.
> Getting too close might a!
>  ccustom young owls to humans, which they should instead be wary of
> generally.  Toward dusk, best keep generous distance in case a feeding
> occurs early.   I'd be interested to know how close the nest is to moving
> cars and other activity as well -- just in case anyone else posts about
> this sighting.  Best, -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama
> >
> >    On Sunday, May 22, 2016 10:50 AM, Tyler Pockette <
> tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
> >
> >
> > There is a fledgling Northern Saw-whet Owl peeking its head out of the
> > nesting box above the parking space at the West Rutland Marsh boardwalk.
> > Normally I wouldn't post the location of a potentially nesting owl, but
> > given the location is at a  popular birding destination, I think it's
> safe
> > to say he'd be spotted eventually if he isn't already known about. Please
> > be respectful of this bird.
> >
> > -Tyler Pockette
> >
> >
> >
>
Subject: PHOTOS from the Third Week of May
From: Jim Block <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:49:07 -0400
I photographed birds in both NH and VT last week.  If you wish, you can see
some of the photos here:
http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/05/3rd-week-of-may/   

 

Photographed species include Green Heron, Broad-winged Hawk, Chestnut-sided
Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, American Redstart, Veery, Bobolink, Red-eyed
Vireo, Ovenbird, Baltimore Oriole, House Wren, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker,
Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Song Sparrow, Least Flycatcher,
White-throated Sparrow, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

 

Jim Block

Etna, NH
Subject: Owl
From: Sue <2birdvt AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:17:22 -0400
The saw whet owl was present this afternoon and spent time watching cars and 
people as they walked/drove by. 

Sue Wetmore 

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:15:44 -0400
Is that the nesting box that the swallows used last summer?  By the parking
area?
On May 22, 2016 4:06 PM, "Tyler Pockette"  wrote:

> Ken, and others,
>
> Perhaps others who visit this site can provide further details about next
> box height, orientation, etc, but what struck me as very odd was the lack
> of conifers anywhere to be seen in the general area. In fact, there are
> almost no large or dense trees in the area for which to conceal the adult
> birds. Also surprising about this nest is that it is so close to the road
> and is literally directly above the parking space of a very popular birding
> hot spot. The nest box itself faces the road and is probably only about
> 10-15 feet from the road. No doubt that if these birds have been nesting in
> here for the entirety of nesting season, they are already quite accustomed
> to human presence. At this particular location, there would be absolutely
> no reason for anyone, including photographers, to leave the road to
> approach any closer.
>
> I've just put a photo of the bird and the box that it's in on my flickr, if
> anyone would like to check it out.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/106350684 AT N05/?
>
> -Tyler
>
> On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 3:28 PM, G M ARCHAMBAULT 
> wrote:
>
> > Since word is out, out-of-staters who won't be visiting this site might
> > appreciate a habitat description of the nest box location.  I would enjoy
> > knowing more about the setting of the nest box -- wooded or open, etc.
> > Height of the nest box off the ground, direction the entry faces, shaded
> or
> > in the sun, etc.  All this intelligence helps us to expand our knowledge
> of
> > this species, and helps people place nest boxes to attract owls.  Thanks.
> > Also, generally the adult will position its day roost within line of
> sight
> > of the nest, so parents might be visible with some scanning of nearby
> trees
> > or tall vegetation (usually an obstructed view).  I've seen Saw-whet
> young
> > in a Wood Duck box in Moraga, CA at the back edge of a meadow, with
> > conifers/hardwoods not far away.  At that site, I noticed trampled grass,
> > indicating photographers had approached the nest box very closely instead
> > of remaining on the trail where sufficiently fine photos were obtainable.
> > Getting too close might accustom young owls to humans, which they should
> > instead be wary of generally.  Toward dusk, best keep generous distance
> in
> > case a feeding occurs early.   I'd be interested to know how close the
> nest
> > is to moving cars and other activity as well -- just in case anyone else
> > posts about this sighting.  Best, -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama
> >
> >     On Sunday, May 22, 2016 10:50 AM, Tyler Pockette <
> > tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
> >
> >
> >  There is a fledgling Northern Saw-whet Owl peeking its head out of the
> > nesting box above the parking space at the West Rutland Marsh boardwalk.
> > Normally I wouldn't post the location of a potentially nesting owl, but
> > given the location is at a  popular birding destination, I think it's
> safe
> > to say he'd be spotted eventually if he isn't already known about. Please
> > be respectful of this bird.
> >
> > -Tyler Pockette
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:03:41 -0400
Ken, and others,

Perhaps others who visit this site can provide further details about next
box height, orientation, etc, but what struck me as very odd was the lack
of conifers anywhere to be seen in the general area. In fact, there are
almost no large or dense trees in the area for which to conceal the adult
birds. Also surprising about this nest is that it is so close to the road
and is literally directly above the parking space of a very popular birding
hot spot. The nest box itself faces the road and is probably only about
10-15 feet from the road. No doubt that if these birds have been nesting in
here for the entirety of nesting season, they are already quite accustomed
to human presence. At this particular location, there would be absolutely
no reason for anyone, including photographers, to leave the road to
approach any closer.

I've just put a photo of the bird and the box that it's in on my flickr, if
anyone would like to check it out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/106350684 AT N05/?

-Tyler

On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 3:28 PM, G M ARCHAMBAULT 
wrote:

> Since word is out, out-of-staters who won't be visiting this site might
> appreciate a habitat description of the nest box location.  I would enjoy
> knowing more about the setting of the nest box -- wooded or open, etc.
> Height of the nest box off the ground, direction the entry faces, shaded or
> in the sun, etc.  All this intelligence helps us to expand our knowledge of
> this species, and helps people place nest boxes to attract owls.  Thanks.
> Also, generally the adult will position its day roost within line of sight
> of the nest, so parents might be visible with some scanning of nearby trees
> or tall vegetation (usually an obstructed view).  I've seen Saw-whet young
> in a Wood Duck box in Moraga, CA at the back edge of a meadow, with
> conifers/hardwoods not far away.  At that site, I noticed trampled grass,
> indicating photographers had approached the nest box very closely instead
> of remaining on the trail where sufficiently fine photos were obtainable.
> Getting too close might accustom young owls to humans, which they should
> instead be wary of generally.  Toward dusk, best keep generous distance in
> case a feeding occurs early.   I'd be interested to know how close the nest
> is to moving cars and other activity as well -- just in case anyone else
> posts about this sighting.  Best, -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama
>
>     On Sunday, May 22, 2016 10:50 AM, Tyler Pockette <
> tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
>
>
>  There is a fledgling Northern Saw-whet Owl peeking its head out of the
> nesting box above the parking space at the West Rutland Marsh boardwalk.
> Normally I wouldn't post the location of a potentially nesting owl, but
> given the location is at a  popular birding destination, I think it's safe
> to say he'd be spotted eventually if he isn't already known about. Please
> be respectful of this bird.
>
> -Tyler Pockette
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 19:28:02 +0000
Since word is out, out-of-staters who won't be visiting this site might 
appreciate a habitat description of the nest box location.  I would enjoy 
knowing more about the setting of the nest box -- wooded or open, etc.  Height 
of the nest box off the ground, direction the entry faces, shaded or in the 
sun, etc.  All this intelligence helps us to expand our knowledge of this 
species, and helps people place nest boxes to attract owls.  Thanks.  Also, 
generally the adult will position its day roost within line of sight of the 
nest, so parents might be visible with some scanning of nearby trees or tall 
vegetation (usually an obstructed view).  I've seen Saw-whet young in a Wood 
Duck box in Moraga, CA at the back edge of a meadow, with conifers/hardwoods 
not far away.  At that site, I noticed trampled grass, indicating 
photographers had approached the nest box very closely instead of remaining on 
the trail where sufficiently fine photos were obtainable.  Getting too close 
might accustom young owls to humans, which they should instead be wary of 
generally.  Toward dusk, best keep generous distance in case a feeding occurs 
early.   I'd be interested to know how close the nest is to moving cars and 
other activity as well -- just in case anyone else posts about this sighting. 
 Best, -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama    


 On Sunday, May 22, 2016 10:50 AM, Tyler Pockette  
wrote: 

 

 There is a fledgling Northern Saw-whet Owl peeking its head out of the
nesting box above the parking space at the West Rutland Marsh boardwalk.
Normally I wouldn't post the location of a potentially nesting owl, but
given the location is at a  popular birding destination, I think it's safe
to say he'd be spotted eventually if he isn't already known about. Please
be respectful of this bird.

-Tyler Pockette



Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owl- West Rutland Marsh
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 11:50:16 -0400
There is a fledgling Northern Saw-whet Owl peeking its head out of the
nesting box above the parking space at the West Rutland Marsh boardwalk.
Normally I wouldn't post the location of a potentially nesting owl, but
given the location is at a  popular birding destination, I think it's safe
to say he'd be spotted eventually if he isn't already known about. Please
be respectful of this bird.

-Tyler Pockette
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip AT NORTHBRANCHNATURECENTER.ORG>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 11:28:08 -0400
There's a Clay-colored Sparrow hanging around the farmhouse at the North
Branch Nature Center this afternoon. I spotted it when it flew from the lawn
to the hydrangea in the front of the house as  I walked out to get the mail.
It wasn't vocalizing but feeding actively in the lawn. Meantime, two
Chipping Sparrows were busy collecting nesting material nearby.

You just can't go anywhere without binoculars this time of year!

Happy Birding!

Chip

 

p.s. - And don't forget - BirdFest is coming May 28th!

 

  BirdFEST! 
Saturday, May 28, 2016
Fee: $10 members, $15 nonmembers, free for kids
Join us for our 5th annual celebration of birds at NBNC! Featuring bird
walks &
workshops, live raptors, kids activities, bird banding demo, bird house
building, photo contest and much more!

 

 

Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director

North Branch Nature Center

(802) 229-6206

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org  

 

 
Subject: first veery song
From: Veer Frost <vfrost AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 07:58:53 -0400
Pouring down from the riverside trees like a waterfall, beautiful 
beyond words. 

Veer Frost, Passumpsic
Subject: Bird-a-thon highlights;
From: Ruth <birder_rws AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 00:55:38 +0000
My first bird for my Bird-a-thon day was a fly across the road Barred Owl! I 
think BAOW in flight is a first for me. 



Second WOW moment was 12! Spotted Sandpipers feeding along the shoreline of 
Emerald Lake. (Dowitchers, sandpipers, etc would have been REAL nice too!) 



Lastly - 2 Brown Thrashers (makes more) behind the VT Country Store In 
Manchester. 



As always, it's more interesting to me what I miss - no Kingfishers, Downy, 
Hairy or Piliated WP and no Least, Willow, Alder Flyc (but that may be related 
more to my hearing loss). 



Last bird of the day - Cowbird! Well, it counts too! And only 3 ticks - but one 
burrowing - yuck!\ 




Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT
Subject: marsh birds at South Slang and update on barred owl nest on Mt. Philo
From: Ellie George <elgeorge46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 16:23:43 -0400
Yesterday morning Stacy Robinson and I canoed South Slang of Little Otter
Creek from the boat launch.   The highlights were 6 short billed dowitchers
in a flock, least bittern, American bittern, Virginia rail, possibly sora,
heard only, gallinule, marsh wren (many, many of them singing), blue winged
teal, and a female goldeneye with 9 very small ducklings in tow.

 

We also did a side trip to Mt. Philo, and found that the barred owl chicks
had fledged.   The nest tree was empty, and we could not see any owlets or
adults nearby.

 

Ellie George,

Paradox, NY
Subject: Essex: 150 Species Plus
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 16:04:50 -0400
On January 2nd of this year I decided if I found both Crossbill species in
Essex I would attempt to find 150 for the calendar year. This has never been
done before and my eBird list for Essex showed about 153 (for 13 years work)
so it meant finding every bird I'd seen in Essex County in one year. It also
meant that I'd have to find 95% of the birds seen by everyone in Essex this
year to make it to 150. I knew there would be a cost in doing this but my
estimates were way off. A month into it I realized that this was going to be
a selfish and destructive ( to the planet) campaign. A better person would
have quit then.but not me. Yes, I know many of you are thinking, "But what
about all the eBird reports added to the database?" And true, I'm sure some
of what I entered will be helpful but it was expensive!! Keeping a written
log of every mile, trip number, and hour spent in Essex county I now can
confirm who is responsible for some of this "Global Warming" . On the 88th
trip this year I found a Willow Flycatcher & Field Sparrow bringing my
yearly total to 150 (Plus Night Hawk & possible Gray cheeked Thrush I have
not counted) I spent 398.5 hours birding in Essex and.here's the killer,
drove 7,367 miles! Yes, Essex is huge to cover but I put (by internet
calculation) , 6,400 pounds of CO2 into the atmosphere.

 

Where there should be some joy in this kind of "accomplishment" there is
only relief.that I am done with this kind of birding (except for CBC's and
Birdaton/Quest one day fund raisers) This was never my kind of
birding..driving from one pond to another, from one field to another, one
feeder to another for that one bird just passing through. Could I have done
it in less trips and less miles, maybe but which of the 88 trips to cut and
miss that trip which produced those species that were only recorded once? I
don't think of this as birding...this is more about the self and about how
many (at least speaking for myself).

This kind of birding made me feel disconnected from nature & the birds & the
habitat I love. I don't enjoy it and even when one finds a new species
towards the goal the joy is so short lived as you seek & search out another
one to add. Birding is many things to different people, I understand that.
But I will be happy to get back to just driving the 13 miles one way to
Victory and walking once I am there. I hope I am not offending anyone by my
own personal perspective & experience with this effort. I do have to pay
some penance for this.I will spend a few weeks thinking about how to
accomplish that and even that is an easy thing to say now after the damage
has been done.

 

I know the 150 number will grow some, it is only May 21st and the potential
list of birds I made still has 14 possibilities but it will grow when I find
birds during my "normal" birding habits.

 

Tom Berriman
Subject: MT Philo Barred Owl & West HAven Prothonotary
From: "Nancy A. Brown" <whites AT VERMONTEL.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 15:53:29 -0400
An exhilarating hike up MT Philo produced an empty nest for the Barred Owl 
owlet has fledged. But a stop at West Haven Galick Rd site of Prothonotary 
found 3:00 pm it still in same place and singing. Still no sign he has 
attracted a mate.