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Updated on Saturday, February 28 at 07:07 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Least Sandpiper,©David Sibley

28 Feb Eastern Addison Co - 2/28 [Donald Jones ]
28 Feb Waxwings in Grand Isle [Bruce MacPherson ]
28 Feb Re: Snowy owl [Kent McFarland ]
28 Feb Re: Snowy owl [JoAnne Russo ]
28 Feb Re: Snowy owl [Diana ]
27 Feb Snowy owl [Kent McFarland ]
27 Feb Re: Waxwing breath [Isis Erb ]
27 Feb Waxwing breath [Ken Copenhaver ]
27 Feb Re: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier ["CAMERON O'CONNOR" ]
27 Feb Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier [Larry Clarfeld ]
27 Feb Re: Lone Female Red Crossbill [Patti Haynes ]
27 Feb Lone Female Red Crossbill [Remy Lary ]
26 Feb Fwd: Barred Owl visitor [cynthia crawford ]
26 Feb Dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk and White-winged Crossbill [Tyler Pockette ]
26 Feb Waxwings [Kim Sargeant ]
25 Feb Re: Finally, Bohemians! [Martha McClintock ]
26 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Joyce Werntgen ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Susan Fogleman ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Lynette Reep ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Karen Uhlendorf ]
25 Feb Re: Fwd: Waxwing video [Karen Uhlendorf ]
25 Feb Fwd: Waxwing video [Susan Fogleman ]
25 Feb Finally, Bohemians! [Miriam Lawrence ]
25 Feb Re: NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins [Scott Sainsbury ]
25 Feb NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins [tfberriman ]
24 Feb Re: Keep your chins up [Barbara Brosnan ]
24 Feb Re: creeper [Joyce Werntgen ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
24 Feb Keep your chins up [Jim Phillips ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
24 Feb South Burlington Bohemians ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
24 Feb creeper [Maeve Kim ]
24 Feb Bohemians [Linda Gionti ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Horace Shaw ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
24 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
23 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Susan Werntgen ]
23 Feb Re: Snowy Owl in Hyde Park still there [Karen Uhlendorf ]
23 Feb Re: Dark Phase Red-tail [Susan Fogleman ]
23 Feb Dark Phase Red-tail ["Peterson, Bruce B." ]
23 Feb Bohemian Rhapsody [Bruce MacPherson ]
23 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Jane Stein ]
23 Feb Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Larry Clarfeld ]
23 Feb Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian [Joyce Werntgen ]
23 Feb Waxwings, Red-bellied Woodpecker ["Scott W. Morrical" ]
23 Feb Re: VTBIRD Digest - 21 Feb 2015 to 22 Feb 2015 (#2015-52) [Martha Pfeiffer ]
23 Feb Re: A shower of redpolls [Isis Erb ]
23 Feb A shower of redpolls [Walter Medwid ]
22 Feb Re: Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure [Patti Haynes ]
22 Feb Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure [Marian McDonald ]
21 Feb Update, sick Hairy Woodpecker [Cynthia Crawford ]
21 Feb Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [anneboby ]
21 Feb New guidelines for submitting Vermont Fish Crow observations to eBird ["Ian A. Worley" ]
21 Feb Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [Marcia Baker ]
21 Feb Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [H Nicolay ]
21 Feb Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [Mona Bearor ]
21 Feb Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [Kent McFarland ]
21 Feb Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [Kim Likakis ]
21 Feb Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker ["CAMERON O'CONNOR" ]
21 Feb Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker [cynthia crawford ]
21 Feb South Burlington Waxwings [Bruce MacPherson ]
21 Feb Re: Waxwings - so.burl [Michele Patenaude ]
21 Feb Re: Waxwings - so.burl [Joyce Werntgen ]
21 Feb Re: Waxwings - so.burl [Roo Slagle ]
21 Feb Waxwings - so.burl [Deenie ]
21 Feb Waxwings [Joyce Werntgen ]
21 Feb Re: bird behavior [Janet Warren ]
21 Feb Re: bird behavior [Betty ]
21 Feb Re: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
20 Feb Re: Snowy Owl in Hyde Park still there ["kcaterer ." ]
20 Feb Re: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk [Ken Cox ]
19 Feb Re: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk [Jeffrey Sonshine ]
19 Feb Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk [Ken Cox ]
19 Feb Addison Snowy [Kevin Thorley ]
19 Feb from the Washington Post -- Ouch [Scott Sainsbury ]
19 Feb Re: random question of the day [anneboby ]

Subject: Eastern Addison Co - 2/28
From: Donald Jones <dwilbertjones AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 18:36:48 -0500
Hi all,

Fellow Middlebury student Fitz Bowen and I enjoyed a superb morning of
birding on this beautiful late winter (am I too optimistic to say it might
have felt like early spring?) day. The birds were definitely characteristic
of the initial sub-zero temperature when we left campus at 7:30, as a large
flock of waxwings feeding on South Main Street distracted us before we
could even get out of town. In addition to the decidedly wintry ratio of
about 75 Bohemians to 5 Cedars, a small flock of Common Redpolls perched
nearby and a handful of Pine Siskins also put in an appearance.

Along the Lincoln/Ripton Road up in the Greens, we were lucky enough to
spot a Barred Owl perched alongside the road in great light, which opened
one eye but obligingly sat still as we watched and took pictures for ten
minutes. Great looks at more Common Redpolls and a Pileated Woodpecker also
enlivened this stretch.

In Lincoln, I had my first Vermont Northern Shrike perched along East River
Road. After a whole winter of looking, I'm realizing that they're tougher
to find than you might think!

From there, we headed more or less directly back to Middlebury, where the
highlight of my day awaited: a massive flock, between 350 and 400 strong,
of Bohemian Waxwings. I followed them around campus, multiple times coming
within 15 feet of dozens at a time as they fed in various fruiting
crabapples. Standing surrounded by the gently purring flock of beautiful
birds from somewhere deep in the far northern boreal forest, all of whom
were utterly unconcerned with my presence, was a reminder of why I truly
love birding. Late this afternoon, I couldn't resist going back for one
last look. I found the entire swarm sitting in the top of an oak adjacent
the CFA parking lot, making forays in groups of 50 and 75 to gobble down
the quickly dwindling supply of crabapples. I don't know how soon this
flock will depart on their wonderful journey or where they'll next stop,
but I will remember them for a long time to come.

Don Jones
Middlebury, VT / Laramie, WY
Subject: Waxwings in Grand Isle
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:02:57 -0500
This afternoon I spotted still another flock of waxwings on route 314 in Grand 
Isle near the continuation of West Shore Road. There were about 100 all told 
with a ratio of Bohemians:Cedars of about 8:1. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
Subject: Re: Snowy owl
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 12:16:26 -0500
Hi,
A lot of people are asking me where the owl is. It was posted to the list
serve a few days ago. But, you can visit this VT eBird map. If you want
Google to give you exact directions, click on any dot then on Checklist
then map and you will be able to tell Google to give directions from
anyplace.


http://ebird.org/ebird/vt/map/snoowl1?neg=true&env.minX=-72.50462571304979&env.minY=43.34105143223757&env.maxX=-72.42051163834276&env.maxY=43.37805701346626&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=range&byr=2015&eyr=2015 


The owl sits on the north end peak of the roof of the barn. It is a very
white adult. Please stay on road and be respectful of owl and landowner.
Enjoy
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


  




On Sat, Feb 28, 2015 at 11:20 AM, Diana  wrote:

> Weathersfield, VT?  Where is the usual barn spot?
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kent McFarland" <
> kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
> To: 
> Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 7:49 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy owl
>
>
>  snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
>> both watched the sun set tonight.
>> Kent
>>
>>
>> --
>> ____________________________
>>
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>>
>> 
>>  
>> > >
>> 
>>
>>
Subject: Re: Snowy owl
From: JoAnne Russo <sukirusso AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:30:07 -0500
Across the street from the main buildings. Easy to locate.

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 28, 2015, at 11:20 AM, Diana  wrote:
> 
> Weathersfield, VT?  Where is the usual barn spot?
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kent McFarland" 
 

> To: 
> Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 7:49 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy owl
> 
> 
>> snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
>> both watched the sun set tonight.
>> Kent
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> ____________________________
>> 
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x2
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: Snowy owl
From: Diana <dlee3 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:20:57 -0500
Weathersfield, VT?  Where is the usual barn spot?


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Kent McFarland" 
To: 
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 7:49 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy owl


> snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
> both watched the sun set tonight.
> Kent
>
>
> -- 
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x2
>
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Snowy owl
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:49:33 -0500
snowy continues on usual barn spot as previous days in weathersfield. We
both watched the sun set tonight.
Kent


-- 
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


  


Subject: Re: Waxwing breath
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:30:39 -0500
I've been trying to capture their exhalations in a photo to no avail. I
noticed it for the first time this winter myself. Pretty interesting to
watch. 😀
Isis Erb

On Friday, February 27, 2015, Ken Copenhaver  wrote:

> For the past several days a mixed flock of Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings has
> been feasting on several large crabapple trees just outside the building
> where I work in Georgia.  Flocks have ranged from 40 to 150 (approx)
> birds.  The trees are on the east side of the building, right up against
> some windows for really close views.  At 7:30 this morning at about -15
> degrees, viewing them through the windows and toward the sun, I could
> actually see wisps of vapor from their breath!  I don't recall ever
> observing a bird's breath before.  Pretty amazing!
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
Subject: Waxwing breath
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:27:41 -0500
For the past several days a mixed flock of Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings has
been feasting on several large crabapple trees just outside the building
where I work in Georgia.  Flocks have ranged from 40 to 150 (approx)
birds.  The trees are on the east side of the building, right up against
some windows for really close views.  At 7:30 this morning at about -15
degrees, viewing them through the windows and toward the sun, I could
actually see wisps of vapor from their breath!  I don't recall ever
observing a bird's breath before.  Pretty amazing!

--Ken Copenhaver
Subject: Re: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier
From: "CAMERON O'CONNOR" <cameron103 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:16:07 -0500
thanks for info... so sorry to hear you won't be around as much - any
birding classes/activities coming up?

On Fri, Feb 27, 2015 at 4:18 PM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:

> Hi VTBirders,
>
> About 150+ Bohemian Waxwings just now in Montpelier at the intersection of
> Elm St. X Pearl St.
>
> Good Birding,
> Larry
>
> *Birding Cape May*
> May 7-11, 2015
> Experience spring migration at its best! For over a decade, NBNC has taken
> teen groups to Cape May for the World Series of Birding, and now, we offer
> adults the opportunity to visit what is widely considered the 'top birding
> destination in the East.'
>
> Learn more at: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/capemay.html
>
> --
> Larry Clarfeld
> Environmental Educator
> Youth Birding Coordinator
>
> North Branch Nature Center
> 713 Elm St.
> Montpelier, VT 05602
>
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> (802) 229-6206
> larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
Subject: Bohemian Waxwings - Montpelier
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:18:46 -0500
Hi VTBirders,

About 150+ Bohemian Waxwings just now in Montpelier at the intersection of
Elm St. X Pearl St.

Good Birding,
Larry

*Birding Cape May*
May 7-11, 2015
Experience spring migration at its best! For over a decade, NBNC has taken
teen groups to Cape May for the World Series of Birding, and now, we offer
adults the opportunity to visit what is widely considered the 'top birding
destination in the East.'

Learn more at: http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/capemay.html

-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Re: Lone Female Red Crossbill
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:44:31 -0500
Were you at home in Rochester Remy?

Patti Haynes, sent from my iPod

On Feb 27, 2015, at 1:27 PM, Remy Lary  wrote:

> - spotted her among a flock of Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted
> Nuthatches, clinging on a batch of cones near the top of the pine.
Subject: Lone Female Red Crossbill
From: Remy Lary <remy.avesart AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:27:40 -0800
- spotted her among a flock of Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted
Nuthatches, clinging on a batch of cones near the top of the pine.
Subject: Fwd: Barred Owl visitor
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 21:15:55 -0500
Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: cynthia crawford 
Date: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 5:07 PM
Subject: Barred Owl visitor
To: Upper Valley Birders 


 Had some great views today of a Barred owl that my daughter spotted. It is
still here, waiting on a branch close to the ground up i the woods where a
red squirrel disappeared in a hole. We saw it make several (unsuccessful)
attempts to catch red squirrels.

Photos here:

http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?p=989

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk and White-winged Crossbill
From: Tyler Pockette <tylerpockette4 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:39:02 -0500
Hi all,

Bruce's dark-morph Red-tailed Hawk was still present today on South St.
Extension in Middlebury. This morning it was perched in a large oak tree
that overlooks the field at the top of a hill.

Yesterday while ice fishing on Lake Dunmore in Salisbury, I had a single
White-winged Crossbill flyover. At first I just passed its chit chit calls
off as a redpoll, but then it went into a full trill song as it passed
directly overhead. Funny enough, I had a solo Red Crossbill flyover the
same spot nearly a month ago while ice fishing. It hasn't been much of a
year for crossbills, but it just goes to show that it doesn't hurt to keep
your ears tuned when you're outdoors!

Happy birding,
Tyler Pockette
Subject: Waxwings
From: Kim Sargeant <grammiekims AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:24:28 -0500
Lots and lots of them around the State House in Montpelier this morning and
noon.
Subject: Re: Finally, Bohemians!
From: Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 20:56:23 -0500
Bill and I found a flock of 50 Bohemians on Old Stage Road in Westford.
They were feeding on wild apples and buckthorn berries in between trips to
the road (for grit?)  We watched them for twenty minutes or so.

Martha
Westford

On Wed, Feb 25, 2015 at 2:01 PM, Miriam Lawrence 
wrote:

> Large flock (50-60 at least) just blew through and briefly worked the trees
> around the United Church of Hinesburg parking lot, Hinesburg.  Gone as
> quickly as they arrived, sad to say.
>
> --
> Miriam Lawrence
>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 00:24:52 +0000
loved it......thank you so much!!
Joyce Werntgen
 

 On Wednesday, February 25, 2015 4:49 PM, Karen Uhlendorf  wrote: 

   

 Oops! Sorry all, I meant to send this to a friend not on this list.
Karen

On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:

> Susan,
> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>
> Karen
>
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>
>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian  
>> Waxwings might find this short video by
>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>>
>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>>
>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>>
>>
>> regards,
>> Susan Fogleman



Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:24:05 -0500
Same thing, Karen.

enjoy!

Susan
On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:

> Susan,
> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
> 
> Karen
> 
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
> 
>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian Waxwings 
might find this short video by 

>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>> 
>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>> 
>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>> 
>> 
>> regards,
>> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Lynette Reep <lreep AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:22:03 -0500
I'm glad you did! Lovely video.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:49 PM, Karen Uhlendorf  wrote:
> 
> Oops! Sorry all, I meant to send this to a friend not on this list.
> Karen
> 
>> On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:
>> 
>> Susan,
>> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>> 
>> Karen
>> 
>>> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>>> 
>>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian Waxwings 
might find this short video by 

>>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>>> 
>>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>>> 
>>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>>> 
>>> 
>>> regards,
>>> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Karen Uhlendorf <ku AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:49:44 -0500
Oops! Sorry all, I meant to send this to a friend not on this list.
Karen

On Feb 25, 2015, at 4:43 PM, Karen Uhlendorf wrote:

> Susan,
> A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>
> Karen
>
> On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
>
>> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian  
>> Waxwings might find this short video by
>> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>>
>>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>>
>>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>>
>>
>> regards,
>> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Re: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Karen Uhlendorf <ku AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:43:37 -0500
Susan,
A short video showing the Cedar, then the Bohemian, waxwings.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U

Karen

On Feb 25, 2015, at 3:13 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:

> Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian  
> Waxwings might find this short video by
> Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:
>
>> video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>>
>> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U
>
>
> regards,
> Susan Fogleman
Subject: Fwd: Waxwing video
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:13:16 -0500
Those who recently were seeking advice on ID-ing Cedar vs Bohemian Waxwings 
might find this short video by 

Shawn P. Carey of Migration Productions useful:

>  video recorded this past Sunday in Quincy,MA
>  
> Posted to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sm3lmJjZr-U


regards,
Susan Fogleman
Subject: Finally, Bohemians!
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:01:10 -0500
Large flock (50-60 at least) just blew through and briefly worked the trees
around the United Church of Hinesburg parking lot, Hinesburg.  Gone as
quickly as they arrived, sad to say.

-- 
Miriam Lawrence
Subject: Re: NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 10:18:16 -0500
Wow Tom.  You have your own North Woods aviary!

Scott


> On Feb 25, 2015, at 10:15 AM, tfberriman  wrote:
> 
> Scattering a few hundred Redpolls and Grosbeaks( mixed flock) an adult
> Northern Goshawk visited the feeders. Shortly after 10 Pine Siskins arrived.
> 
> 
> 
> Tom
> 
Subject: NEK: Northern Goshawk, Pine Sisikins
From: tfberriman <blackpoll AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 10:15:19 -0500
Scattering a few hundred Redpolls and Grosbeaks( mixed flock) an adult
Northern Goshawk visited the feeders. Shortly after 10 Pine Siskins arrived.

 

Tom
Subject: Re: Keep your chins up
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 16:31:31 -0500
Thanks!
Barbara Brosnan
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of Jim Phillips
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2015 10:43 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Keep your chins up

Here's something to give you a little boost after waking up (again) to
sub-zero temperatures.

http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html

Hang in there,
Jim
Subject: Re: creeper
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 14:48:47 -0500
There was a Brown Creeper here in Montpelier working up and down in my backyard 
trees and I appreciated his enthusiasm and energy on such scold, cold day. 


Joyce

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 24, 2015, at 8:55 AM, Maeve Kim  wrote:
> 
> This morning as I stepped out to get the newspaper, I heard the sweet early 
spring noise of a Brown Creeper. The temperature was just a little above -20, 
so I hoped the little bird would leave the tree trunk and move to one of the 
suet feeders to restock its fat resources - but I haven’t seen it on the 
feeders yet. 

> 
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:45:41 -0500
Thanks again for all the help in identifying these beautiful birds. I'm 
learning a lot! 


Joyce

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 24, 2015, at 10:39 AM, Peterson, Bruce B.  
wrote: 

> 
> Something in us wants to look for special field marks when sometimes simpler
> characteristics are more telling.  Bohemian waxwings are gray.  Cedars are
> brown.  Much easier than sorting out wingtips and white spots if you can't
> see the undertail coverts.  Bruce Peterson
> 
> 
>> On 2/23/15 4:00 PM, "Joyce Werntgen"  wrote:
>> 
>> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
>> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings? They come in such a huge flock and fly back and 

>> forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to
>> tell who's who?
>> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
Subject: Keep your chins up
From: Jim Phillips <jim AT THEPHILLIPS.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:42:33 -0500
Here's something to give you a little boost after waking up (again) to 
sub-zero temperatures.

http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html

Hang in there,
Jim
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 15:39:12 +0000
Something in us wants to look for special field marks when sometimes simpler
characteristics are more telling.  Bohemian waxwings are gray.  Cedars are
brown.  Much easier than sorting out wingtips and white spots if you can't
see the undertail coverts.  Bruce Peterson


On 2/23/15 4:00 PM, "Joyce Werntgen"  wrote:

> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings? They come in such a huge flock and fly back and
> forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to
> tell who's who?
> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
Subject: South Burlington Bohemians
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 09:43:07 -0500
A busy flock of 80-100 Bohemian Waxwings descended on my neighbor's  
crab-apple tree this morning, here for 20 min or so, and then gone.

Scott
South Burlington
Subject: creeper
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus AT SURFGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 08:55:52 -0500
This morning as I stepped out to get the newspaper, I heard the sweet early 
spring noise of a Brown Creeper. The temperature was just a little above -20, 
so I hoped the little bird would leave the tree trunk and move to one of the 
suet feeders to restock its fat resources - but I havent seen it on the 
feeders yet. 


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
Subject: Bohemians
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti AT GMAVT.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 08:28:53 -0500
Stepping out to the birdfeeder this morning I heard a twittering, and found 15 
bohemians fluffed up against the cold. Then they mobbed a crabapple where the 
light was better, affording me one decent picture before my hands froze. I 
often have cedar waxwings here, but I'm not sure I've ever had bohemians here 
before. Totally made my morning. 


Linda Gionti
Huntington, VT
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Horace Shaw <horaceshaw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 07:58:02 -0500
Ditto!  Very interesting and helpful essay Larry!

Thanks, Horace
in Winooski

On Monday, February 23, 2015, Susan Werntgen  wrote:

> Thanks Larry!
>
> What a well written and informative article!   It helps those of us who
> are eager, but have much to learn.  You covered many interesting points
> with much enthusiasm for these beautiful northern visitors.  I learned a
> lot.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Susan
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Feb 23, 2015, at 4:05 PM, Larry Clarfeld  > wrote:
> >
> > Hi Joyce,
> >
> > There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:
> >
> 
http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

> > (you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).
> >
> > Good birding,
> > Larry
> >
> >> On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  > wrote:
> >>
> >> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between
> the
> >> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly
> back
> >> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult
> for
> >> me to tell who's who?
> >> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Larry Clarfeld
> > Environmental Educator
> > Youth Birding Coordinator
> >
> > North Branch Nature Center
> > 713 Elm St.
> > Montpelier, VT 05602
> >
> > www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> > (802) 229-6206
> > larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
>
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 00:56:55 +0000
Thank you for the clues Jane.......I'm looking forward to a bit more keen 
observation the next time (hope it's soon) that the Waxwings show up. 

Joyce
 

 On Monday, February 23, 2015 4:41 PM, Jane Stein  
wrote: 

   

 It's actually easier, I've found, to identify Bohemians in a mixed flock 
because they really stand out side by side with Cedars-- they're 
noticeably bulkier, grayer, and have, um, an "attitude" of regality 
their Cedar cousins lack.  Sorry, I know that's anthropomorphic, but 
it's the impression they give, whatever the reason for it.  Maybe it's 
the proportions, maybe the posture, don't know.

Anytime I see an individual or a small flock of just one kind, I have 
more trouble. Then when I see them together, I'm astounded that I had 
any trouble at all because they seem so distinctive.

Also, a large flock of Bohemians really purrs or buzzes loudly.  It's a 
fantastic sound, lower pitched and with more tone to it than the Cedars' 
wispy, breathy call.  I have a slight hearing impairment that makes very 
high-pitched calls difficult to hear unless I'm right on top of them 
(can't hear Blackpoll warblers at all from more than a couple of feet 
and Bay-Breasted never), but I can hear the Bohemians from a good little 
distance very well.

Hope that helps.



On 2/23/2015 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen wrote:
> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the 
Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back and 
forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to 
tell who's who? 

> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
>



Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 00:54:44 +0000
Thanks very much Larry, much appreciated.
Joyce
 

 On Monday, February 23, 2015 4:05 PM, Larry Clarfeld  
wrote: 

   

 Hi Joyce,

There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:

http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

(you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).

Good birding,
Larry

On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:

> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back
> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for
> me to tell who's who?
> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
>



-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org



Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Susan Werntgen <swerntgen AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:46:04 -0500
Thanks Larry!

What a well written and informative article! It helps those of us who are 
eager, but have much to learn. You covered many interesting points with much 
enthusiasm for these beautiful northern visitors. I learned a lot. 


Thanks!

Susan

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 23, 2015, at 4:05 PM, Larry Clarfeld  wrote:
> 
> Hi Joyce,
> 
> There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:
> 
http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

> (you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).
> 
> Good birding,
> Larry
> 
>> On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:
>> 
>> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
>> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back
>> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for
>> me to tell who's who?
>> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Larry Clarfeld
> Environmental Educator
> Youth Birding Coordinator
> 
> North Branch Nature Center
> 713 Elm St.
> Montpelier, VT 05602
> 
> www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
> (802) 229-6206
> larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl in Hyde Park still there
From: Karen Uhlendorf <ku AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:39:29 -0500
Yes, I saw the Hyde Park snowy again yesterday around 11:00 a.m. Same  
place, on the small shed in the middle of the pasture. If not there,  
look on the roof of the white storage building behind the brown house  
(not as visible). It was perched there on Saturday.
Karen

On Feb 20, 2015, at 6:50 PM, kcaterer . wrote:

> Is the snowy owl still in Hyde Park?
>
> On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 10:20 AM, Karen Uhlendorf   
> wrote:
>
>> The snowy owl that has been previously reported in Hyde Park along  
>> west
>> side of Rt. 100 about 0.7 mi. north of the roundabout near Lanphear  
>> Farm
>> was out in the sunshine this morning about 10:10 a.m. sitting on  
>> the small
>> wooden shed out in the middle of the pasture between the house and  
>> large
>> barn. Beautiful bird!
>> Karen Uhlendorf
>>
>
>
>
> -- 
> "Wherever you go, go with all your heart."  Confucius
Subject: Re: Dark Phase Red-tail
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:14:16 -0500
I am envious, Bruce! Dark morph Red-tails are really gorgeous, and you're right 
-- they are not common in the East. I'll likely be doing my final Winter Raptor 
Survey of the season this week, so I'm hoping this bird will fly a bit westward 
into my route! 


Great sighting!

Susan Fogleman
Campton, NH


On Feb 23, 2015, at 6:04 PM, Peterson, Bruce B. wrote:

> Today about 3 pm, on South St. Extension about a half mile south of Porter 
Hospital, a beautiful dark phase red-tail. I first thought the sitting bird was 
a dark rough-leg, but it obligingly flew in front of the car. The bird was 
almost chocolate brown with a very dark red tail (close to Harvard crimson - 
can't think of another comparison). A spectacularly beautiful bird. 

> 
> My impression is that dark red-tails are not common in the East. Is this 
correct? 

> 
> Bruce Peterson
Subject: Dark Phase Red-tail
From: "Peterson, Bruce B." <peterson AT MIDDLEBURY.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 23:04:53 +0000
Today about 3 pm, on South St. Extension about a half mile south of Porter 
Hospital, a beautiful dark phase red-tail. I first thought the sitting bird was 
a dark rough-leg, but it obligingly flew in front of the car. The bird was 
almost chocolate brown with a very dark red tail (close to Harvard crimson - 
can't think of another comparison). A spectacularly beautiful bird. 


My impression is that dark red-tails are not common in the East. Is this 
correct? 


Bruce Peterson
Subject: Bohemian Rhapsody
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:17:09 -0500
I came across still another flock of about 40 Bohemian Waxwings at the end of 
Lake Road in Charlotte not far from Thompson's Point Road. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington

Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:40:51 -0500
It's actually easier, I've found, to identify Bohemians in a mixed flock 
because they really stand out side by side with Cedars-- they're 
noticeably bulkier, grayer, and have, um, an "attitude" of regality 
their Cedar cousins lack.  Sorry, I know that's anthropomorphic, but 
it's the impression they give, whatever the reason for it.  Maybe it's 
the proportions, maybe the posture, don't know.

Anytime I see an individual or a small flock of just one kind, I have 
more trouble. Then when I see them together, I'm astounded that I had 
any trouble at all because they seem so distinctive.

Also, a large flock of Bohemians really purrs or buzzes loudly.  It's a 
fantastic sound, lower pitched and with more tone to it than the Cedars' 
wispy, breathy call.  I have a slight hearing impairment that makes very 
high-pitched calls difficult to hear unless I'm right on top of them 
(can't hear Blackpoll warblers at all from more than a couple of feet 
and Bay-Breasted never), but I can hear the Bohemians from a good little 
distance very well.

Hope that helps.



On 2/23/2015 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen wrote:
> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the 
Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings? They come in such a huge flock and fly back and 
forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to 
tell who's who? 

> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
>
Subject: Re: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:05:34 -0500
Hi Joyce,

There is a nice side-by-side photo and ID tips in this blog post:

http://northbranchnaturecenter.blogspot.com/2011/03/bohemian-waxwings-invade.html 

(you can click on the comparison photo to view a larger version of it).

Good birding,
Larry

On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 4:00 PM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:

> Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the
> Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back
> and forth pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for
> me to tell who's who?
> Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
>



-- 
Larry Clarfeld
Environmental Educator
Youth Birding Coordinator

North Branch Nature Center
713 Elm St.
Montpelier, VT 05602

www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
(802) 229-6206
larry AT NorthBranchNatureCenter.org
Subject: Waxwings - Cedar or Bohemian
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 21:00:21 +0000
Can someone give me a fairly quick way to tell the difference between the Cedar 
and Bohemian Waxwings?  They come in such a huge flock and fly back and forth 
pretty quickly feeding on the berry trees and it's difficult for me to tell 
who's who? 

Thanks,JoyceMontpelier
Subject: Waxwings, Red-bellied Woodpecker
From: "Scott W. Morrical" <smorrica AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:53:43 -0500
Small flock of ~10 Bohemian & ~15 Cedar Waxwings in my Neighborhood  
near Harbor Ridge x Baycest Dr. in South Burlington today.

Also a Red-bellied Woodpecker came to our suet feeder earlier today--  
a new yard bird!

Yesterday, a flock of ~125 waxwings, about 50/50 Bohemian and Cedar,  
passed through my yard and up the hill; probably the same flock  
reported on earlier by Bruce.

Scott Morrical
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 21 Feb 2015 to 22 Feb 2015 (#2015-52)
From: Martha Pfeiffer <kmpfeiffer AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:48:06 +0000
Patti Haynes in Costa Rica,
Hi, patti, I'm your neighbor down here in CR.  I'm over in Ocotal.  How long 
will you be here?Come over to bird my area some morning? 

 Pura Vida,  Martha Pfeiffer 

 On Monday, February 23, 2015 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

   
 

 There are 2 messages totaling 49 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure (2)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 22 Feb 2015 16:50:29 -0500
From:    Marian McDonald 
Subject: Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure

Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure Presentation

Date of Event: Tuesday February 24, 2015

Time of Event:  7 P.M.

Location of Event: Rutland Free Library Fox Room, 10 Court St, Rutland VT

About The Event: Last March a flock of Rutland area Audubon members flew to a 
birders paradise, Costa Rica, for a ten day stay. Hear and see a photo 
presentation about their amazing adventure. 

    
More information On the Web: at http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 22 Feb 2015 19:56:58 -0500
From:    Patti Haynes 
Subject: Re: Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure

I highly recommend going to see this presentation to chase away this 
unbelievably cold winter. I'd go, but I'm actually in Costa Rica right now 
enjoying those fabulous birds and soaking up the sun...Ahhhh, Pura Vida! 


Patti Haynes, sent from my iPod
Playas Del Coca, CR

On Feb 22, 2015, at 4:50 PM, Marian McDonald  wrote:

> Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure Presentation
> 
> Date of Event: Tuesday February 24, 2015
> 
> Time of Event:  7 P.M.
> 
> Location of Event: Rutland Free Library Fox Room, 10 Court St, Rutland VT
> 
> About The Event: Last March a flock of Rutland area Audubon members flew to a 
birders paradise, Costa Rica, for a ten day stay. Hear and see a photo 
presentation about their amazing adventure. 

> 
> More information On the Web: at http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 21 Feb 2015 to 22 Feb 2015 (#2015-52)
************************************************************

 

Subject: Re: A shower of redpolls
From: Isis Erb <isisunit AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 09:08:25 -0500
While not about Redpolls, I've a suggestion for bird lexicon as well - a
group of Bohemian Waxwings would be a "Bohemian Rhapsody."  As silly as it
is, I honestly like it. Make of it what you will (and I'm sure I'm not the
first to think of it).

Happy Birding ~
Isis

On Monday, February 23, 2015, Walter Medwid  wrote:

> For the last few days, flocks of redpolls shower onto the nyger feeders.
> The way they arrive is quite spectacular. My suggestion for the bird
> lexicon is "shower of redpolls."  From Derby.
>
Subject: A shower of redpolls
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 09:01:33 -0500
For the last few days, flocks of redpolls shower onto the nyger feeders.
The way they arrive is quite spectacular. My suggestion for the bird
lexicon is "shower of redpolls."  From Derby.
Subject: Re: Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 19:56:58 -0500
I highly recommend going to see this presentation to chase away this 
unbelievably cold winter. I'd go, but I'm actually in Costa Rica right now 
enjoying those fabulous birds and soaking up the sun...Ahhhh, Pura Vida! 


Patti Haynes, sent from my iPod
Playas Del Coca, CR

On Feb 22, 2015, at 4:50 PM, Marian McDonald  wrote:

> Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure Presentation
> 
> Date of Event: Tuesday February 24, 2015
> 
> Time of Event:  7 P.M.
> 
> Location of Event: Rutland Free Library Fox Room, 10 Court St, Rutland VT
> 
> About The Event: Last March a flock of Rutland area Audubon members flew to a 
birders paradise, Costa Rica, for a ten day stay. Hear and see a photo 
presentation about their amazing adventure. 

> 
> More information On the Web: at http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
Subject: Tues 2/24: Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure
From: Marian McDonald <marianmcd1000 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 16:50:29 -0500
Rutland County Audubon Costa Rica Adventure Presentation

Date of Event: Tuesday February 24, 2015

Time of Event:  7 P.M.

Location of Event: Rutland Free Library Fox Room, 10 Court St, Rutland VT

About The Event: Last March a flock of Rutland area Audubon members flew to a 
birders paradise, Costa Rica, for a ten day stay. Hear and see a photo 
presentation about their amazing adventure. 

     
More information On the Web: at http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
Subject: Update, sick Hairy Woodpecker
From: Cynthia Crawford <cynthia.crawford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 21:06:33 -0500
The consensus seems to be mites. At least on it's legs.  

Helena says this:

Mites. Suggestion is to get 1.87 % ivermectin paste for horses at a feed
store, then spread a very thin layer of the paste (use gloves) all over the
suet. Repeat in 2 weeks. Bird should heal fine. Remember a bird dose would
be half a grain of rice size, thus spread the stuff very thin. Hope this
helps. Helena, wildlife rehabilitator.

Sara Esienhauer from VINS says it is too far gone to help, at least at VINS-it 
also might contaminate other birds. 


Helena....other (healthy) birds are going to end up with ivemectin too if I 
coat the suet. Will it harm them? Little birds eat the same suet, like 
Red-breasted Nuthatches, chickadees and white-breasted nuthatches. And 
squirrels. I wish I could isolate this bird, but it is still very active, 
though perhaps getting worse pretty fast. Hard to tell. 


I'm worried about my other birds getting this too. Will wash down all feeders 
and suet holders, but at least no other bird I've seen here has gotten this (so 
far). Ugh- it's horrible! 

Subject: Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: anneboby <anneboby AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 18:40:37 -0500
Cynthia - as a bird bander I occasionally encounter a bird with crusty growths 
on tarsus and toes. It is called "foot pox" caused by a mite...can sometimes 
assume gross, ugly proportions. In my experience it appears mostly in Red-wings 
and Grackles...never seen it in a woodpecker. Sometimes a very few warblers 
will exhibit it. 


Re the bird's eyes, I suspect conjunctivitis, but that's only conjecture.

Bob Yunick
Schenectady, NY
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: cynthia crawford 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Sat, Feb 21, 2015 4:32 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker


This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/

3 pictures.  Very unhappy!

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/

 
Subject: New guidelines for submitting Vermont Fish Crow observations to eBird
From: "Ian A. Worley" <iworley AT UVM.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:56:55 -0500
Vermont has two species of crows, and one is very scarce and tricky to 
identify with certainty. Fish Crows are near their northern limits in 
Vermont. An extremely small breeding population is well known in the 
Burlington area.

What should you look and listen for when you suspect a Fish Crow? Are 
there simple features or vocalizations that you can use? What are the 
common errors birders make?

To help answer these questions, check out Vermont eBird's new guidelines 
for careful observations and adequate documentation for submitting Fish 
Crow observations to eBird at:

http://ebird.org/content/vt/news/counting-vermonts-crows/

Help us all better know this intriguing Vermont species and better 
understand the so localized a population with your submissions to eBird.

Happy birding!

For Vermont eBird ....
Ian
----------------------------------------------
Vermont eBird is sponsored by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies.
http://vtecostudies.org/
Subject: Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:37:29 -0500
Hi Helena, I didn't get to send you a donation at Xmas time this year as I have 
misplaced your address. If you send me your address, I'd like to support all 
you do as a rehabber. 


Thanks, Marcia in Brownsville

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 21, 2015, at 5:21 PM, H Nicolay  wrote:
> 
> Mites. Suggestion is to get 1.87 % ivermectin paste for horses at a feed
> store, then spread a very thin layer of the paste (use gloves) all over the
> suet. Repeat in 2 weeks. Bird should heal fine. Remember a bird dose would
> be half a grain of rice size, thus spread the stuff very thin. Hope this
> helps. Helena, wildlife rehabilitator.
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: "cynthia crawford" 
> Date: Feb 21, 2015 4:32 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
> To: 
> Cc:
> 
> This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
> just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
> something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
> He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
> of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
> others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/
> 
> 3 pictures.  Very unhappy!
> 
> Cynthia Crawford
> 
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.com
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/
> 
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: H Nicolay <sqrlma AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:21:41 -0500
Mites. Suggestion is to get 1.87 % ivermectin paste for horses at a feed
store, then spread a very thin layer of the paste (use gloves) all over the
suet. Repeat in 2 weeks. Bird should heal fine. Remember a bird dose would
be half a grain of rice size, thus spread the stuff very thin. Hope this
helps. Helena, wildlife rehabilitator.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "cynthia crawford" 
Date: Feb 21, 2015 4:32 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
To: 
Cc:

This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/

3 pictures.  Very unhappy!

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: Mona Bearor <conservebirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:44:44 -0500
The bird in your photo looks like it may be afflicted with avian pox. Just a 
guess; photos here: 

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/hofi/recognizing.html 

Mona Bearor
South Glens Falls, NY



-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:VTBIRD AT list.uvm.edu] On Behalf Of cynthia crawford
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 4:31 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker

This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he just 
had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is something 
very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse. 

He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/

3 pictures.  Very unhappy!

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities* Animal and Nature Paintings, 
Portraits and Prints www.creaturekinships.com MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: 
http://pbase.com/creaturekinships EVEN MORE PHOTOS: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/ 


BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland AT VTECOSTUDIES.ORG>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:43:57 -0500
Looks like it has bird scaly leg. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaly_leg

Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x2


  




On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 4:31 PM, cynthia crawford <
cynthia.crawford AT gmail.com> wrote:

> This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
> just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
> something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
> He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
> of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
> others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/
>
> 3 pictures.  Very unhappy!
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.com
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/
>
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>
Subject: Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: Kim Likakis <kim.likakis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:41:23 -0500
Geez, Cynthia, it looks like mites. I don't know what anyone could do about
it -- I'm not sure, I've never seen a wild bird look like this.

Kim



On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 4:31 PM, cynthia crawford <
cynthia.crawford AT gmail.com> wrote:

> This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
> just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
> something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
> He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
> of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
> others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/
>
> 3 pictures.  Very unhappy!
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.com
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/
>
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>
Subject: Re: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: "CAMERON O'CONNOR" <cameron103 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:39:54 -0500
very sad picture of your woodpecker - i would be interested to know what
this ailment is too.  thanks for your photos, cameron

On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 4:31 PM, cynthia crawford <
cynthia.crawford AT gmail.com> wrote:

> This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
> just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
> something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
> He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
> of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
> others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/
>
> 3 pictures.  Very unhappy!
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.com
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/
>
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>
Subject: Strange (sick?) Hairy Woodpecker
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:31:17 -0500
This male has been coming to my feeder all winter. At first I thought he
just had extra white feathers around his eye. Now it is clear there is
something very wrong. His feet are huge and scaly, and his eyes are worse.
He still flies around and eats well- no way I could catch him that I know
of.  Does anyone know what's wrong with him? Would it be contagious?    The
others are all fine so far- at least  1 other male and 2 females.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/16604325512/

3 pictures.  Very unhappy!

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164 AT N03/

BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
Subject: South Burlington Waxwings
From: Bruce MacPherson <bmacphe AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 15:48:48 -0500
Earlier this afternoon I stopped by Palace 9. No waxwings were there, but a 
Cooper's Hawk was. 



Curses. Foiled again.


Not for long, though. As I threaded my way along Harbor Ridge Road near 
Deerfield Drive in South Burlington, I spotted a flock of 137 waxwings perched 
in a distant tree. Periodically, small groups of these waxwings swept in to 
feed in the crab apple trees lining the road. All the waxwings that I could 
identify during a half hour of observing them were Bohemians. 



Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington

Subject: Re: Waxwings - so.burl
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep AT SOVER.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 11:28:01 -0500
I was there yesterday at Palace 9 in South Burlington. There were about 100 
waxwings I estimated there were about 60 Bohemians and 40 Cedars. They were 
hard to count because they were so active. There were also 2 Robins and about 
150 Starlings. They came down so low in the trees that I was able to watch them 
for over a half hour without leaving my car. They were very close. 


Michele Patenaude 
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On Feb 21, 2015, at 11:09 AM, Joyce Werntgen  wrote:
> 
> Cedar Waxwings....was too cold for me to take the time to get a closer look 
for Bohemians. 

> 
> Joyce
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Feb 21, 2015, at 11:02 AM, Roo Slagle  wrote:
>> 
>> What kind?
>> 
>>> On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 9:56 AM, Deenie  wrote:
>>> 
>>> So many feasting across from Palace 9 movie theaters! Now!
>>> 
>>> deenie
>>> 
Subject: Re: Waxwings - so.burl
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 11:09:56 -0500
Cedar Waxwings....was too cold for me to take the time to get a closer look for 
Bohemians. 


Joyce

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 21, 2015, at 11:02 AM, Roo Slagle  wrote:
> 
> What kind?
> 
>> On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 9:56 AM, Deenie  wrote:
>> 
>> So many feasting across from Palace 9 movie theaters! Now!
>> 
>> deenie
>> 
Subject: Re: Waxwings - so.burl
From: Roo Slagle <roospin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 11:02:14 -0500
What kind?

On Sat, Feb 21, 2015 at 9:56 AM, Deenie  wrote:

> So many feasting across from Palace 9 movie theaters! Now!
>
> deenie
>
Subject: Waxwings - so.burl
From: Deenie <vtdeenie AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:56:58 -0500
So many feasting across from Palace 9 movie theaters! Now!

deenie
Subject: Waxwings
From: Joyce Werntgen <joywert AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:19:02 -0500
At about 3:45 yesterday there were two huge flocks of Cedar Waxwings feasting 
on the berry trees on Stone Cutters Way as I drove toward Hunger Mt Co-op in 
Montpelier. 


Joyce Werntgen

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: bird behavior
From: Janet Warren <jwarren AT SHOREHAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 09:00:33 -0500
We have two ravens coming to the compost. We sometimes put donuts and cat food 
there. If there has been snow recently, we often see them sweeping the snow out 
of the way pretty vigorously with their bills in a back and forth motion, I 
assume for any morsels that are under the snow. 

 It’s sometimes hard to tell the difference between the crows and the ravens, 
but we’ve noticed that the crows are much more wary, and approach the food 
sidewise, lean way out and get only close enough to grab something and the back 
away quickly. We wonder if this is maybe because they have some kind of race 
memory about the possibility of being caught while stealing bait from a steel 
leg trap. These days there aren’t nearly as many traps around (thank 
goodness), so the behavior would have to have been passed on by a parent or 
resulted from natural selection even though no longer necessary.When the ravens 
first started coming, they would instead hop up and down a few feet, perhaps 
just from nervousness, but we wondered if doing that might spring a trap so 
that they can steal the bait safely. 

Janet Warren
Cornwall

PS saw a big flock (50 or more?) of Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings yesterday at 
the intersection of Rte 74 and South Bingham St. in Cornwall. 

> On Feb 21, 2015, at 8:16 AM, Betty  wrote:
> 
> Hi, Bonnie. I'm Betty who phoned you to talk about the crows. I looked up the 
articles in BNA on crows and in the articles I find no help to your crow 
behavior. I am more and more convinced that it had to do with re-finding food 
where it had once done so, possibly a cache. If you ever learn more, please let 
me know. Cheers, B- 

> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Bonnie D
> Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:53 AM
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Subject: [VTBIRD] bird behavior
> 
> We have seen two unusual types of bird behavior this week. Although we have 
put out plenty of food scattered in several feeders and places, one of the male 
cardinals has been pretending to be a hummingbird as it tries to flutter in 
front of the suet cage (real suet, not a store-bought suet/seed cake). It has 
been successful pulling out pieces of suet and eating them. Tree Sparrows have 
also been eating suet, but can actually cling to the cage. 

> The second behavior was with a crow. After one of the recent snow storms, it 
would put its head down under the snow and “snowplow” for 2-4 steps. When 
it emerged, it was eating something; we couldn’t tell what. It did this 
several times. 

> Bonnie Dundas
> Bennington
Subject: Re: bird behavior
From: Betty <egilbert AT MYFAIRPOINT.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 08:16:06 -0500
Hi, Bonnie.   I'm Betty who phoned you to talk about the crows. I looked up 
the articles in BNA on crows and in the articles I find no help to your 
crow behavior.  I am more and more convinced that it had to do with 
re-finding food where it had once done so, possibly a cache.   If you ever 
learn more, please let me know.    Cheers, B-

-----Original Message----- 
From: Bonnie D
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:53 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] bird behavior

We have seen two unusual types of bird behavior this week. Although we have 
put out plenty of food scattered in several feeders and places, one of the 
male cardinals has been pretending to be a hummingbird as it tries to 
flutter in front of the suet cage (real suet, not a store-bought suet/seed 
cake). It has been successful pulling out pieces of suet and eating them. 
Tree Sparrows have also been eating suet, but can actually cling to the 
cage.
The second behavior was with a crow. After one of the recent snow storms, it 
would put its head down under the snow and “snowplow” for 2-4 steps. When 
it 

emerged, it was eating something; we couldn’t tell what. It did this several 
times.
Bonnie Dundas
Bennington
Subject: Re: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 01:32:20 +0000
Thank you

On Fri, Feb 20, 2015, 5:15 PM Ken Cox  wrote:

> Jeff,
>
> The easiest access is from the intersection of Main Street and State Street
> in downtown Windsor.  From here drive State Street about 0.7 miles where
> State Street continues straight ahead as Hunt Road.  On it drive another
> 1.5 miles to the intersection with Marton Road on the right.  Turning onto
> Marton Road and after 0.5 miles, on the right you'll see the landscape
> open to large fields.  This is prison farm property.  Drive another 0.7
> miles and your pretty much at the center
> of the property.  Off to the east is the correctional facility which is off
> limits, although walking down the gravel road (State Farm Road) a little
> ways seems to be tolerated but by no means go beyond the second set of
> signs.  Habitat diversity is great favoring a diversity of birds and some
> specialties.
>
> Nice to hear you enjoy the blog.
>
> Ken
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 9:31 PM, Jeffrey Sonshine <
> jeffrey.sonshine AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Kenneth,
> > Very nice. I like your blog. Lots of good sites. To get on the farm at
> > southeast correctional, do you just drive up the main road or is there a
> > better way to access the site?
> > Jeff
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
> >
> > > On Feb 19, 2015, at 8:31 PM, Ken Cox  wrote:
> > >
> > > On my way to work this morning a hawk perched in a dead tree next to
> the
> > > Black River caught my attention.  Observed through bins, it had the
> field
> > > markings of a Red-shouldered Hawk, albeit one with lighter than typical
> > > lower breast and belly with very faint buff barring. Several digital
> > > photos were taken but unfortunately are of poor quality.  With luck it
> > will
> > > be there tomorrow, and I'll be prepared to take better pics and will
> > post.
> > >
> > > --
> > > Kenneth Cox
> > > South Reading, VT
> > > http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Kenneth Cox
> South Reading, VT
> http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
>
Subject: Re: Snowy Owl in Hyde Park still there
From: "kcaterer ." <kristin.caterer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 18:50:49 -0500
Is the snowy owl still in Hyde Park?

On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 10:20 AM, Karen Uhlendorf  wrote:

> The snowy owl that has been previously reported in Hyde Park along west
> side of Rt. 100 about 0.7 mi. north of the roundabout near Lanphear Farm
> was out in the sunshine this morning about 10:10 a.m. sitting on the small
> wooden shed out in the middle of the pasture between the house and large
> barn. Beautiful bird!
> Karen Uhlendorf
>



-- 
"Wherever you go, go with all your heart."  Confucius
Subject: Re: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk
From: Ken Cox <kencox5 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 18:15:43 -0500
Jeff,

The easiest access is from the intersection of Main Street and State Street
in downtown Windsor.  From here drive State Street about 0.7 miles where
State Street continues straight ahead as Hunt Road.  On it drive another
1.5 miles to the intersection with Marton Road on the right.  Turning onto
Marton Road and after 0.5 miles, on the right you'll see the landscape
open to large fields.  This is prison farm property.  Drive another 0.7
miles and your pretty much at the center
of the property.  Off to the east is the correctional facility which is off
limits, although walking down the gravel road (State Farm Road) a little
ways seems to be tolerated but by no means go beyond the second set of
signs.  Habitat diversity is great favoring a diversity of birds and some
specialties.

Nice to hear you enjoy the blog.

Ken




On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 9:31 PM, Jeffrey Sonshine <
jeffrey.sonshine AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Kenneth,
> Very nice. I like your blog. Lots of good sites. To get on the farm at
> southeast correctional, do you just drive up the main road or is there a
> better way to access the site?
> Jeff
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Feb 19, 2015, at 8:31 PM, Ken Cox  wrote:
> >
> > On my way to work this morning a hawk perched in a dead tree next to the
> > Black River caught my attention.  Observed through bins, it had the field
> > markings of a Red-shouldered Hawk, albeit one with lighter than typical
> > lower breast and belly with very faint buff barring. Several digital
> > photos were taken but unfortunately are of poor quality.  With luck it
> will
> > be there tomorrow, and I'll be prepared to take better pics and will
> post.
> >
> > --
> > Kenneth Cox
> > South Reading, VT
> > http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
>



-- 
Kenneth Cox
South Reading, VT
http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
Subject: Re: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk
From: Jeffrey Sonshine <jeffrey.sonshine AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 21:31:59 -0500
Kenneth,
Very nice. I like your blog. Lots of good sites. To get on the farm at 
southeast correctional, do you just drive up the main road or is there a better 
way to access the site? 

Jeff

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 19, 2015, at 8:31 PM, Ken Cox  wrote:
> 
> On my way to work this morning a hawk perched in a dead tree next to the
> Black River caught my attention.  Observed through bins, it had the field
> markings of a Red-shouldered Hawk, albeit one with lighter than typical
> lower breast and belly with very faint buff barring. Several digital
> photos were taken but unfortunately are of poor quality.  With luck it will
> be there tomorrow, and I'll be prepared to take better pics and will post.
> 
> -- 
> Kenneth Cox
> South Reading, VT
> http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
Subject: Springfield Red-shouldered Hawk
From: Ken Cox <kencox5 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 20:31:58 -0500
On my way to work this morning a hawk perched in a dead tree next to the
Black River caught my attention.  Observed through bins, it had the field
markings of a Red-shouldered Hawk, albeit one with lighter than typical
lower breast and belly with very faint buff barring. Several digital
photos were taken but unfortunately are of poor quality.  With luck it will
be there tomorrow, and I'll be prepared to take better pics and will post.

-- 
Kenneth Cox
South Reading, VT
http://northernwingsbirder.blogspot.com/
Subject: Addison Snowy
From: Kevin Thorley <elron8711 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 23:53:35 +0000
Donnie Coleman and I headed down to Dead Creek for a pre-work attempt at a
Snowy, based on the report of one on a telephone pole outside the
management office yesterday. We weren't expecting to do it while the snow
was falling, but we're glad we went. We found a Snowy Owl in the field
across from the management office (I think thats what it is called), about
100 yards from the road. The pictures didn't come out great, but we did get
some. The only other birds of note were an immature (we think) Red-tailed
Hawk in a tree at the goose viewing area and a flock of about 100 Snow
Buntings on Gage Road.

Speaking of Snow Buntings, we also spotted a flock of 50 on Pinnacle Drive
in South Burlington on Wednesday afternoon.
Subject: from the Washington Post -- Ouch
From: Scott Sainsbury <scott AT BEACONASSOCIATES.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 18:31:42 -0500
Danger for Eagles and waterfowl.


ews/energy-environment/wp/2015/02/18/the-eagle-killer-the-name-of-a-new-scary-red-bacteria-is-well-earned/?hpid=z10 


Scott
Moretown
Subject: Re: random question of the day
From: anneboby <anneboby AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 15:13:35 -0500
According to my ancient Webster's dictionary of many, many moons ago, tody is 
derived from the Latin todus meaning small bird. 

 
Bob Yunick
Schenectady, NY
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Blust 
To: VTBIRD 
Sent: Thu, Feb 19, 2015 12:53 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] random question of the day


One possible explanation is applying the name of one group of birds to
another group or individual species due to similarity in appearance or
behavior.  Things like "woodpecker finch", "hawk owl", "magpie jays", or
for a larger taxonomic stretch - "squirrel cuckoo".


*Michael H. Blust*
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Mexico
Prof. Emer. Green Mountain College

On Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 11:01 AM, Scott Sainsbury <
scott AT beaconassociates.com> wrote:

> I was looking up one of the birds that Noah Stryker mentioned in his daily
> journal from his quest for 5000 birds in 1 year.
>
> It was a tody tyrant.  I noticed that there are also tody flycatchers.
> And, I became good buddies with a tody motmot in Costa Rica last year.
>
> I can understand the use of the name tody for the motmot as it is part of
> the todidae family.  But what’s with the flycatchers using the name?
>
> Does tody have a general meaning — like “small” or something like that 
— 

> that drives its use in the family name todidae and the genus names in the
> case of the tyrants and flycatchers? (not to mention the confusion that
> tyrants are flycatchers, therefore meaning the use of tody in the
> flycatchers and other flycatchers genus names, ha!)
>
> Scott
> Moretown
>