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Updated on Thursday, July 24 at 08:32 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Marvelous Spatule-tail,©BirdQuest

24 Jul eagles [Jim & Judy Phillips ]
24 Jul Bald Eagle at Opekiska Lock and Dam [Judy Bowling ]
24 Jul Shorebird Report [Mike Griffith ]
24 Jul Very early Pied-billed Grebe in Morgantown [Terry Bronson ]
24 Jul Hummers, etc [Bruni Haydl ]
23 Jul Bald eagle reported Upshur County [Holly Canfield ]
22 Jul RB Nuthatch, P. Finch, 7 Warblers at Cooper's Rock clear cut area [Terry Bronson ]
22 Jul Broad-winged hawk, Yellow-billed cuckoos, Scarlet tanager - Jefferson County [Bird Mom ]
20 Jul Prickett's Fort [Joey Herron ]
20 Jul Cliff Swallows [Herb Myers ]
20 Jul Black-billed Cuckoo [LeJay Graffious ]
20 Jul Kestrels [Jean Neely ]
19 Jul Red-headed juvenile today ["Cynthia D. Ellis" ]
18 Jul Re: More baby juncos (Tucker) [David Griffith ]
18 Jul More baby juncos (Tucker) [Casey Rucker ]
18 Jul Purple Martins [Richard Kazmierski ]
18 Jul Ruby-throated hummingbird missed shaped bill [Wima ]
18 Jul Monongalia County Lesser Scaup update [Terry Bronson ]
17 Jul Yard birds [Bruni Haydl ]
17 Jul Lesser Scaup still in Star City; shorebirds still AWOL [Terry Bronson ]
17 Jul Perfect day [laura ceperley ]
16 Jul Re: Lesser Scaup - Mon County [Ryan Tomazin ]
16 Jul Re: Lesser Scaup - Mon County [Terry Bronson ]
16 Jul Re: Peregrine in New River Gorge [Wendy Perrone ]
16 Jul Peregrine in New River Gorge ["Williams, Barry C" ]
15 Jul Southbound Shorebirds [Mike Griffith ]
15 Jul PVAS-sponsored Bird Walk at Blue Ridge Center (VA): Kentucky Warblers, Scarlet Tanagers, YB Chats, Blue Grosbeaks, etc. [Deb Hale ]
14 Jul Carolina Wren update [Bruni Haydl ]
13 Jul Very large Cliff Swallow colony at Opekiska Dam on Monongahela River [Terry Bronson ]
12 Jul Purple martins [laura ceperley ]
12 Jul Normal?? [Nan McDaniel ]
12 Jul Common Merganser [DAVID ]
10 Jul Re: Red-headed woodpecker, Red-shouldered hawks, and one amazing hummer - Jefferson County [Joan Carr ]
10 Jul Red-headed woodpecker, Red-shouldered hawks, and one amazing hummer - Jefferson County [Bird Mom ]
9 Jul Purple Martins pre-staging ["Cynthia D. Ellis" ]
9 Jul Peregrine - Jefferson County [Deb Hale ]
7 Jul Disastrous day for Momma Wood Duck [Terry Bronson ]
5 Jul Mountain Top Birds [Herb Myers ]
5 Jul Hooligan Ravens in Bridgeport [Jeff Del Col ]
5 Jul creeper [Jim & Judy Phillips ]
4 Jul GC Flycatcher calling at night? [Jeff Del Col ]
4 Jul Early Fall Migrant? [Mike Griffith ]
4 Jul Fourth of July Birding [Herb Myers ]
3 Jul Pleasant Creek/Doe Run Shorebirds (7/3/14) [Randy Bodkins ]
30 Jun Baby kingbirds - Bolivar Heights last evening. [Deb Hale ]
29 Jun broadwings ["Cynthia D. Ellis" ]
28 Jun The Naked Wren [Bruni Haydl ]
27 Jun Golden Tanager in Monongalia County [Terry Bronson ]
26 Jun Re: WV-BIRD Digest - 24 Jun 2014 to 25 Jun 2014 (#2014-172) [Hallie Mason ]
25 Jun Information on eBird submissions [Matt ]
25 Jun Dickcissels - Jefferson county [Matt ]
24 Jun Young 'uns [Deb Hale ]
24 Jun Unfortunate Hummer [Bruni Haydl ]
22 Jun Canaan/Davis area (was Re: Hummer Influx) [Sarah Anderson ]
22 Jun Re: Hummer Influx - also here in Rockwood, Pa [zora naron ]
22 Jun Hummer Influx [Bruni Haydl ]
21 Jun Preston County Golden-winged Warbler, Henslow's Sparrows [Terry Bronson ]
21 Jun AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS- Tygart Lake, Taylor county [Joe Hildreth ]
21 Jun National Conservation Training Center (NCTC), Jun 21, 2014 [Elliot Kirschbaum ]
21 Jun Savannahs multiplying [Deb Hale ]
21 Jun MBC outing to New River Gorge and Cranberry Glades [Jon Benedetti ]
20 Jun COGR & crawdad [Jim & Judy Phillips ]
18 Jun unsubscribe [Andrew Dennhardt ]
18 Jun New yard bird -Wood Thrush [Bruni Haydl ]
18 Jun Baby Junco (Tucker) [Casey Rucker ]
16 Jun Marshall County--Final Day: Fledglings, Cuckoo, Turkeys [Terry Bronson ]
16 Jun Common(?) Mergansers - Greenbrier County ["Williams, Barry C" ]
15 Jun Blue Grosbeaks in Grant Co. [Jerry Westfall ]
15 Jun Harpers Ferry birds this week. [Deb Hale ]
14 Jun Visit a Purple Martin Supercool ! at the 20th Annual Purple Martin Field Day [Ron Kingston ]
14 Jun Stonewall Jackson Dam Visitor Center and Tailwaters, Jun 14, 2014 [Davette Saeler ]
14 Jun eagle [Jim & Judy Phillips ]
13 Jun Marshall County--Day 3: Purple Finch, Prairie Warbler [Terry Bronson ]
13 Jun Golden Eagle + more goshawk visits (Tucker) [Casey Rucker ]
13 Jun Osprey at Canaan Tucker County [steve kimbrell ]
13 Jun osprey [Jim & Judy Phillips ]

Subject: eagles
From: Jim & Judy Phillips <jimandjudyphillips AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:06:53 -0400
We saw two adult bald eagles over Bluestone Dam, Summers Co. this afternoon.
Jim & Judy Phillips
Summers County
Pipestem, WV
Subject: Bald Eagle at Opekiska Lock and Dam
From: Judy Bowling <judybowling AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:17:39 -0400
Greetings everyone. I've been following this listserv for awhile and thought 
I'd join in. I drove over to Opekiska Lock and Dam along the Mon River on 
Tuesday to see the cliff swallows and got a brief look at a bald eagle that 
landed in a crag tree and moved quickly into the woods. Beautiful bird! 

Subject: Shorebird Report
From: Mike Griffith <birdonawire47 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:01:21 -0400
Gallipolis Ferry (Mason Co.):

Semipalmated Plover - 3
Greater Yellowlegs - 1
Solitary Sandpiper - 5

Also at R.C. Byrd Locks - 1 Bald Eagle (hatch-year) and 6 Herring Gulls (5 
adults and 1 hatch-year) 


Mike Griffith
Huntington
Subject: Very early Pied-billed Grebe in Morgantown
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:14:55 -0400
At Morgantown's White Park reservoir this morning, I was extremely
surprised to find an adult PIED-BILLED GREBE in breeding plumage swimming
around just around the bend past the mud flats. Since there have been no
reports of this species at White Park to my knowledge this year, I'm pretty
sure this bird has to be a very early migrant--perhaps a failed breeder?
There is virtually no emergent vegetation at this reservoir, so it did not
breed there.

There is only one eBird record in WV for July--a bird seen at R.C. Byrd
Locks and Dam by Todd Deal in 2010 coincidentally on today's date, July 24.
The next earliest record is a bird I saw Aug. 4, 2012 at Dixon Lake west of
Morgantown--which may have been there all summer. Migrants usually start
showing up here and there beginning mid-August.

Of course, there are a few birds present in July in the state. The WV
Breeding Bird Atlas update now nearing conclusion has reports of breeding
birds in 11 blocks scattered throughout the state, so almost all of those
would no doubt have been present in July even if reported in June or May,
based on the length of time it takes to raise a brood of youngsters.

In the hour I spent at the park, I also noted the following:

Spotted Sandpiper--1
Belted Kingfisher--1
Louisiana Waterthrush--1 singing

There are extensive mud flats in the reservoir, and although only a few
shorebirds ever show up there, it's that time of year, so periodic checks
may yield a surprise or two.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Hummers, etc
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:58:01 -0400
The much needed rain we got around 6:30 last night really got the 
Hummers fired up.  Had the best time watching them.  There was one that 
insisted on perching on the rim of the ant trap cup of the feeder right 
next to the patio door.   Don't remember seeing them do that in the 
past.  This went on for over an hour.  This morning, while checking the 
video I took of the hummer,  I see this yellow bird sitting on the back 
of my patio chair.   It took me a second to realize I was looking at a 
female Yellow Warbler.  That was a surprise, and to see it two feet away 
from the sliding glass door no less.

Last week there was a female Orchard Oriole getting dog fur from the 
suet cage.  Would they be building another nest this late?  Frumpy, the 
Carolina Wren appears to have finished laying eggs.  She has four and 
the rain doesn't seem to have affected her nest in the flower pot, 
probably because of the deep cup and the very thick roof.  Plus the 
protection of the Penta plant.

The other day there was a very pretty young Robin taking a bath.  It had 
some really interesting marking around the head.  While I was watching 
it spit up a cherry pit.  I see these pits more often now in the bird bath.

Other youngsters such as a Nuthatch, Chickadees, Titmice, Downy and RB 
Woodpeckers etc are coming to the feeder tray.  Fun to see their 
incomplete feathers.  The Gray Catbird is the new kid on the block (or 
tray) and is a bit more shy but still comes for the peanut suet and 
sunflower hearts.

Last week I visited a 200 acre private property in nearby VA  for a 
butterfly count.  It was an absolute haven for wildlife and not by 
accident either but because of the owner's interest.  What caught my eye 
immediately were the alternate-leafed dogwood trees that were loaded 
with dark blue berries.  Needless to say the bird activity was 
phenomenal.   I will definitely get one or two of those trees next 
spring. /Cornus //alternifolia, /also known as Pagoda Dogwood is not a 
common tree in nurseries most likely because it does not have the 
traditional dogwood flowers.  Who cares if it is such a magnet for birds.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Bald eagle reported Upshur County
From: Holly Canfield <canfield99 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:52:00 -0400
I just got a report of a bald eagle sighting on Stoney Run Road in Buckhannon, 
Upshur County, eating a groundhog in a field for the past 30 minutes from a 
family member. They confirmed a white head. 


I'm not able to go out and check at this time.

Holly Canfield
Buckhannon, WV

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RB Nuthatch, P. Finch, 7 Warblers at Cooper's Rock clear cut area
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:43:28 -0400
A visit to the regenerating clear cut area adjacent to the Ken's Run Trail
a mile back behind the forest maintenance building on Chestnut Ridge Road
in Cooper's Rock State Forest (actually that portion is the WV University
Experimental Forest) east of Morgantown in Preston County this morning
yielded a couple of surprises.

Though not a priority block in the WV Breeding Bird Atlas, this block (Lake
Lynn-5) is just a few miles south of the PA state line and is about the
northernmost block in the state for higher-elevation species. It is about
2,500 feet there.

New species for the Atlas included:

Red-breasted Nuthatch--1, becomes northernmost Atlas record in the state
Blackburnian Warbler--1, ditto
Black-throated Blue Warbler--2, ditto
Black-throated Green Warbler--1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher--1
Sharp-shinned Hawk--1

Upgrades included:

Purple Finch--3, with 2 singing
Hooded Warbler--2 singing
Common Yellowthroat--9, including 2 juveniles
Chipping Sparrow--5, including 2 juveniles

Others of note:

Chestnut-sided Warbler--4, all males
Ruby-throated Hummingbird--2
Cedar Waxwing--11
American Redstart--1
Field Sparrow--13, including 3 juveniles
Scarlet Tanager--2
Baltimore Oriole--1
Turkey Vulture--1 juvenile

34 species total. The only disappointment was that I could not find an
adult Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. I had a juvenile 2 years ago, but it was
independent and not countable for the Atlas.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Broad-winged hawk, Yellow-billed cuckoos, Scarlet tanager - Jefferson County
From: Bird Mom <pep4223 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:41:33 +0000
Like you, I've been loving this wonderful unseasonably cool weather 
and thunderstorms the last week or so.  It's kept me outside digging in the 
dirt (gardening), and I'm hearing what goes on in my yard and neighborhood when 
I'm inside or not home. 




The most exciting has been hearing a Broad-winged hawk.  It's high pitched 
whistle is unlike any other hawk.  I heard it on July 17, then again on the 
18th, then for the third time on July 20.  The location is the same 
place--wooded area,  private land on the edge or just outside the subdivision 
, so I can't easily go exploring  for it.  I hope it is a nest location.  
After checking my eBird records, I heard a Broad-winged hawk on August 1, 2013 
in the same general location (one of my BBA blocks.) 




I've also been hearing numerous Yellow-billed cuckoos in my yard and 
neighboring yards.  I  even heard one while driving about 40 mph with windows 
down p ast Sam Michael's Park.  On July 20, while making the turn from Flowing 
Springs Road to Job Corps Road, I heard a Scarlet tanager singing in the woods 
. 




Hoping it stays cool, 



BIRDMOM 

Jefferson County, WV 
Subject: Prickett's Fort
From: Joey Herron <0000002ee8843fb4-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 18:07:08 -0700
Had 36 species today...............first Solitary Sandpiper today.
Also, a Yellow-throated Warbler a Parula Warbler.
8 Killdeer
19 Canada Geese
9 Mallards
5 Wood Ducks

Joey Herron
Marion County
Fairmont WV
Subject: Cliff Swallows
From: Herb Myers <hesemyers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:34:47 -0400
Since I am working in Fairmont this weekend, I decided to see the Cliff
Swallow colony that Terry Bronson mentioned at the Opekiska Lock and Dam. I
counted 21 nests on the downriver side of the dam and 78 nests on the
upriver side. There clearly had been more than that as some were already
broken down. Most of the nesting activity must be over as there were only a
few swallows going in and out of a few of the nests. 

 

There were 75 - 100 Cliff Swallows wallowing in the sun on the wall of the
lock on the downriver side. Some of them looked like young birds. It was
fascinating as they would lie on their sides as if to warm their bellies.
There were more Cliff Swallows flying on the upriver side of the dam over
the Monongahela River along with some Barn Swallows. 

 

Swallows have been one of my favorite birds as, growing up on the farm, I
loved to watch Barn Swallows swooping around the tractor as we worked the
fields. Cliff Swallows are just about as good at aerial acrobatics. Herb
Myers, Harman, Randolph County

 
Subject: Black-billed Cuckoo
From: LeJay Graffious <lejaygraffious AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 10:17:27 -0400
Black-billed Cuckoo at Old Hemlock house today.    

LeJay Graffious
Bruceton Mills. WV
Preston County

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Kestrels
From: Jean Neely <jeaneely AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 07:05:12 -0400
Good morning, All:
Yesterday, while driving along the southern edges of Jefferson Co., I
meandered down Box Factory Rd (yes, there used to be a box factory there!)
looking at the lush farm scene.

To my delight, there were seven kestrels perched on various dead snags on
both sides of the road within 1/4 mile of one another!  A real bonanzanever
had seen so many of the fierce little birds in one area before.  There must
be a nest in one of those snaggy trees.

Nice to see them doing well.  I happened along at exactly the right time.

Jean Neely
Near Shepherdstown
Subject: Red-headed juvenile today
From: "Cynthia D. Ellis" <cdellis AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 13:23:11 -0400
Second year to see adult Red-headed Woodpeckers bring young to feeders here.
                                                                   ~Cindy,
Putnam County

-- 
Cynthia D. Ellis
3114 Steel Ridge Road
Red House, WV 25168-7724
304 586-4135
304 206-0083 [no cell service at residence]
cdellis AT wildblue.net


Surely no child, and few adults, have ever watched a bird in flight without
envy.
                             ~Isaac Asimov
Subject: Re: More baby juncos (Tucker)
From: David Griffith <dwgriff AT SPRYNET.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:30:59 -0400
Wow! Baby Juncos in WV. Get any pictures?

> On Jul 18, 2014, at 9:13 PM, Casey Rucker  wrote:
> 
> Hi, all,
> 
> 
> 
> My inaugural breeding Dark-eyed Juncos have had a second clutch. I just
> watched three fledglings being fed by mouth on my porch, after the first
> round apparently produced only one chick. What an exciting summer bird.
> 
> 
> 
> This morning, I heard an Eastern Screech-Owl at dawn on Rt. 72 a couple of
> miles north of Red Creek, and later I saw an unexpected Canada Warbler at
> Dry Fork river level south of Parsons. It's right below the Fernow
> Experimental Forest, a hotbed of Canadas, so I guess I shouldn't have been
> surprised.
> 
> 
> 
> Good birding to all, 
> 
> 
> 
> Casey Rucker
> Dry Fork, WV 
> 
> 
Subject: More baby juncos (Tucker)
From: Casey Rucker <autoblock AT FRONTIERNET.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:13:57 -0400
Hi, all,

 

My inaugural breeding Dark-eyed Juncos have had a second clutch. I just
watched three fledglings being fed by mouth on my porch, after the first
round apparently produced only one chick. What an exciting summer bird.

 

This morning, I heard an Eastern Screech-Owl at dawn on Rt. 72 a couple of
miles north of Red Creek, and later I saw an unexpected Canada Warbler at
Dry Fork river level south of Parsons. It's right below the Fernow
Experimental Forest, a hotbed of Canadas, so I guess I shouldn't have been
surprised.

 

Good birding to all, 

 

Casey Rucker
Dry Fork, WV 

 
Subject: Purple Martins
From: Richard Kazmierski <richardkazmierski AT MSN.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 19:58:41 -0400
7:50 and many Purple Martins going over the neighborhood heading towards Teays 
Valley. I'm located in Hurricane, Putnam County. 


To add as a courtesy, would like to mention that Cindy has seen Osprey not too 
long ago and Randy was the first one to spot the one we saw across the river at 
the Winfield Wetlands. 


Cindy not sure of your dates. If you get a chance you could add those.

Happy Birding,
Kim Kazmierski
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ruby-throated hummingbird missed shaped bill
From: Wima <wjar AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:47:35 -0400
 There is a hummingbird coming to feeder this week with top upper mandible 
curved down along throat and breast. 

  Seems to do better feeding on feeder with slots, does go to others some.

Wilma Jarrell
Wileyville
Wetzel County

Sent from my iPod
Subject: Monongalia County Lesser Scaup update
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:31:06 -0400
The drake first reported 2 days ago at Barill Park in Star City was still
there this morning, seen by me and separately by Kyle Aldinger, and perhaps
others later.

It wasn't very active while I watched. I did not see it dive at all.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Yard birds
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 19:25:44 -0400
The Gray Catbird has shown up at the window tray several times in the 
past and twice today.  It was eating the shelled sunflowers. Normally I 
see them under the tube feeder or in the birdbath.

A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has also been in the yard.  They are so tiny and 
look like a cross between a chickadee and hummer.  Yesterday, while 
talking to my sister on the phone I blurted out:  He just pooped on my 
car.  She said:  Who?  And I told her:  The Blue- gray Gnatcatcher.   
Fortunately she is used to such strange comments because she knows there 
is always something going on in the yard, no matter which window you 
look out.

Frumpy, the Carolina Wren, now has 4 eggs in her new nest in the flower 
pot.    It was nice to see the female Towhee in the birdbath this 
morning.  Unlike the male, she is not a regular visitor.

Saw my first Red Spotted Purple butterfly today.  It was on the 
Hummingbird feed.  When it left a Monarch took its place.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Lesser Scaup still in Star City; shorebirds still AWOL
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:15:30 -0400
The LESSER SCAUP reported yesterday was still present this afternoon at
2:30-2:45 pm, across the river from Barill Park in Star City near the
sandbar. I attempted to get a few photos, but they are barely recognizable
due to distance, heat haze, and scope wobble. Thanks to John Boback for
keeping me informed on its status during the morning. No other unusual
ducks found during a trip down the river to the Fort Martin boat ramp.

At Pleasant Creek Wildlife Management Area in Barbour and Taylor Counties
this morning, I found 1 lone Killdeer at the new pond next to the railroad
trestle. Water levels were high at Doe Run Impoundment and Upper Pleasant
Creek wetlands, so basically almost no shorebird habitat is available now.

At Prickett's Fort State Park on the way home, there was 1 SOLITARY
SANDPIPER on the mudflats, along with 11 Killdeers.

At Upper Pleasant Creek, highlights included:
Mallard--1 female with 6 almost completely grown ducklings
Belted Kingfisher--1
Tree Swallow--20, with about half in juvenile brown plumage
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher--1
Yellow Warbler--2, including a young or molting male with almost no tail or
breast streaking singing an unusual not-ready-for-prime-time
song--something like "tseet-tseet-tseet (pause) tseet-tsi-tsu".
Yellow-breasted Chat--2
Baltimore Oriole--1 adult male

At the new pond nest to the railroad trestle:
Green Heron--1 adult (caught and ate a small fish) and 2 juveniles
Empidonax Flycatcher--1 silent bird
Eastern Kingbird--2, with 1 looking like it was carrying a vine tendril.
Way too late for nesting--this species is almost 2 weeks past its safe date
period end in the WV Breeding Bird Atlas.
Eastern Bluebird--4, with a male going into and out of one of the duck
boxes. 1 juvenile too.

At Doe Run Impoundment:
Great Blue Heron--1 immature
Mallard--1 female with 8 very small ducklings

Along Bailey Road:
Hairy Woodpecker--1 female
Alder Flycatcher--1 singing. Out on a utility wire above a farm field--not
exactly its usual habitat.
Barn Swallow--10
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher--1
Eastern Bluebird--4 juveniles
Brown Thrasher--3
Common Yellowthroat--3, including a juvenile
American Redstart--2
Field Sparrow--10, including some juveniles

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Perfect day
From: laura ceperley <ceperleylau AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:21:00 -0400
Wednesday was perfect for birding the Winfield wetlands and locks on both
sides of the kanawha.  Light breeze, low humidity, 70 degrees.   Orioles
(both flavors), catbirds, brown thrashers, cliff swallows and their
cousins, multiple green and great blues, and several vireos.  Made more
perfect when alert birders kim and randy sited an osprey nest on top of one
of the REALLY tall comm towers above Bancroft --with one adult circling and
a youngsters on the nest stretching.  Cool.  PLUS randy sites a solitary
Solitary Sandpiper on the mud around the last lake of the lock area.  Cindy
e, Bev w, Christy c, randy u,  Kevin c, Kim k, and laura
Subject: Re: Lesser Scaup - Mon County
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:42:15 -0400
There is a lot of this in Pennsylvania, too. I wonder if some individuals never 
went back north, or else got confused in one way or another. Perhaps they are 
2nd year birds. I have a hunch that a lot of this has to do with the Great 
Lakes freeze last winter. 


Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

> Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:12:44 -0400
> From: bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: Lesser Scaup - Mon County
> To: WV-BIRD AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> 
> I too saw the Lesser Scaup between 11:00 and 11:30, and was equally
> flabbergasted.
> This is an extremely rare summer record for the state. Neither the first
> nor the second
> (in progress) WV Breeding Bird Atlas (so far) have any breeding records for
> the state.
> 
> Birds of North America Online indicates this species breeds almost
> exclusively in Canada,
> with very small areas north of Lakes Erie and Ontario and along the St.
> Lawrence River
> being the closest known breeding areas to WV.
> 
> A quick check of eBird shows zero July records in West Virginia; the
> closest was July 4, 2009
> at Piney Reservoir in Garrett County, MD, just across the MD/WV border.
> There are, however,
> numerous records on Chesapeake Bay and on the Great Lakes.
> 
> George Hall in his 1983 book "West Virginia Birds" has this to say about
> summer Lesser
> Scaups in WV:
> 
> "Occasional birds of this species are seen in June or even later in the
> summer in the state.
> These birds are probably incapacitated in some way but there is evidence of
> breeding in
> the state. Thaddeus Surber reported (fide Brooks, 1944) an adult with downy
> young on the
> Greenbrier River in Greenbrier County in 1907. Rives (1898) took a female
> in breeding
> condition on the Blackwater River in Tucker County. Young birds were seen
> on Lake
> Terra Alta, Preston County, in the summer of 1936 (Brooks, 1936)."
> 
> But nothing since. This all begs the question: Is this bird an injured bird
> from last winter
> that has been here all along but just not noticed since almost all birders
> mostly ignore
> the Monongahela River, Cheat Lake, and other water bodies in the state once
> the ducks
> have migrated north in the spring and boat traffic takes over for the
> summer?
> 
> Fascinating food for thought.
> 
> Terry
> 
> 
> On Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 2:39 PM, John Boback <
> 00000017c64535d6-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org> wrote:
> 
> > Hi All,
> >
> > Much to my surprise, I found a male Lesser Scaup on the Monongahela River
> > today at Star City's Barill Park. It was actively diving and swimming
> > around.
> >
> > I also saw a Least Sandpiper in the parking lot beside Ashley Furniture at
> > the University Town Centre.
> >
> > John Boback
> > Morgantown, WV
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Terry Bronson
> Morgantown, WV
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Lesser Scaup - Mon County
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:12:44 -0400
I too saw the Lesser Scaup between 11:00 and 11:30, and was equally
flabbergasted.
This is an extremely rare summer record for the state. Neither the first
nor the second
(in progress) WV Breeding Bird Atlas (so far) have any breeding records for
the state.

Birds of North America Online indicates this species breeds almost
exclusively in Canada,
with very small areas north of Lakes Erie and Ontario and along the St.
Lawrence River
being the closest known breeding areas to WV.

A quick check of eBird shows zero July records in West Virginia; the
closest was July 4, 2009
at Piney Reservoir in Garrett County, MD, just across the MD/WV border.
There are, however,
numerous records on Chesapeake Bay and on the Great Lakes.

George Hall in his 1983 book "West Virginia Birds" has this to say about
summer Lesser
Scaups in WV:

"Occasional birds of this species are seen in June or even later in the
summer in the state.
These birds are probably incapacitated in some way but there is evidence of
breeding in
the state. Thaddeus Surber reported (fide Brooks, 1944) an adult with downy
young on the
Greenbrier River in Greenbrier County in 1907. Rives (1898) took a female
in breeding
condition on the Blackwater River in Tucker County. Young birds were seen
on Lake
Terra Alta, Preston County, in the summer of 1936 (Brooks, 1936)."

But nothing since. This all begs the question: Is this bird an injured bird
from last winter
that has been here all along but just not noticed since almost all birders
mostly ignore
the Monongahela River, Cheat Lake, and other water bodies in the state once
the ducks
have migrated north in the spring and boat traffic takes over for the
summer?

Fascinating food for thought.

Terry


On Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 2:39 PM, John Boback <
00000017c64535d6-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org> wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> Much to my surprise, I found a male Lesser Scaup on the Monongahela River
> today at Star City's Barill Park. It was actively diving and swimming
> around.
>
> I also saw a Least Sandpiper in the parking lot beside Ashley Furniture at
> the University Town Centre.
>
> John Boback
> Morgantown, WV




-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Re: Peregrine in New River Gorge
From: Wendy Perrone <wendy AT TRACWV.ORG>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 09:04:57 -0400
There were 4 hatched out on the New River Gorge Bridge this year.

Wendy Perrone, Executive Director
Three Rivers Avian Center
2583 Brooks Mountain Road
HC 74  Box 279
Brooks, WV 25951
304-466-4683  land line
304-575-5024  mobile
www.tracwv.org
visit us on Facebook "Three Rivers Avian Center"



On 7/16/2014 8:10 AM, Williams, Barry C wrote:
> A coworker asked me to ID a "hawk" that she had photographed on July 3
> on the Long Point Trail in the New River Gorge.  It was a juvenile
> Peregrine Falcon.  She said there was also another one circling just
> overhead, not sure if it was another juvenile or adult.
>
>
>
> Barry Williams
>
> Organ Cave, Greenbrier County
>
Subject: Peregrine in New River Gorge
From: "Williams, Barry C" <Barry.C.Williams AT WV.GOV>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 08:10:44 -0400
A coworker asked me to ID a "hawk" that she had photographed on July 3
on the Long Point Trail in the New River Gorge.  It was a juvenile
Peregrine Falcon.  She said there was also another one circling just
overhead, not sure if it was another juvenile or adult.

 

Barry Williams

Organ Cave, Greenbrier County
Subject: Southbound Shorebirds
From: Mike Griffith <birdonawire47 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:52:52 -0400
R.C. Byrd Locks (Mason Co.):

Lesser Yellowlegs - 1 (one of the earliest summer/fall migration records for 
this area) 

Least Sandpiper - 3
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1 (earliest summer/fall migration record for this 
area) 


Mike Griffith
Huntington
Subject: PVAS-sponsored Bird Walk at Blue Ridge Center (VA): Kentucky Warblers, Scarlet Tanagers, YB Chats, Blue Grosbeaks, etc.
From: Deb Hale <debhale72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:50:43 -0400
The rain held off for us this morning, and the sun just roasted us a little
bit after we emerged from the woods at the Blue Ridge Center in nearby
Loudoun County, VA. Our group of one dozen birders found some nice birds
along the way of a 3-mile route including wild fields and deep woods. Great
mix of habitat.

Highlights included: the pair of Kentucky Warblers heard/seen flitting
around their nest site - a Lifer for several; Scarlet Tanagers finally
spotted - one very much orange-hued; clear view of several Yellow-breasted
Chats (and tons of Common Yellowthroats) in the fields; and to finish - a
pair of Blue Grosbeaks close enough to hear and see when we returned to our
cars. A wonderful place to explore. Thanks to all those who made the trip
across the river.

Deb Hale
Harpers Ferry/Bolivar

49 species

Great Blue Heron  3
Turkey Vulture  13
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  1
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  4
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  6
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  4
Acadian Flycatcher  12
Eastern Phoebe  2
Red-eyed Vireo  12
American Crow  X
Fish Crow  1
Tree Swallow  3
Barn Swallow  20     all lined up on the telephone line as we drove out.
Carolina Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  1
Carolina Wren  3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  4
Eastern Bluebird  6
American Robin  1
Brown Thrasher  3
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  x
Cedar Waxwing  5
Ovenbird  1
Worm-eating Warbler  1
Louisiana Waterthrush  3     1 singing near Piney Run; 2 others heard
chipping on the walk back to the cars through the  wooded hallway
Kentucky Warbler  5     one pair seen flying around their nest site; others
heard singing and chipping in the deep woods.
Common Yellowthroat  12
Northern Parula  4     all heard singing down near Piney Run
Yellow-breasted Chat  5
Eastern Towhee  2
Chipping Sparrow  1
Field Sparrow  6
Song Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  4
Northern Cardinal  6
Blue Grosbeak  2     hanging out not far from the parking area - we heard
then saw them as we returned to our cars - at the top of small trees on the
far side of the meadow growth.
Indigo Bunting  15
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Common Grackle  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  3
American Goldfinch  8

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19108886
Subject: Carolina Wren update
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:44:41 -0400
Last Friday I saw Frumpy (the Carolina Wren with the bad case of mites) 
   and her mate carrying nesting material and was surprised when they 
ducked into the pot of pentas on my patio table.  Sure enough, there was 
the beginning of a nest.   For an instant I thought about pulling it out 
but realized it was more important for her to have a shot at raising her 
own babies instead of feeding the Cowbird chick on her first nesting go 
around.  The flowers can be watered  from below  through the saucer.  It 
was amazing how quickly the nest materialized.  The speedy progress says 
a lot about teamwork.

I don't know where she nested the first time but the location she picked 
this time is certainly attractive.  She also has the window feeder tray 
and several bird baths nearby.  This morning when she left the nest I 
peaked in and saw one egg.

Some of the Hummers are very tiny and must be the youngsters.  Other 
baby birds such as Cardinals, WB Nuthatches, Chickadees and Titmice are 
also showing up at the feeder tray by themselves.

While preparing supper last night I wondered where  the "colorful" birds 
were.  When I looked at the birdbath there was an Indigo Bunting right 
in the middle of it and behind him a beautiful  male Tiger Swallowtail 
nectaring on the hot pink tall phlox.   Really pretty.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Very large Cliff Swallow colony at Opekiska Dam on Monongahela River
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 14:48:16 -0400
While my wife was doing some fishing near Opekiska Lock and Dam southwest
of Morgantown this morning, I wandered up and down the Monongahela River
Rail Trail in both directions from the dam, noting the following:

Cliff Swallow--at least 150 nests on the dam, with maybe half in use.
Dozens of nestlings poking their heads out of the nests to be fed by
adults. Conservatively 200 birds present, including young in nests. Likely
300 if 2-3 young in each nest. Certainly one of the largest colonies in the
state, higher than the current eBird high count of 154 birds in Red House
along the Kanawha River in 2012, though I'm sure historically even higher
counts occurred. A whopping increase at this location since eBird has only
1 record of 2 birds in late-July 2006.

Statewide, Cliff Swallows have made a big comeback since the first WV
Breeding Bird Atlas in the late 1980s. That Atlas found the birds in only
35 blocks; the not-quite-final-yet count in the current Atlas update is 88
blocks.

Also present and noteworthy at the dam and along the rail trail:

Canada Goose--3, including 1 juvenile. About 25 more birds present along
Opekiska Road in the residential area just before the river.
Great Blue Heron--1
Green Heron--1
Belted Kingfisher--2
Eastern Kingbird--1
Barn Swallow--20. All flying around the dam, but curiously all nests on the
dam were Cliff Swallow nests.
Hooded Warbler--2
Yellow Warbler--4
Scarlet Tanager--2
Indigo Bunting--3
Red-winged Blackbird--30, all in female/juvenile plumages

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Purple martins
From: laura ceperley <ceperleylau AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 19:59:03 -0400
Around 3 pm today, 60 plus purple martins were flitting around and perching
on one of the super tall towers in the middle of Kettle6, a priority block
west of clendenin.   Despite the late season, hot sun and 90 degree
heat,  we saw and or heard 40 species in two hours, adding a few records to
the atlas, including waxwings which are missing from many blocks in the
Teays valley region.

Bev wright, martha hopper and laura ceperley.
Subject: Normal??
From: Nan McDaniel <fordrun AT SUDDENLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:31:20 -0400
Our daughter got married this weekend. As the wedding party arrived Wednesday 
night, they spotted a little brown guy sleeping in a broken birdhouse. They 
checked to confirm he was breathing, snapped a flash free photo to keep from 
awakening him, and had ?s I couldn't answer. (I'm a novice). First, is it 
normal for a bird to lie down to sleep. He was lying down on belly, listing 
slightly to the right side. 

what kind of bird is it? It was sparrow sized with brown back and wings with 
white dots on its back. List serve will not let me post photo. Thanks Nan 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Common Merganser
From: DAVID <patick AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 15:56:48 +0000
While fishing on the Greenbrier River this am, I observed 11 female Common 
Mergansers swimming downstream about 0.5 miles north of the Buckeye bridge 
which runs over the Greenbrier River. 

  
  
David Patick, 
Hillsboro, WV 
Subject: Re: Red-headed woodpecker, Red-shouldered hawks, and one amazing hummer - Jefferson County
From: Joan Carr <joan-of-art AT SUDDENLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 10:02:48 -0400
Hi Birdmom,

How do we ever get anything done outdoors when there is so much going on? I 
stop to watch wasps carrying a spider to its nest, a darner resting on the beak 
of the copper cranes at the pond's edge, birds bathing or drinking at the ponds 
and waterfall, ants trekking across the patio with food held tightly, a 
red-bellied snake wiggling from the leaf mold, and birds making all kinds of 
wondrous sounds. My husband and I find all kinds of things to enjoy on our 60+ 
acres of woodland mountains and creeks. 


Thanks for sharing your adventures.  

Cheers,
Joan of Art and Nature in Kentucky, adjacent to Williamson, WV
Subject: Red-headed woodpecker, Red-shouldered hawks, and one amazing hummer - Jefferson County
From: Bird Mom <pep4223 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 01:20:15 +0000
The hummer moved methodically from flower head to flower head, feeding 
diligently on every plant, then repeated the cycle all over again .  The Bee B 
alm was exploding with color and nectar .  When she landed, I watched her sit 
quietly on an upright stick that was straightening a leaning plant near the 
pond.  Her mouth was open, and my first thought was that she was cooling 
off.  It was humid, but not that hot, as a thunderstorm was looming, but not 
happening at the moment.  Her beak resembled miniature chop sticks, waiting 
for the right moment.  I had seen it on the glorious  show "Extraordinary 
Birds" featured on Nature aired on PBS, but never in real life until today.  
Success!  She caught that tiny gnat in her tiny beak and gulped it down quick 
.  Hummers rarely come to my feeder right now, as there is so much good stuff 
to eat in the yard.  Who wants a feeder when you can have the real nectar from 
native flowers and plenty of meaty insects ? 




Earlier in the morning while weeding , I heard the screams of a Red-shouldered 
hawk.  I looked up and there was a small kettle of 5 Red-shouldered hawks, 
circling around and around high over my driveway.  I watched them soaring 
gracefully, then they disappeared into the clouds. 




The Red-headed woodpecker I' ve been watching all summer was sitting on the 
crossbars of the powerline this evening as I rode my bike on a short jaunt.  
I have not been able to find a nest (except a dummy nest cavity) , but hope 
that it found someplace safe to call home this season.   




BIRDMOM 

Jefferson County, WV 
Subject: Purple Martins pre-staging
From: "Cynthia D. Ellis" <cdellis AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 12:43:23 -0400
Local Martin host sends word that groups of birds are gathering each
evening in the Putnam County area used last year.  He thought that it seems
early.
Saw an Osprey near Winfield Bridge on both Monday and Tuesday.

                             ~Cindy Ellis

-- 
Cynthia D. Ellis
3114 Steel Ridge Road
Red House, WV 25168-7724
304 586-4135
304 206-0083 [no cell service at residence]
cdellis AT wildblue.net


~Well the one thing we did right
Was the day we started to fight
Keep your eyes on the prize, hold on~
Subject: Peregrine - Jefferson County
From: Deb Hale <debhale72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 12:18:35 -0400
Just happened to check out the bird flapping its wings above Route 340
yesterday afternoon as Mom & I drove to the Walmart (this between Aldi &
Walmart, my homes away from home).

Classic falcon profile. Unmistakable. Size-wise Peregrine. Wish I could
have watched it longer but had to keep my eyes on the road. He was heading
NE.

Deb Hale
Harpers Ferry/Bolivar
Subject: Disastrous day for Momma Wood Duck
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 16:02:45 -0400
No happy ending here, unfortunately. After I finished a morning of
last-ditch atlasing in the Grafton-6 block of the WV Breeding Bird Atlas, I
stopped at the new Pleasant Creek Wildlife Management Area pond between
Routes 119/250 and the railroad trestle.

The pond did have some mud around the edges, but no shorebirds were
present. However, 2 Great Blue Herons, 15 Canada Geese, 3 Eastern Phoebes,
1 Eastern Kingbird, 1 Yellow-throated Warbler, 1 Common Yellowthroat, and a
few other common species were.

Also present was a female Wood Duck with 2 surviving ducklings that were
about 3/4 grown. They were swimming around near the islands at the south
end of the pond. I walked part-way around the pond and set up my scope to
look at what turned out to be the Kingbird. Out of the corner of my eye I
saw a flash of a lighter color streak past.

It turned out to be an adult Red-shouldered Hawk, which was sitting
partially obscured behind a small berm at the edge of the pond behind the
female Wood Duck, who was frantic, and, sadly, only one duckling. The hawk
was bending down like it was feeding, but I couldn't see what it had. After
a couple of minutes it moved up the bank a bit, and I could see it did have
a baby Wood Duck, still struggling, in its bill. But not for long. The hawk
soon flew off with the hapless duckling.

I then noticed the Great Blue Herons flying off and tried to find the
remaining Wood Ducks. Suddenly, the female flew off by herself crying. I
could not find the remaining duckling, which I assume couldn't fly. A
mother duck would not abandon her brood, so I'm speculating that while the
mother was distracted, one of the Great Blue Herons grabbed the remaining
duckling and flew off with it. Either that or it swam behind the island.
But the fact that the mother flew off alone leads me to think the second
duckling also met its fate.

With a sad heart, I continued on to the Upper Pleasant Creek wetlands
across Routes 119/250, where there was no mud and no shorebirds. I found
another Wood Duck family of a female and 3 half-grown youngsters. I only
spent a few minutes, but saw 1 Great Blue Heron (probably one of the 2 seen
earlier), 2 Brown Thrashers, another Eastern Kingbird, and heard a
Yellow-breasted Chat and a Common Yellowthroat.

Earlier in the morning, the atlasing in Grafton-6 had these highlights:

West Hill Road:
Red-bellied Woodpecker--1 juvenile
Scarlet Tanager--1
Orchard Oriole--1

Meyers Cove Road:
Mallard--18
Acadian Flycatcher--2
Black-capped Chickadee--1 heard-only 2-note "fee-bee" song.
Hooded Warbler--1
Yellow-throated Warbler--1

McVicker Road:
Acadian Flycatcher--2
White-eyed Vireo--2
Cedar Waxwing--1
Common Yellowthroat--2
Scarlet Tanager--2
Eastern Meadowlark--1

Tygart Lake Pleasant Creek boat launch access road:
Broad-winged Hawk--1, new to block
Black-capped Chickadee--1, also heard-only
Ovenbird--1
Blue-winged Warbler--1, new to block
Hooded Warbler--1
American Redstart--1

Doe Run Impoundment:
Mallard--1 female with 9 small ducklings
Green Heron--1
Killdeer--4
Tree Swallow--1 adult, 3 brown-backed females/juveniles
Eastern Bluebird--1
Hooded Warbler--1

Unless someone else finds a few more species, this block will close out
with only 77 species compared to 83 in the first Atlas. I'm not sure why
since there is very little development in this block, mostly along West
Hill Road.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Mountain Top Birds
From: Herb Myers <hesemyers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2014 21:27:35 -0400
This morning Sarah and I hiked to the top of Briar Patch Mountain behind our
house to try to get some more higher elevation birds or upgrade their
breeding status for Harman Block 6. It seems like the birds may sing a bit
later in the summer at the higher elevation where it is cooler. The Magnolia
and Yellow-rumped Warblers where very active as were the Golden-crowned
Kinglets. Dark-eyed Juncos were trilling with their bell-like voices. A
Hermit Thrush sang in the distance. Cedar Waxwings sat like silent sentinels
on the very tops of the spruce trees. I am always amazed by the American
Robins. They are at home nesting on our porch but are also at home on the
tops of the mountains. As we prepared to descend, a Winter Wren repeatedly
sang almost beside us.  Also, we finally heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch as we
were heading back. It was another beautiful morning - a true mountaintop
experience. Herb Myers, Harman, Randolph County
Subject: Hooligan Ravens in Bridgeport
From: Jeff Del Col <delcolja AT AB.EDU>
Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2014 16:41:52 -0400
This morning I watched and heard two Common Ravens buzzing a parking lot at
Sam's Club in Bridgeport.  They were screaming at one another and seemed to
be having a grand time terrorizing the shoppers.  Influenced by Hitchcock,
I guess.

Jeff Del Col
Subject: creeper
From: Jim & Judy Phillips <jimandjudyphillips AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2014 11:43:23 -0400
We heard and saw a brown creeper this morning on Pipestem S.P. Recent 
June & July sightings cause me to wonder if they may be nesting.
Have at least one family of rose-breasted grosbeaks coming to our feeders.
Jim & Judy Phillips
Summers county
Pipestem, WV
Subject: GC Flycatcher calling at night?
From: Jeff Del Col <delcolja AT AB.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2014 21:47:24 -0400
For the second evening in a row I am hearing what certainly sounds like a
Great-crested Flycatcher calling the woods after dark.  This doesn't make
sense to me.  Has anyone else heard them at night.    We have a manic
mocker or two in the vicinity, but this is not one of them--no variation to
the call, just a "wheeep! every five or six seconds.

What other bird could it be?

Jeff Del Col,
Philippi
Subject: Early Fall Migrant?
From: Mike Griffith <birdonawire47 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2014 20:19:13 -0400
Green Bottom WMA (Cabell Co.):

One Least Sandpiper was present with 3 Killdeer.

Mike Griffith
Huntington
Subject: Fourth of July Birding
From: Herb Myers <hesemyers AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Jul 2014 14:56:46 -0400
My wife and I spent about 3 hours hiking in Harman Block 6 this morning for
the West Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas. It was cloudy and intermittently
drizzling but nice and cool. We savored black raspberries along the way.
Flowers decorated both sides of the logging road. I want to share with you
some of the wonders of this walk.

 

When we got out of the car, an almost adult Bald Eagle was soaring overhead.
Awesome.

 

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers seemed to be communicating across the valley or
were having a contest with their Morse code type tapping. 

 

We encountered a family of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks along the logging road.
They weren't pleased with our presence so we moved on.

 

A Mourning Warbler sang at the first switchback. 

 

A Wood Thrush was almost singing a Hermit Thrush type song. 

 

Gray Catbirds were mimicking other forest birds and almost fooling me. 

 

Indigo Buntings seemed to be everywhere. 

 

As we returned to the car a Louisiana Waterthrush sang and teetered on the
rocks of the Dry Fork. 

 

As we drove through Harman, the odors of chicken barbeque welcomed us home. 

 

This morning beat fire-works hands down. Herb Myers, Harman, Randolph County

 
Subject: Pleasant Creek/Doe Run Shorebirds (7/3/14)
From: Randy Bodkins <highvirginia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Jul 2014 20:41:52 -0400
No exposed mud anywhere

Randy Bodkins
Norton, WV
Subject: Baby kingbirds - Bolivar Heights last evening.
From: Deb Hale <debhale72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2014 11:27:13 -0400
3 or 4 baby kingbirds sat lined up on a branch awaiting feeding, mostly
obscured by the leafy fronds and green textured fruit of a mature black
walnut tree, under which we sat with our dog. 1 or 2 would hop to an
adjacent open branch, providing us wonderful views of their chubby
unfinished figures from below. Mom and Dad worked diligently nearby,
"hunting," resting momentarily on battlefield marker signs and cannons.

Their little show and the pleasant breezes flowing up the hill provided us
a wonderful way to wind down an otherwise hectic day, a simple reminder of
the wonders of the natural world.

Deb Hale
Harpers Ferry/Bolivar
Subject: broadwings
From: "Cynthia D. Ellis" <cdellis AT WILDBLUE.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2014 11:14:47 -0400
Gratified to hear, and see, 3 Broad-winged Hawks calling and circling here
this morning.
                         ~Cindy
                               Putnam County
-- 
Cynthia D. Ellis
3114 Steel Ridge Road
Red House, WV 25168-7724
304 586-4135
304 206-0083 [no cell service at residence]
cdellis AT wildblue.net


~Well the one thing we did right
Was the day we started to fight
Keep your eyes on the prize, hold on~
Subject: The Naked Wren
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:09:09 -0400
Yesterday the Carolina Wren I nicknamed Frumpy because of her roughed up 
coat came to the feeder tray after having visited the birdbath.  She is 
a sight to behold.  Nothing but pink skin on her torso below the 
feathered neck.  Luckily my camera was on the kitchen counter so I was 
able to get some good photos of her.  Sure wish I knew what the cause of 
her condition is.  As I said before, she eats well and her flight 
feathers are in good shape.  However, if her feathers don't grow back by 
winter she better consider moving to Florida.

There were two 1st year male Orchard Orioles around the birdbath. At one 
point one of them sat on the garden wire facing me and I could see some 
rusty spots below his black throat as well as a rusty line going down 
the center of his breast.  I've also had a female get dog fur out of the 
suet basket so there may be a second brood on the way.

A Chipping Sparrow and Robin shared the birdbath making for a good size 
comparison.  Later on the orioles and an Indigo Bunting showed up.  A 
lovely Great Crested Flycatcher made a brief appearance.

A House Wren had a nest in an old birdhouse that was on its last leg.  I 
was afraid the nearly rotted bottom would fall out so a couple of days 
ago I decided to put a string around it to hold it together.  When I did 
that, facing the back of the box, all of a sudden there was this 
explosion of three youngsters coming out of the hole and hopping around 
on the grass.  Reminded me of miniature clay pigeons.  They must have 
been ready to leave the nest or they would have stayed put.

Of the three new Bluebird nests, one of them has an unusual amount of 
nesting material (3.5 inches) made up mostly of white pine needles.  It 
concerned me because that makes the cup not all that far down from the 
entry hole.  When I checked yesterday it contained 5 eggs.  Let's hope 
this is a case of mother knows best.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Golden Tanager in Monongalia County
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 13:05:38 -0400
This morning, while squeezing in a couple of hours of mop-up WV Breeding
Bird Atlas work in the Blacksville area of western Monongalia County, I
came across a startling bright gold Scarlet Tanager male, seen in the
bright sun at Mt. Herman Cemetery at the end of Stull Hollow Road. The
wings and tail were the normal black color. He was singing the normal
Scarlet Tanager song.

Orange-morph males are occasionally reported, but this is the first I've
heard of that was actually golden yellow in color. It looked like a large
darker yellow Goldfinch without the black cap and white wing markings. I
attempted to get my camera on it, but the bird was only visible for about
10-15 seconds, so no photo.

A bit later while walking down Long Drain Road west of the cemetery, a
red-morph Ruffed Grouse flushed from the roadside. A Cooper's Hawk flew
overhead.Also of note were unseen singing Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Kentucky
and Hooded Warblers, and yet another Chickadee that looked like a Carolina
but sang the 2-note "fee-bee" song.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Re: WV-BIRD Digest - 24 Jun 2014 to 25 Jun 2014 (#2014-172)
From: Hallie Mason <halliemason AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 06:45:58 -0400
Teasing out the details to verify unusual sightings (both my own and
others) is one of the things that has helped me become a better birder.
When I get queried, it prompts research in several guides and calls my
attention to fieldmarks or behavior that I had not maybe noticed.  It is
always a learning experience.  Thanks to the e-Bird monitors for the time
they spend.

Hallie


On Thu, Jun 26, 2014 at 12:00 AM, WV-BIRD automatic digest system <
LISTSERV AT list.audubon.org> wrote:

> There are 2 messages totaling 66 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Dickcissels - Jefferson county
>   2. Information on eBird submissions
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 25 Jun 2014 14:21:05 -0400
> From:    Matt 
> Subject: Dickcissels - Jefferson county
>
> While out looking for butterflies at lunch today I drove through the
> sub-division being built out with homes in the Candlewood Dr area where
> we used to find them. While nothing earth shattering on the leps front I
> heard a Dickcissel signing near the end of Courier Dr. (This is from the
> end of Candlewood Dr). There may be a pair. Grasshopper Sparrows were
> also in song but it was rather tough to hear them over the nearby heavy
> machinery.
>
> Good Birding,
>   Matt Orsie - Summit Point
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 25 Jun 2014 16:36:47 -0400
> From:    Matt 
> Subject: Information on eBird submissions
>
> Hello All,
>     For those of you who use eBird a hardy "Thank You" is in order for
> your contributions. It is a somewhat tedious task to be entering data
> from the many trips you take and we appreciate it. On the same token it
> a tedious task sometimes for the reviewers to try to make judgement
> calls on everything that flags an "alert". Please understand that the
> reviewers are not "police" but we want to make sure the data entered is
> as accurate as possible. We will err on the side of caution to
> invalidate a record if there's not enough supporting evidence. To that
> end, when and if you are prompted for more information during data entry
> because of thresholds on the various filters please take the time to
> give as much information as possible. If there is a dearth of
> information in the alert then the odds favor an invalidation due to lack
> of supporting documentation. Documentation can come in the form of the
> detailed specifics of how you came to the conclusion you did. Don't try
> to put a label on everything. If you only have a shred of evidence don't
> jump to conclusions. Let it go or try to find out more if you can to get
> a conclusive ID. Audio and/or photographs are of great assistance and
> are encouraged if you have a camera, etc. The eBird alerts/flagged
> species come up when birds are entered with "high counts", out of season
> or just plain rare for the area birded. Are the filters perfect? No, but
> they are constantly being massaged based on what/when species are reported.
>
> Please don't take offense if more information is asked for. Also please
> don't take the attitude, "I know what I saw and that should be good
> enough". We know most most of you but there are others we do not so
> please bear with us in that regard. We can't rubber stamp everything
> flagged and that's why we have an on-line vetting process. Even if a
> record is invalidated due to lack of sufficient documentation in the
> reviewer's opinion it is still in your personal database (just not
> publicly displayed) and available for research efforts, etc.
>
> Thanks for going along on the ride. It's only going to get better as
> time goes on.
>
> Matt Orsie and Joey Herron
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of WV-BIRD Digest - 24 Jun 2014 to 25 Jun 2014 (#2014-172)
> **************************************************************
>
Subject: Information on eBird submissions
From: Matt <wvbirder AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Jun 2014 16:36:47 -0400
Hello All,
    For those of you who use eBird a hardy "Thank You" is in order for 
your contributions. It is a somewhat tedious task to be entering data 
from the many trips you take and we appreciate it. On the same token it 
a tedious task sometimes for the reviewers to try to make judgement 
calls on everything that flags an "alert". Please understand that the 
reviewers are not "police" but we want to make sure the data entered is 
as accurate as possible. We will err on the side of caution to 
invalidate a record if there's not enough supporting evidence. To that 
end, when and if you are prompted for more information during data entry 
because of thresholds on the various filters please take the time to 
give as much information as possible. If there is a dearth of 
information in the alert then the odds favor an invalidation due to lack 
of supporting documentation. Documentation can come in the form of the 
detailed specifics of how you came to the conclusion you did. Don't try 
to put a label on everything. If you only have a shred of evidence don't 
jump to conclusions. Let it go or try to find out more if you can to get 
a conclusive ID. Audio and/or photographs are of great assistance and 
are encouraged if you have a camera, etc. The eBird alerts/flagged 
species come up when birds are entered with "high counts", out of season 
or just plain rare for the area birded. Are the filters perfect? No, but 
they are constantly being massaged based on what/when species are reported.

Please don't take offense if more information is asked for. Also please 
don't take the attitude, "I know what I saw and that should be good 
enough". We know most most of you but there are others we do not so 
please bear with us in that regard. We can't rubber stamp everything 
flagged and that's why we have an on-line vetting process. Even if a 
record is invalidated due to lack of sufficient documentation in the 
reviewer's opinion it is still in your personal database (just not 
publicly displayed) and available for research efforts, etc.

Thanks for going along on the ride. It's only going to get better as 
time goes on.

Matt Orsie and Joey Herron
Subject: Dickcissels - Jefferson county
From: Matt <wvbirder AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Jun 2014 14:21:05 -0400
While out looking for butterflies at lunch today I drove through the 
sub-division being built out with homes in the Candlewood Dr area where 
we used to find them. While nothing earth shattering on the leps front I 
heard a Dickcissel signing near the end of Courier Dr. (This is from the 
end of Candlewood Dr). There may be a pair. Grasshopper Sparrows were 
also in song but it was rather tough to hear them over the nearby heavy 
machinery.

Good Birding,
  Matt Orsie - Summit Point
Subject: Young 'uns
From: Deb Hale <debhale72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 10:56:23 -0400
About 10 turkey poults erupted from the grass along the "wooded hallway" -
that path that runs along the ridge above Flowing Springs run - at South
Schoolhouse Ridge this morning.

Also present on this beautiful morning:
YB Chat
Scarlet Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
13 Grasshopper Sparrows
adult Bald Eagle
Red-tailed and Red-shouldered hawk

Last evening my husband & I witnessed the feeding of a baby cardinal. Both
parents foraged high and low for this one bird, nestled safely in the
boughs of our American holly (in perfect close range to our front porch).
For a full half-hour Mom and Dad brought treats in the form of mulberries
and bugs (one big one with long wings that somehow Baby managed to gulp
down).  Baby Cardinal kept chipping for more, more, more - he seemed to
have an unsatiated appetite!

Deb Hale
Harpers Ferry/Bolivar
Subject: Unfortunate Hummer
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 07:12:03 -0400
The Hummer I saw  at the feeder on Saturday who appeared to be holding 
something in its foot (I had hoped) seems to have the item stuck to his 
foot.  Whatever it is, the size is about 3 cm long and 1 cm in 
diameter.  The bird is either a female or first year male. It came to 
the feeders twice yesterday evening while I was sitting on the patio:  
once at almost 7:00 and again at 8:00.  Sure wish there were a way to 
trap it and remove whatever it is dragging around with it.  Makes me 
feel so helpless not to be able to do anything.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Canaan/Davis area (was Re: Hummer Influx)
From: Sarah Anderson <0000004de8cd7385-dmarc-request AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 15:34:10 -0400
 Just outside of Davis at about 11:00am yesterday (Saturday June 21) we were on 
the mountain biking trails very close to the CVI building when an Osprey flew 
overhead carrying a fish. I know they are being seen in this area, just wanted 
to add my own sighting to the tally. 


Also, we have doubled the number of hummingbirds coming to our feeder in Canaan 
Valley from one male to two. Have not seen any females since Memorial Day 
weekend when I saw .... one. I hope the "influx" is a real trend! 


 

Sarah Anderson
Canaan Valley, WV & Cabin John, MD

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: zora naron 
To: WV-BIRD 
Sent: Sun, Jun 22, 2014 7:54 am
Subject: Re: Hummer Influx - also here in Rockwood, Pa


I am glad you posted this. At the end of April I had 20 hummingbirds. But then 

they all disappeared and I was wondering what happened to them.  They usually 
slow down for a bit after migrating here and I thought that was because they 
were nesting.  But even when they are nesting, they feed.  But this year they 
were just gone which made me very sad. This morning I am seeing a few more and 

I am hoping they are coming back.  Strange behavior this year.  I wonder why.

zora naron
zoran AT hughes.net




On Jun 22, 2014, at 7:47 AM, Bruni Haydl  wrote:

I was beginning to wonder where all the Hummers were since they have been 
sparse 

up until now. 90% of the nectar has been consumed by orioles and woodpeckers. 

In the last few days the number of Hummingbirds has really shot up and so has 
their activity. It almost seems like a new shipment arrived. Yesterday morning 

at 5:30 I opened the front door to check the temperature and there was a male 
Hummer feeding already.  My opening the door didn't even startle him into 
flight.  This particular male is quite chubby and has a smoky belly.  He seems 
to have appropriated this particular feeder which is only 45 inches from the 
front door.   The nearby Zelkova tree is the perfect place for him to keep an 
eye on "his" feeder. A minute ago he was on the feeder when another one flew 

in and took the next feeding port.  The big male leaned sideways in order to 
peak around the base of the feeder so he could see the intruder and then ran 
him 

off.  Funny little maneuver that made me laugh.

Yesterday evening I noticed a hummer on the feeder.  It was holding something 
oblong in its foot that looked like it might be a clump of dog fur. At least I 

hope it was holding it and not stuck to whatever it was. I managed to get a bit 

of video before it flew off.  The activity in the back yard around the feeders 
was incredible. Hummers sitting on the garden wire, then zipping around, joined 

by two male Orchard Orioles that also chased each other.  The immature Orchard 
with his black throat also made an appearance.    I was sitting on the patio 
talking to a friend and couldn't help interject the conversation with 
commentary 

on all the activity right in front of me. Fortunately she is also a birder and 

understood.

A male Towhee is a daily regular under the feeder.  The female Towhee appeared 
briefly yesterday morning.  She must have been busy with the young because I 
hadn't seen her for a while.   When I grabbed the camera to get a shot of "the 
couple" she had taken off and now there were two pretty males under the feeder, 

both adults. Immature Cardinals are also coming around.

I've been wondering about Tree Swallow behavior lately.  After they have 
fledged, I still see what may be the family flying around the nest box, landing 

on it and going in and out of it, even when the old nest has been taken out. I 

thought a new nest was being started but the box was empty. The offspring just 

seems to enjoy hanging out around the old homestead.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town

 
Subject: Re: Hummer Influx - also here in Rockwood, Pa
From: zora naron <zoran AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 07:53:50 -0400
I am glad you posted this. At the end of April I had 20 hummingbirds. But then 
they all disappeared and I was wondering what happened to them. They usually 
slow down for a bit after migrating here and I thought that was because they 
were nesting. But even when they are nesting, they feed. But this year they 
were just gone which made me very sad. This morning I am seeing a few more and 
I am hoping they are coming back. Strange behavior this year. I wonder why. 


zora naron
zoran AT hughes.net




On Jun 22, 2014, at 7:47 AM, Bruni Haydl  wrote:

I was beginning to wonder where all the Hummers were since they have been 
sparse up until now. 90% of the nectar has been consumed by orioles and 
woodpeckers. In the last few days the number of Hummingbirds has really shot up 
and so has their activity. It almost seems like a new shipment arrived. 
Yesterday morning at 5:30 I opened the front door to check the temperature and 
there was a male Hummer feeding already. My opening the door didn't even 
startle him into flight. This particular male is quite chubby and has a smoky 
belly. He seems to have appropriated this particular feeder which is only 45 
inches from the front door. The nearby Zelkova tree is the perfect place for 
him to keep an eye on "his" feeder. A minute ago he was on the feeder when 
another one flew in and took the next feeding port. The big male leaned 
sideways in order to peak around the base of the feeder so he could see the 
intruder and then ran him off. Funny little maneuver that made me laugh. 


Yesterday evening I noticed a hummer on the feeder. It was holding something 
oblong in its foot that looked like it might be a clump of dog fur. At least I 
hope it was holding it and not stuck to whatever it was. I managed to get a bit 
of video before it flew off. The activity in the back yard around the feeders 
was incredible. Hummers sitting on the garden wire, then zipping around, joined 
by two male Orchard Orioles that also chased each other. The immature Orchard 
with his black throat also made an appearance. I was sitting on the patio 
talking to a friend and couldn't help interject the conversation with 
commentary on all the activity right in front of me. Fortunately she is also a 
birder and understood. 


A male Towhee is a daily regular under the feeder. The female Towhee appeared 
briefly yesterday morning. She must have been busy with the young because I 
hadn't seen her for a while. When I grabbed the camera to get a shot of "the 
couple" she had taken off and now there were two pretty males under the feeder, 
both adults. Immature Cardinals are also coming around. 


I've been wondering about Tree Swallow behavior lately. After they have 
fledged, I still see what may be the family flying around the nest box, landing 
on it and going in and out of it, even when the old nest has been taken out. I 
thought a new nest was being started but the box was empty. The offspring just 
seems to enjoy hanging out around the old homestead. 


Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Hummer Influx
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 07:47:40 -0400
I was beginning to wonder where all the Hummers were since they have 
been sparse up until now.  90% of the nectar has been consumed by 
orioles and woodpeckers.  In the last few days the number of 
Hummingbirds has really shot up and so has their activity.  It almost 
seems like a new shipment arrived.  Yesterday morning at 5:30 I opened 
the front door to check the temperature and there was a male Hummer 
feeding already.  My opening the door didn't even startle him into 
flight.  This particular male is quite chubby and has a smoky belly.  He 
seems to have appropriated this particular feeder which is only 45 
inches from the front door.   The nearby Zelkova tree is the perfect 
place for him to keep an eye on "his" feeder.    A minute ago he was on 
the feeder when another one flew in and took the next feeding port.  The 
big male leaned sideways in order to peak around the base of the feeder 
so he could see the intruder and then ran him off.  Funny little 
maneuver that made me laugh.

Yesterday evening I noticed a hummer on the feeder.  It was holding 
something oblong in its foot that looked like it might be a clump of dog 
fur.  At least I hope it was holding it and not stuck to whatever it 
was.  I managed to get a bit of video before it flew off.  The activity 
in the back yard around the feeders was incredible.  Hummers sitting on 
the garden wire, then zipping around, joined by two male Orchard Orioles 
that also chased each other.  The immature Orchard with his black throat 
also made an appearance.    I was sitting on the patio talking to a 
friend and couldn't help interject the conversation with commentary on 
all the activity right in front of me.  Fortunately she is also a birder 
and understood.

A male Towhee is a daily regular under the feeder.  The female Towhee 
appeared briefly yesterday morning.  She must have been busy with the 
young because I hadn't seen her for a while.   When I grabbed the camera 
to get a shot of "the couple" she had taken off and now there were two 
pretty males under the feeder, both adults. Immature Cardinals are also 
coming around.

I've been wondering about Tree Swallow behavior lately.  After they have 
fledged, I still see what may be the family flying around the nest box, 
landing on it and going in and out of it, even when the old nest has 
been taken out.  I thought a new nest was being started but the box was 
empty.   The offspring just seems to enjoy hanging out around the old 
homestead.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Preston County Golden-winged Warbler, Henslow's Sparrows
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 18:25:38 -0400
Massachusetts birder Mike Resch paid another visit to WV today with the 2
species in the subject line as primary targets, so I took him to northern
Preston County.

We had terrific luck on finding a male Golden-wing in the usual spot on
Planeing Mill Road. Terrific in that less than a minute after we saw him,
the rains started, forcing a hasty retreat to the car.

We then went to the unpaved portion of Beech Run Road a few miles away to
search for Henslow's Sparrows. We had to wait out some showers and bird
intermittently, but Mike heard 8 Henslow's at 3 locations in the hayfields
both north and south of the road to the microwave tower. I heard only 1 due
to my limited ability to hear quiet songs. There were no Henslow's at the
traditional spot where the olive trees are now getting so high (6 feet or
so in some spots) that the birds have likely moved southward 1/4 to 1/2
mile to more suitable habitat.

Also present along Beech Run Road:

Grasshopper Sparrow--9, with 4 juveniles
Savannah Sparrow--1
Field Sparrow--4, with 1 juvenile
Prairie Warbler--1
Indigo Bunting--1
Bobolink--8
Eastern Meadowlark--8, including 1 carrying food
Red-winged Blackbird--10, including 1 carrying food
Gray Catbird--1
Brown Thrasher--2
Northern Mockingbird--1
Killdeer--2
Common Raven--1
Eastern Bluebird--1
Wild Turkey--4
Red-tailed Hawk--1
plus several other usual species

On the way home, we checked the spot on Galloway Road where LeJay Graffious
has found Henslow's in the past. Unfortunately, the hay had already been
cut, so no birds.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS- Tygart Lake, Taylor county
From: Joe Hildreth <joehildreth AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 17:30:56 -0400
I had a flyover flock of 20-25 American White Pelicans on Tygart Lake around 
3-4pm I took some distant shots with my iPhone.. I'll do my best to edit them 
on the computer later after I get off the lake... They were headed roughly east 
after leaving the lake. 


Joe Hildreth
Taylor county
Subject: National Conservation Training Center (NCTC), Jun 21, 2014
From: Elliot Kirschbaum <kingfisher501 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 14:05:41 -0400
We had a total of 53 species on this morning's Potomac Valley Audubon Society's 
(PVAS) field trip to NCTC led by Sanford Sagalkin. The Xs and Ts, etc. shown 
next to the species numbers are WV Breeding Bird Atlas (WV BBAII) Codes. I made 
six entries to the BBAII database for species observed with breeding behavior 
indicating high breeding probability than previously recorded. 


Yellow-billed Cuckoo and Red-bellied Woodpecker carrying food for young (CF);
White-eyed Vireo male new for the block and singing on territory (T1);
Northern Rough-winged Swallows new for the block (X);
Blue-winged Warbler males singing on territory (T1); and
Eastern Towhee pair in appropriate habitat (PO).

The group of 20 got good looks at one adult and two young eaglets in and near 
the nest. 



> National Conservation Training Center, Jefferson, US-WV
> Jun 21, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     PVAS field trip. WV BBAII SHEPHE-4 Atlas Block
> 53 species
> 
> Green Heron  2     X
> Bald Eagle  3
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4     X
> Mourning Dove  2     X
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1     X
> Belted Kingfisher  1     X
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
> Downy Woodpecker  2     X
> Northern Flicker  2     X
> Pileated Woodpecker  1     X
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  2     T1
> Acadian Flycatcher  1     T1
> Eastern Phoebe  2     T1
> Great Crested Flycatcher  2     T1
> Eastern Kingbird  2     X
> White-eyed Vireo  1     T1
> Warbling Vireo  3     T1
> Blue Jay  4     X
> American Crow  7     X
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow  6     X
> Purple Martin  1     X
> Tree Swallow  5     X
> Barn Swallow  6     X
> Carolina Chickadee  10     X
> Tufted Titmouse  2     T1
> White-breasted Nuthatch  3     X
> Carolina Wren  1     T1
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2     X
> Eastern Bluebird  4     X
> Wood Thrush  2     T1
> Gray Catbird  7     X
> Brown Thrasher  4     X
> Northern Mockingbird  5     X
> European Starling  1     X
> Cedar Waxwing  5     X
> Blue-winged Warbler  2     T1
> Common Yellowthroat  1     T1
> Eastern Towhee  8     PO
> Chipping Sparrow  2     X
> Field Sparrow  9     T1
> Song Sparrow  2     T1
> Scarlet Tanager  6     T1
> Northern Cardinal  7     T1
> Indigo Bunting  7     T1
> Red-winged Blackbird  17     AB
> Eastern Meadowlark  2     X
> Common Grackle  16     PO
> Brown-headed Cowbird  6     PO
> Orchard Oriole  4     T1
> Baltimore Oriole  9     T1
> House Finch  1     T1
> American Goldfinch  18     T1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18851969 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

-- 
Elliot

-- 
Elliot Kirschbaum
Shepherdstown, WV
kingfisher501 at gmail dot com
Subject: Savannahs multiplying
From: Deb Hale <debhale72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 13:25:52 -0400
The Savannah Sparrow  who often sings or chirps alone on the split-rail
fence at North Schoolhouse Ridge had company this morning - 2 more of his
kind joined him there.  I couldn't tell if they were juveniles (dog &
husband walking ahead of me making them fly) but my guess is Yes.  Lucky
Savannahs beat the farmer's tractor this time.

The female Blue Grosbeak flew up from the way-far side of her usual field
to gorge in a mulberry tree.

Yesterday morning a Worm-eating Warbler in the Bolivar Heights woods
greeted me repeatedly from friendly perches all around. He was a pleasure
to behold. It's always the little things that bring great delight.

Deb Hale
Harpers Ferry/Bolivar
Subject: MBC outing to New River Gorge and Cranberry Glades
From: Jon Benedetti <jon.benedetti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 09:01:39 -0400
 June 18-20 ( Wed - Fri) Nancy Cornes, Emily Grafton, Jeanie Hilton, Almuth
Tschunko, Barb & Neal Hohman, and Judy & I went on the Mountwood Bird Club
outing to the New River Gorge area near Fayetteville, and Cranberry Glades,
and areas near Muddlety.  We had some heavy rains on and off Thursday at
Cranberry and driving back to Summersville, and again coming home Friday
afternoon. Otherwise we had pretty nice weather. A very nice group of
people, and thanks to the eyes and ears of the ladies we had some very good
birding.

Birds:  "*" - highlights,   "**" - special highlights for me

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
*Wild Turkey - 2 hens and 2 groups of poults
Great Blue Heron
*Green Heron
*Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Red-tailed Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Killdeer
**American Woodcock - 1
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
*Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chimney Swift
*Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
**Olive-sided Flycatcher - 2 - Cranberry boardwalk
Eastern Wood-pewee
**Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - Cranberry boardwalk
*Acadian Flycatcher
**Alder Flycatcher - Cranberry boardwalk
Eastern Phoebe
*Great Crested Flycatcher
*Eastern Kingbird
*White-eyed Vireo
*Yellow-throated Vireo
*Blue-headed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
*Common Raven
*Tree Swallow
*Northern Rough-winged Swallow
*Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
*Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
*Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
*House Wren
**Winter Wren
*Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
*Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
*Cedar Waxwing

*Blue-winged Warbler
*Northern Parula
*Yellow Warbler
*Chestnut-sided Warbler
*Magnolia Warbler
*Black-throated Blue Warbler
*Yellow-rumped Warbler
*Black-throated Green Warbler
*Blackburnian Warbler
*Yellow-throated Warbler
*Pine Warbler
*Black-and-white Warbler
*American Redstart
***Swainson's Warbler - 5 - 3 seen & heard, 2 heard only
*Ovenbird
*Northern Waterthrush
*Louisiana Waterthrush
*Kentucky Warbler
*Common Yellowthroat
*Hooded Warbler
**Canada Warbler - 3 heard - one of them seen

*Summer Tanager
*Scarlet Tanager
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Song Sparrow
*Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
*Orchard Oriole
*Baltimore Oriole
**Red Crossbill - 50+
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

I think it's about 96 species and 21 warbler species and 8 flycatcher
species. I may have missed a couple.

Jon Benedetti
Vienna, WV
jon.benedetti AT gmail.com
Subject: COGR & crawdad
From: Jim & Judy Phillips <jimandjudyphillips AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2014 15:34:08 -0400
We walked the dog at Bellepoint Park at the base of Bluestone Dam this 
morning. We saw a grackle fly to the bank with a crawdad in its beak. 
The crawdad was about 5" long and still alive. The bird landed next to a 
juvenile and held it while the fledgling ate it. Another adult cleaned 
up the scraps.
Happy WV Day! WV is 151 years old today.
Jim & Judy Phillips
Summers County
Pipestem, WV
Subject: unsubscribe
From: Andrew Dennhardt <adennhar AT MIX.WVU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 15:27:14 -0400
To whom this may concern:

I would like to unsubscribe (address: adennhar AT mix.wvu.edu) from this
emailing list. Thank you for the assistance today and for the many years of
information on local bird populations.

AD
Subject: New yard bird -Wood Thrush
From: Bruni Haydl <bruni AT CITLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 14:30:12 -0400
Yesterday evening Ken and Patsy Hunter came by to bring me a book. It 
was about 8:30.  As we were standing on the parking pad Ken heard a Wood 
Thrush singing nearby.  It was coming from the wild buffer between me 
and my neighbor's back yard.  What great news.  Didn't think I had the 
habitat for them.  Now I'm wondering if what I saw and assumed was a 
young Brown Thrasher may in fact have been a Wood Thrush.   The area 
where the song was coming from would be a safe nesting site, at least 
from cats or dogs.

Saw my first Box Turtle in my yard on Monday morning.  A beautiful 
male.  Of course I had to get the camera and record his shell pattern.   
A few minutes later I passed the square suet cage hanging on the trellis 
with the Coral Honeysuckle when I saw that the Cecropia Moth had emerged 
from its cocoon.  A friend had given me the cocoon last fall.  The suet 
cage is about 5x5 with a 1/2 inch grid, making it a perfect and safe 
container to overwinter cocoons outdoors.  This moth turned out to be a 
male so I will be releasing him this evening.

When I checked nest box #2 I was surprised to find a young *B*lacksnake 
in it and yesterday when I opened box #3 it contained a small Milk 
Snake.  Fortunately both boxes had been empty.  Diane Sylvester and I 
just checked an old nest box I made years ago from a hollowed log.  It 
yielded snake number three.  There had been a nest of House Wrens in 
there.  Not sure if they fledged or got eaten.  What's with the snakes 
all of a sudden?    The same or a different House Wren made a nest two 
boxes down which contains five small brown eggs.

Last week I got the surprise of my life when I saw a squirrel clinging 
to the quince bush with his hind legs and holding on to the Hummingbird 
feeder perch with his front paws, and drinking nectar from the tilted 
feeder.    When I examined the feeder the squirrel had broken or bitten 
through one section of the circular perch. That was motivation enough to 
prune the offending branch off the quince.

Bruni Haydl
Charles Town
Subject: Baby Junco (Tucker)
From: Casey Rucker <autoblock AT FRONTIERNET.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 09:27:45 -0400
Hi, all,

 

A Dark-eyed Junco was just feeding a fledgling by mouth on my porch. This is
the first year that any juncos have stayed to breed - usually they disappear
in May and reappear in September. 

 

Good birding,

 

Casey Rucker
Dry Fork, WV 

 
Subject: Marshall County--Final Day: Fledglings, Cuckoo, Turkeys
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 17:54:23 -0400
My final day of atlasing in Marshall County today for the WV Breeding Bird
Atlas in the Majorsville-6 block abutting the PA state line west of
Waynesburg, PA yielded only 5 new species, so that block will finish 6
short of the first Atlas. This block has several gas pipeline and
high-tension wire cuts, with more under construction, plus lots of gas
exploration and well-pad activity, plus it's on the edge of a coal mine.
Habitat disappearing daily.

The highlight of the day was a fledgling LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH along Poplar
Springs Road that fluttered weakly across the road, while an agitated
parent chipped on the other side of the road. The youngster was rather
fuzzy looking, with very little striping on its underparts, but it knew how
to bob its rear end.

Another fledgling along Wolf Run Road was interesting. It was only about
2.5 inches long, had no tail, and few feathers. It was in the gravel road
and could barely scramble off into the weeds. I suspect its lifespan would
not be long. My best guess is that it was a EUROPEAN STARLING that had
somehow gotten away from its nest, based on the presence of several others
in the area.

A singing and briefly seen YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO along Poplar Springs Road
was possibly one of a pair. Another bird seen too briefly to ID but of
similar build had zoomed across the road a couple of minutes earlier.

5 fully grown WILD TURKEYS were in a field along Rancher Drive.

One sad note was a roadkilled male INDIGO BUNTING along Dry Ridge Road.

Other new species besides the Turkeys for the block included Cedar Waxwing,
American Redstart, Ovenbird, and Northern Rough-winged Swallow.

Upgrades based on carrying food included House Wren (which I saw enter a
hole in a tree), Eastern Bluebird, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle,
and Song Sparrow. An American Robin was gathering nesting material in a
ditch. Independent juvenile American Robins, Eastern Bluebirds, Common
Grackles, Field Sparrows, and European Starlings were seen. Bluebirds had
commandered a newspaper box along Rancher Drive, but all I could see in it
was straw and other nest material. A bird did fly out of it, however.

Other notables included a Great Blue Heron, several Eastern Meadowlarks, a
Baltimore Oriole, 2 Orchard Orioles, a Yellow-breasted Chat, and an Eastern
Kingbird.

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Common(?) Mergansers - Greenbrier County
From: "Williams, Barry C" <Barry.C.Williams AT WV.GOV>
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 12:43:51 -0400
This Saturday, on a float trip down the Greenbrier River from Ronceverte
to Fort Spring, I saw a flock of 13 female Mergansers.  I assume they
were Commons but I did not have my binocs with me.  What was I thinking?
J

 

Barry Williams

Organ Cave, Greenbrier County
Subject: Blue Grosbeaks in Grant Co.
From: Jerry Westfall <jerrywestfall AT SUDDENLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2014 20:16:00 -0400
Yesterday, Mary Drury and her adult son Kevin Drury (new friends from the 
Canaan Birding Festival) and I went looking for loggerhead shrikes and 
dickcissels in Grant County. Together we walked Houghlin Lane (CR 28/2) (west 
of Petersburg) and I later I surveyed Belle Babb Lane (CR 2) (east of Scherr) 
– areas where shrikes and dickcissels were seen in past years. 


While we found no shrikes or dickcissels were found after a pretty thorough 
search, we were rewarded with a consolation prize along Houghlin Lane – a 
pair of blue grosbeaks. (The blue grosbeak was a life bird for both Mary and 
Kevin!) We first spotted the female blue grosbeak (distinctive with overall 
rufous-brown coloration and cinnamon wing bars), and knew a male was not far 
away. Sure enough…a male showed up not too much later. For those interested, 
the pair is located about 1.3 miles from the junction of WV Rt. 28, on the 
other side of the road from the “swallow barn,” or N39 01.311 W79 10.711 
for those with a GPS. 


While my quest for dickcissels and shrikes continues, it was a great day 
birding with a couple of new friends. And the prickly pear cactus blooms along 
Belle Babb Lane were beautiful. 


Jerry Westfall
Parkersburg, WV
Subject: Harpers Ferry birds this week.
From: Deb Hale <debhale72 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2014 14:50:55 -0400
2 Red-shouldered hawk babies in nest on Virginius Island today, one
significantly larger/older than the other.  The Cliff Swallows seem to have
abandoned their nests under the Rte 340 bridge nearby; I haven't seen any
sign of them for days.

At North Schoolhouse, some interesting birds over the last week:
1 Savannah Sparrow, male - singing
1 YB Chat
1 Prairie Warbler
a M/F pair of Blue Grosbeaks - I found Dad chinking in a tree while Mom
flew to the middle of the field and lighted on a blooming thistle. It was a
pretty picture. With a sky full of bugs, she was no doubt hunting down
treats for her little ones back at the nest.
Orchard Orioles - they are everywhere, seem to be outnumbering their
Baltimore cousins this year.

At home our yard is taken over by catbirds - so many of them I cannot keep
count - fathers among them now. So, Happy Father's Day to you dads out
there -

Deb Hale
Harpers Ferry/Bolivar
Subject: Visit a Purple Martin Supercool ! at the 20th Annual Purple Martin Field Day
From: Ron Kingston <kingston AT CSTONE.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 21:19:32 -0400
              The 20th Annual Purple Martin Field Day will be held in
central Virginia

Any person interested in establishing, restoring, or expanding a Purple
Martin Colony is invited to learn about and see in
operation the most up-to-date and effective techniques and technology
available for
successful Purple Martin stewardship and management.   Saturday, June 21,
2014
                                   Main presentation begins at 10:00 a.m.
                   The 2013 event was a huge success with 140 attendees from
six states!

 

 

                                             YOU CAN VISIT A PURPLE MARTIN
SUPERCOLONY! 

                      Visit:

http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/index.html

The 20th Annual Purple Martin Field Day will be held in central Virginia at
the farm of Mrs. Merle Wood and her son, Mr. Lance Wood, who have graciously
opened up their farm and martin colony to the public, hosting this event for
many years-and this year, we are celebrating our 20th Anniversary! The main
program begins at 10:00 a.m.-please arrive before that time so you will not
miss the Door Prize give-away (including free GOURDS!) or the beginning of
the primary presentation. 

Lance Wood and several other landlords will teach you how to attract and
manage martins and increase the size of your colony. You will learn the
advantages and disadvantages of different types of martin housing, how to
protect martins from snakes, hawks, owls, raccoons, House Sparrows,
Starlings, wind damage, lightning, etc., and how to add Starling-Resistant
Entrance Holes to martin gourds and houses. Then Lance Wood will give
another presentation on how to grow natural gourds and turn them into safe,
long-lasting Purple Martin homes, and Ron Kingston, a veteran bluebirder for
thirty-six years, will be available to answer questions about bluebirds,
tree swallows, and other native cavity-nesters. 
Other experienced landlords will be on-hand to answer martin questions and
offer guidance on where to place your martin pole (bring sketches/photos of
site options, or satellite pictures from map websites.) You'll get to watch
130 pairs of martins feeding their nestlings and have a chance to meet
fellow martin-lovers including some of the landlords who post on the PMCA
Forum! 
See   www.purplemartinfieldday.org for
photos and complete information and to find out what to bring (and not to
bring!) Receive free literature on martin attraction and management, and
catalogs for martin equipment, as well as free handouts on bluebird
conservation. Event is FREE but donations are appreciated to cover expenses.
Come join the fun in central Virginia!
Visit:   
http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/index.html   Contact Ron  AT  (434)
962-8232

 

 

 
Subject: Stonewall Jackson Dam Visitor Center and Tailwaters, Jun 14, 2014
From: Davette Saeler <ivorybill_24 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 20:55:05 -0400
   
Hello all,

 

 Had a pretty good day today. Enjoyed watching baby birds out and about. 
Watched 2 Chipping Sparrows in the parking lot chasing their parent and 
begging. Got to watch a Red-bellied Woodpecker feeding it's baby berries. The 
Orchard Orioles fledged in my parents yard next door. A really beautiful day! 
List for the lake attached below. 


 

Good birding!

 

Davette

----- Original Message ----- 
From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org 

To: ivorybill_24 AT msn.com 

Sent: Saturday, June 14, 2014 8:39 PM

Subject: eBird Report - Stonewall Jackson Dam Visitor Center and Tailwaters, 
Jun 14, 2014 




Stonewall Jackson Dam Visitor Center and Tailwaters, Lewis, US-WV
Jun 14, 2014 7:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
41 species

Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  6
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  4
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  2
Eastern Phoebe  2
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  4
Tree Swallow  5
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
House Wren  5
Carolina Wren  1
Eastern Bluebird  4
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  5
Gray Catbird  1
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  2
Cedar Waxwing  10
Ovenbird  2
Blue-winged Warbler  2
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Kentucky Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  1
Yellow-throated Warbler  1
Eastern Towhee  3
Chipping Sparrow  3
Field Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  6
Brown-headed Cowbird  5
Orchard Oriole  2
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18789981 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 
(http://ebird.org) 

Subject: eagle
From: Jim & Judy Phillips <jimandjudyphillips AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 08:45:31 -0400
Last evening, we saw an adult bald eagle fly over the house.
Jim & Judy Phillips
Summers County
Pipestem, WV
Subject: Marshall County--Day 3: Purple Finch, Prairie Warbler
From: Terry Bronson <bronsonwv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2014 18:33:00 -0400
I just barely finished birding in the WV Breeding Bird Atlas Cameron-6
block adjacent to the PA border in southeast Marshall County this afternoon
before the rain started. The block was 5 species short of the first Atlas,
and I found exactly 5 new species to make it even.

Highlights included:

Purple Finch--a beautiful singing male along Woodruff Road. This becomes
the third record for the Northern Panhandle (Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, and
Marshall Counties). Interestingly, these 3 records are isolated from all
the other records in the state, which run from the Morgantown area
southeast into the mountains and east into the Eastern Panhandle.
Prairie Warbler--another singing male along Fall Run Lane (formerly
Winterhill Road)
Great Blue Heron--1 in Fish Creek at Belton, another flying high overhead
along Woodruff Road
Broad-winged Hawk--1 soaring over Woodruff Road
Ruby-throated Hummingbird--2 at a feeder along Woodruff Road
Great Crested Flycatcher--1 along Woodruff Road
Louisiana Waterthrush--1 along Fish Creek at Belton. Plumage looked rough,
so possibly a juvenile--or just a wet bird from last night's rain.
Northern Parula--1 singing along Harts Run Road
Rose-breasted Grosbeak--1 singing along Harts Run Road
Orchard Oriole--1 at Belton, 1 along Woodruff Road
Baltimore Oriole--1 along Woodruff Road, 1 along Mt. Carmel Ridge Road (a
new name for parts of former Belton, Ernest Hill, and Winterhill Roads)

-- 
Terry Bronson
Morgantown, WV
Subject: Golden Eagle + more goshawk visits (Tucker)
From: Casey Rucker <autoblock AT FRONTIERNET.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2014 17:16:11 -0400
Hi, all,

 

Today at noon I saw a fourth-summer Golden Eagle soaring above a meadow just
east of Davis. 

 

Yesterday afternoon, a Sharp-shinned Hawk had flown over my yard, and a
while later I was sitting on the front porch when I heard a Northern Goshawk
calling. I looked up, and the sharpie flew right over my head,  Gears were
clinking in my mind as I kept looking, and sure enough, about 150 feet up an
adult Northern Goshawk was circling and calling. The calls came two more
times in the afternoon.

 

My feeders may be regular hunting spot for the goshawks at this point.
Meanwhile, baby House Wrens are noisy in their house.

 

Good birding,

Casey Rucker
Dry Fork, WV 

 
Subject: Osprey at Canaan Tucker County
From: steve kimbrell <galvmcm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2014 15:14:19 -0400
Watched an osprey this morning on the Beall trails, Canaan Valley National
Wildlife Refuge. Have seen a Northern Harrier, male, there the last three
mornings.
       Tomorrow the Beginning Birding Birdwalks start at 7:30 and 10am.
Meet at the NWR Nature Center.
Subject: osprey
From: Jim & Judy Phillips <jimandjudyphillips AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jun 2014 09:50:17 -0400
Last evening, Judy saw an osprey fly over our house. Just now, I saw one 
fly the same path. Looked like it was headed to Long Branch Lake on 
Pipestem State Park.
Jim & Judy Phillips
Summers County
Pipestem, WV